Appendix C1 - Benchmark Index by Function - Safety of Canadians

Executive Group Benchmark - Number: 10-E-1

Position Title: Senior Assistant Deputy Minister, National Security

General Accountability

Is accountable for providing independent policy advice and support to the Deputy Minister on national security issues, and coordinating national counterterrorism and emergency management exercises designed to enhance the federal government's capacity to respond to threats to national security.

Organization Structure

This is one of six positions at the first managerial level reporting to the Deputy Minister. The others are Assistant Deputy Minister, Strategic Policy and Programs; Assistant Deputy Minister, Policing and Law Enforcement; Assistant Deputy Minister, Corporate Management; Inspector General, Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS); and Director and General Counsel, Legal Services.

Specific functions of the positions reporting to the Senior Assistant Deputy Minister, National Security, are as follows:

Director General, National Security, (staff of 39) is responsible for developing and implementing new policies related to national security, counterterrorism, technology and lawful access; providing strategic advice on national security issues and threats; developing ministerial directions to CSIS; and managing bilateral counterterrorism relations with the United States (US) and trilateral arrangements with the US and the United Kingdom (UK).

Executive Director, Integrated Justice Information Secretariat, (staff of 40) is responsible for providing leadership in and overseeing a major initiative to improve the integration, sharing and management of criminal justice information among components of the national criminal justice system and to support the development of the Canada Public Safety Information Network (CPSIN) and interoperability among portfolio agencies and the larger public safety community.

Nature And Scope

The Department plays a fundamental role in protecting the safety of Canadians by addressing national security, law enforcement and anti-terrorist weaknesses, as well as the demands for domestic and international cooperation and integration of effort in order to combat terrorism and crime and improve public safety. At the same time, the Department is a strategic and policy-focussed centre that provides advice, policy research and support to the Minister and Deputy Minister to ensure that all Canadians continue to enjoy the benefits of an open society. The Department supports the Minister in providing direction to the portfolio of public safety agencies, boards and committees, including responsibility for emergency preparedness, emergency management, national security, corrections, policing, civilian oversight, crime prevention and border functions, for which the incumbent is accountable to Parliament.

In this context, the Senior Assistant Deputy Minister, National Security, is a key player in providing leadership and direction in response to the demands on the entire national security apparatus to ensure that the Government of Canada has the capacity to protect Canadians and to fulfill international obligations with respect to international terrorism (which are historically unprecedented), international criminality and other national security threats.

Within the constantly evolving global environment of escalating terrorism and other national security threats, the incumbent is called upon to provide crisis management leadership and coordinate the development of immediate and longer-term strategies and plans designed to improve public safety and national capabilities against terrorist attacks and other threats to national security and public safety, and to respond to the expectations of Canada's allies. In meeting this challenge, the incumbent must ensure that all plans, programs and strategies regarding national security, including those involving the police and law enforcement authorities, are continuously reassessed and revised.

A major challenge for the Senior Assistant Deputy Minister is to develop and coordinate the implementation of national strategies designed to improve public safety and to eliminate the gaps and vulnerabilities. The incumbent supports the Minister's national leadership role by developing legislation, policies and plans and providing strategic, long-term and national leadership in national security and counterterrorism, including the development and revision of the National Counter-Terrorism Plan and the Operational Readiness Plan.

As the national expert in national security and counterterrorism, the incumbent chairs the Assistant Deputy Minister Committee on Public Safety, and is heavily involved in the development of partnerships with other departments, other levels of government, non-governmental organizations and other countries. The incumbent liaises with senior officials and counterparts in the US and develops enhanced cooperative arrangements with them, including revising and upgrading the joint operational readiness program.

A further challenge facing the Senior Assistant Deputy Minister is the timely exchange and management of information as a critical component in raising public defences against crime, including terrorism and other forms of international criminality. The cornerstone of Integrated Justice Information (IJI) is the CPSIN, which was initially directed toward ending the fragmentation of critical information throughout the criminal justice system and promoting the exchange and sharing of criminal justice information. The incumbent oversees the expansion of CPSIN beyond its original criminal justice and law enforcement scope in order to promote connectivity among portfolio agencies nationally-to include partners, such as the Department of National Defence, the Passport Office, Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Transport Canada, in the larger public safety network-and internationally, to link with the US and, possibly at a later stage, with the UK and other countries that are advancing the integration of their own systems.

The Senior Assistant Deputy Minster, National Security, is the designated second-in-command to the Deputy Minister and, in this capacity, participates in the regular briefings of the Minister and is the Deputy's alternate at inter-agency strategic and policy meetings and at international negotiations at the Ministerial level. This advice is critical for the Minister because of strong public expectations and pressure concerning the protection of society in relation to the activities of these agencies and their extraordinary powers over individuals in Canadian society. The Senior Assistant Deputy Minster assists the Deputy in the coordination, within the portfolio, of horizontal issues, which cut across organizational lines.

Dimensions (Constant Dollars)
FTEs: 75
Operation budget:

$1.3 million

Minister's total portfolio budget: $712.2 million

Specific Accountabilities

  1. Provides expert advice and support to the Minister and the Deputy Minister, and makes recommendations on all matters related to national security, counterterrorism, summit security and the sharing and exchange of criminal justice information.
  2. Provides leadership in and oversees the development and coordination of strategies to improve public safety and address the gaps and vulnerabilities that exist in the public safety framework, including legislative and policy proposals, plans, program changes and strategies.
  3. Provides leadership in and oversees the development of national policies related to national security and counterterrorist strategies, as well as the development of partnerships and cooperative arrangements with other agencies, the provinces and territories, and other countries, to provide a cohesive, unified effort and response to existing and potential threats and improve public safety and security.
  4. Promotes an advanced integrated effort, cooperation, and joint initiatives with the US and other partners in the field of anti-terrorism to improve collective protection against terrorist acts, increase the likelihood of detecting and preventing planned terrorist attacks, and fulfill international obligations.
  5. Represents the Minister in key international fora concerned with international cooperation on security and the development of countermeasures to combat terrorism, such as the Organization of American States, the European Council on Justice and Home Affairs and the G8.
  6. Oversees the development and revision of the National Anti-Terrorist Plan to detect, prevent, protect against and combat terrorist threats and capabilities and improve Canada's state of operational readiness so that it can respond better to terrorist incidents.

Evaluation Rationale

Senior Assistant Deputy Minister, National Security

Know-How

G
In-depth and specialized knowledge of Canadian and international legislative frameworks and environments impacting on national security and counterterrorism. Knowledge of the mandates, goals and objectives of multiple and varied organizations (federal, provincial, international, non-governmental) in order to develop broad policy and program initiatives that will enhance the government's capacity to respond to existing and potential threats and improve public safety and security.
IV
Provides federal leadership in guiding the development, harmonization and implementation of national approaches, policies and initiatives related to national security.
3
Successful achievement of objectives requires the incumbent to work effectively with national and international organizations in order to address national, global and hemispheric security issues.
1056
The high number reflects the complexity of the mandate and the leadership skill required to develop the government's policy and program framework, and build consensus and support across multiple levels of government and non-governmental organizations with divergent priorities and perspectives.

Problem Solving / Thinking

G
Thinking within broadly defined concepts and guidelines in order to develop new legislation, policies and approaches in an increasingly diverse and uncertain environment.
4
Significant analytical, interpretative, evaluative and constructive thinking is required to assess risks, consider global issues and negotiate international cooperative measures, while ensuring the continuation of a Canadian open society.
(66) 700
The high number recognizes the challenge of identifying and resolving issues in an increasingly uncertain environment and of developing plans and approaches to mitigate the impact of uncertainty.

Accountability / Decision Making

G
The position reports to the Deputy Minister and is provided with only general guidance for its legislative, policy and program responsibilities. As one of the most senior national security officials, the incumbent represents the government's position across the portfolio and across all sectors.
5C
Contributory impact on the public safety and emergency preparedness portfolio of departments and agencies, as well as influence on other federal security and public safety budgets of the provinces and territories. The proxy selected to represent these activities is the Minister's total portfolio budget of $712.2 million (constant).
700
High number reflects the novelty of the policy and program responsibilities and the requirement to enhance public confidence in the government's capacity to respond to national security and terrorism threats.

Summary

GIV3 1056
G4(66) 700
G5C 700
Total = 2456 0
Senior Assistant Deputy Minister, National Security - Number: 10 - E - 1
Org Chart of the senior assistant deputy minister - national security
Figure: 10 – E – 1 - Text version

Benchmark Number: 10 – E – 1

Senior Assistant Deputy Minister, National Security

The subject position is at the first managerial level reporting to the deputy head, and there are 5 peer positions at the same reporting level.

Reporting to the Senior Assistant Deputy Minister, National Security are 1 Director General and 1 Executive Director.

Linear organisation chart:

Deputy Minister (Departmental deputy head)

  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Strategic Policy and Programs
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Policing and Law Enforcement
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Corporate Management
  • Inspector General, Canadian Security Intelligence Service
  • Director and General Counsel, Legal Services
  • Senior Assistant Deputy Minister, National Security
    • Director General, National Security
    • Executive Director, Integrated Justice Information Secretariat

Executive Group Benchmark - Number: 8-E-1

Position Title: Executive Director, Pest Management Regulatory Agency

General Accountability

Is accountable for directing the formulation and implementation of legislation, regulations, policies, strategies, plans, processes and procedures required for the delivery of an integrated pest management regulatory regime to protect the health, safety and environment of the population of Canada and to provide effective pest control products to support the requirements of Canadian industry in the context of revenue dependency in a global environment.

Organization Structure

This is 1 of 16 positions at the first level reporting to the Deputy Minister. The others are Assistant Deputy Minister, Health Products and Food; Assistant Deputy Minister, Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety; Assistant Deputy Minister, Health Policy and Communications; Assistant Deputy Minister, Population and Public Health; Assistant Deputy Minister, First Nations and Inuit Health; Chief Scientist; Assistant Deputy Minister, Corporate Services; Assistant Deputy Minister, Information Analysis and Connectivity; Senior Policy Advisor; and 6 Regional Directors General of Atlantic, Quebec, Ontario and Nunavut, Manitoba and Saskatchewan, Alberta and Northwest Territories, and British Columbia and the Yukon.

Specific functions of the positions reporting to the Executive Director are as follows:

Chief Registrar (staff of 94) is responsible for ensuring the scientific integrity and legality of the scientific review process to support and advance transparent and progressive decision making for the integrated product registration process within a global environment; providing strategic thinking and issues management related to pesticide regulation; and providing senior-level contact with provinces, territories and stakeholders.

Director, Efficacy and Sustainability Assessment, (staff of 49) is responsible for evaluating the efficacy, value and sustainability of pest control products; and providing leadership in assessing the value of pest control products within the context of the scientific review, risk assessment, risk management and product registration decision-making process.

Director, Health Evaluation, (staff of 122) is responsible for developing and implementing approaches and methodologies for toxicology assessments, exposure assessments, food residue assessments, the establishment of Maximum Residue Limits (MRLs) and the chemical evaluation for pest control products; and providing leadership in the assessment of the toxicological and chemical components of pest control products within the context of the science review, risk management and product registration decision-making process to protect the health of Canadians and the safety of their food and water.

Director, Environmental Assessment, (staff of 40) is responsible for developing, recommending and directing the implementation of the policy, regulatory and methodological framework for the assessment and management of environmental risks associated with pest management products; and providing leadership in the assessment of the toxicological and exposure component of pest control products within the context of the scientific review, risk assessment, risk management and product registration decision-making process to protect the environment of Canadians.

Director, Compliance, Laboratory Services and Regional Operations, (staff of 81) is responsible for the development, implementation and federal/provincial/territorial (FPT) coordination of the Agency's compliance policy, programs and enforcement activities; and the management and delivery of laboratory services relating to compliance and to the scientific evaluation of pest control products.

Director, Strategic Planning, Financial and Business Operations, (staff of 39) is accountable for developing the Agency's integrated planning framework; ensuring the application of professional accounting and financial management standards and practices as the senior financial officer responsible for the Agency's comptrollership function; and planning, developing, implementing and managing human resources, administrative and contracting programs to support senior management decision making and the operations of the Agency.

Director, Alternative Strategies and Regulatory Affairs, (staff of 60) is responsible for overseeing the development of policies, programs and projects related to sustainable pest management; coordinating national and international activities; directing development and management through the regulatory review process, major revisions to the Pest Control Products Act (PCPA), the reform of the regulatory system, and the development, review and assessment of policies, programs and regulatory amendments; overseeing the continuous learning program; managing the publication process; and developing and implementing strategic communications plans for the Agency.

Director, Business Line Improvement and Technology Development, (staff of 30) is responsible for designing, developing, implementing and integrating business processes and systems for the Pest Management Regulatory Agency; managing multi-dimensional projects associated with re-engineering, including its design, development and implementation in a multidisciplinary environment; and managing information technology services.

Director, Re-Evaluation Management, (staff of 25) is responsible for developing and implementing a coordinated matrix re-evaluation program for older pesticides through a multilateral approach with the Environmental Protection Agency of the United States and other Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries.

Nature And Scope

The Department's mission is to help the people of Canada maintain and improve their health. Its mandate, underpinned by a solid information and knowledge base, covers three broad areas: national health policy and systems, including health care; health promotion and protection, including disease, illness and injury prevention; and First Nations and Inuit health. The scope of the mandate includes the protection of health and the environment as they relate to pesticides, under the PCPA.

The Executive Director provides authoritative advice to the Deputy Minister on all strategic and operational issues affecting the Agency's development and operation. The incumbent provides policy advice and briefings to the Minister, the Deputy Minister, senior departmental managers and officials of other federal departments, Canadian jurisdictions and non-governmental organizations.

The incumbent directs the development of effective legislative and regulatory instruments, policies, standards, processes and procedures to ensure the integrity and legality of the scientific review process and the timeliness and cost-efficiency of reviews of applications for registration. He or she ensures the ability to protect Canadians' health and environment, as well as the regularity of pesticide re-evaluation, to determine whether pesticides on the market continue to be acceptable for use from an environmental and health risk perspective. He or she also directs the development of effective regulatory instruments, policies, standards, processes and procedures related to cost-recovery initiatives. A key challenge to this is the divergent interests related to the potential negative impact of cost-recovery initiatives on the Canadian pesticide industry, users and a revenue-dependent program.

The incumbent directs the management of many highly trained scientists who are responsible for conducting evaluations and risk assessments of new and existing pesticides, determining the acceptability of health and environmental risks and the acceptable value under the PCPA, and setting drinking water standards and MRLs of pesticides promulgated under the Food and Drugs Act in order to protect Canada's domestic and imported food supplies. He or she also directs the management of a national compliance program through the Agency's regional offices to ensure compliance with the PCPA, and works with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, which monitors the food residue levels established by the Agency.

The Executive Director keeps abreast of the interests of multiple Canadian and international stakeholders, including chemical manufacturers, farmers and foresters, provincial and territorial governments, environmental and public interest groups and private citizens. One of the major challenges facing the incumbent is to balance stakeholders' divergent interests and concerns, such as data development costs, timely access to cost-effective products, availability of information on pesticides and concern about the use of pest control products. Another challenge is to help the Agency develop effective information and communications strategies and systems to facilitate the exchange of interests and concerns with key stakeholders, while ensuring value and protecting the health of Canadians and the environment.

The Executive Director develops and implements strategies and initiatives to harmonize Canadian approaches and practices with those in place or proposed by foreign governments. The incumbent represents Canada in co-chairing the North American Free Trade Agreement Technical Working Group on Pesticides with the United States and Mexico, which works to ensure North American harmonization of approaches to pesticide regulation. He or she also participates on the OECD working group on pesticides.

The Executive Director represents the Agency's interests and concerns in such fora as the Minister's Pest Management Advisory Council and guides the FPT Committee on Pest Management and Pesticides and the Economic Management Advisory Committee through the Chief Registrar, as well as other internal and external senior-level committees.

Recognizing the requirements of modern comptrollership, the Executive Director implements outcome-based decision making, reporting and accountability on the basis of integrated financial and non-financial performance information; ensures the integration of comprehensive risk management with decision making; and oversees the operation of a sound system of process, infrastructure and organizational controls. The Executive Director also maintains a framework for shared ethics, values and principles as a key element of modern comptrollership.

Dimensions (Constant Dollars)

FTEs:

545

Operating budget:

$7.2 million

Revenue:

$1.4 million

Specific Accountabilities

  1. Provides professional and managerial leadership for developing and establishing strategic directions and priorities for the cost-effective management of the registration, re-evaluation and regulation of pest control products, including the harmonization of the registration of pest control products with foreign jurisdictions on behalf of the Government of Canada.
  2. Provides leadership for developing and establishing strategic directions, approaches, priorities, processes and procedures for managing assessments of pest control products based on scientific evaluations of health, environmental and value information; assessing the risks inherent in the use of such products; and establishing MRLs for the domestic and imported food supply
  3. Provides national leadership in developing strategies and initiatives for the use of alternative approaches to pest management by directing the development and implementation of consultation and communications strategies and approaches to inform and educate the Agency's diverse stakeholders.
  4. Directs the development and monitors the implementation of legislation, regulations, policies and regulatory frameworks for pest control products, including the provision of the required laboratory services that support the Agency's compliance activities.
  5. Directs the development and implementation of cost-recovery regulations, policies, approaches and mechanisms and the associated performance measures and level of service standards.
  6. Represents the Agency's interests and concerns in a variety of fora in the federal government, with provincial and foreign governments, internationally and with the Agency's diverse stakeholders to obtain understanding and acceptance with respect to the Agency's strategic direction and operations.

Evaluation Rationale

Executive Director, Pest Management Regulatory Agency

Know-How

G
Mastery of the Agency's legislation, policies, regulations, practices, processes and procedures; professional expertise in economics and biological and chemical sciences associated with the multi-faceted evaluation of pest control products; in-depth knowledge of the chemical and agricultural industries, the provincial and territorial governments and the interests and concerns of non-governmental groups and stakeholders; professional knowledge of policies, programs, regulatory regimes, processes, procedures and practices related to the management of pest control registration in foreign jurisdictions; and professional knowledge of managing an Agency funded through cost recovery.
III
Operational and conceptual management of a regulatory agency, including the promotion of alternative approaches to pest control management.
3
Critical human relations skills required to promote acceptance of innovative approaches to the registration and use of pest control products and practices.
800
High number reflects the depth of specialized technical and scientific knowledge, as well as the significant management challenges associated with managing a stand-alone agency dedicated to establishing, implementing and administering an integrated approach to the registration of pest control products and the promotion of alternative approaches to managing pests.

Problem Solving / Thinking

G
Thinking is done within general government and departmental objectives to provide an integrated pest management regulatory regime and to promote the use of approaches that are less hazardous to physical and human environments.
4
Innovative approaches must be developed at the policy and program delivery level to meet the government's strategic and operational objectives and to reconcile them with the needs and expectations of a diverse community of stakeholders.
(66) 528
Higher number reflects the requirement to be engaged in legislation and policy work aimed at balancing the divergent interests of chemical manufacturers, farmers and foresters and environmental and other public interest groups. Concerns include production costs, cost-effective control products and the safety of continued reliance on pest control products.

Accountability / Decision Making

G
Receives broad managerial direction from the Deputy Minister in establishing, developing and administering the government's approach to the cost-effective management of the regulation of pest control products and the promotion of alternative approaches to controlling pests.
3P
The position has direct and effective control over the policies, regulations and operations of the federal pest management regulatory regime. This control is represented by a salary and operating budget of $7.2 million (constant).
608
Mid-range number recognizes the position's latitude in leading a national program to register and regulate pest control products and the relative size of the budget.

Summary

G113 800
G4(66) 528
G3P 608
Total = 1936 A1
Executive Director, Pest Management Regulatory Agency - Number: 8 - E - 1
Org Chart of the EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR PEST MANAGEMENT REGULATORY AGENCY
Figure: 8 – E – 1 - Text version

Benchmark Number: 8 – E – 1

Executive Director, Pest Management Regulatory Agency

The subject position is at the first managerial level reporting to the deputy head, and there are 15 peer positions at the same reporting level.

Reporting to the Executive Director, Pest Management Regulatory Agency are 8 Directors and 1 Chief Registrar.

Linear organisation chart:

Deputy Minister (Departmental deputy head)

  • ADM, Health Products and Food
  • ADM, Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety
  • ADM, Health Policy and Communications
  • ADM, Population and Public Health
  • ADM, First Nations and Inuit Health
  • Chief Scientist
  • ADM, Corporate Services
  • ADM, Information Analysis and Connectivity
  • Senior Policy Advisor
  • 6 Regional Directors General for :
    • Atlantic
    • Quebec
    • Ontario and Nunavut
    • Manitoba and Saskatchewan
    • Alberta and Northwest Territories
    • British Columbia and the Yukon
  • Executive Director, Pest Management Regulatory Agency
    • Chief Registrar
    • 8 Directors for :
      • Efficacy and Sustainability Assessment
      • Health Evaluation
      • Environmental Assessment
      • Compliance, Laboratory Services and Regional Operations
      • Strategic Planning, Financial and Business Operations
      • Business Line Improvement and Technology Development
      • Re-Evaluation Management
      • Alternative Strategies and Regulatory Affairs

Executive Group Benchmark - Number: 8-E-2

Position Title: Director General, Civil Aviation

General Accountability

The Director General, Civil Aviation, is responsible for regulating and overseeing the safety of civil aviation in Canada and in Canadian-controlled airspace to ensure the safety of the Canadian air transportation sector.

Organization Structure

This is 1 of 10 positions at the second managerial level reporting to the Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM), Safety and Security. The others are Director General, Marine Safety; Director General, Rail Safety; Director General, Road Safety and Motor Vehicle Regulation; Director General, Aircraft Services; Director General, Security and Emergency Preparedness; Director General, Marine Security; Director General, Transportation of Dangerous Goods; Director General, Strategies and Integration; and Director, Executive Services Secretariat.

Specific functions of the positions reporting to the Director General, Civil Aviation, are as follows:

Director, Aerodromes and Air Navigation, (staff of 59) is responsible for regulating the safe provision of all air navigation and aerodrome services in Canada; directing the formulation and ongoing development of air navigation, airspace and aerodrome standards and practices; directing the conduct of national air navigation services, aerodrome safety oversight and risk management processes; and contributing to the development of international air navigation standards, policies and practices.

Director, Aircraft Certification, (staff of 155) is responsible for establishing and applying certification regulations and standards for aeronautical products designed or operated in Canada in highly technical fields, such as aircraft design, structures, avionics, electrical and mechanical systems, power plants, equipment and engineering flight tests.

Director, Civil Aviation and Marine Medicine, (staff of 24) is responsible for establishing and applying regulations and standards required for the medical validation of licensed aviation and marine personnel.

Director, Commercial and Business Aviation, (staff of 103) is responsible for establishing and applying regulations and standards for all Canadian business and commercial air operators, as well as foreign air operators who operate in Canadian airspace.

Director, General Aviation, (staff of 56) is responsible for the licensing of all pilots and flight engineers; developing licensing and testing standards and safety regulations; inspecting and monitoring all Canadian flight training units; regulating aircraft registration and leasing; maintaining a Canadian Aircraft Register; maintaining a safety oversight of recreational aviation and special flight operations, such as air shows; and regulating civil and commercial rocket launch operations in Canada.

Director, International Aviation and Technical Programs, (staff of 21) is responsible for providing technical advice and support on civil aviation technical programs and international civil aviation matters; coordinating technical input for the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) and other international civil aviation bodies; and providing strategic guidance to the Canadian permanent mission to ICAO.

Director, Aircraft Maintenance and Manufacturing, (staff of 39) is responsible for establishing and applying regulations and standards for the manufacture and maintenance of all aeronautical products built, operated or maintained under Canadian control standards.

Director, Regulatory Services, (staff of 46) is responsible for developing and maintaining aeronautical legislation through the Canadian Aviation Regulatory Advisory Council (CARAC); establishing and applying enforcement regulations and standards; presenting cases before the Civil Aviation Tribunal; providing translation services; and developing and standardizing aeronautical terminology.

Director, System Safety, (staff of 24) is responsible for the ongoing development of safety communications, risk assessments, civil aviation emergency responses and safety data analyses.

Director, Aviation Learning Services, (staff of 15) is responsible for efficiently and effectively providing the best possible learning products for civil aviation employees.

Manager, Strategic Issues and Communications, (staff of 7) is responsible for the strategic and tactical management and production of all civil aviation communication products.

Director, Quality and Resource Management, (staff of 25) is responsible for developing and maintaining the integrated management system and a quality assurance program to monitor and maximize the quality and effectiveness of the civil aviation program; planning and directing activities, such as business planning, activity analysis and costing, national information systems services, multimedia publishing services, planning and management studies, human resources planning and issue studies; and providing functional direction to the regional program services offices.

Nature And Scope

The Department develops and administers policies, regulations and programs to ensure an exemplary, safe, efficient and environmentally friendly transportation system that contributes to Canada's economic growth and social development and protects the physical environment. The Department has regulatory responsibilities for the development and enforcement of safety regulations covering all modes of transportation and is responsible for developing programs that support broader government goals in such areas as economic and industrial development, environmental protection and energy conservation.

It is in this context that the Director General, Civil Aviation, is responsible for providing corporate leadership in developing legislation, regulations, national standards and air safety policy. The incumbent directs overall planning and policy development for the air transportation sector. The incumbent directs the implementation of monitoring, testing, inspections, research and development and subsidy programs; and ensures the provision of functional leadership to the civil aviation organizations in each region.

The Director General is responsible for establishing and maintaining the civil aviation safety framework as part of the Department's strategic plan for safety and security in the transportation sector. This responsibility requires the incumbent to ensure that the framework establishes the program's operating principles, values, strategic directions and safety targets in order to continue to improve on the high level of aviation safety in Canada and to build a high level of public confidence in Canada's civil aviation program.

The Director General, Civil Aviation, must balance multiple major and conflicting demands. The incumbent must consider both the interests of Canada's aerospace manufacturing industry-worth over $20 billion, with industry exports of $16 billion annually, and over 1,000 foreign air operators flying into and out of Canada-and the expectation of the Canadian public for a world-leading high level of safety for aviation in Canada and for Canadian operations internationally. In addition to achieving a demanding level of aviation safety, the incumbent must also meet the public's expectation that environmental concerns, including emissions, energy efficiency and noise tolerances, are addressed. Size and diversity pose a major challenge for the Director General when planning and managing the balance between the safety of Canadians and pressures resulting from the introduction of cost-saving measures by a highly competitive aviation industry. All of these needs must be met in an environment of intense media attention and scrutiny.

The Director General chairs numerous committees: Civil Aviation Management Executive Committee, National Civil Aviation Management Executive Committee, Canadian Aviation Regulatory Advisory Council and technical committees of departmental and industry representatives. Major activities of these committees involve identifying and prioritizing regulatory issues; providing advice, options and recommendations to the ADM, Safety and Security; analysing aviation issues; developing regulatory recommendations; and reporting on the results of the benefits of proposed regulations. The Director General is also heavily involved in representing Canada's interests internationally through his or her participation in or involvement with ICAO, the North American Aviation Trilateral, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration, the European Joint Aviation Authorities and others.

As a member of the management committee of the ADM, Safety and Security, the Director General participates in the decision-making process and in the formulation of long-range plans affecting the policies, procedures and operations of all modes of transportation.

Dimensions (Constant Dollars)
Line Functional
FTEs: 575 859

Operating budget:

$9.4 million

$12.2 million

Specific Accountabilities

  1. Directs the development and implementation of the national civil aviation regulatory framework of regulations and legislation, policy and programs to foster and promote safe civil aviation in Canada.
  2. Plans and directs programs for individual safety oversight, aircraft and their operation, aviation companies, airports, the air navigation system and aeronautical products through a comprehensive national program of licenses, certifications, approvals, inspections, audits and enforcement to provide for compliance with the regulations.
  3. Oversees the planning and implementation of a national quality assurance program designed for the consistent application of the civil aviation program to the frequency and quality standards established through the civil aviation quality management system approved by the National Civil Aviation Management Executive Committee, including the establishment of program and functional business plans, performance measures and reports, levels of service standards and internal audits.
  4. Represents Canada at national and international committees, conferences and councils, and in negotiating and solidifying bilateral and multilateral agreements and partnerships on new developments or changes to aviation regulations, standards and practices, including acting as Canada's chief delegate to the ICAO triennial assembly.
  5. Oversees the design, development and delivery of enhanced civil aviation training programs provided to departmental, industry and foreign government inspectors, engineers and other technical personnel to maintain a world-leading level of safety for aviation in Canada and Canadian operations internationally.

Evaluation Rationale

Director General, Civil Aviation

Know-How

G
In-depth professional knowledge of the legislation, policies and practices governing civil aviation; in-depth professional knowledge of the interrelationships of the regulatory framework, international agreements and industry commercial practices; and in-depth knowledge of the relationship between the aviation industry and technological advances, in order to develop national programs that meet competing demands of multiple and divergent organizations, while ensuring the safety of the Canadian transportation system.
III
Conceptual and operational management of the development and enforcement of national civil aviation safety policies, programs, standards and regulatory controls. Provides functional leadership to regional operations.
3
Successful achievement of civil aviation objectives hinges on strong interpersonal relationships in dealings with the aviation industry, NAVCANADA, other government and international organizations and regional civil aviation staff.
800
High number reflects the strong managerial and operational knowledge required to integrate the highly diversified roles of the organization that encompass legislation, policy and regulations and provide national leadership for compliance and enforcement.

Problem Solving / Thinking

F
Thinking within general objectives related to providing a safe, highly competitive and economic civil aviation system, aviation industry requirements, new and emerging civil aviation issues, and international agreements and obligations.
4
Highly adaptive thinking required to develop national civil aviation programs, policies, standards and regulatory controls that respond to client needs and demands, and to develop innovative approaches in civil aviation operations.
(57) 460
High percentage reflects the degree of thinking challenge inherent in identifying and addressing the multiple variables of size, diversity and economic impact in the Canadian civil aviation system.

Accountability / Decision Making

F
General direction is provided by the ADM, Safety and Security. The incumbent has extensive freedom in determining the national civil aviation regulatory framework and regulatory controls.
3P
Primary impact on the activities of the civil aviation organization. The proxy selected to represent these activities is an operating budget of $9.4 million (constant).
460
High number reflects the size of the budget coupled with the influence the position has over the economic viability of the aviation industry.

Summary

G113 800
F4(57) 460
F3P 460
Total = 1720 0
Director General, Civil Aviation - Number: 8 - E - 2
Org Chart of the DIRECTOR GENERAL CIVIL AVIATION
Figure: 8 – E – 2 - Text version

Benchmark Number: 8 – E – 2

Director General, Civil Aviation

The subject position is at the second managerial level reporting to the Assistant Deputy Minister, Safety and Security, and there are 9 peer positions at the same reporting level.

Reporting to the Director General, Civil Aviation are 11 Directors and 1 Manager.

Linear organisation chart:

Assistant Deputy Minister, Safety and Security

  • Director General, Marine Safety
  • Director General, Rail Safety
  • Director General, Road Safety and Motor Vehicle Regulation
  • Director General, Aircraft Services
  • Director General, Security and Emergency Preparedness
  • Director General, Marine Security
  • Director General, Transportation of Dangerous Goods
  • Director General, Strategies and Integration
  • Director, Executive Services Secretariat
  • Director General, Civil Aviation
    • 11 Directors for :
      • Aerodromes and Air Navigation
      • Aircraft Certification
      • Civil Aviation and Marine Medicine
      • Commercial and Business Aviation
      • General Aviation
      • International Aviation and Technical Programs
      • Aircraft Maintenance and Manufacturing
      • Regulatory Services
      • System Safety
      • Aviation Learning Services
      • Quality and Resource Management
  • Manager, Strategic Issues and Communications

Executive Group Benchmark - Number: 7-E-1

Position Title: Director General, Food

General Accountability

Is accountable for the development and implementation of integrated and cohesive policy, legislative and regulatory frameworks to support the Department's mandate, strategic agenda and statutory obligations related to the safety, quality and nutrition of food available in Canada.

Organization Structure

The Director General is 1 of 14 positions at the second managerial level reporting to the Assistant Deputy Minister, Health Products and Food. The others are the Director General, Therapeutic Products; the Director General, Natural Health Products; the Director General, Policy and Strategic Planning; the Director General, Office of Regulatory and International Affairs; the Director General, Biologic and Genetic Therapies; the Executive Director, Litigation Secretariat; the Director General, Office of Consumer and Public Involvement; the Executive Director, Office of Science and Biotechnology, and five Regional Directors General.

Specific functions of the positions reporting to the Director General, Food, are as follows:

Director, Bureau of Biostatistics and Computer Applications, (staff of 35) is responsible for program-wide development and management of the collection, analysis and reporting of biostatistics and epidemiological data and the development and implementation of performance measurementstrategies.

Director, Bureau of Food Assessment, (staff of 15) is responsible for the overall management of the Department's role in assessing the effectiveness of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's (CFIA) food safety and nutrition activities through an ongoing program of assessment, report and follow-up.

Director, Bureau of Chemical Safety, (staff of 105) is responsible for food policy, standard setting, risk assessment, pre-market evaluation and research related to potentially harmful chemicals in the food supply.

Director, Bureau of Microbial Hazards, (staff of 55) is responsible for policy, standard setting, risk assessment, research and evaluation activities on microbial hazards and extraneous material in the food supply.

Director, Bureau of Food Regulatory, International and Inter-Agency Affairs, (staff of 19) is responsible for ensuring that all proposed regulatory amendments adhere to the Government of Canada's regulatory policy; managing the regulatory amendment process; and supporting the Department and Canadian interests in international, inter-agency and federal/provincial/territorial fora.

Director, Bureau of Policy Integration, (staff of 11) is responsible for the development, analysis, evaluation and continuous improvement of integrated frameworks to ensure cohesive food policy, regulatory and standards development.

Director, Bureau of Nutritional Sciences, (staff of 51) is responsible for policy, standard setting, research, risk assessment and evaluation related to the nutritional quality of the food supply.

Director, Policy and Strategic Planning, (staff of 7) is responsible for the development and maintenance of management frameworks to support finance, administration, human resources and continuing education for the Directorate.

Director, Animal Resources, (staff of 35) is responsible for providing professional veterinary and laboratory animal care services to the Department's research community.

Nature And Scope

The Department's mission is to help the people of Canada maintain and improve their health. Its mandate, underpinned by a solid information and knowledge base, covers three broad areas: national health policy and systems, including health care; health promotion and protection, including disease, illness and injury prevention; and First Nations and Inuit health.

It is in this context that the Director General ensures an integrated and cohesive approach in combining rigorous regulation with high standards and direct scientific research that will safeguard Canadians against undue risk associated with food products. The incumbent provides leadership and overall direction for the Food Safety Assessment Program to assess the effectiveness of the CFIA's activities related to food safety.

The Director General establishes integrated frameworks to ensure cohesive approaches to food policy and regulatory development with respect to all aspects of food safety, including microbial hazards, chemical safety and nutrition. The incumbent undertakes extensive consultation at the most senior levels across the community of stakeholders, including the policy community, other regulators, industry representatives, health care practitioners, professional associations and special interest groups, and ensures that serious consideration is given to their views and concerns.

The Director General has extensive representational responsibilities across the Department and with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency; other federal departments and agencies; the provinces and territories; food industry representatives; foreign bodies, such as the United States Food and Drug Administration; and international bodies, such as the World Health Organization, the United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization and the European Union. The incumbent provides leadership in negotiations with the provinces and territories and in international bilateral negotiations related to food regulations and standards. The Director General faces significant challenges in an operating environment where the food system and food safety concerns are becoming increasingly complex as a result of global trade, new food products and production methods such as biotechnology, and new processing and distribution technologies. The Director General also leads policy and regulatory development in an industry that is constantly changing in the face of new and evolving technologies, broadening distribution systems and increasing accessibility to imported foods.

As the senior scientist in the Food Program, the Director General faces a significant challenge in leading renewed and integrated approaches to scientific research and the management of findings. The incumbent must address safety considerations from both regulatory and non-regulatory perspectives and ensure that the risks and benefits associated with each approach are defined and that appropriate recommendations are developed. Research is conducted in laboratories at national headquarters and across the regions, and the Director General is accountable for ensuring that the research facilities are managed with optimal efficiency.

The Director General develops and implements an integrated management framework to track and support the evaluation of submissions on food inputs, processing and products. The incumbent oversees health risk assessments and pre-market safety evaluations; develops renewed surveillance strategies that enhance public health surveillance systems to provide real-time information on outbreaks of food-borne illnesses; and strengthens communication links between regions, provinces and communities so that timely, complete and accurate information is available for decision making.

Nutritional science is an important aspect of the Food Program's responsibilities, and the Director General oversees nutritional research and evaluation, which integrates the nutritional and metabolic aspects of foods. This activity adds to the complexity of the Director General's role because it is distinguished somewhat from the other research areas by its education implications for health professionals and the public, and by a shift in focus from avoiding harm to increasing well-being. The Director General leads approaches to scientific data management, including computer applications, to support the analysis of scientific data and the development and analysis of biostatistics.

The Director General oversees the development of consultation frameworks and mechanisms in an open and inclusive approach across the community of stakeholders, and works collaboratively with the Office of Consumer and Public Involvement and the Corporate Consultation Secretariat in planning and managing public involvement activities for the Food Program.

The Director General provides the Assistant Deputy Minister, the Deputy Minister and other senior executives with detailed scientific and policy briefings on the potential impact of food regulation, standards and related issues in domestic and international fora.

Dimensions (Constant Dollars)
FTEs: 468
Operating budget: $8 million

Specific Accountabilities

  1. Provides professional and managerial leadership for the development and maintenance of integrated frameworks to ensure cohesive approaches to food policy and regulatory development with respect to all aspects of food safety, including microbial hazards, chemical safety and nutrition.

  2. Provides expert and authoritative representation at the most senior levels across the Department and with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and other federal departments and agencies; the provinces and territories; food industry representatives; foreign bodies, such as the United States Food and Drug Administration; and international bodies, such as the World Health Organization, the United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization and the European Union.

  3. Oversees the development of consultation frameworks and mechanisms in an open and inclusive approach across the community of stakeholders, and works collaboratively with the Office of Consumer and Public Involvement and the Corporate Consultation Secretariat in planning and managing public involvement activities for the Food Program.

  4. Leads and directs an integrated approach to domestic and international food regulation and standards; oversees all evaluation, risk assessment and risk management of food regulations in domestic and international contexts; and represents the federal government in the negotiation of food regulations and standards with the provinces, territories and international organizations.

  5. As the senior scientist in the Food Program, leads and directs integrated approaches to scientific research and the management of findings generated by the study of chemical safety, microbial hazards, the safety of veterinary drugs in the food chain, nutritional research and evaluation, biostatistics and epidemiology, and the assessment of submissions.

  6. Directs the Food Safety Assessment Program, including the review and approval of multi-year and annual plans and assessment reports; oversees the review of the design and operational delivery of CFIA programs related to food safety, compliance with health and safety standards and the results achieved; and makes expert recommendations to the Minister on the need for change.

  7. Provides the Assistant Deputy Minister, the Deputy Minister, the Minister and other senior executives with expert advice on sensitive issues and detailed scientific and policy briefings on the potential impact of food regulation, standards and related issues in domestic and international fora.

Evaluation Rationale

Director General, Food

Know-How

G
Mastery of interrelationships between a broad range of scientific fields, such as toxicology, pathology, synthetic and analytical chemistry, food technology and nutrition, electron microscopy, food microbiology, statistical design and the epidemiology of food-related disease; and professional knowledge of policy and regulation development in the federal government.
III
Conceptual integration of many diverse aspects of food production, preparation and storage; and operational management of the policy and regulatory regime for food safety and quality.
3
Critical level of human relations skills is required to lead and oversee stakeholder consultation processes, influence senior officials and manage a large staff.
700
Mid-range number reflects a solid rating in all dimensions and recognizes the breadth of professional knowledge required.

Problem Solving / Thinking

F
Thinking is done within broadly defined objectives to develop and implement integrated and cohesive policy, legislation and regulatory frameworks to ensure food safety, quality and nutrition of food available in Canada.
4
Analytical and evaluative thinking is required to address safety considerations from both regulatory and non-regulatory perspectives in order to determine significant food safety and quality issues and associated risks and benefits when devising appropriate solutions and recommendations.
(57) 400
Higher percentage reflects the challenges associated with developing policies, legislation and regulatory frameworks for a rapidly evolving and complex food production and distribution industry that will ensure the safety of Canada's food supply.

Accountability / Decision Making

F
Reporting to the Assistant Deputy Minister, Health Products and Food, is subject to general managerial direction. Leads and directs an integrated approach to domestic and international food regulations and standards.
3P
The position has a primary impact on the achievement of Food Program objectives as represented by a budget of $8 million (constant).
460
High number reflects the position's latitude in managing a broad national program impacting the quality of food products in Canada and the magnitude of the budget.

Summary

GIII3 700
F4(57) 400
F3P 460
Total = 1560 A1
Director General, Food - Number: 7 - E - 1
Org Chart of the DIRECTOR GENERAL, FOOD
Figure: 7 – E – 1 - Text version

Benchmark Number: 7 – E – 1

Director General, Food

The subject position is at the second managerial level reporting to the Assistant Deputy Minister, Health Products and Food, and there are 13 peer positions at the same reporting level.

Reporting to the Director General, Food are 9 Directors.

Linear organisation chart:

Assistant Deputy Minister, Health Products and Food

  • Director General, Therapeutic Products
  • Director General, Natural Health Products
  • Director General, Policy and Strategic Planning
  • Director General, Office of Regulatory and International Affairs
  • Director General, Biologic and Genetic Therapies
  • Executive Director, Litigation Secretariat
  • Director General, Office of Consumer and Public Involvement
  • Executive Director, Office of Science and Biotechnology
  • 5 Regional Directors General
  • Director General, Food
    • 9 Directors for :
      • Bureau of Biostatistics and Computer Applications
      • Bureau of Food Assessment
      • Bureau of Chemical Safety
      • Bureau of Microbial Hazards
      • Bureau of Food Regulatory, International and Inter-Agency Affairs
      • Bureau of Policy Integration
      • Bureau of Nutritional Sciences
      • Policy and Strategic Planning
      • Animal Resources

Executive Group Benchmark - Number: 6-E-1

Position Title: Director, Environmental Assessment

General Accountability

Is accountable for developing, recommending and directing the implementation of the policy, regulatory and methodological framework to assess and manage environmental risks associated with pest control products.

Organization Structure

This is one of nine positions at the second managerial level reporting to the Executive Director. The others are Chief Registrar; Director, Business Line Improvement and Technology Development; Director, Efficacy and Sustainability Assessment; Director, Health Evaluation; Director, Compliance Laboratory Services and Regional Operations; Director, Alternative Strategies and Regulatory Affairs; Director, Re-evaluation Management; and Director, Strategic Planning, Financial and Business Operations.

Specific functions of the positions reporting to the Director, Environmental Assessment, are as follows:

Five (5) Section Heads, Product Evaluation, (total staff of 37) responsible for planning, directing and coordinating the approaches, standards and methodologies for the assessment of new and already registered pest control products in order to determine their hazards and risks to the environment; and providing expert advice in these areas.

Nature And Scope

The Pest Management Regulatory Agency is responsible for preventing unacceptable risks to people and the environment from the use of pest control products. Issues of both national and international scope in the field of pest management have a significant impact on Canadian farmers, foresters, fish farmers and manufacturers and their ability to compete in a global marketplace; and on both the Canadian public and the physical environment. Provinces and territories play an important role in pest control product regulation through legislation related to the transportation, storage, sale, use and disposal of pesticides and related products.

It is in this context that the Director, Environmental Assessment, provides corporate leadership for the integrated delivery of a national program to assess the risks to the environment inherent in pest control products and to develop recommendations on methods for managing those risks.

The Director manages the Agency's centre of scientific expertise, which determines the environmental hazards and risks associated with a wide variety of pest control products submitted for evaluation, re-evaluation, registration and de-registration.

The Director ensures that the appropriate interpretations of environmental impact are brought forward to support the integrated decision-making process. This task involves managing the health and environmental risks of pest control products so that they can be safely used by the agriculture, forestry and aquaculture sectors to enable them to remain competitive in a global marketplace. The incumbent identifies products or uses that are environmentally unacceptable, regardless of benefits to the user.

The Director plans, organizes and implements strategies and initiatives to ensure that the processes, procedures and policies for determining the risks and hazards to the environment are streamlined, efficient and effective in order to meet the competing interests of a wide variety of stakeholders. These include chemical manufacturers, which provide revenues to the Agency in the form of fees for submissions and maintenance of registration, as well as groups, such as farmers and foresters, and other non-government organizations, such as environmental groups.

The Director provides authoritative advice to the Executive Director on strategic and operational issues related to environmental risk assessment that affect the Agency's development and operation.

A major challenge facing the incumbent is to lead joint initiatives to harmonize environmental assessment approaches across international boundaries (e.g. with the United States and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development). Another major challenge is to foster cooperation between various federal departments and agencies (e.g. Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada), provincial and territorial governments, officials of foreign agencies responsible for pest management regimes, manufacturers and distributors, commercial users, the media, interest groups and citizens who are interested in the objectives and directions of the Agency.

Dimensions (Constant Dollars)
FTEs: 37
Operating budget: $586,000
Annual sales of pest management products used in Canada: $260 million

Specific Accountabilities

  1. Provides professional and managerial leadership for the development and implementation of approaches, methodologies, standards, processes, procedures and policies to determine the risks and hazards to the physical environment associated with pest control products.
  2. Participates in the establishment and application of approaches, priorities, processes, procedures and policies for managing the environmental assessment of pest control products and the assessment of the risks inherent in their use, based on scientific evaluations.
  3. Ensures the international harmonization of guidelines for the conduct and review of scientific tests to determine the hazards and risks to the environment from the use of pest control products.
  4. Directs negotiations for the conduct of the environmental portion of joint reviews of products with the United States Environmental Protection Agency and the development of productive working relationships with other regulatory agencies.
  5. Represents the Agency's interests and concerns related to environmental risk assessment in a variety of fora within the federal government, with provincial and foreign governments and with the Agency's diverse stakeholders in order to foster understanding about and, where possible, to arrive at a consensus on the Agency's strategic direction and operations.

Evaluation Rationale

Director, Environmental Assessment

Know-How

F
Extensive knowledge of complex theory, principles and practices of the biological and physical sciences associated with the evaluation of toxic products and their immediate and long-term effects on environmental factors and their interrelationships with human, animal and plant health; professional knowledge of the legislation, policies, regulations, practices, processes and procedures of a regulatory agency; professional knowledge of the chemical industries and of the industries in which pest management products are used, particularly the agriculture, forestry and mining industries; professional knowledge of the jurisdictions and interests of the provincial and territorial governments, as well as the interests and concerns of non-governmental groups and stakeholders; and professional knowledge of the policies, programs, regulatory regimes, processes, procedures and practices related to the management of pest control registration in foreign jurisdictions.
III
Operational and conceptual management of a national program to evaluate and reduce the risk posed to the physical and human environments by the use of pest control products.
3
Critical human relations skills required to promote acceptance of innovative approaches to regulating pest control products and practices in the provinces and territories, in industry and internationally.
608
Highest number reflects the depth of complex scientific knowledge required and the knowledge required of the interplay between health and environmental factors. The highest value also reflects the position's status as the national environmental assessment focal point for the Agency.

Problem Solving / Thinking

F
Thinking is within Agency objectives to provide an integrated pest management regulatory regime and promote the use of appropriate products and measures that are less hazardous to the physical and human environments. The position operates in a revenue-dependent context.
4
Creative and analytical thinking is required to manage critical activity in the approval process for the registration of pest management products and to assess the related risks and benefits.
(50) 304
Solid percentage reflects the challenges associated with developing national policies, approaches, standards and methodologies to identify and mitigate risks within the existing regulatory framework.

Accountability / Decision Making

F
Reporting to the Executive Director, is subject to management direction within the context of the regulatory and policy framework for assessing the risks posed to the environment by the use of pest management products.
5C
The position has primary impact on the Agency's environmental protection policies and programs and a contributing impact on the value of the pesticide industry to Canada. The proxy selected to represent these activities is a contributory impact on the sale and use of regulated pest management products in Canada valued at $260 million (constant).
350
Lowest number reflects the impact that the position has on decision making associated with the registration of pest management products and commercial decisions made by the industry in introducing products into the Canadian market.

Summary

FIII3 608
F4(50) 304
F5C 350
Total = 1262 A1
Directo, Environmental Assessment - Number: 6-E-1
Org chart of the Director - environmental assessment
Figure: 6 – E – 1 - Text version

Benchmark Number: 6 – E – 1

Director, Environmental Assessment

The subject position is at the second managerial level reporting to the Executive Director, and there are 8 peer positions at the same reporting level.

Reporting to the Director, Environmental Assessment are 5 Section Heads.

Linear organisation chart:

Executive Director

  • Chief Registrar
  • Director, Business Line Improvement and Technology Development
  • Director, Efficacy and Sustainability Assessment
  • Director, Health Evaluation
  • Director, Compliance Laboratory Services and Regional Operations
  • Director, Alternative Strategies and Regulatory Affairs
  • Director, Re-evaluation Management
  • Director, Strategic Planning, Financial and Business Operations
  • Director, Environmental Assessment
    • 5 Section Heads, Product Evaluation

Executive Group Benchmark - Number: 6-E-2

Position Title: Regional Director, Civil Aviation, Atlantic Region

General Accountability

Is accountable for managing the oversight of civil aviation in the Atlantic Region.

Organization Structure

This is one of nine positions at the second managerial level reporting to the Regional Director General. The other positions are Director, Surface; Director, Marine; Director, Programs; Director, Security and Emergency Preparedness; Director, Finance and Administration; Director, Human Resources; Director, Communications; and Director, Coordination and Policy Advice.

Specific functions of the positions reporting to the Regional Director, Civil Aviation, are as follows:

Regional Manager, Aircraft Certification, (staff of 2) is responsible for ensuring that the designs of aeronautical products, repairs and modifications meet the applicable airworthiness standards.

Regional Manager, Maintenance and Manufacturing, (staff of 20) is responsible for monitoring, inspecting and auditing all companies and personnel involved in the manufacture, repair and distribution of aeronautical products.

Regional Manager, Enforcement, (staff of 7) is responsible for strategic planning and management of the operation and delivery of regulatory programs (enforcement) for the Region.

Regional Manager, General Aviation, (staff of 10) is responsible for licensing aviation personnel, overseeing general aviation operations and registering aircraft, in compliance with the Canadian Aviation Regulations.

Regional Manager, Commercial and Business Aviation, (staff of 27) is responsible for ensuring that a satisfactory level of safety is maintained by all regionally based commercial and business air carriers.

Regional Manager, Aerodrome Safety, (staff of 7) is responsible for ensuring that a satisfactory level of safety is maintained for airports and aerodromes.

Regional Manager, System Safety, (staff of 6) is responsible for safety awareness and promotion in the civil aviation transportation system in the Atlantic Region.

Regional Manager, Air Navigation Services and Airspace, (staff of 2) is responsible for ensuring that a satisfactory level of service for Air Navigation Service facilities and services, including weather, navigation, radar and communication services, is maintained.

Regional Director, Quality Assurance and Review, (staff of 6) is responsible for managing the Integrated Management System in the Region.

Nature And Scope

The Civil Aviation Group is responsible for the development of regulations and national standards; and the implementation of monitoring, testing, inspections, research and development, and subsidy programs, which contribute to safety and security in aviation transport. The regions contribute to the development of program contents, policy and standards, in addition to delivering the program.

It is in this context that the Regional Director, Civil Aviation, is responsible for ensuring a safe and efficient aviation system in the Atlantic Region and ensuring that all persons and aircraft using that system do so in accordance with the safety legislation and rules set out to govern its use. The incumbent's primary responsibility is to provide a safe and efficient civil aviation system. This is done through control of the aeronautical products, people and companies that operate within the aviation system.

The Regional Director must license and regulate people, aircraft, airports, air carriers, corporate aircraft operators, flight training establishments, aircraft manufacturers and repairers, and manufacturers and repairers of other aeronautical products (such as engines, propellers and components). The incumbent acts as the convening authority for regulatory audits of airline companies that are part of the National Audit Program.

The Regional Director manages the regulatory regime under which existing airports and proposed entrants to the regulated aviation industry are assessed with respect to their continued compliance with the standards regulating their entry into the aviation industry. The incumbent must ensure that the operations of licensees are monitored, tested and audited, and that appropriate enforcement action (judicial or administrative) is taken when these standards are not observed. The incumbent must defend actions before the Transportation Appeal Tribunal of Canada when licences or operating certificates can be revoked, suspended or cancelled and before coroners or the courts when the Department is thought to be implicated, normally as a result of an aviation accident.

A major challenge for the Regional Director is to direct and manage the regional regulatory program in a manner that allows the regional aviation industry to be operationally viable, while at the same time not compromising safety to the travelling public and within the National Civil Air Transportation System as a result of the introduction of cost-saving measures by a highly competitive aviation industry.

The Regional Director is responsible for the implementation and enforcement of national policies, standards and procedures in the Region to meet the Region's changing needs. In doing so, the incumbent is responsible for the establishment of appropriate implementation plans with general direction from the Regional Director General. Advice and standards are provided by the functional headquarters' Director General.

The Regional Director exercises delegated statutory responsibilities, including the unusual Aeronautics Act power to exempt persons, aircraft, etc. from the law (in essence, the power to create a person- or aircraft-specific law without the need for Ministerial or Privy Council approval).

The Regional Director is part of the regional management team and maintains high-level contacts with the aviation industry and associations. These contacts are at the senior management level (i.e. company presidents and vice-presidents of large international airports) in order to provide expert aviation operations advice.

Dimensions (Constant Dollars)
FTEs: 87
Operating budget: $1.0 million

Specific Accountabilities

  1. Ensures that commercial and private aeronautical activities in the Region and in international or foreign airspace under the incumbent's jurisdiction comply with departmental regulations.
  2. Provides the necessary strategic perspective and organizational integration; and ensures that the activities of all management and line staff work toward fulfilling the Branch mission in the Region.
  3. Participates in the determination of all national policies and programs that impact on air navigation, system safety and aviation regulation in Canada.
  4. Ensures that the departmental perspective on all regional matters dealing with air navigation, system safety and aviation regulation is brought forward to the public, media, other departments or levels of government, industry, unions, tribunals and courts.
  5. Ensures that cost-recovery policies are implemented.

Evaluation Rationale

Regional Director, Civil Aviation, Atlantic Region

Know-How

F
In-depth professional knowledge of the policies and regulations governing the Canadian air transportation system; professional knowledge of the engineering principles and concepts to apply in the certification and inspection of air carriers; and in-depth knowledge of the Canadian and international aviation environment and commercial practices.
III
Operational management of aviation system safety in the Region.
3
The establishment of productive interpersonal relationships is critical in dealing with industry, other levels of government, the public, the media, unions, tribunals and courts on regional aviation matters.
608
High number reflects the depth and breadth of knowledge of the regulatory regime, specialized engineering concepts and practices, and knowledge of the highly competitive airline industry to ensure that the safety of the travelling public is not compromised.

Problem Solving / Thinking

F
Thinking is done within operational objectives, specialized technical engineering requirements, operational imperatives and a diverse regulatory framework that encompasses licensing, certification and inspection of air carriers and air carrier personnel.
4
Work requires analytical, evaluative and constructive thinking in developing sound approaches to assess risks to travellers by balancing safety and efficiency, while meeting industry and public demands to prevent degradation in service or safety.
(50) 304
Solid percentage reflects the challenge of managing risk within a regulatory framework that must be considered in conjunction with advice and direction from the functional headquarters authority.

Accountability / Decision Making

F
Reporting to the Regional Director General, with functional direction from headquarters Directors General, is accountable for ensuring the safety of air travellers in exercising a wide range of aviation authorities in the Region.
2P
The position has effective control over regional aviation programs and services. The proxy selected to represent these programs and services is an operating budget of $1 million (constant).
350
High number reflects the size of the budget, the decision-making authority in protecting travellers' safety and the influence on the economic viability of regional air carriers.

Summary

FIII3 608
F4(50) 304
F2P 350
Total = 1 262 A1
Regional Director, Civil Aviation, Atlantic Region - Number: 6-E-2
Org chart of the EGIONAL DIRECTOR CIVIL AVIATION, ATLANTIC REGION
Figure: 6 – E – 2 - Text version

Benchmark Number: 6 – E – 2

Regional Director, Civil Aviation, Atlantic Region

The subject position is at the second managerial level reporting to the Regional Director General, and there are 8 peer positions at the same reporting level.

Reporting to the Regional Director, Civil Aviation, Atlantic Region are 8 Regional Managers and 1 Regional Director.

Linear organisation chart:

Regional Director General

  • Director, Surface
  • Director, Marine
  • Director, Programs
  • Director, Security and Emergency Preparedness
  • Director, Finances and Administration
  • Director, Human Resources
  • Director, Communications
  • Director, Coordination and Policy Advice
  • Regional Director, Civil Aviation, Atlantic Region
    • 8 Regional Managers for :
      • Aircraft Certification
      • Maintenance and Manufacturing
      • Enforcement
      • General Aviation
      • Commercial and Business Aviation
      • Aerodrome Safety
      • System Safety
      • Air Navigation Services and Airspace
    • Regional Director, Quality Assurance and Review

Executive Group Benchmark - Number: 4-E-1

Position Title: Regional Director, National Crime Prevention Centre, B.C. Region

General Accountability

Is accountable for providing regional leadership in the planning, development, implementation and management of policies, procedures, partnerships and programs to support and advance the implementation of the National Strategy on Community Safety and Crime Prevention.

Organization Structure

This is 1 of 12 positions at the third managerial level reporting to the Executive Director, National Crime Prevention Centre. The others are Director, Program Development and Delivery; Director, Policy and Strategic Planning; Director, Research and Evaluation; Director, Communications, Promotion and Public Education; Director, Investment Fund; Director, Administration and Operations; and five Regional Directors.

Specific responsibilities of the 10 positions reporting to the Director include conducting research; program planning, development and implementation; community outreach; public education; and managing and monitoring the Centre's joint crime prevention initiatives.

Nature And Scope

The Department plays a fundamental role in the safety of Canadians, while ensuring that all Canadians continue to enjoy the benefits of an open society. The Minister's vast portfolio of public safety-related agencies, boards and committees includes responsibility for emergency preparedness, crisis management, national security, corrections, policing, oversight, crime prevention and border functions.

The National Crime Prevention Centre's mandate is to decrease the rates of crime, victimization, and fear of crime and to increase the number of public, private and community partners working to prevent crime in Canada. The national strategy is aimed at reducing crime and victimization by addressing their root causes, such as abuse, violence and drug and alcohol abuse, through a social development approach directed at removing the personal, social and economic factors that lead to crime.

It is in this context that the Director is responsible for monitoring and identifying local socio-economic trends that impact the Centre's regional policies and strategies, including health, education and economic development matters related to crime and its prevention. This intelligence and this analysis are also provided to senior Centre officials, departmental staff and other federal government stakeholders to assist them in formulating broader policies and strategies in order to harmonize federal and provincial goals and develop more integrated approaches to crime prevention.

As the Centre's senior manager in the Region, the Director is responsible for providing professional leadership in the formulation, development and implementation of strategies, initiatives and programs designed to motivate and empower communities to determine and implement their own long-term approaches to crime prevention. A major challenge for the incumbent is to ensure that the Region has the resources and capacity to tailor and deliver the Centre's multi-dimensional program initiatives in a manner that addresses the primary crime prevention issues in the Region. The Director is accountable for directing analysis and reporting on emerging issues, challenges and the success of regional strategies to the Executive Director.

The Director is responsible for managing five crime prevention programs-the Business Action Plan, the Community Mobilization Program, the Strategic Fund, the Partnership Program and the Investment Fund-involving over 500 individual projects and $6.1 million (constant) in annual funding. The Centre never provides 100% of the funding for projects, so the challenge is to develop and promote joint funding strategies that allow the cost of these investments to be shared with other levels of government and community groups to ensure that communities take ownership for and develop effective approaches to crime prevention that address the root causes.

The Director is responsible for coordinating regional funding by working with other organizations, particularly Health Canada, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, Social Development Canada, and Canadian Heritage, to facilitate linkages between the various horizontal initiatives in order to avoid duplication, explore joint funding opportunities and have the Centre's work supported through other federal government initiatives. A major challenge for the incumbent is to review and prioritize multiple funding proposals that exceed available resources. This challenge will likely intensify as the availability of funds decreases as a result of fiscal pressures.

The Director is also responsible for developing and maintaining good working relationships with provincial representatives from a range of ministries. Communities have historically relied on provincial governments to support community-based crime prevention activities. Given the recent fiscal pressures on provincial governments, there will be significant challenges in gaining provincial support for work in crime prevention and in filling the gaps created by reduced provincial funding.

The Director is responsible for leading the review of funding requests from a wide variety of professional, non-profit, voluntary and academic institutions involved in crime prevention. The incumbent ensures that proposals are assessed in order to ensure compliance with national program criteria, provincial priorities, review committee priorities, and with policy, program and legislative initiatives of the Department. The incumbent negotiates funding agreements and contribution levels and monitors, reviews and reports on the status of funded proposals to ensure compliance with the Treasury Board's accountability requirements.

One of the key challenges of the position is managing political sensitivities with regard to funding programs that are co-managed with provincial governments. The Social Union Agreement between the federal and provincial governments establishes respective responsibilities and stipulates that the federal government will respect the jurisdictions, mandates and priorities of the provincial governments.

The incumbent is responsible for establishing and maintaining a public education and information program, including the establishment of regional learning centres to disseminate resources and tools and best practices to communities that are ready and able to apply them. The Director takes responsibility in other outreach and public education activities to create awareness about the value of crime prevention through social development and by publicizing the Centre's programs and responsibilities. The incumbent is also responsible for assessing and consulting with client groups to identify their resource and knowledge needs and make recommendations to the Department in order to better serve these communities.

The Director leads and participates in work teams composed of colleagues, provincial and territorial government representatives, and recognized experts for the purpose of establishing strategies and setting goals for service delivery, providing advice on technical support, preparing instructional materials, examining legal issues, examining solutions to funding constraints and facilitating better community involvement in the development and implementation of crime prevention programs. The incumbent is also the Centre's representative on the Region's Policy Liaison Team, which coordinates the Department's policy, program and communications functions to improve the integration of the Region's programs and share knowledge, skills and expertise in order to ensure a more strategic and integrated approach to the work done in the Region.

The Director also represents the Region on national management teams, working groups and advisory committees to recommend, refine and improve the Centre's national business strategies, objectives and strategic partnerships with other government departments, other levels of government and other stakeholder groups. The incumbent is also responsible for contributing to the development of broad policy frameworks and strategies in order to improve crime prevention initiatives and ensure effective integration and implementation of the federal government's crime prevention agenda.

Dimensions (Constant Dollars)
FTEs: 11
Operating budget: $118,000
Regional program budget: $1.95 million

Specific Accountabilities

  1. Directs the review, development, implementation and monitoring of regional policies, strategies, procedures and program approvals to ensure the most effective and efficient use of crime prevention program funds to meet the Centre's mandate.
  2. Directs the Region's strategic planning processes, which involves other levels of government and non-governmental organizations, and recommends adjustments to the program mandate and focus to enhance the delivery and administration of programs, and alignment and compliance with national strategic objectives, policies and operational goals.
  3. Develops and implements a regional accountability structure and operational procedures for grants and contributions funding to ensure value for money and regard for due process.
  4. Negotiates and manages program partnership arrangements and structured program delivery processes with the provincial government to ensure effective use of resources, while preventing crime and promoting safer communities.
  5. Monitors the implementation of program terms and conditions, funding criteria and evaluation and reporting mechanisms to ensure that there are no conflicts with existing laws or with legislative and other government objectives.
  6. Negotiates amendments to existing delivery mechanisms when problems are encountered to ensure that there are no funding or procedural conflicts or problems.
  7. Provides leadership in the Region and manages a multidisciplinary team in order to continually improve service delivery capacity and program design, increase staff knowledge and expertise, and improve crime prevention capacity within communities.

Evaluation Rationale

Regional Director, National Crime Prevention Centre, B.C. Region

Know-How

F
Specialized professional knowledge of concepts, principles, techniques and processes in the field of crime and crime prevention; expert knowledge and experience in the development of policies and programs related to crime prevention; in-depth knowledge of acts and legislation related to crime prevention; and in-depth knowledge of related federal and provincial departments and community groups involved in crime prevention.
II
Policy and operational integration and coordination for planning, organizing, directing and controlling the development and implementation of approaches, processes and procedures for managing a multi-dimensional crime prevention program.
3
Successful achievement of objectives requires the incumbent to develop and maintain open and constructive working relationships with partners in order to develop and promote joint funding strategies and deliver co-managed programs.
460
High number reflects the in-depth expertise, knowledge and human relations skills required to identify, develop and co-manage multiple jointly funded programs and to negotiate agreements involving several levels of government and other stakeholders.

Problem Solving / Thinking

F
Thinking within generally defined policies, objectives and practices of the Centre, the position directs strategic planning processes for the Region, involving other levels of government and non-governmental organizations, to recommend adjustments to the program mandate and focus, and respond to local needs, while ensuring proper alignment with national strategic objectives, policies and operational goals.
4
Analytical, constructive and evaluative thinking is required to develop new policy frameworks and program structures involving a large number of organizations and stakeholder groups.
(50) 230
Low percentage reflects the role of the position as the regional expert in providing advisory services to a broad clientele and in identifying, recommending and supporting new policy frameworks and service delivery directions for the Department in the area of crime prevention

Accountability / Decision Making

F
Reporting to the Executive Director, within broad practices, procedures and generally defined objectives, is accountable for the development, coordination and monitoring of the Department's crime prevention program in the Region. Acts with considerable autonomy in negotiating joint funding agreements with other stakeholders.
3S
The position negotiates and manages program partnership arrangements and structured program delivery processes with the province and coordinates regional funding with other government departments to support the objectives of crime prevention programs. Joint funding contribution levels vary, and the proxy selected to represent this activity is the regional program budget of $1.9 million (constant).
264
The low number reflects the dollar value and the amount of relative freedom to act in recommending new policy and program design, and joint funding agreements.

Summary

FII3 460
F4(50) 230
F3S 264
Total = 954 A1
Regional Director, National Crime Prevention Centre, B.C. Region - Number: 4 - E - 1
Org chart of the REGIONAL DIRECTOR NATIONAL CRIME PREVENTION CENTRE, B.C. REGION
Figure: 6 – E – 1 - Text version

Benchmark Number: 4 – E – 1

Regional Director, National Crime Prevention Centre, B.C. Region

The subject position is at the third managerial level reporting to the Executive Director, National Crime Prevention Centre, and there are 11 peer positions at the same reporting level.

Reporting to the Regional Director, National Crime Prevention Centre, B.C. Region are 3 Program Analysts, 3 Program Officers, 2 Communication Officers and 2 Administration.

Linear organisation chart:

Executive Director, National Crime Prevention Centre

  • Director, Program Development and Delivery
  • Director, Policy and Strategic Planning
  • Director, Research and Evaluation
  • Director, Communications, Promotion and Public Education
  • Director, Investment Fund
  • Director, Administration and Operations
  • 5 Regional Directors
  • Regional Director, National Crime Prevention Centre, B.C. Region
    • 3 Program Analysts
    • 3 Program Officers
    • 2 Communication Officers
    • 2 Administration

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