Information Technology (IT) - Job Evaluation Standard

Amendments

Amendment Number Date Description
n/a December 9, 2021 Information Technology group definition and job evaluation standard in effect.

Table of contents

Policy context

  1. Effective date
    • 1.1 This standard takes effect on December 9, 2021.
    • 1.2 This standard replaces the Computer Systems Administration (CS) Job Evaluation Standard 1985.
  2. Application
    • 2.1 This standard applies to the core public administration as defined in section 11.1 of the Financial Administration Act, unless excluded through specific acts, regulations, or Orders in Council.
    • 2.2 This standard is to be used to establish the appropriate level for work allocated to the Information Technology (IT) Group and evaluated using the Information Technology Job Evaluation Standard.
  3. Context
    • 3.1 This standard is a key component of the classification system and must be read in conjunction with the Policy Framework for the Management of Compensation, the Policy on People Management, the Directive on Classification, the Directive on Classification Grievances, and occupational group definitions.
    • 3.2 The classification system is the infrastructure that is put in place to effectively manage the classification of positions within the core public administration. Classification entails allocating positions by occupational group and level using the appropriate job evaluation standard to ensure that the relative value of work is respected across the core public administration.
    • 3.3 This standard is issued pursuant to sections 7 and 11.1 of the Financial Administration Act.
  4. Gender Neutrality
    • 4.1 This standard assesses the four factors (skill, effort, responsibility, and working conditions) required by the Equal Wages Guidelines of the Canadian Human Rights Act.
  5. Consequences
    • 5.1 The consequences identified in the Policy on People Management apply in cases of non‑compliance with this standard.
  6. Related policies and publications
    • Policy on People Management
    • Directive on Classification
    • Directive on Classification Grievances
    • Occupational Group Definitions
    • Guide to Allocating Positions Using the Occupational Group Definitions
    • Job evaluation standards
    • Other policy instruments and guides that may be published from time to time
  7. Inquiries
    • 7.1 Please direct inquiries about this standard to your departmental corporate classification office. To obtain information on the application of this standard, a representative of the departmental corporate classification office should contact:


      Workforce Organization and Classification
      Compensation and Labour Relations Sector
      Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer
      Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat
      Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R5
      Email: publicenquiries-demandesderenseignement@tbs-sct.gc.ca

Occupational group definition

The Information Technology (IT) Group comprises positions for which the application of comprehensive computer systems knowledge is the primary requirement to the development, implementation and/or maintenance of IT systems and infrastructure.

Inclusions

Notwithstanding the generality of the foregoing, for greater certainty, it includes positions that have, as their primary purpose, responsibility for one or more of the following activities:

  1. designing, developing, integrating, deploying, and/or maintaining software, hardware, or network systems;
  2. providing technical support, service and control for software, hardware, and network infrastructure;
  3. providing technical analysis, advice and recommendations on IT systems, products and services;
  4. researching, developing, implementing, or evaluating information technology policies, directives, standards, and frameworks; or
  5. leading, managing, or supervising any of the above activities.

Exclusions

Positions excluded from the Information Technology Group are those whose primary purpose is included in the definition of any other occupational group or those in which one or more of the following activities is of primary importance:

  1. the planning, development, delivery or management of administrative and federal government policies, programs, services, or other activities directed to the public or to the Public Service; or
  2. the support or provision of administrative, scientific, professional or technical services that may involve limited or specific application of information technology skills and knowledge as an auxiliary to the performance of the activities central to the primary purpose of the position (for example, positions using geographic information systems, web development, human resource systems or performing scientific research); or
  3. planning, business analysis, information management (that is, positions that support the management of information in an organization, such as organizing, disseminating, disposing, or preserving), or data manipulation activities that do not require comprehensive information technology systems knowledge (for example, positions which are responsible for the content generated by the information technology system and not responsible for the system itself); or
  4. operating electronic equipment to communicate information for the safety of life at sea, the protection of the environment and the efficient movement of marine vessels and to monitor radio aids to marine navigation and the provision of associated advisory services; or
  5. applying electronics technology to the design, construction, installation, inspection, maintenance, and repair of electronic, radio and associated equipment, systems and facilities and the development and enforcement of regulations and standards governing the use of such equipment; or
  6. the operation, scheduling or controlling of the operations of electronic equipment used in the processing of data for the purpose of reporting, storing, extracting and comparing information or for solving formulated problems according to prescribed plans; or
  7. where a comprehensive knowledge of engineering, engineering technology or its specialized techniques is the prime requirement in: the planning, design, construction or maintenance of physical systems, structures or equipment; the development or application of engineering standards or procedures including the planning, design, construction or maintenance of buildings, equipment, structures or systems such as transportation, telecommunications, utilities or water use projects; or the development or modification of physical systems or equipment for use in special purpose computer systems applications; or the provision of advice, the conduct of studies, the development and application of related standards and procedures.

Introduction

The Information Technology (IT) Job Evaluation Standard is a point-rating plan consisting of the definition of the occupational group, introduction, overview of the job evaluation standard, glossary of key terms, the notes to raters and element rating scales, and benchmark job descriptions.

Elements

Seven elements are used in this plan. These elements represent aspects of work that are common to all jobs and important in the capture of the overall nature and value of IT work at each level, as well as serve to differentiate amongst the levels. These elements also reflect coverage of the four broad pay equity factors of Skill, Effort, Responsibility and Working Conditions required by prevailing legislation and guidelines on Equal Wages.

Each element contains a definition and a number of degrees that describe the various levels of work present in IT jobs and are designed to fairly, objectively and fully measure the relative value of IT jobs in a gender-neutral fashion. The elements in the IT job evaluation plan are as follows:

  1. Critical Thinking and Analysis (Skill and Effort)
  2. Leadership and Planning (Responsibility)
  3. Technical Knowledge (Skill)
  4. Management Knowledge (Skill)
  5. Communication and Interaction (Skill and Responsibility)
  6. Effort (Effort)
    1. Sensory Effort
    2. Physical Effort
  7. Work Environment (Working Conditions)
    1. Psychological Work Environment
    2. Physical Work Environment

Notes to raters

The notes to raters describe how the job evaluation plan works, guide interpretation, and facilitate accurate, fair, and consistent application across the core public administration.

Benchmarks

Benchmarks are provided as reference tools to exemplify the various levels of work found in the IT Occupational Group. Each benchmark consists of a list of key activities and information specific to the elements used in this job evaluation plan. These benchmarks are an integral part of the job evaluation standard and provide examples of work at the various element degrees.

Use of the job evaluation standard

This IT job evaluation plan must be used in conjunction with the notes to raters and the benchmarks. There are five steps in the application of this job evaluation standard:

  1. The subject position job description is studied, including all supporting organizational information, to ensure full understanding of the work as a whole including work context. The relationship of the subject position to other positions within the organization is important.
  2. Allocation of the position to the occupational group is decided by referring to the occupational group definition and description of inclusions and exclusions.
  3. Tentative degrees for each element are determined by comparing the subject position with the degree descriptors in the rating scales and referring to the notes to raters. The job description is compared with the benchmarks illustrating the degree tentatively selected, and comparisons are also made with the benchmarks for the degrees above and below the degree tentatively selected, as a check on the validity of the selection.
  4. The point values for all elements are added to determine the total point rating and resulting level.
  5. The position being rated is compared, as a whole, to a benchmark with a similar rating pattern and comparable total points as a check on the validity of the level selected.

Overview of the job evaluation standard

The IT Job Evaluation Standard is designed around five levels of work, reflecting business, organization design, work design and workforce management realities as described by key business and functional leaders charged with the design and management of IT organizations and work. While there are a variety of distinct technology disciplines and areas of expertise within the IT Occupational Group, the broad workforce structure looks as follows:

Figure 1: Overview of the IT Job Evaluation Standard
Figure 1:  Overview of the IT Job Evaluation Standard
Figure 1 - Text version

This figure represents the roles of work within the IT job evaluation standard in relation to the various classification levels.

There are three roles that can exist: one is individual contributor role; another is project manager role; and the third is functional manager role.

Jobs at IT-01 and IT-02 are junior/developing level and working level and are uniquely individual contributor role.

Jobs at IT-03 can be Technical Advisor in the individual contributor role or Project Lead in the project management role or Team Lead in the functional management role.

Jobs at IT-04 can be Senior Advisor in the individual contributor role or Senior Project Manager in the project management role or Manager in the functional management role.

Jobs at IT-05 are uniquely Director in the in the functional management role.

Point rating plan

This IT Job Evaluation Standard is a point rating plan, meaning an analytical, quantitative method of determining the relative value of jobs. The relative value of each element measured in the job evaluation plan is mathematically expressed as a percentage weight relative to all other elements in the plan – the sum of the weights of all elements therefore equals 100%. The total value for each job classified under the plan is determined by the sum of the point values assigned by the evaluators.

IT Group weighting model

The table below shows the distribution of weight allocated to each element.

Element Percentage of Total Points Maximum Point Value
Critical Thinking and Analysis 30.0% 300
Leadership and Planning 14.0% 140
Technical Knowledge 30.0% 300
Management Knowledge 12.0% 120
Communication and Interaction 12.0% 120

Effort

  • Sensory Effort
  • Physical Effort
1.0% 10

Work Environment

  • Psychological Work Environment
  • Physical Work Environment
1.0% 10
Total 100.0% 1,000

Element point-rating scales

The table below shows the distribution of points allocated within each element.

Element point-rating scales
1 2 3 4 5 6a 6b 7a 7b
Degree Critical Thinking and Analysis Maximum Point Value Technical Knowledge Management Knowledge Communication and Interaction Sensory Effort Physical Effort Psychological Work Environment Physical Work Environment
1 30 14 40 12 12 1 1 1 1
2 70 30 80 42 30 5 5 5 5
3 145 60 165 82 50 n/a n/a n/a n/a
4 245 110 265 120 95 n/a n/a n/a n/a
5 300 140 300 n/a 120 n/a n/a n/a n/a
% Total 30.0% 14.0% 30.0% 12.0% 12.0% 0.5% 0.5% 0.5% 0.5%

Point ranges

The objective of using point ranges in the job evaluation standard is to group the most meaningful clusters of total point values together to reflect similar overall job value. These clusters are reflected as point ranges and become the classification levels in the job evaluation plan. Jobs with total point values within a given point range are deemed to be of equivalent value and will have the same classification level.

The following table shows the five classification levels in the IT job evaluation plan and the associated minimum and maximum points in the range for each level.

Level Minimum Point Range Maximum Point Range
IT-01 112 200
IT-02 201 350
IT-03 351 600
IT-04 601 850
IT-05 851 1,000

Glossary of terms

The glossary of terms contains various terms, definitions and abbreviations used in the standard. The selection aims to assist evaluators in using this standard.

Functional management:
the management of financial, human and materiel resources in accordance with the relevant policies, directives, and legislation.
Information system:
an information system is generally composed of data, computing platforms, communications networks, business applications, people, and processes organized for the collection, processing, maintenance, use, sharing, dissemination, or disposition of information.
LAN/MAN/WAN:
Local area network/metropolitan area network/wide area network. These are groups of computers and network devices connected together within a particular area.
Operational management:
the management of IT operations to accomplish the organization’s mandate.
Organizational nomenclature:
the terms for the various levels of organizational structure used in this standard to provide a reference for comparison with the wide variety of terms for similar structures used in departments and agencies. Figure 2 depicts the organizational nomenclature. Please note that the figure is illustrative not prescriptive.
Project:
For the purposes of this standard, a project is an activity or series of activities that has a beginning and an end. A project is required to produce defined outputs and realize specific outcomes in support of an information technology objective, within a clear schedule and resource plan. A project is undertaken within specific time, cost and performance parameters and delivered in accordance with the relevant policies, directives, and legislation.
Project Management:
The systematic planning, organizing and control of allocated resources to accomplish identified project objectives and outcomes. Project management is normally reserved for focused, non-repetitive, time-limited activities with some degree of risk, and for activities beyond the usual scope of program (operational) activities.
System Development Lifecycle:

The successive stages through which information systems are brought into service. The lifecycle includes the phases: 1) stakeholder engagement, 2) concept, 3) planning, 4) requirements analysis, 5) high-level design, 6) detailed design, 7) development, 8) integration and testing and 9) installation.

Figure 2: Organizational nomenclature
Figure 2: Organizational nomenclature
Figure 2 - Text version

This figure depicts the organizational nomenclature for the various levels of organizational structure used in this standard and provides a reference for comparison with the wide variety of terms for similar structures used in departments and agencies. The figure is meant to be illustrative and not prescriptive.

A team is made up of individual contributors with a formal reporting relationship to a team lead (IT-03). The team lead reports to a manager (IT-04) and the manager reports to a director (IT-05). The team may be augmented by temporary resources.

A unit is made up of multiple subordinate teams with formal reporting relationships to a manager (IT-04). The manager reports to a director (IT-05). The unit may be augmented by temporary resources.

An organization is made up of multiple subordinate units with formal reporting relationships to a director (IT-05) or an executive position.

An individual contributor can also report directly to a manager or to a director within a unit or an organization.

Team:
A team is made up of individual contributors with a formal reporting relationship to a team lead (IT-03). The team may be augmented by temporary resources.
Unit:
A unit is made up of multiple subordinate teams with formal reporting relationships to a manager (IT-04). The unit may be augmented by temporary resources.
Organization:
An organization is made up of multiple subordinate units with formal reporting relationships to a director (IT-05) or an executive position.

General notes to raters

General remarks on rating the elements

This section provides general and specific notes to raters for each of the seven elements in the IT job evaluation plan. Each element leads with guidelines for understanding and applying the element, then finally the rating table with degree descriptors, associated points, and benchmark references.

All elements in this job evaluation plan are structured as cumulative progressions. A rating at a higher degree subsumes the degree descriptions of all lower degrees. The full degree description must apply to the subject position, not just a selection of specific phrases or words. In addition, note that degree guidelines refer to the work within the IT Group only and when an aspect of work is described as being of “relatively low complexity”, it means that it is relative to other work in this group, and not that the work is of low complexity in absolute terms. Similarly, the highest degree of leadership and planning is relative within the IT Group and not the highest degree in absolute terms.

When using all components of this job evaluation tool (for example, degree descriptors, benchmarks, and notes to raters), as well as when reviewing and understanding job descriptions, the context surrounding the subject position is critical. Words, phrases, and work examples should never be interpreted in isolation of their overall context.

In selecting the most appropriate degree, the following key principles must be applied:

  • Do not consider an individual incumbent’s performance or achievements in the job evaluation process. In other words, evaluate the work required of the subject position and not an incumbent’s ability to perform the work.
  • Consider only typical, ongoing job responsibilities of the assigned work. Do not consider exceptional, one-time circumstances or developmental opportunities beyond the substantive job.
  • Select the statement that best describes the highest level of responsibility at which the job is typically expected to work and that best represents a significant part of the ongoing responsibilities of the job.
  • Evaluate regional jobs in the same manner as headquarters jobs.
  • Designate a degree for each element (that is, no element can receive zero points).

Progression of work in the IT Group

This job evaluation standard is designed to reflect the multi-pronged career path that exists within the IT Group. As described in the accompanying graphic, work progresses along an individual contributor path until level 3, at which point the path diverges to include project management and functional management work streams. Individual contributor and project management paths then continue to progress to level 4, while the functional management path continues to level 5.

Progression of work in the IT Group
IT Level Individual Contributor Project Management Functional Management
5 n/a n/a 5D
4 4 IC 4 PM 4 M
3 3 IC 3 PL 3 TL
2 2 IC n/a n/a
1 1 IC n/a n/a

Legend:

  • IC = Individual Contributor
  • PM = Project Manager
  • PL = Project Leader
  • D = Director
  • M = Manager
  • TL = Team Leader

Given that this is a highly technical group, it is critical that evaluators recognize that IT functional management and project management jobs are technical management roles and require a balance of the technical and management aspects of work throughout the application of the IT job evaluation tool.

In addition, despite a wide variety of diverse work streams related to specific technology areas and functions within the IT Group, the design of this job evaluation plan reflects a business direction to value all technology areas equally.

Context and relativity

It is critical for evaluators to understand the full context of a given job both as part of the organizational structure within which it sits, as well as within the context of the IT Group across government.

Understanding this broader core public administration context is of particular relevance to smaller departments or agencies housing small IT organizations, since they must consider their IT positions relative to the broader spectrum of IT work across government. To illustrate, consider an IT management job situation:

  • In a micro or very small department or agency housing a smaller IT organization, the IT manager is likely considered the top IT job in that department or agency. This job may sit at the executive table and provide advice on a host of IT matters pertaining to the organization’s business. The implications may be that, in the context of its home organization, this job may be described with ‘top’ management, planning, and knowledge type language in the job description, which could possibly lead to over-classification against the IT classification standard.
  • The context challenge to understand is that there are even higher levels of IT work that exist in other, larger IT organizations. The scope, breadth and complexity of IT work performed, particularly of management jobs that come with larger, more complex businesses will surpass the complexity and scope that resides in a smaller IT organization. This must be understood and considered in evaluating work consistently across the whole of government.

This same principle must also be applied to a subject matter expert position as it is relative to the whole IT Group across the core public administration.

Order of element evaluation

This job evaluation standard determines the relative value of the ensemble of IT work in a given position by bringing together the important and interrelated aspects of work for assessment. It evaluates the assigned work responsibilities and the related knowledge and skill required to carry them out. In other words:

  • A job requires specific knowledge and skills in order to execute assigned responsibilities. The assigned responsibilities, therefore, are the lens through which we understand how knowledge and skills are applied and the relative levels of knowledge and skill required.

The sequence order of the job elements in the IT job evaluation plan have therefore been set out to reflect this natural principle as follows:

  • Element 1 Critical Thinking and Analysis

    This element sets out the foundation of IT work by describing the central purpose of IT work, be it in an individual contributor, project leadership or functional management role. The focus is on problem solving and analytical skills underpinned by the increasing levels of complexity of work from entry through to senior level jobs.

  • Element 2 Leadership and Planning

    The Leadership and Planning element builds on the foundation of Critical Thinking and Analysis by addressing the fact that the delivery of IT work requires additional functional and project management structures and responsibilities. This element measures the responsibility to plan and lead work and people.

  • Element 3 Technical Knowledge and Element 4 Management Knowledge

    In rating the Knowledge elements, the key question is “what level of knowledge and nature of knowledge is required to execute the assigned work responsibilities?” By rating the Critical Thinking and Analysis and Leadership and Planning elements first, this combined understanding assists evaluators in assigning the appropriate rating to technical and management knowledge elements.

  • Element 5 Communication and Interaction

    The Communication and Interaction element then rounds out this cumulative understanding of IT work by considering the communications skills required to execute the work described in Critical Thinking and Analysis, and Leadership and Planning, as well as the purpose and contextual complexity of the interactions.

  • Element 6 Sensory and Physical Effort and Element 7 Psychological and Physical Work Environment

    Finally, evaluators should examine the sensory and physical effort required to perform the work, and the psychological and physical working conditions within which the work is conducted.

Each of the key skill and responsibility elements are naturally correlated in their measurement of IT work. This means that when a job requires a certain level of responsibility, it will require a commensurate level of knowledge and skill. Therefore, with the design of IT work and its corresponding IT job evaluation plan, one would expect consistency in rating patterns across key elements. For example, a subject matter expert role would score higher on technical elements and lower on functional management elements than its project/management counterparts at the same level.

In this context, after evaluating work on an element-by-element basis, evaluators should review the ratings and the degree descriptors to ensure that there is cohesion in the overall evaluation. Any unexpected ratings should be validated against the job description, organizational structure, surrounding positions, and supporting information from the responsible manager.

Element 1: Critical thinking and analysis

General guidelines

This element measures the increasing levels of critical thinking and analytical skill that stem from the complexity of typical issues encountered in the work, the nature of the analysis required, and the judgment that must be applied in working through the analysis.

Critical thinking and analysis increase in direct proportion with the complexity and impact of issues encountered in the assigned work. This element rests on the critical continuum of complexity that differentiates IT work from junior to senior levels regardless of aspect or element of work being measured. In other words, this complexity continuum underpins many of the elements in this job evaluation standard as it is a key differentiator that naturally occurs in the design of the jobs.

Complexity should be considered as a number of integrated pieces that are weighed and balanced differently for each issue that arises in the work. Examples of these integrated pieces include:

  • the scope and variety of technical areas,
  • operational, client management, client technology issues and their variety, scope, risk, reach of impact and degree of inter-relatedness, and
  • the number and nature of stakeholders involved.

The degree descriptors for this element depict typical blends of these contributing factors found in the various levels of IT work.

When evaluating the level of critical thinking and analysis, also consider the level of guidance available in dealing with issues and problem solving. Normally, the less guidance available means that more judgment is required. Similarly, the more guidance available, the less complex the problem will be lowering the required level of critical thinking. Guidance can take several forms including policies, frameworks, instructions, precedents, management direction and advice, et cetera.

Specific guidelines

Degree descriptors comprise three components to reflect the three dimensions that grow together. The first part of the degree descriptor describes the nature and complexity of typical problems or issues encountered in the work. The second part describes the corresponding nature of analysis required and its practical application to problem solving and analysis. The third statement describes the nature of guidance available.

Note that problems and issues can take many forms including technical challenges, management issues, client concerns, et cetera. The job evaluation plan does not differentiate the content of the problems and issues. Instead, it focuses on the overall complexity regardless of the type of issue encountered.

At degree 1, problems are routine and well defined. They would be considered common issues with an established set of instructions or standardized processes and procedures to follow in resolving them.

When atypical problems are referred to higher levels, this includes occasions where the standard approach does not result in a fix to the problem, requiring a higher-level, more experienced analyst to delve deeper for a different root cause and solution.

At degree 2, the problems are fulsome in nature. This means that they include more components and factors to consider, making the thinking challenge greater in coming up with a solution. Work at this degree needs to research problems further and examine a variety of information sources at a deeper level in order to understand what is truly going on. While the problems and solutions are less straightforward at this degree, the paths, or processes to conduct the investigation and analysis remain known.

This is an autonomous level where the requirements of the position are to work through issues independently and guidance is in the form of support from colleagues and management when required or sought.

At degree 3, issues are described as complex in that they increase in variety and challenge, and are more comprehensive, encompassing a greater number and/or depth of factors. At this degree, problems are broader in scope and issues involve more people, more opinions, more areas of technology, and the consideration of broader operational variables. Because of this added complexity, solutions and analytical approaches are ill-defined and require the development of a ‘thinking strategy’ first, in order to work through the various issues versus getting directly to solution options. In other words, problems must be broken down into components and thought through separately, yet in an integrated way. Correspondingly, the analysis needs to take into account any broader trends, as well as the resulting implications beyond the immediate problem that may affect other people, operational and/or technical aspects.

In terms of scope, issues and problems at this level are confined to the work team and smaller scale projects. Guidance at this degree is available from frameworks, directives, policies, and processes, reflective of the greater ambiguity in analytical approach and possible solution paths.

At degree 4, issues are highly complex. They are larger in scope, risk, and impact, and they are multi-dimensional in that the problem and its components have many facets that need to be examined in a number and variety of ways. Issues at this level involve many stakeholders and perspectives, often with competing priorities. Issues also have a longer line of sight with broader and longer-term implications on the direction of IT programs and policies, resulting in the requirement to think broadly to areas of risk and impact that would not typically be obvious.

Complexity of analysis is increased by the requirement to consider how to balance technical solution options that may not be in harmony with business or policy directions or objectives, or desires of a client business owner, necessitating a broader approach to analyze risks and impacts in determining solution options that consider all perspectives. Technical advice and recommendations at this degree are authoritative.

At degree 5, the issues are of the highest complexity (within the IT Group) involving the convergence of technology, business, policy, program, and resource strategy challenges and constraints in order to deliver the work. The breadth and impact of the issues and analysis at this degree are at the level of overall program direction and technology priorities. There is also a horizontal perspective in critical thinking and analysis that reaches across business and technology programs and policy interests with impacts on overall program strategy and direction.

The guidance becomes much less at this degree. There may be some broad guiding principles. However, principles; however, precedent is elusive, and frameworks need to be developed and adapted to address these highly complex matters.

Critical thinking and analysis rating scale

This element measures the requirement for critical thinking and analysis in IT work. It measures the increasing level of critical thinking and analysis that stems from the nature and complexity of typical problems and issues encountered in the work; the nature of analysis and judgment that must be applied; and the degree of guidance available.

Degree Degree Descriptor Points and BM
1

Problems and issues are typically well-defined, straightforward in nature, with known solution options. Critical thinking involves assessing fact-based information and following standardized diagnostics, processes and procedures with atypical problems being referred to more senior levels.

Analysis is guided by standardized instructions and operational procedures with supervisory oversight.

30
BM 1
BM 2
2

Problems and issues are fulsome in nature involving a variety of components and factors to consider however, analytical paths and approaches are known. Critical thinking and analysis involve researching and analyzing problem components and assumptions to identify connections and to uncover and address underlying issues and gaps in information.

Problem solving is independent at this level with advice and direction available from more senior colleagues and management.

70
BM 3
3

Problems and issues are complex in nature characterized by a variety of more comprehensive, challenging technical, people and operational variables, often with ill-defined solution options. Critical thinking and analysis involve breaking down problems into component parts; identifying patterns, trends, and conflicts, and anticipating emerging issues and implications to generate alternative solution options and recommendations.

Problem solving and critical thinking are generally within the context of the work unit or project area's objectives and plans and are guided by associated established frameworks, directives, policies, and processes.

145
BM 4
BM 5
4

Problems and issues are highly complex and multi-dimensional, involving multiple perspectives, often-competing priorities, and significant technical and business risk. Critical thinking and analysis involve assessing and balancing technical, business and policy objectives, and determining risk and impacts to provide authoritative advice and recommendations that impact the direction of IT policies, programs or services.

Problem solving and critical thinking are generally within the context of the organization or a large, broad project and are guided by associated established frameworks, directives, policies, and processes.

245
BM 6
BM 7
5

Problems and issues are of the highest complexity, involving multiple and highly interconnected technology, business, policy, program, and resource strategy challenges and constraints. Critical thinking and analysis are highly horizontal and strategic in nature involving the alignment of IT program strategy with departmental business objectives, priorities and resource realities while balancing technology investments and risk management strategies.

Problem solving and critical thinking are generally guided by broader business, policy and technology direction governing the directorate, department, and whole of government.

300
BM 8

Element 2: Leadership and planning

General guidelines

This element measures the responsibility for planning, leading and being accountable for resources and the achievement of results. It captures the planning of independent work of a single position through to the formal delegated responsibility for managing people, financial resources and results in formal organizational structures as well as the leadership challenges of bringing people, resources and expertise together in a project team format to achieve results where there is not a formal reporting relationship. Responsibilities include planning work, planning, and managing resources, assigning work, ensuring quality of deliverables, providing feedback and follow-up to ensure that performance standards are met, and results are achieved.

While management jobs at multiple levels comprise a number of the same accountabilities, (for example, planning and managing people and financial resources in the delivery of work, reporting, performance et cetera), the relative complexity, scope and size of operations, units or teams being managed result in very different levels of management challenge within the work. For example, an increase in scope, nature and complexity (as evidenced by a variety of technology and business interests, risks and impact, number and nature of resources and constraints, presence of subordinate management structures, et cetera) leads to an increase in complexity of management accountability and challenge in the work as it progresses.

NOTE: Evaluators must consider the leadership and planning requirements of the job in the context of all IT jobs across government not simply within the context of their own departments and their own work.

Specific guidelines

Evaluators should take note of the naming convention in this job evaluation standard regarding organizational units (see “organizational nomenclature” in glossary). Because organizations differ from department to department in their structures, variability in organizational design and nomenclature for organizational structures and business lines, generic language is used to denote organizational scope.

Degree descriptors are structured such that the first portion describes the nature and complexity of leadership and planning responsibility. The last portion describes the scope through samples of the types of leadership and planning activities that typify work at each degree. This is intended to provide evaluators with a practical indication of the activities involved at each degree. These portions of the degree descriptors are not intended to be an exhaustive representation of leadership and planning activities and should be considered as representative examples only. The organizational scope delineator must always be considered carefully since a number of leadership and planning activities may be similar from degree to degree and scope determines the complexity.

At degree 1, the leadership and planning role is limited. While there is a requirement to coordinate with clients, colleagues, and management in the delivery of work, the nature of work is relatively junior and of limited scope and complexity. Because of this limited complexity, the need to plan, manage and work with and through others is correspondingly limited.

At degree 2, work is at the fully autonomous independent contributor level, and the requirement to participate in and contribute subject matter expertise to project initiatives is typical. As such, the work

requires more planning to balance various commitments and deliverables. Leadership and planning at this degree may extend to assigning tasks to more junior staff, though supervisory requirements are not as fulsome as at degree 3.

At degree 3, work is at the first formal level of both leadership and planning, where roles are either Team Lead or Project Lead. The planning and leadership challenges therefore include associated operational and functional (human, materiel and financial) management responsibilities. Scope at this degree is within a work team or project team setting.

At degree 4, work is the first formal level of management. Leadership and planning responsibility moves to the level of a unit (that is, multiple teams reporting to a manager position). Because of this significant increase in organizational scope and complexity, the level of planning and leadership responsibility also increases. Note that degree 4 has a double-barreled statement to describe the structure and scope surrounding functional management and project leadership roles. While the roles and level of planning and management responsibility are equivalent, the components that create complexity are different in each case. In cases where both descriptions apply to a single position, a rating of degree 4 shall be given.

At degree 5, responsibility for planning and leadership is at the level of a large and comprehensive IT organization comprised of multiple layers of subordinate management organizations, and multiple technology areas and business lines. The multiple technology areas and business lines can refer to a variety of work streams within an IT organization or it can refer to a variety of specialized areas within a single stream of work in a large IT organization in a very large department. Leadership and planning are operational and strategic in nature, whereby the jobs must integrate a technical focus with horizontal and future-oriented outlooks to be effective.

Leadership and planning rating scale

This element measures the responsibility for planning, leading and being accountable for resources and the achievement of results.

Degree Degree Descriptor Points and BM
1

Limited planning and leadership required in the job. Responsible for prioritizing and completing assigned work activities according to plan, participating as a team member and working collaboratively within a broader team environment.

14
BM 1
BM 2
2

Responsible for the independent planning and delivery of an assigned workload within assigned area of work and expertise. Responsibilities include coordinating with colleagues, clients, contract resources and management in the delivery of the work, contributing expertise as a technical subject-matter resource on broader project teams as required. May supervise tasks and activities of more junior staff.

30
BM 3
BM 5
BM 6

3

Responsible for the planning and management of people and resources assigned to a work team, section, or project team. Responsibilities include assigning work to team members, contractors, and support staff, ensuring quality, timeliness and consistency of work and results, monitoring and feedback, and independent management of relationships and issues with clients, vendors, and contract resources.

60
BM 4

4

Responsible for the planning and management of people, resources and operations assigned to an IT organization comprised of multiple subordinate projects and/or multiple work teams or sections, team leaders, project leaders, technical advisors, contract resources and staff.

Responsibilities are focused on setting the priorities for the assigned organization, planning operational work, establishing and managing HR and financial plans to meet operational requirements, aligning team members to work assignments, ensuring quality of deliverables, evaluating performance, providing coaching and guidance, managing operational results and contributing to and implementing IT business plans.  

OR

Responsible for planning and leading highly complex, multi-dimensional IT project teams typically comprised of a variety of diverse specialized technical staff and contractors, and multiple integrated streams of activity and sub-projects.

Responsibilities include conceiving and planning the overall approach to conducting the project and its component sub-projects, determining and negotiating resource requirements, establishing and managing the project team, its components, and sub-project team leads, assigning work, establishing and monitoring objectives and results, coordinating requirements and schedules of multiple business owner stakeholders and resources; integrating all component inputs into the comprehensive deliverable, and providing ongoing guidance, advice and feedback to team members.

110
BM 7
5

Responsible for broad operational and strategic leadership and planning of all operations and resources of a large and comprehensive IT organization comprised of multiple layers of subordinate management organizations, and multiple technology areas and business lines. Responsibility at this level involves balancing a variety of highly complex business, technology and governance challenges and risk management considerations.

Responsibilities include setting the vision, business direction and priorities of the group, managing key client business relationships, reviewing and integrating work plans and priorities of subordinate units and project teams, including human and financial resource plans into broader cohesive strategy and plan, as well as contributing to and implementing higher level business plans.

140
BM 8

Element 3: Technical knowledge

General guidelines

This element measures the level of IT subject matter knowledge, including its various disciplines, components, theories, and principles, as well as its practice and practical application in the business environment. This element also measures knowledge of the technology context relevant to the position, including stakeholders’ technology contexts such as technology platforms, technical environments, and IT requirements.

In seeking to evaluate the degree of knowledge required in IT jobs one must look toward the practical application of the knowledge in the work as the key indicator to guide the rating. In other words, ‘abc’ technical knowledge is required in order to execute ‘xyz’ responsibilities of the work.

It is important to note that in this element, all disciplines of IT are valued equally. The focus is on the overall level of technical knowledge required to perform the work, regardless of the discipline.

Consider only the knowledge required for the job within the assigned area of work, and not the knowledge that the incumbent may possess.

Specific guidelines

At degree 1 of technical knowledge, work is at a junior or developing level and requires practical technical job content knowledge specific to the assigned work. In addition, the position is within a technical operational context; therefore, the work requires a general understanding of what technology platforms and products are used within the position and the technological environment in which the position is required to operate.

At degree 2, the technical content knowledge grows in depth and breadth to perform the work autonomously. At this degree, the technical knowledge requirement enables work on the full spectrum of typical issues and activities that would be encountered at the working level. Atypical or very complex concepts are referred to more senior levels of technical expertise. The contextual technical knowledge also grows to include a fulsome understanding of the clients’ technology environment.

At degree 3, the work is typically at an experienced working level and technical content knowledge increases in depth to deal with more complex technical issues. Advanced technical content knowledge is required to oversee and review the work of others, be a reference source for more junior IT staff, handle the technical problems that are escalated from junior levels, and act as a subject matter resource. The contextual technical knowledge increases in breadth to include clients’ technology partners and the broader government technology arena.

At degree 4, technical content knowledge grows in breadth to incorporate a variety of technical areas. The variety of technical areas can refer to multiple distinct business lines (that is, teams or units with different technological focuses) which are managed by a single position. The contextual technical knowledge increases in depth to include the interactions, strengths, and vulnerabilities of the broader interdependent development and delivery area. Degree 4 is the highest technical knowledge for management positions where technical knowledge plateaus to allow for the significant management knowledge also required of these positions.

At degree 5, technical content knowledge is at the greatest depth of subject matter expertise within an IT discipline, is relatively rare across government, and is a unique position within a department. This rating should be reserved for work which requires the highest subject matter expertise and to which technical authority within the specific IT discipline is recognized at the departmental or government-wide level. It is important to consider the organizational context of the position when applying this degree. Smaller-scope organizations have requirements for subject matter experts. However, when gauged against the expertise across the IT Group of the core public administration, this expertise may not meet the test of the degree 5 descriptor. Recall that the elements are cumulative. Therefore, degree 5 subsumes all aspects of degree 4.

Technical knowledge rating scale

This element measures the level of subject matter knowledge of information technology, including its various disciplines, components, theories and principles, and its practice and practical application in the business environment. This element also captures the critical contextual knowledge required related to the broader security and policy environments governing IT in the Public Service, as well as knowledge of technology stakeholders and business partners, including clients, vendors, contractors, and consultants.

Degree Degree Descriptor Points and BM
1

Requires knowledge of information technology theories, principles and practices related to assigned work and a general understanding of the operating context within which the work is performed.

40
BM 1
BM 2
2

Requires sound working-level knowledge of the information technology discipline and associated theories, principles and practices related to the assigned area of work and a sound understanding of clients’ business, technology, and operations.

80
BM 3
3

Requires advanced subject matter knowledge of the information technology discipline related to the assigned area of work including associated theories, principles and practices and their application, as well as, a strong understanding of clients’ business and technology environments, technology partners and their function, and the broader government technology arena.

165
BM 4
BM 5
4

Requires extensive and broad knowledge of information technology across a variety of technical areas focused on strategic knowledge application to large-scale technology interconnectedness, functionality, effectiveness, vulnerabilities, and risk.

265
BM 7
BM 8
5

Requires deep and comprehensive understanding of the subject matter of the specific information technology discipline related to the work. Knowledge is at the greatest depth of subject matter expertise within the IT discipline, such that the requirements of the position are to provide departmental or public service-wide expertise on issues related to the discipline.

300
BM 6

Element 4: Management knowledge

General guidelines

This element measures the level of knowledge of management principles, processes and approaches, and their application required to operate at increasing levels of IT management. This element captures management knowledge required of the full range of functional and project management roles, including knowledge of management practices and approaches (that is, human resources, operational, and financial), as well as the contextual knowledge of operational, policy and governance constructs.

Management knowledge focuses on practical knowledge application from tactical and operational to strategic management knowledge. When evaluating the level of knowledge required in IT jobs, consider the practical application of the knowledge in the work as the key indicator to guide the rating (that is, the knowledge required to execute leadership and planning responsibilities).

The foundation element in this job evaluation standard is technical expertise. Overlaying this technical expertise is the secondary role of management, and the knowledge that it requires. Note that a position may not hold the top degree in both the technical knowledge and the management knowledge elements. It follows that as jobs move from technical practice to management practice, the technical knowledge and expertise plateau to accommodate the additional requirement for a high degree of management knowledge.

Specific guidelines

Degree descriptors begin with statements that focus on the body of functional management knowledge required in the core public administration, including principles, practices, processes, prevailing legislation, and accountability requirements.

Degree descriptors end with management context for the positions’, clients’, partners’, and vendors’ organizations. The management context includes governance structures, accountability mechanisms, and decision-making channels. This contextual knowledge is required to deliver on objectives within the applicable approval structures.

Consider only the knowledge required for the job within the assigned area of work, and not the knowledge that the incumbent may possess. Also, consider the knowledge of the job in the context of all IT management jobs across government not simply within the context of the home organization and structure.

At degree 1, work does not require management knowledge beyond awareness of the management constructs within which this work is assigned to the individual contributor and/or team participant. Knowledge of supervisory techniques is developing at this degree, for example, through exposure to the supervisory techniques and practices used within the position’s organization or through development opportunities.

Degree 2 is the first level at which management knowledge is applied in that there is a formal subordinate structure or responsibility for leading a project team with resources formally or informally assigned. As such, the position requires sound knowledge of basic resource management techniques, policies, protocols, and associated management contexts.

Degree 2 also captures the application of sound functional and project management knowledge and contextual management knowledge required by senior subject matter experts in the execution of their responsibilities. For example, expert advisors are required to integrate their work and deliverables into complex project plans, organizational structures, and governance mechanisms and provide technical recommendations that impact functional resources; these responsibilities require a more sophisticated application of management knowledge than is found in degree 1 despite the absence of formal supervisory responsibilities for the position.

At degree 3, management knowledge is in-depth because there are formal management responsibilities related to a broader program or service area than those found at degree 2. With this larger management scope and accountability, there is a need for deeper management knowledge across a number of business, finance and human resources management areas. The complexity of roles also requires an in-depth level of management contextual knowledge related to the management and governance constructs of client and stakeholder organizations to navigate projects and deliverables through applicable governance structures.

Degree 4 is the highest level of management knowledge and it requires strategic application. The work requires extensive knowledge of a variety of management approaches and how to position operations to achieve long-term IT strategies and priorities. Organizational scope is broader and more complex due to the multiple layers of subordinate and multidisciplinary management structures, which requires a corresponding increase in management knowledge from degree 3 in order to set the business plans, human resources plans and budgets for the operation and execute more complex and varying responsibilities.

Contextual management knowledge requires an extensive understanding of the surrounding departmental and governmental IT, operational and policy contexts within which the operation sits, and in IT across the core public administration.

Management knowledge rating scale

The Management Knowledge element captures functional, project and operational management principles, practices, and their application in the associated management contexts.

Degree Degree Descriptor Points and BM
1

Requires knowledge of the management constructs within which work is performed within the federal public service with some developing knowledge of team leadership and supervision techniques.

12
BM 1
BM 2
BM 3
BM 5
2

Requires sound knowledge of functional and project management principles, processes, and approaches, as well as of prevailing management-related policy and legislation and their application to a variety of practical work situations.

Requires an understanding of the management context of clients’ businesses, as well as of the internal management and governance context of the position.

42
BM 4
BM 6
3

Requires in-depth knowledge of functional, operational and project management principles, processes and approaches and an in-depth understanding of the relevant business, operational, legislative and policy contexts related to the development or delivery area.

Requires an in depth understanding of the management context of clients’ businesses, as well as of the internal management and governance context of the position.

82
BM 7
4

Requires expert knowledge of information technology management at the strategic level and extensive knowledge of strategic and operational management approaches and the translation of strategic objectives into operational priorities and plans.

Requires a multifaceted understanding of the various challenges and integration points for a multi-disciplinary IT program including an extensive understanding of the relevant business, operational and policy contexts related to broader IT environment within the department being served and across the core public administration.

120
BM 8

Element 5: Communication and interaction

General guidelines

IT work in the core public administration requires delivering work through complex networks of teams and working with a variety of business owners, external partner organizations, contractors, and other stakeholders.

IT work requires communications skills and the management of interactions, not only in the daily management of the work, but also building and managing relationships, influencing and facilitating stakeholders to coordinate approaches, advance issues, negotiate agreements and deliver on commitments. It is critical to assess only the communication skills that the job requires, and not the skill that an incumbent may possess. To facilitate rating this element, evaluators should first assess the typical interactions required of a job, and then assess the corresponding level of communication skill required in the work (refer to the Order of Element Evaluation section).

This element does not value the level or importance of the people with whom the job is required to interact or the audience or subject of communications. For example, if a job requires providing information related to a straightforward technical issue to a senior executive, the fact that the recipient of the information is the executive has no bearing on the assessment of the level of interaction and communication skill. The fact that the issue and the exchange are straightforward is what determines the level of challenge in the interaction and therefore the required communication skill.

Specific guidelines

This element is structured with three dimensions that grow together: nature of communication skill, purpose of interaction, and scope and complexity of typical interactions. Degree descriptors portray the relative skill and responsibility at each level. The overall statement, in aggregate, must be representative of the job.

Degree descriptors begin with statements describing the nature of communication skill required as it relates to the purpose of interactions. The second portion of the degree descriptors describes the scope and complexity of communication and interactions. Degree descriptors end with the type of communication products to illustrate the progression in complexity of communication skill and responsibility.

At degree 1, both the issues and the context of interactions are of relatively low complexity. The nature of communication is typified by responding to client queries, clarifying work assignments, and exchanging information with colleagues. Typical written communications products at this level are similarly straightforward and include template-based reports and/or straightforward technical documentation.

At degree 2, investigation and consultation skills are required to probe and explore situations, extract root causes and missing information, and bring people and ideas together. The scope statement frames the interaction to single clients or single issues, and communication products convey more complex information in a broader variety of settings. Communication products include full technical reports and more complex technical specifications and documentation.

At degree 3, facilitation and advisory skills are required, and interactions are focused on building collaboration with a broader, more complex scope of team or project context. Communication skill increases in scope and complexity of product and output. Communication products include a variety of comprehensive project and technical documents including project charters, project and work plans, in-depth technical documents, and a variety of management-related proposals, briefing and reporting documentation.

At degree 4, a broad variety of interactions with a multiplicity of clients and stakeholders requires tailoring communications accordingly and requires higher level persuasion and diplomacy skills in order to bring differing perspectives together to achieve solutions. Complexity is increased by the large variety of technical issues that must be synthesized and communicated. Written communications products include a variety of complex technical, project-related, and operational business planning, policy and delivery documents and reports.

At degree 5, communication skills are at the highest level. The work requires managing key relationships and influencing decisions which affect the full IT organization. The context surrounding interactions is of significant scope, complexity, and impact. Communication at this level must influence and set direction with strategic intent.

Communication and interaction rating scale

This element measures the communication skill required in carrying out job responsibilities in IT work by considering the nature and complexity of typical interactions within which the communication skill is applied.

Degree Degree Descriptor Points and BM
1

Responds to requests and exchanges information related to client service calls and work assignments including questioning to clarify requirements to deliver on assigned work tasks. Interactions at this level are typically straightforward in nature and have generally been encountered before. Completes template-based reports and writes straightforward technical documentation.

12
BM 1
BM 2
2

Probes and explores problems or client situations where objectives, root issues or information are not clearly defined or apparent, requiring investigation and consultation skills to extract required information from clients, colleagues and delivery partners to deliver the work. Interactions at this level are typically non-routine and either single-issue or client-specific in nature. Writes full technical service reports and more complex technical documentation.

30
BM 3
3

Facilitates discussions with and provides advice to clients, colleagues, and delivery partners to build collaboration toward a common approach to work delivery and project initiatives and solicit input toward improvement of team planning and delivery. Interactions at this level are typically single-focus project or work-team related and involve a variety of connections to other work or project teams and deliverables. Written communications skills include writing a variety of comprehensive project and technical documents, and a variety of management-related proposals, briefing and reporting documentation.

50
BM 4
BM 5
4

Requires advanced persuasion and diplomacy skills to consult and provide advice on complex issues and ideas, negotiate resourcing, funding and service level agreements, work across multiple businesses, technical and project areas in order to secure support and involvement in projects and initiatives and ensure alignment, quality and consistency of planning and deliverables. Interactions at this level typically involve large, broad projects or work teams with multiple and diverse stakeholders, resources, technical and business domain areas. Writes a variety of complex technical, project-related, and operational business planning, policy and delivery documents and reports.

95
BM 6
MB 7
5

Requires extensive negotiation and influencing skills to manage key relationships with IT and business owner leadership, external delivery agents, and subordinate unit and project leadership toward agreement on highly complex matters including objectives and plans, integrated resourcing and funding, service level agreements, and contracts, as well as to influence on issues impacting the overall direction and delivery of the IT organization.

Interactions at this level are characterized by significant complexity resulting from multiple stakeholder parties within and/or outside government, multiple technical and business issues of substantial, broad-reaching scope, risk, and impact; diverse and often competing perspectives; and variability in objectives.

120
BM 8

Element 6: Sensory and physical effort

General guidelines

This element measures the physical and sensory effort required in the performance of IT work. It recognizes the physical effort and energy involved in exerting force, either while moving or while staying still, or in performing a sequence of small movements. It also recognizes the strain associated with intense sensory focus, for example, visual, tactile, or auditory.

The element provides some generic examples of efforts in these broad categories. These examples are intended to provide illustration of the nature and intensity of physical and sensory effort captured by this element. However, they are not exhaustive. Other efforts of equivalent intensity should be also be considered and rated similarly.

Evaluators should consider frequency with a degree of reasonability. The standard does not require a precise calculation of time for these efforts in order to make an appropriate rating assessment. The question is one of typical efforts associated with the work being evaluated relative to all other work in the IT Group.

Remember that there is a separate element that assesses the environmental conditions of the work.

Sensory and physical effort rating scales

This element captures the sensory and physical effort required in the performance of IT work.

Sensory Effort measures the effort required by the work to use one or more of the senses (for example, sight, hearing, et cetera). All factors that contribute to fatigue or strain associated with sustained use of the senses in the performance of the work should be considered.

Physical Effort measures the effort required to perform the work. All factors that contribute to physical fatigue in the performance of the work are considered. It does not consider the physical fitness of the individual, only the relative levels of physical effort required by the work.

Both components must be rated separately.

Degree Degree Descriptor Points and BM
Sensory Effort
1

Regular periods of sensory effort such as listening, reading, reviewing data or documentation with opportunity to shift activity.

1
BM 4
BM 5
BM 6
BM 7
BM 8
2

Prolonged periods of sensory effort such as listening, reading, or reviewing data or documentation with limited opportunity to shift activity.

5
BM 1
BM 2
BM 3
Physical Effort
1

Prolonged periods of sitting, keyboarding, or performing other repetitive fine-motor movements. Occasional carrying or moving light-weight work materials.

1
BM 2
BM 3
BM 4
BM 5
BM 6
BM 7
BM 8
2

Regular requirement to lift and move heavy electronic equipment or other materials or the regular requirement to bend, climb, crouch, or crawl to reach computer equipment in awkward places.

5
BM 1

Element 7: Work environment

General guidelines

This element measures the psychological and physical surroundings or conditions within which the work must be performed and the extent to which they make the job unpleasant. The psychological surroundings include the exposure to aspects of work that result in psychological discomfort, whereas the physical surroundings include the exposure to aspects of work that result in physical discomfort. Both components are to be rated separately.

When rating, assume that working conditions comply with current legislation and standards. Do not consider any inefficiencies relating to local heating, cooling or ventilation systems or other such matters that are regulated through workplace health and safety policies. Measure only those conditions that are an integral part of the work. In addition, do not consider any working conditions that are remunerated separately, such as those under the prevailing collective agreement, the terms and conditions of employment, or National Joint Council directives (for example, overtime, travel, foreign service, motor vehicle operation, et cetera).

Note that there are no frequency or duration scales in this element. When evaluating the psychological and physical work environments, select the highest normal level that applies to the work, excluding rare, or chance occurrences that are not an integral part of the work.

Specific guidelines

Keep in mind that this element is designed to capture the conditions under which the work is normally performed as opposed to the effort required to deal with the conditions. The lists of examples provided under this element are intended to represent the type of environment that may be encountered when performing the job.

For the most part, as high-level professional knowledge work, IT work is generally performed in a typical office environment with relatively few challenging physical or psychological working conditions beyond the norm.

Psychological and physical work environment rating scales

This element measures the psychological and physical surroundings or conditions within which IT work must be delivered and the extent to which these conditions make the job unpleasant. Below are illustrative examples of the disagreeable psychological and physical conditions that may be found in the IT work environment.

Degree Degree Descriptor Points and BM
Psychological Work Environment
1 Possible exposure to disgruntled clients; occasional tight deadlines. 1
BM 1
BM 2
BM 3
BM 6
2 Complaints and criticism from clients; frequent uncontrolled mandated time pressures; pressure from clients or stakeholders; conflicting or changing priorities. 5
BM 4
BM 5
BM 7
BM 8
Physical Work Environment
1 Physical work environment is generally a controlled office environment; open office environment may present visual and auditory distractions and interruptions. 1
BM 2
BM 3
BM 5
BM 6
BM 7
BM 8
2 Frequent exposure to unpleasant temperatures, dust, dirt, confined spaces, or other uncomfortable work settings in the delivery of the work. 5
BM 1
BM 4

Benchmarks

Benchmarks by point total and level

BM # Benchmark Title Point Total Group and Level
1

Infrastructure Support Technician

124

IT-01

2

Programmer

116

IT-01

3

Programmer Analyst

230

IT-02

4

Team Lead, Infrastructure Operations

514

IT-03

5

IT Security Technical Specialist

410

IT-03

6

Senior Advisor, Enterprise Architecture

716

IT-04

7

Manager, Application Development

843

IT-04

8

Director, Infrastructure Operations

953

IT-05

Benchmarks by element and degree

Element Degree 1 Degree 2 Degree 3 Degree 4 Degree 5
Critical Thinking & Analysis

30 points

1. Infrastructure Support Technician
2. Programmer

70 points

3. Programmer Analyst

145 points

4. Team Lead, Infrastructure Operations
5. IT Security Technical Specialist

245 points

6. Senior Advisor, Enterprise Architecture
7. Manager, Application Development

300 points

8. Director, Infrastructure Operations

Leadership & Planning

14 points

1. Infrastructure Support Technician
2. Programmer

30 points

3. Programmer Analyst
5. IT Security Technical Specialist
6. Senior Advisor, Enterprise Architecture

60 points

4. Team Lead, Infrastructure Operations

110 points

7. Manager, Application Development

140 points

8. Director, Infrastructure Operations

Technical Knowledge

40 points

1. Infrastructure Support Technician
2. Programmer

80 points

3. Programmer Analyst

165 points

4. Team Lead, Infrastructure Operations
5. IT Security Technical Specialist

265 points

7. Manager, Application Development
8. Director, Infrastructure Operations

300 points

6. Senior Advisor, Enterprise Architecture

Management Knowledge

12 points

1. Infrastructure Support Technician
2. Programmer
3. Programmer Analyst
5. IT Security Technical Specialist

42 points

4. Team Lead, Infrastructure Operations
6. Senior Advisor, Enterprise Architecture

82 points

7. Manager, Application Development

120 points

8. Director, Infrastructure Operations

n/a

Communication & Interaction

12 points

1. Infrastructure Support Technician
2. Programmer

30 points

3. Programmer Analyst

50 points

4. Team Lead, Infrastructure Operations
5. IT Security Technical Specialist

95 points

6. Senior Advisor, Enterprise Architecture
7. Manager, Application Development

120 points

8. Director, Infrastructure Operations

Sensory Effort

1 point

4. Team Lead, Infrastructure Operations
5. IT Security Technical Specialist
6. Senior Advisor, Enterprise Architecture
7. Manager, Application Development
8. Director, Infrastructure Operations

5 points

1. Infrastructure Support Technician
2. Programmer
3. Programmer Analyst

n/a

n/a

n/a

Physical Effort

1 point

2. Programmer
3. Programmer Analyst
4. Team Lead, Infrastructure Operations
5. IT Security Technical Specialist
6. Senior Advisor, Enterprise Architecture
7. Manager, Application Development
8. Director, Infrastructure Operations

5 points

1. Infrastructure Support Technician

n/a

n/a

n/a

Psychological Work Environment

1 point

1. Infrastructure Support Technician
2. Programmer
3. Programmer Analyst
6. Senior Advisor, Enterprise Architecture

5 points

4. Team Lead, Infrastructure Operations
5. IT Security Technical Specialist
7. Manager, Application Development
8. Director, Infrastructure Operations

n/a

n/a

n/a

Physical Work Environment

1 point

2. Programmer
3. Programmer Analyst
5. IT Security Technical Specialist
6. Senior Advisor, Enterprise Architecture
7. Manager, Application Development
8. Director, Infrastructure Operations

5 points

1. Infrastructure Support Technician
4. Team Lead, Infrastructure Operations

n/a

n/a

n/a

Benchmark 1: Infrastructure Support Technician

Total points: 124

Level IT-01

Organization context and summary

This is an entry-level infrastructure and operations support position under the supervision of a Team Leader.

Client service results

Provision of technical support in the implementation, integration, and maintenance of components of IT infrastructure and operations. Technical support and provision of client service to technology users within an assigned portfolio.

Key activities

  • Provides technical support by assessing and resolving service requests, such as those with workstation hardware/software, mail or internet work routing, LAN/MAN/WAN services, and cabling and peripheral equipment problems; escalates or follows up on outstanding client issues as required.
  • Installs, configures, monitors, and tests components in the computing environment.
  • Produces basic system documentation, reports, and correspondence on computer problem identification, resolution, and monitoring activities.
  • Performs routine monitoring activities of systems and equipment performance.
  • Supports backup and recovery processes and procedures.
  • Participates as a member on projects as required.

Critical thinking and analysis

Degree: 1

Points: 30

Under guidance, troubleshoots problems (typically reported by clients or revealed by monitoring tools) to resolve common network, hardware and software issues and configures, installs and tests hardware and software in a computing environment to ensure that they work properly and meet user requirements.

Troubleshoots typical problems and implements technical solutions by applying established diagnostic processes. Guidance is available from user guides, technical manuals, departmental solution logs, and more senior IT staff.

Atypical or complex issues are referred to more senior IT staff.

Leadership and planning

Degree: 1

Points: 14

Completes assigned work and prioritizes service calls and ad hoc requests.

Participates in work teams, project teams or committees. There may be a requirement to demonstrate procedures, processes, standards, and tools to new team members.

Technical knowledge

Degree: 1

Points: 40

Knowledge of the theories, principles, and practices of technology infrastructure, systems configuration and administration, operating systems, network systems and diagnostic techniques is required to provide effective support of the department’s IT infrastructure.

Knowledge of the standards and methodologies (including performance standards, capabilities, and limitations) of hardware, software and various operating systems used in large-scale mainframe and distributed computing environments is required in order to support the configuration, installation, security, performance and functionality of the computing environment and for the identification, diagnosis, and resolution of straightforward hardware, software and network related problems.

Knowledge of backup and recovery processes is required to protect data from loss.

Management knowledge

Degree: 1

Points: 12

The position does not have formal supervisory requirements.

Communication and interaction

Degree: 1

Points: 12

Communication skills are required to ask questions and obtain information from users, such as the description of their problem, to diagnose likely causes and provide information on the resolution steps.

Logs problems and solutions into a tracking system and produces incident reports and other routine documentation as required.

Sensory effort

Degree: 2

Points: 5

There is a requirement for sensory effort (for example, visual acuity and manual dexterity) to install components, cables, connectors, and related equipment. Hearing, sight, and smell are important when detecting and repairing hardware problems.

Physical effort

Degree: 2

Points: 5

There is a regular requirement for physical effort when loading, lifting, or rearranging computer equipment. There is a regular requirement to crouch, crawl, or bend to reach computer equipment in awkward places.

Psychological work environment

Degree: 1

Points: 1

Possible exposure to frustrated clients and occasional exposure to tight deadlines and time pressures.

Physical work environment

Degree: 2

Points: 5

The work is typically performed in an open office environment with ambient noise and distraction. There is a regular requirement to work in server rooms, which may involve exposure to cramped quarters, cool temperatures, and noise.

Benchmark 2: Programmer

Total points: 116

Level IT-01

Organization context and summary

This is an entry-level applications development position under the supervision of the Team Leader.

Client service results

As part of a team, designs, develops, tests, integrates and/or maintains components of IT applications.

Key activities

  • Under direction, analyzes, defines, and documents client requirements. Designs, develops, implements, integrates, and maintains software applications as directed.
  • Under direction, produces programming specifications, writes new or modifies existing code, writes, and updates user guides, operational instructions and documentation on application systems, software, tools, functions or supporting systems development and implementation activities.
  • Supports testing and quality assurance activities by running utility applications and troubleshooting portions of developed applications.
  • Assists front-line technical support personnel in providing application support services for new or updated software.
  • Plans and prioritizes assigned work to meet milestones and team objectives.
  • Participates as a member on projects as required.

Critical thinking and analysis

Degree: 1

Points: 30

Under guidance, evaluates client requirements or issues and: develops specifications for programming requirements to meet client needs.

Develops and/or modifies, tests and debugs software applications. Troubleshoots own work by identifying logic and coding problems, writes testing applications and conducts quality assurance activities such as running utility applications.

Researches, identifies, and implements technical solutions to straightforward problems in existing components of software applications.

Analysis is guided by technical manuals and documentation, user guides, departmental solution logs, and more senior analysts.

Atypical or complex problems are referred to more senior IT analysts.

Leadership and planning

Degree: 1

Points: 14

Prioritizes and plans own work activities to meet defined deadlines and objectives.

Participates in work teams, project teams or committees.

Technical knowledge

Degree: 1

Points: 40

Knowledge of theories and principles of computer science as they relate to application development, including operating systems, systems architecture, and applications, is required to perform software application and program analysis, design, and development.

Knowledge of the methods and practices of system operating procedures covering a range of systems and architectural platforms, software application development, one or more programming languages, and testing and debugging tools is required to develop assigned portions of applications.

Awareness of the position’s operating context is required to develop products that support team objectives and deliverables.

Management knowledge

Degree: 1

Points: 12

The position does not have formal supervisory requirements.

Communication and interaction

Degree: 1

Points: 12

Communication skills are required to obtain or provide information on assigned work to clarify expectations or obtain assistance to resolve technical issues.

Produces logic diagrams, program code and related documentation, user guides, and help files.

Maintains logs of changes and error reports including details such as status, priority, and circumstances.

Sensory effort

Degree: 1

Points: 5

Regular requirement to sit at a desk for long periods of time focusing on a computer monitor to input and compile code and/or data and debug applications.

Regular requirement to proofread program code (may be thousands of lines of code) and study data and process models. Prolonged sustained attention is involved in detecting minute errors in lengthy programming code.

Physical effort

Degree: 1

Points: 1

Position regularly requires sitting for prolonged periods using a keyboard and pointing device.

Psychological work environment

Degree: 1

Points: 1

The work is occasionally performed under conditions of multiple urgent and unpredictable demands, deadlines, and short time frames. The duration varies according to the demand or deadline.

Physical work environment

Degree: 1

Points: 1

The work is performed in an open office environment characterized by frequent interruptions and distractions.

Benchmark 3: Programmer Analyst

Total points: 230

Level IT-02

Organization context and summary

This is an autonomous working level applications development position under the supervision of the Team Leader.

Client service results

Designs and develops systems and applications and/or customizes off-the-shelf software applications for clients including development, testing, and maintenance in the operational environment.

Key activities

  • Designs, develops, tests, implements, and maintains applications on various technology platforms in an assigned area.
  • Works with clients to define and document user requirements. Conducts impact analyses to identify scope and impact of changes to software and make resulting modifications to specifications and coding.
  • Produces programming specifications, writes new or modifies code and produces technical documentation such as specifications, user guides and impact analyses.
  • Selects, installs, configures, tests, and modifies development tools.
  • Provides technical advice and assistance to junior programmers and technical assistance to users for supported applications.
  • Participates in project teams.

Critical thinking and analysis

Degree: 2

Points: 70

Provides programming and analysis for the design, development, implementation, and enhancement of a variety of departmental software applications within assigned portfolio.

Researches, analyzes, and interprets client requirements, in conjunction with identifying the constraints and opportunities presented by the existing technology environment. Formulates programming specifications and models potential solutions, while considering a variety of programming technical requirements and system constraints, for applications that meet user requirements. Modifies existing software, including researching, and analyzing the design intent and construction techniques to analyzes the impacts of any required changes. Tests applications by designing program test cases that isolate subcomponents, test the functionality, and reveal any problems. Analyzes test results and develops solutions to identified problems.

Unusual or complex problems are referred to the team leader or subject matter expert.

Leadership and planning

Degree: 2

Points: 30

Prepares work plans for assigned work or portions of projects to define tasks and level of effort. Tracks progress of own work against plans and takes corrective action as necessary. Reports on progress.

Coordinate work with colleagues for group deliverables. May lead short-term project teams on occasion, which involves overseeing the activities of programmers and trainees, providing them with technical guidance, providing input to reviews of technical performance and reporting on assigned activities.

Technical knowledge

Degree: 2

Points: 80

Knowledge is required of theories and principles of computer science as they relate to application development, the software development life cycle, operating systems, systems architecture, and applications to conduct software application and program analysis, design and development. Requires technical knowledge in related areas to augment subject-specific knowledge of the position including software engineering principles, business process and data modelling, database management systems, telecommunications principles, networks, and systems integration.

Knowledge of the methods and practices of software application development, one or more programming languages, and testing and debugging tools is required to develop assigned portions of applications for client users. Knowledge of practical and technical concepts of the technology platform and architecture within which the assigned work will be integrated is required to develop compatible applications.

Requires contextual knowledge of the technology environment and associated systems that support clients’ operations and programs, as well as of the specific technology platform and architecture within which the assigned work will be integrated, in order to develop compatible applications and solutions that support the clients’ business needs.

Management knowledge

Degree: 2

Points: 12

The position does not have formal supervisory requirements. The work requires awareness of how duties are formally assigned to the subject position and the deliverables are evaluated.

Communication and interaction

Degree: 2

Points: 30

Explores and clarifies client requirements. Because clients may not always clearly define their needs or fully appreciate the limitations and capabilities of computer systems and applications, questions must be posed to elicit all necessary information. Collaborates with colleagues and subject matter resources on technical issues.

Produces programming specifications, user guides, programming documentation, and technical reports.

Sensory effort

Degree: 2

Points: 5

Requirement to sit at a desk for prolonged periods of time focusing on a computer monitor to input and compile code and/or data and debug applications.

Requirement to proofread program code (may be thousands of lines of code) and study data and process models. Significant and prolonged attention is involved in detecting minute errors in large, complex programs.

Physical effort

Degree: 1

Points: 1

Position regularly requires sitting for prolonged periods using a keyboard and pointing device.

Psychological work environment

Degree: 1

Points: 1

The work is occasionally performed under conditions of multiple urgent and unpredictable demands, deadlines, and short time frames. The duration varies according to the demand or deadline.

Physical work environment

Degree: 1

Points: 1

The work is performed in an open office environment characterized by frequent interruptions and distractions.

Benchmark 4: Team Lead, Infrastructure Operations

Total points: 474

Level IT-03

Organization context and summary

This is a team lead position with supervisory responsibilities, with a team of six technicians and reporting to an IT-04 manager.

Client service results

Leads a team responsible for the provision of technical support and advice to clients on all aspects of infrastructure operations including hardware, software and network products and services for an assigned portfolio of clients.

Key activities

  • Assigns work and supervises the team and contract resources in the analysis, development, implementation, integration, or maintenance issues of the IT infrastructure for an assigned client portfolio. Implements corporate infrastructure initiatives.
  • Analyzes technical complexities and trends and resolves technical issues within the assigned portfolio.
  • Provides technical advice, guidance and support to managers, colleagues and clients, and acts as the senior technical resource for the team.
  • Develops project implementation plans, statements of work, requests for proposals and other IT-related documents and reports. Oversees the development of operational reports and documentation of subordinates.
  • Represents the team in meetings with managers, clients, or technical staff to obtain agreement on requirements for services or the resolution of technical issues.

Critical thinking and analysis

Degree: 3

Points: 145

Provides technical analysis and advice to resolve various operations issues in hardware, software and networks including those affecting capacity, connectivity, and performance. Analyzes, develops, and implements methods to improve efficiencies of existing systems and operations. Identifies trends in reported issues to develop and recommend proactive solutions that address underlying problems. Researches, analyzes, and anticipates issues resulting from changes in client requirements or shifts in departmental corporate IT to determine impacts on the operability of the current infrastructure and operations.

Technical problems are such that initial triggers and subsequent operational symptoms are not readily apparent, and analysis requires investigating various interrelated components to isolate the root problem or problems. Complexity of problems is characterized by urgency or criticality, the high degree of interoperability among a large number of hardware, software and network systems components; and/or impact on multiple client bases requiring coordination with other IT teams.

Complexity of problems arises from multiple client requirements, the scope of various initiatives, the availability of resources both human and financial, delivery deadlines, the need to coordinate schedules with other projects and organizations, competing objectives, shifting priorities, changing budgets, and different client contexts.

The position requires working within established departmental and governmental policies, standards and guidelines.

Leadership and planning

Degree: 3

Points: 60

Plans and supervises the activities of the unit, which includes technical support staff and any contracted or temporary resources. Organizes the assigned regular operational work and juggles urgencies and priority assignments. Responsibilities include developing and approving work plans; assigning and reviewing work; monitoring progress; evaluating performance; providing orientation, training, technical advice, and guidance; identifying and approving training needs.

Responsible for estimating costs and resource requirements and for verifying that contracted services meet requirements. Provides input into the manager’s human resources and business plans.

Technical knowledge

Degree: 3

Points: 165

Knowledge of the theories, practices and principles of computer science including infrastructure and operations, network architecture and systems design, analysis, implementation, configuration and operation and the knowledge of the techniques and practices for their installation, configuration, integration, troubleshooting and maintenance. This knowledge is required to design, install, integrate, monitor, analyze, configure, test and maintain hardware, software and network infrastructure operations for the assigned areas within the departmental infrastructure.

Knowledge of the mandate, role, organizational structure, programs, services, and initiatives of the department; the IT architectural framework and IT systems in place; short- and long-range goals and priorities for IT products and services; and departmental IT policies, standards and standard operating procedures is required to ensure consistent, effective and efficient client service across the department and to identify opportunities for improving overall service.

Knowledge is required of the roles, responsibilities, business lines, IT applications, and technology platforms in other departments and/or agencies with which the department interacts to understand their infrastructure requirements and capabilities to successfully achieve integrated service delivery.

Knowledge of applicable legislation, standards, central and internal policies, and directives related to infrastructure and operations is required to work within legislative requirements and implement best practices, technologies, and tools in the team.

Management knowledge

Degree: 2

Points: 42

Knowledge of principles related to human resources management is required to supervise the work of subordinate staff and monitor the work of contractors; evaluate performance; adhere to human resources governance (such as legislation, policy and practices related to staffing, official languages, employment equity, harassment prevention, et cetera); and provide career development advice and guidance.

Knowledge of departmental administrative policies and practices related to project management, planning, contracting, and procurement to apply policies and practices in planning and management of IT services, and in planning and managing staff and resources to meet team delivery objectives.

Knowledge of the mission, mandate, organizational structure, programs, and business priorities of the IT organization is required to understand the context within which the work unit operates to ensure a coordinated approach to service delivery. In addition, a good knowledge of the client portfolio, including knowledge of the business activities, operations, and management structure, is required to understand clients’ service requirements, evaluate proposals and recommend commitments for service agreements.

Communication and interaction

Degree: 3

Points: 50

Provides advice, guidance, technical solutions, and recommendations on computer software, hardware and network usage, capabilities, limitations, and configuration to clients, staff, colleagues, and management. Chairs technical meetings with clients to discuss project plans, to represent and advocate unit or departmental positions on IT development, to discuss products and services implementation and/or facilitate resolution of issues.

Writes a variety of technical documents on infrastructure and operations systems and their components, reporting on their capacity, performance, and feasibility. Writes a variety of business documentation such as expenditure analyses, feasibility studies and risk assessments, project reports, and employee evaluations.

In addition, advanced communication skills are required to manage employee performance and provide feedback to subordinates.

Sensory effort

Degree: 1

Points: 1

Requirement to focus on a computer monitor to read, write, and review technical and business documentation, with regular opportunity to shift activity.

Physical effort

Degree: 1

Points: 1

The position requires sitting for prolonged periods to work at a computer using a keyboard and pointing device. There is regular opportunity to shift activity.

Psychological work environment

Degree: 2

Points: 5

There is a requirement to accommodate changing priorities, tight deadlines and competing demands resulting in time pressures. Supervising subordinates can occasionally involve exposure to interpersonal conflicts and frustrated or dissatisfied employees.

Physical work environment

Degree: 2

Points: 5

The work is performed in an open office environment with ambient noise and distraction. There is an occasional requirement to work in server rooms with resulting exposure to noise and cool temperatures. There may be an occasional requirement to work in cramped quarters with exposure to dust and dirt.

Benchmark 5: IT Security Technical Specialist

Total points: 410

Level IT-03

Organization context and summary

This position is a technical advisor reporting to an EX-01 director within the Chief Information Officer Branch. This is the only specialized security position in this small department. This position does not have supervisory responsibilities.

Client service results

Specialized advice and recommendations on technical issues related to the planning, development, implementation, integration, delivery and maintenance of the department’s IT security hardware and software environment in accordance with the Government of Canada security policies.

Key activities

  • Provides specialized technical advice and guidance to the Director, team leads and colleagues, on IT security matters. Facilitates the implementation and support of IT security infrastructure for the department within the established government frameworks
  • Works with the applications development team to ensure that IT security requirements are integrated throughout development projects to ensure the overall security compliance and integrity of corporate and client software applications.
  • Conducts the Security Assessment and Authorization (SAA) of computer systems required for operational security compliance for all department-critical systems, applications, services, and programs. Conducting SAAs includes compiling, analyzing, and assessing IT security evidence (such as Statements of Sensitivity or Threat and Risk Assessments) against security controls, recommending risk mitigation approaches and appropriate residual risk acceptance criteria, and coordinating operational authorization by management.
  • Monitors IT security alerts and threats, to identify and recommend potential actions to protect the agency's hardware, software, network, and information assets. Conducts investigations of IT security incidents and violations and implements corrective action. Prepares communiqués for department staff to inform them of potential threats and instructions on action required.
  • Provides subject matter expertise in the development of policies and procedures in areas of assessment and mitigation of IT risk, IT business continuity and disaster recovery planning for the approval and use of senior management. Liaises with security leads in central agencies and service provider departments for responses to cyber threats and consistent implementation of security policy and directives within the home department.
  • Occasionally leads project teams and working groups in the conduct of feasibility studies to facilitate the development, maintenance, and renewal of complex security infrastructure components.

Critical thinking and analysis

Degree: 3

Points: 145

Audits and assesses numerous infrastructure components, systems, and applications across multiple client groups throughout the systems development life cycle to ensure compliant systems and products, identify vulnerabilities, mitigate risks, and recommend corrective action.

Assesses cyber security incidents to determine the impact, severity, and probable causes and reacts swiftly and appropriately to ensure the confidentiality, integrity and availability of IT assets and information. Partners with cyber security specialists in central agencies and departments providing centralized IT services to deliver integrated responses to cyber security incidents. Conducts post-incident analyses to update and strengthen incident responses and safeguard department IT assets and information.

Provides specialist subject matter advice to business owners to ensure that requirements for IT security are integrated into department policy, directives, standards, processes, procedures, and guidelines. Ensures departmental readiness for cyber threats by reviewing and providing input to business continuity and disaster recovery plans.

Works within the established department and Government of Canada frameworks, directives, and policies.

Leadership and planning

Degree: 2

Points: 30

Participates as a subject matter resource in IT security to ensure compliance with security policies and standards. Works with clients to integrate security assessment processes into their project plans and build required security processes and safeguards into their products and services.

Works autonomously and delivers on the assigned security workload. Occasionally leads work groups by setting goals, priorities and following up on deliverables.

Technical knowledge

Degree: 3

Points: 165

Requires knowledge of the theories, principles and practices of computer science related to IT security including applicable security and privacy legislation, IT security standards, policies, programs and operations, and security risk management in order to identify IT vulnerabilities and threats, evaluate and reduce risks, contribute to the development of IT business resumption plans, respond to security incidents, and provide safeguards for department's IT systems, platforms, architectures and infrastructure.

Requires knowledge of infrastructure design, as well as systems and applications development processes and the integration of IT security requirements in order to identify security vulnerabilities and threats, assess risk and recommend risk mitigation approaches, and contribute to ensuring that IT security compliance is integrated into all aspects of the organization’s IT systems, platforms, architectures and infrastructure.

Knowledge of the department, its business objectives and activities as well as its hardware, software and network architecture, standards, configurations, applications and tools is required in order to provide specialized advice and recommendations to senior management and colleagues, on all matters related to IT security and to serve as a technical authority for the resolution of IT security-related problems.

Management knowledge

Degree: 1

Points: 12

Knowledge of the techniques and practices of project management is required to lead short-term projects within the work unit, to develop project plans and timelines, to identify required resources, and to track and report on project progress.

Knowledge of the department’s management and IT governance structures is required to coordinate monitoring and compliance activities in IT security compliance.

Requires awareness of how the position’s work is formally assigned and evaluated.

Communication and interaction

Degree: 3

Points: 50

Represents the IT security organization in discussions with managers and technical staff on the resolution of security issues and to improve adherence to government security standards. Liaises with cyber security specialists in central agencies and departments providing centralized IT services on cyber security incidents. Briefs internal management and advises clients on security policy, procedures, and areas of vulnerability, mitigation strategies, and compliance requirements. Provides specialized advice to response teams during security threats.

Develops security vulnerability, breach and issues reports that include comprehensive analyses and recommendations. Prepares communiqués for department staff to inform them of potential threats and instruct them on action required.

Sensory effort

Degree: 1

Points: 1

Requirement to focus on a computer monitor to read, write, and review technical and business documentation, with regular opportunity to shift activity. Requirement to review security logs attentively to identify anomalies when conducting security incident investigations.

Physical effort

Degree: 1

Points: 1

The position requires sitting for prolonged periods to work at a computer using a keyboard and pointing device.

Psychological work environment

Degree: 2

Points: 5

Possible exposure to disgruntled clients when investigating security incidents; short timelines when responding to security threats.

Physical work environment

Degree: 1

Points: 1

The work is performed in an open office environment characterized by frequent interruptions and distractions.

Benchmark 6: Senior Advisor, Enterprise Architecture

Total points: 716

Level IT-04

Organization context and summary

The responsibilities of this position are those of the departmental subject matter expert on the IT architecture for a medium-sized department which also provides IT services to two smaller departments. Reporting to the Director General, Enterprise Solutions Branch, this position does not have supervisory responsibilities. There are two other IT-04 subject matter experts in the department within other disciplines and reporting to different executives. Note the two smaller departments are included in departmental clients within this benchmark.

Client service results

Provides expert technical advice to clients, colleagues, and senior management on the department’s IT architecture. Develops IT architectural frameworks, standards, policies, plans, and designs for the department.

Key activities

  • Acts as the technical authority for the department’s IT architecture needs. Consults and negotiates with senior business-line and IT managers in the department and with senior IT architecture officials in other federal departments and external organizations to develop architectural strategies and plans that will enable long-term, enterprise-focused infrastructure and systems.
  • Works with internal clients and external partners to align technical infrastructure with architectural designs and objectives.
  • Provides architectural advice, direction and assistance to a broad range of clients (including IT senior management, data architects, database administrators, systems analysts and other architects) on technical changes to departmental infrastructure including, but not limited to, mainframe and mid-range computers operations, application integration and connectivity.
  • Provides expert advice and strategies on technical changes to IT architectural frameworks, standards, plans and designs; the introduction of new technologies to replace legacy technologies; and the impact of IT policies, standards, and guidelines with respect to departmental architecture.
  • Participates in departmental, interdepartmental, national, or international technology standards, policies and architecture working groups or committees.

Critical thinking and analysis

Degree: 4

Points: 245

Researches, plans, and designs IT architecture and architectural frameworks, strategies, and policies for the IT architecture program. Architectural issues span multiple broad technology and business areas (many of which are outside the control of the subject position) and solutions must be strategic and long-lasting as they affect significant IT investment and long-term operations. Recommends strategies that consider departmental priorities and strategic objectives, clients’ business needs, technology innovations, cost, risk and value and the established overarching IT policies and frameworks.

Researches and synthesizes complex technical data with contextual information (for example, the existing technology environment, available options, client priorities, enterprise direction). Analyzes any planned new or modified components of the technical infrastructure and ensures they will align with approved architectural designs.

Assesses risks, benefits, and impacts to operations and service delivery.

Leadership and planning

Degree: 2

Points: 30

Participates as a subject matter resource in IT architecture to provide expert advice and recommendations and ensure alignment between new infrastructure and architectural designs.

Works autonomously and delivers on the assigned workload. Occasionally leads work groups by setting goals, priorities and timelines and following up on deliverables.

Technical knowledge

Degree: 5

Points: 300

Expert knowledge of the theories, principles, practices and methods of computer science, IT architecture, application development, IT systems and infrastructure, and complex technology platforms and architectures is required to research, analyze, design, and integrate multiple, complex technical systems into a robust and enduring IT architectural solution.

In-depth knowledge is required in the following related areas to augment the primary knowledge areas: data management and the development and implementation of IT systems and services. These knowledge areas are required to provide well-rounded expert technical advice, conduct research and analysis, and consult meaningfully with clients and business owners in multiple technical disciplines.

Expert knowledge in the core area augmented by in-depth knowledge of multiple and interrelated technical disciplines is required to act as the department’s subject matter expert and technical authority in enterprise architecture to design and effect IT architecture for the department.

Management knowledge

Degree: 2

Points: 42

Knowledge of the principles, methods and techniques of functional and project management is required in order to develop options that consider resourcing constraints (people and financial), integrate deliverables into appropriate project development and implementation cycles, and coordinate with multiple stakeholders and technology partners.

Knowledge of the management structures and governance mechanisms of both the clients’ businesses and the internal IT business is required to identify and influence the appropriate stakeholders and position recommendations within appropriate decision-making channels. Knowledge of the relevant management-related legislation, policies, and directives is required to conduct contracting and procurement activities within the established frameworks.

Communication and interaction

Degree: 4

Points: 95

Represents the IT organization as the department’s technical authority on the full range of infrastructure architecture standards, policies, and procedures to provide expert technical advice and recommendations and influence decision makers on technical investments and policy direction.

Persuades, advises, influences, and negotiates with a wide variety of internal and external stakeholders and business owners on architecture issues, standards and strategic directions to meet departmental business requirements. Engages and persuades multiple business owners and stakeholders to commit to architectural designs and plans.

Produces highly technical contract specifications, architectural designs, technical documentation, and reports. Prepares business cases to support the development, implementation, and maintenance of IT architectures. Develops cost estimates and recommendations (including cost benefit, technical and risk analyses) for equipment, software, contracts, or professional services.

Sensory effort

Degree: 1

Points: 1

Requirement to focus on a computer monitor for prolonged periods to read, write, and review technical and business documentation, with regular opportunity to shift activity.

Physical effort

Degree: 1

Points: 1

Regularly requires sitting for prolonged periods using a keyboard and pointing device.

Psychological work environment

Degree: 1

Points: 1

Requires maintaining a professional demeanour while dealing with heavy workloads, tight deadlines and multiple (and sometimes conflicting) demands from clients, changing priorities and time pressures.

Physical work environment

Degree: 1

Points: 1

The work is performed in an open office environment characterized by frequent interruptions and distractions.

Benchmark 7: Manager, Application Development

Total points: 805

Level IT-04

Organization context and summary

Manages the Application Development Unit, reporting to the Director, Application Services (IT-05) in a medium-sized department. The Application Development Unit includes a number of multi-disciplinary teams, and some stand-alone technical advisors (IT-03). The unit is frequently augmented with contract resources and technical staff temporarily assigned from other units.

Client service results

Management and expert technical advisory services for the strategic direction and delivery of IT application development to meet the business needs of departmental and external clients.

Key activities

  • Manages the activities and financial and human resources of the Applications Development Unit through subordinate team leaders and technical advisors engaged in the delivery of IT application development and maintenance services.
  • Manages the provision of expert technical advice to clients on software applications focusing on making clients’ business delivery more effective and efficient. Negotiates software development service delivery agreements with clients.
  • Manages the review and evaluation of technology proposals, subordinates’ reports and recommendations, and contract deliverables against acceptance criteria.
  • Translates higher-level guidance and direction into business objectives and deliverables. Develops and implements IT standards and plans.
  • Develops and integrates applications for multiple clients’ businesses. Consults and negotiates with clients for requirements, deliverables, and timelines; negotiates with other IT managers to coordinate deliverables and technical resources.

Critical thinking and analysis

Degree: 4

Points: 245

Manages multiple teams and subject-matter resources responsible for delivering application development services to a variety of clients. Manages the work of supporting a range of applications and the development of new applications or customization of existing applications for clients. Determines requirements for various different and concurrent projects and commitments. Defines scope and resource requirements (including human resource and budget responsibilities). Conducts risk assessments. Identifies options and recommends applications solutions that will meet clients’ needs while respecting technical standards, policy objectives and IT business direction.

Issues are highly complex due to such factors as: providing services that meet multiple technical and business requirements, dealing with varying availability of resources, consulting and negotiating with clients, coordinating timelines, deliverables, resources and expertise with other technical teams or units, delivering on commitments to clients, involving stakeholders with corollary interests, working within changing budgets, and responding to competing priorities.

Recommendations and decisions affect the planning, development and delivery of the department’s application architecture program; the expenditure of funds on contracts and capital investments; the utilization of human resources within the Application Development Unit; and the attainment of the unit’s and directorate’s service-delivery objectives.

There is latitude to develop and apply processes that improve efficiency and effectiveness. Work is guided by IT frameworks, policies, and directives.

Leadership and planning

Degree: 4

Points: 110

Manages the work performed by subordinate teams, subject matter experts and contract resources in delivering the work of the Application Development Unit.

Assigns specialists to work groups and projects based on expertise, constraints, and availability. Sets plans, priorities, target dates, milestones, and deliverables and work schedules to ensure effective delivery. Provides technical guidance, direction, and review of deliverables for work teams and projects and assigned personnel, including evaluating performance and recommending training. Analyzes service-delivery commitments, funding levels, and client priorities to develop operational, financial, and business plans for the unit. Provides input to and implements assigned components of higher-level business plans. Recommends human resource requirements and strategy to deliver the work of the unit (for example, a blend of indeterminate, contract and temporarily assigned resources). Allocates human resources to delivery areas to match skill sets with work objectives.

Commits to and manages service level agreements with client organizations and contracts with suppliers of technical goods and services. Initiates contract process for services and approves payments on the fulfillment of contracted technical specifications. Budgets and manages financial resources and commits expenditures within established guidelines and procedures.

Technical knowledge

Degree: 4

Points: 265

Knowledge is required of the theories and principles of computer science; application development, the systems development life cycle; systems integration; departmental hardware, software and network infrastructure systems; and IT standards in order to plan, manage, and review the work of the unit’s multidisciplinary teams and technical advisors throughout the full spectrum of the systems development life cycle, provide services to clients, and make technical recommendations to the Director, and integrate the unit’s deliverables into broader systems.

Knowledge of the methods and practices of software application development and practical and technical aspects of the multiple technical areas within the Application Development Unit are required in order to define client requirements, manage and review the work and deliverables of multiple subordinate teams with different and distinct application development responsibilities and provide expertise and guidance to team members within their disciplines of expertise.

Knowledge of the relevant IT standards and the legislation, regulations and policies that govern how IT applications are developed and implemented in the public service is required to manage the development of compliant products and services for client groups.

Knowledge of trends and developments in application development and implementation and in computer systems analysis techniques and practices is required to assess current and anticipate future applicability of products and services, review and assess vendor proposals, and to manage the planning, development of departmental applications in alignment with client business requirements and departmental IT strategy.

Knowledge is required of the department’s IT applications environment across all business areas, including the business programs and processes that are supported, the client business owners, the user community, and how the applications must connect and be integrated (for example, technical contextual knowledge is required of the partner technology areas in order to incorporate their inputs at key points in the development cycle). Knowledge is required of the clients’ suite of applications and services, within the department’s IT applications environment across all business areas, in order to develop and negotiate appropriate product and service commitments, identify and mitigate areas of vulnerability and risk as well as plan future products and services.

Management knowledge

Degree: 3

Points: 82

Knowledge of leadership and management theories, principles, and practices is required to manage multiple teams, provide guidance to other employees and consultants, and lead committees and teams. Knowledge is required of the theories, principles and practices of business analysis and planning, financial management, human resources management, administrative management, contract management, risk management and client consultation in order to plan resource requirements, deliverables, and operations and to manage the Application Development Unit.

Knowledge of the methods and techniques related to project management is required to conduct related cost-benefit analyses, manage financial, materiel and human resources, develop plans and progress reports, and plan, allocate, monitor and approve the work performed by multiple subordinate teams. In-depth project management knowledge is required to integrate the timelines, dependencies, and deliverables of multiple teams working on different applications in different stages of delivery.

Knowledge of departmental and central agency administrative policies and practices and applicable portions of legislation related to human resources, finance, project management, planning, contracting, and procurement is required to manage these resources within established legislation, policy, and best practice.

Knowledge of the IT organization’s mission, mandate, organizational structure, programs, and business priorities is required to ensure these constructs are reflected when delivering on objectives. In addition, a thorough knowledge of the client organizations, including knowledge of their business activities, operations, and management structure, is required to foster relationships, negotiate product and service commitments, and navigate approval and governance requirements.

Communication and interaction

Degree: 4

Points: 95

Consults with clients on technology requirements to meet business needs and negotiates product and service commitments. Engages a broad variety of stakeholders, including internal partners within the Chief Information Officer Branch, external partners in other government departments, clients, and vendors, where interests may be competing, and successful delivery of business objectives is at stake. Diplomacy and persuasion are required when service delivery options and resource limitations do not meet client expectations for application solutions. Partners with contractors, suppliers, and other technical managers and their staff to provide integrated service delivery. Briefs senior management on complex, technical issues and provides advice and recommendations.

Identifies and engages a variety of stakeholders at their respective points in the systems development life cycle to promote engagement and ensure successful delivery and maintenance of applications which meet business requirements.

Uses diplomacy and advanced communication skills when evaluating employees’ and contract resource performance, implementing conflict resolution strategies, and fostering positive relationships within the Unit.

Produces and reviews a wide variety of technical and business documentation including: contract specifications, user requirements, service level agreements, feasibility assessments, requests for proposals, benchmarks, business cases, product evaluations, statements of work, project charters, progress reports, risk assessments, employee evaluations, briefing notes, business plans, reports, and presentations.

Sensory effort

Degree: 1

Points: 1

Requirement to focus on a computer monitor for prolonged periods to read, write, and review technical and business documentation, with regular opportunity to shift activity.

Physical effort

Degree: 1

Points: 1

Regularly requires sitting for prolonged periods using a keyboard and pointing device.

Psychological work environment

Degree: 2

Points: 5

Requires maintaining a professional demeanour while dealing with tight deadlines and multiple (and sometimes conflicting) demands from clients, changing priorities and pressure for rapid problem resolution. Occasionally, negative feedback from clients or disputes involving interpretation of contracted terms and requirements can arise. While some of these demands may be controlled, others are not and may be unpredictable.

Managing subordinates may involve exposure to interpersonal conflicts and frustrated or dissatisfied employees. These situations are unpredictable.

Physical work environment

Degree: 1

Points: 1

The work is performed in an open office environment characterized by frequent interruptions and distractions.

Benchmark 8: Director, Infrastructure

Total points: 953

Level IT-05

Organization context and summary

This position is the Director of the Infrastructure and Operations Directorate reporting to the divisional Director General within the Information Technology Solutions Branch of a medium-sized department. Six subordinates (IT-04) report to the subject position: five managers (each with multiple subordinate team leads) and one subject matter expert.

Client service results

Planning, management and delivery of the department’s IT infrastructure and operations programs, resources, and results to ensure effectiveness in meeting client business requirements in accordance with the overall IT strategy and infrastructure direction of the Department.

Key activities

  • Directs the Infrastructure and Operations Directorate, by managing its financial and human resources, setting its objectives and priorities, and developing operational business plans. Oversees progress and ensures realization of major objectives. Forecasts and manages project budgets and establishes funding arrangements that leverage multiple sources.
  • Develops long-term strategies and plans for renewing departmental IT infrastructure. Provides technical direction on the IT infrastructure, standards, policies and systems and their alignment with departmental business priorities and program/service delivery.
  • Directs the research, development, integration, implementation, monitoring and maintenance of the department’s information technology infrastructure. Provides technical leadership on the evaluation of IT platforms, enterprise-wide applications and IT business solutions that best respond to department program and service delivery needs and meet overall IT strategy and direction.
  • Leads the development of the client service framework, determines service delivery standards for clients, and directs the provision of infrastructure services to the department. Ensures consistent service delivery throughout the department and conformance with corporate IT plans and priorities. Identifies opportunities for service enhancements and recommends new IT initiatives for increasing productivity and reducing costs.
  • Partners with other government departments and/or the private sector to develop solutions to common IT infrastructure issues. Develops complex technical and management reports and papers on the departmental IT infrastructure program. Reviews and approves technical reports and recommendations from subordinates.

Critical thinking and analysis

Degree: 5

Points: 300

Develops service-delivery strategies that involve a broad mix of infrastructure systems, businesses, and operations and considers resource availability, cost, risk, and value to the department. Addresses issues relating to the complexity and integration of business requirements, costs, delivery schedules, major deliverables and critical paths, technical system specifications, client service standards, and the availability of technical expertise.

Critical thinking and analysis are highly horizontal in aligning the department’s internal IT Infrastructure program strategy with other areas of departmental IT operations and the strategic direction of key stakeholders such as other government departments, central agencies, and industry sectors with which the department interacts. Develops the strategies, frameworks, policies and standards for the IT infrastructure program, which involves the horizontal analysis of a variety of technology platforms and services (including network systems, desktop or mobile computing devices, server and mainframe operations) to guide the directorate’s service delivery in alignment with departmental and governmental IT policy direction within the broader central agency and legislative parameters.

Leadership and planning

Degree: 5

Points: 140

Establishes the strategic direction for the directorate in alignment with departmental IT strategy and vision and integrated with the other IT disciplines in the department. Reviews and integrates IT operational and business plans that span the multiple operational areas within the directorate, plans and develops multi-year forecasts and human resource models, assesses and approves financial commitments and expenditures, monitors and reports on financial expenditures against multiple project budgets and the directorate budget. Directs the development of work plans for major deliverables and critical paths and the identification of risk scenarios, mitigation strategies and business continuity approaches.

Directs, through subordinate managers, the delivery of the full spectrum of IT infrastructure and operations services (including hardware, software, and network) for the department and oversees the work of external contractors on major projects. Evaluates managers’ performance, develops the framework and budget for training and learning plans, develops succession plans for key leadership and technical roles in the directorate, and determines the need for external expertise.

Balances a broad variety of considerations when performing the work, such as service delivery commitments to the portfolio of clients, clients’ expectations, technology opportunities and limitations, resource constraints, and governance requirements (such as approval processes or higher-level direction for plans and priorities) and applies risk management principles and strategies. Sets objectives, oversees progress, and ensures realization of major objectives. Forecasts and manages project budgets and establishes funding arrangements that leverage multiple sources.

Technical knowledge

Degree: 4

Points: 265

Extensive knowledge is required of the theories, principles and concepts of computer science as they apply to the management and planning of all facets of infrastructure and operations including infrastructure planning and computer operations, enterprise architecture planning and implementation, business solutions development, database management and data administration, information technology security, networking and telecommunications. This knowledge is required to develop strategic and operational plans governing the department’s IT systems environment and ensure its evolution to meet departmental and central agency policy direction.

Extensive knowledge is required of the principles, techniques and methods associated with architecture planning, computer systems design, application development, programming and testing, the systems development life cycle, the management of server domains and user work environments, client/server administration, network optimization and performance management, telecommunications protocols, the application of IT security standards and processes, system diagnostic and troubleshooting in order to plan and provide direction on IT infrastructure service delivery to the department.

Extensive knowledge of departmental IT priorities, policies, programs, issues and technology partner roles and responsibilities, legislation related to IT systems and technologies to provide advice to senior officials in the area of IT infrastructure products and services, and to develop plans and recommendations and innovative approaches for the delivery of projects and programs and/or services to clients.

Knowledge of applicable legislation, standards, central and internal policies and directives is required in order to work within legislative requirements and implement best practices, technologies and tools in the directorate.

Management knowledge

Degree: 4

Points: 120

Expert knowledge in management and leadership theories and principles is required to direct a large IT organization comprising multiple subordinate structures and spanning multiple technical areas. Extensive knowledge is required of relevant federal government legislation, departmental resource management administration, delegation instruments pertaining to finance, human resources, procurement, contracting, and planning and accountability frameworks to adhere to prevailing governance and accountability requirements.

Expert knowledge is required of business management theories and principles and the departmental management and governance structures to integrate technology, business, and transformation strategies into a coherent service delivery model. This knowledge is also required to formulate IT strategies and identify key opportunities for senior management to advance the department’s IT agenda, to define IT business drivers and to align IT initiatives with departmental business objectives and priorities.

Thorough knowledge is required of government priorities, policies, initiatives, and legislation in relation to information technology, particularly in terms of current and future directions, trends and challenges inherent to the federal public sector in order to align infrastructure initiatives with broader government direction.

Communication and interaction

Degree: 5

Points: 120

Requires extensive communication and negotiation skills to influence senior management to support infrastructure initiatives that advance the department’s strategic IT objectives as well as advancing the broader business objectives of the department. Works with business owners to define their strategic IT infrastructure requirements, discusses current and emerging IT infrastructure issues and recommended IT solutions, and negotiates and commits to service provision parameters. Presents and defends infrastructure service delivery models, including constraints and possibilities, to achieve agreement on terms and deliverables for service provision with business owners.

Leads negotiations among IT service delivery partners (within and outside the department) and business owners to achieve agreement on approaches for future infrastructure and operations strategy. Secures support and necessary resources for recommended solutions. Directs consultations and represents the directorate in departmental and inter-departmental committees and working groups to negotiate major IT projects and plans, arriving at agreements on statements of work, the terms and conditions of goods and service delivery and costs.

Develops and maintains key relationships to cultivate networks with counterparts and business owners in other government departments and the private sector that will leverage resources, expertise, and support from within and outside government. Presents the departmental position to clients on major government initiatives that have the potential for substantial impact on the department’s IT strategies and directions.

Produces a variety of technical and business documents including Treasury Board submissions, analytical reports, Memoranda to Cabinet, ministerial correspondence, and position papers. Prepares strategies, plans, project frameworks and proposals for senior management. Reviews, modifies, and edits drafts of policies, standards, procedures, communications, and other products related to the directorate’s services.

Sensory effort

Degree: 1

Points: 1

Requirement to focus on a computer monitor for prolonged periods to read, write, and review technical and business documentation, with regular opportunity to shift activity.

Physical effort

Degree: 1

Points: 1

Regularly requires sitting for prolonged periods using a keyboard and pointing device.

Psychological work environment

Degree: 2

Points: 5

Requires maintaining a professional demeanour while dealing with tight deadlines and multiple (and sometimes conflicting) demands from clients, changing priorities and pressure for rapid problem resolution. Occasionally, negative feedback from clients or disputes involving interpretation of contracted terms and requirements can arise. While some of these demands may be controlled, others are not and may be unpredictable.

Managing subordinates may involve exposure to interpersonal conflicts and frustrated or dissatisfied employees. These situations are unpredictable.

Physical work environment

Degree: 1

Points: 1

The work is performed in an office environment characterized by frequent interruptions and distractions.

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