Culture Satellite Account

The Culture Satellite Account (CSA) is an accounting framework created to better measure the economic importance of culture, arts, heritage and sport in the Canadian economy.

Several official products have been released through the CSA work:

The Provincial and Territorial Culture Indicators for 2010-2014

The Provincial and Territorial Culture Satellite Account for 2010

The National Culture Satellite Account for 2010

For further information on the concepts behind the CSA, please refer to the Conceptual Framework for Culture Statistics 2011 and the Classification Guide for the Canadian Framework for Culture Statistics 2011.

These products were developed by Statistics Canada with the support of a diverse group of partners referred to as the Culture Statistics Strategy Consortium, which consists of:

If you have technical questions related to the concepts, methods or data quality of these releases, please contact Statistics Canada at 1-800-263-1136; 514-283-8300; or email.

For Media Relations please call 613-951-4636; or email.

If you have questions regarding the partnership behind the Culture Statistics Strategy, please contact the Department of Canadian Heritage.

Culture: Value in Our Lives, Value in Our Economy

Learn more about the importance of culture to the Canadian economy. Video includes the latest figures for culture Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and jobs.

Transcript | Watch on YouTube

Infographics

Culture: Value in Our Lives, Value in Our Economy

[PDF Version, 2.2 KB]

Description of the illustration Culture: Value in Our Lives, Value in Our Economy

Illustration of a fictional city block with buildings, people, vehicles, and a park with a water fountain, showcasing culture’s importance in our lives and in our economy.

Top left title text bubble

[Written text] Culture. Value in our Lives, Value in our Economy

Culture is everywhere. It is the books we read, the movies we watch, the arts & heritage events we attend and so much more. It is easy to see the value of culture in our own lives but did you know that culture is also economically significant? This visual representation shows the breakdown of the key areas of culture activities and their contribution to the Canadian economy.

Education and Training: $3.8B.

[Written text] Learning activities support the development, understanding, and reception of culture for the entire creative chain. These activities include the training of culture creators (e.g. dance, theatre, film, and art schools), culture interpreters (for example: criticism, theory), and culture consumers, at all ages and stages of development.

[Image description] A tall brown building with many small windows stands in as the Education and Training building.

Audio-visual and Interactive Media: $18.4B.

[Written text] This domain is split into three core subdomains: Film and Video, Broadcasting and Interactive Media. Broadcasting includes those industries that disseminate radio, television and Internet-based programming. Interactive Media includes only the culture component of the interactive digital media industry, which includes electronic and video games (including console, mobile, and PC games), as well as other interactive digital edutainment products. 

[Image description] Next door to the education and training building is the Audio-visual and Interactive Media building which is a short flat pink building with a sign above the door that reads Video Games and a wifi symbol above it. Next to the door on the same exterior wall is a large gaming screen showing Game Over and three teenagers are standing before the screen with game consoles in their hands. Next to the gaming teenagers are two more teenagers wearing virtual goggles. On the right side of the building, a film crew is shooting a video. There is a sound man holding a microphone high up in the air, a woman with a clapperboard, two actors, a man sitting in a chair looking through a movie camera and a black car with a movie camera attached to it and two directors chairs.

Sound Recording: $560.8M.

[Written text] This domain includes all activities related to the creation of recorded music, including composition, publishing, and distribution, including digital downloads and uploads.

[Image description] Sitting on top of the Audio-visual building is a communication tower. Next to the communication tower is a small building with an illustration of a microphone and a musical staff and treble clef on its roof indicating it is the Sound Recording building.

Written and Published Works. $9.7B.

[Written text] This domain includes written content in traditional print formats such as books and magazines, as well as formats such as Braille, and online and downloadable electronic publications, such as e-zines, audiobooks, online newspapers, and eBooks.

[Image description] Moving eastward there is a square, short, green building with large glass windows that look onto shelves filled with books. There are people on the street outside of the library. A teenager has earphones on and is taking a picture with his phone. There is a woman wearing earphones and carrying a large tablet. An older woman is pushing a wheelchair containing an elderly woman who is wearing earphones. There is a woman wearing earphones and looking at her phone, a blind woman carrying an assisted reading device. Two men are holding books outside of the library and are talking. A woman in her 50s is walking with her library book.

Heritage and Libraries: $833.0M.

[Written text] This domain consists of four core sub-domains: Archives, Libraries, Cultural Heritage (museums and art galleries), and Natural Heritage. Heritage institutions collect, document, conserve and exhibit collections in order to explain human development, encourage further research and support creative experience.

[Image description] Behind the library is a park with a water fountain. A young girl is skipping rope, her dog and her books beside her. Three musicians play beside the park: a man with a guitar, a woman in a wheelchair plays the violin and a woman standing plays a violin.

Next to the library is a classic looking museum-type building with huge round columns, large wide stairs that lead to oversized brown heavy wooden doors. This is the heritage and libraries building.

Visual and Applied Arts: $11.2B.

[Written text] This domain includes four core sub-domains: Original Visual Art, Art Reproductions, Photography, and Crafts, and only the culture component of three ancillary sub-domains: Advertising, Architecture and Design.

[Image description] On the corner beside the Heritage and Libraries building stand two women wearing headphones and sharing a large tablet. A young man is walking along the sidewalk looking at his phone.

Moving south, across the street from the Heritage and Libraries Building, sits a large red brick, two story building. On the top level, there are two rooms. The room on the left is bright yellow and has a woman standing before an easel painting a flower. There is a second easel beside her, blank and waiting. The second room is dark blue and has a large screen on the wall with computer graphic images displayed on it. The images are the before and after versions of three images: a communication tower in wire mode and final mode; a 3D woman in wire mode and final mode; and the heritage and libraries building in 3D wire mode and final mode. Facing the screen is a long table with three computers on it. There is a man and two women sitting in chairs at the table working on the computers.

Live Performance: $2.5B.

[Written text] This domain includes live performances of theatre, dance, opera, musical theatre, orchestras, music groups and artists, circuses, puppetry, and multidisciplinary events such as celebrations and festivals.

[Image description] On the bottom level of the Visual and Applied Arts building is a red marquee with yellow lights flashing around the ‘now playing’ sign. Below the marquee are two doors leading into the building. On the street, on both sides of the doors, are line ups of people waiting to be admitted into the theatre. There are three posters on the façade of the building announcing upcoming shows: Puppets, Songwriters Circle, and Playwrites Fun night.

Governance, Funding and Professional Support: $6.8B.

[Written text] This domain tracks activities that finance, promote, regulate, or sustain all stages of the creative chain, with a particular emphasis on the supply of culture content. This support is provided by all levels of government, business, and the not-for-profit sector.

[Image description] Moving west, across from the Visual and Applied Arts building is a non-descript, drab beige building with narrow windows.

Trends in Culture Gross Domestic Product and Jobs 2010-2014

[PDF Version, 551 KB]

Description of the illustration Trends in Culture Gross Domestic Product and Jobs 2010-2014

Image of a map of Canada with lines connecting each province/territory to individual boxes. Boxes contain the name of the province/territory and the statistical information relating to the specific jurisdiction it points to.

Trends in Culture Gross Domestic Product and Jobs 2010-2014
  Percentage change in culture GDP between 2010 and 2014 Culture GDP in 2014 (Percentage of total provincial/territorial GDP) Culture GDP in  2010 (Percentage of total provincial/territorial GDP) Culture jobs in 2014 (Percentage of total provincial/territorial jobs) Culture jobs in 2010 (Percentage of total provincial/territorial jobs)
Canada No change $54.6B (3.0%) $47.4B (3.0%) 630,483 (3.5%) 625,206 (3.6%)
Northwest Territories +0.1% $69.8M (1.5%) $67.1M (1.4%) 771 (2.5% ) 670 (2.6%)
Yukon -0.2% $54.6M (2.2%) $54.4M (2.4%) 814 (3.2%) 817 (3.8%)
British Columbia No change $6.7B (3.0%) $5.7B (3.0%) 81,385 (3.5%) 85,215 (3.8%)
Alberta - 0.2% $5.7B (1.6%) $4.7B (1.8%) 55,518 (2.4%) 54,685 (2.6%)
Saskatchewan - 0.1% $1.0B (1.3%) $816.4M (1.4%)  12,581 (2.1%) 11,850 (2.1%)
Manitoba +0.1% $1.7B (2.9%) $1.4B (2.8%) 21,565 (3.3%) 21,328 (3.3%)
Ontario + 0.1% $25.3B (3.8%) $21.9B (3.7%) 276,083 (3.9%) 266,882 (4.0%)
Nunavut - 0.2% $56.6M (2.3%) $47.2M (2.5%) 418 (2.8%) 395 (3.1%)
Quebec No change $11.9B (3.5%) $10.7B (3.5%) 150,749 (3.7%) 153,711 (3.9%)
Newfoundland and Labrador No change $449.8M (1.4%) $386.2M (1.4%) 5,042 (2.2%) 5,348 (2.5%)
Prince Edward Island - 0.3% $123.2M (2.3%) $122.5M (2.6%) 1,996 (2.7%) 1,894 (2.7%)
Nova Scotia + 0.2% $949.1M (2.7%) $823.3M (2.5%) 13,874 (3.0%) 13,247 (2.9%)
New Brunswick No change $670.5M (2.3%) $625.1M (2.3%) 9,688 (2.7%) 9,163 (2.5%)

Trends in Sport Gross Domestic Product and Jobs 2010-2014

[PDF Version, 546 KB]

Description of the illustration Trends in Sport Gross Domestic Product and Jobs 2010-2014

Image of a map of Canada with lines connecting each province/territory to individual boxes. Boxes contain the name of the province/territory and the statistical information relating to the specific jurisdiction it points to.

Trends in Sport GDP and Jobs 2010-2014
  Percentage change in sport GDP between 2010 and 2014 Sport GDP in 2014 (Percentage of total provincial/territorial GDP) Sport GDP in 2010 (Percentage of total provincial/territorial GDP) Sport jobs in 2014  (Percentage of total provincial/territorial jobs) Sport jobs in 2010 (Percentage of total provincial/territorial jobs)
Canada No change $5.8B (0.3%) $4.9B (0.3%) 101,604 (0.6%) 97,992 (0.6%)
Northwest Territories + 0.1% $7.6M (0.2%) $6.7M (0.1%) 91 (0.3%) 78 (0.3%)
Yukon No change $6.4M (0.3%) $5.9M (0.3%) 113 (0.4%) 102 (0.5%)
British Columbia - 0.1% $973.5M (0.4%) $921.0M (0.5%) 19,129 (0.8%) 19,991 (0.9%)
Alberta No change $750.2M (0.2%) $555.9M (0.2%) 11,847 (0.5%) 10,750 (0.5%)
Saskatchewan No change $191.3M (0.2%) $145.3M (0.2%) 2,853 (0.5%) 2,597 (0.5%)
Manitoba + 0.1% $160.3M (0.3%) $123.2M (0.2%) 2,825 (0.4%) 2,712 (0.4%)
Ontario No change $2.5B (0.4%) $2.1B (0.4%) 42,394 (0.6%) 41,335 (0.6%)
Nunavut No change $6.2M (0.3%) $5.1M (0.3%) 69 (0.5%) 72 (0.6%)
Quebec + 0.1% $901.6M (0.3%) $749.1M (0.2%) 17,374 (0.4%) 15,557 (0.4%)
Newfoundland and Labrador No change $55.3M (0.2%) $49.0M (0.2%) 922 (0.4%) 874 (0.4%)
Prince Edward Island No change $22.5M (0.4%) $21.2M (0.4%) 369 (0.5%) 373 (0.5%)
Nova Scotia No change $98.2M (0.3%) $89.3M (0.3%) 1,939 (0.4%) 1,896 (0.4%)
New Brunswick No change $90.5M (0.3%) $87.3M (0.3%) 1,680 (0.5%) 1,655 (0.5%)

Culture Gross Domestic Product and Jobs in Canada

[PDF Version, 102 KB]

Description of the illustration Culture Gross Domestic Product and Jobs in Canada

This infographic shows trends in culture Gross Domestic Product (GDP) between 2010 and 2014 and total culture jobs for 2014.

At the top left of the page is the title: Culture.

The page is divided into two with two-thirds representing GDP and one third representing jobs.

Left two-thirds of the page:

GDP is the subtitle with the following text below it: Culture contributed $54.6B (3%) of GDP to the Canadian economy in 2014.

There are two circles:

One is large and at the forefront representing the figure for 2014: $54.6B

The second is much smaller and sits behind. It represents the figure for 2010: $47.4B

At the bottom of the page to the right sits a bar graph representing the standing of the domains in descending order: Audio-Visual and Interactive Media, Visual and Applied Arts, Written and Published Works, Governance, Funding and Professional Support, Education and Training, Live Performance, Heritage and Libraries, Sound Recording. The following text sits beneath the bar graph: Culture GDP at basic prices, by domain (2014)

To the right is a large dollar sign representing GDP.

Right one-third of page:

Subtitle reads jobs with the following text below it: In 2014, culture jobs (630,483) accounted for 3.5% of the total number of jobs in Canada.

630,483 is centered on the page.

At the bottom of the page to the right sits a bar graph representing the standing of the domains in descending order: Visual and Applied Arts, Audio-Visual and Interactive Media, Written and Published Works, Governance, Funding and Professional Support, Live Performance, Education and Training, Heritage and Libraries, Sound Recording. The following text sits beneath the bar graph: Culture jobs at basic prices, by domain (2014).

To the right of the page is an image of a stickman representing the culture workforce.

Sport Gross Domestic Product and Jobs in Canada

[PDF Version, 99 KB]

Description of the illustration Sport Gross Domestic Product and Jobs in Canada

This infographic shows trends in sport Gross Domestic Product (GDP) between 2010 and 2014 and total sport jobs for 2014.

At the top left of the page is the title: Sport.

The page is divided into two with two-thirds representing GDP and one third representing jobs.

Left two-thirds of the page:

GDP is the subtitle in font with the following text below it:  Sport contributed $5.8B (0.3%) of GDP to the Canadian economy in 2014.

There are two circles:

One is large and at the forefront representing the figure for 2014: $5.8B

The second is much smaller and sits behind. It represents the figure for 2010: $4.9B

At the bottom of the page to the right sits a bar graph representing the standing of the provinces and territories in descending order: ON, BC, PE, QC, MB, NS, NB, YT, NU, AB, SK, NL, NT. The following text sits beneath the bar graph: Distribution of sport GDP as share of provincial/territorial jobs (percent)

To the right is a large dollar sign representing GDP.

Right one-third of page:

Subtitle is jobs with the following text below it: In 2014, culture jobs (101,604) accounted for 0.6% of the total number of jobs in Canada.

101,604 is centered on the page.

At the bottom of the page to the right sits a bar graph representing the standing of the provinces and territories in ascending order: NT, NS, NL, QC, MB, YT, NB, PE, NU, SK, AB, ON, BC. The following text sits beneath the bar graph: Distribution of sport jobs as share of provincial/territorial jobs (percent)

To the right of the page is an image of a stickman representing the culture workforce.

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