Departmental Results Report 2018-2019 — Canadian Heritage

The Honourable Steven Guilbeault, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Canadian Heritage

The Honourable Bardish Chagger, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Diversity and Inclusion and Youth

The Honourable Mélanie Joly, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Economic Development and Official Languages

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Message from the Ministers

Steven Guilbeault
Bardish Chagger
Mélanie Joly

We are pleased to present the 2018–19 Departmental Results Report for the Department of Canadian Heritage to Parliament and to all Canadians. It outlines our department’s efforts to encourage inclusion and diversity, celebrate our history and heritage, and build strong, vibrant communities.

The Department worked hard to give Canadian creators opportunities to thrive in the digital world, including leading two successful creative trade missions to China and Latin America. It is also examining the Copyright Act, the Broadcasting Act and the Telecommunications Act with a view to modernize and adapt them to today’s realities.

In the fall of 2018, the Government launched national consultations to develop a new strategy to combat racism and discrimination. The goal of the new strategy is to support community initiatives and provide tools to address systemic racism in the long term.

As part of our commitment to reconciliation, the Government was proud to introduce the Indigenous Languages Act in early 2019. This historic legislation was co-developed with Indigenous Peoples to help revitalize and promote Indigenous languages—a key part of Indigenous culture and identity.

In 2018, the Department also focused on making Canada’s national sport system safer and more accessible. It took concrete steps to boost gender equity in sport; to combat harassment, abuse and discrimination; and to prevent and manage concussions. It also committed funds toward sport for social development in Indigenous communities; and worked to support high-performance athletes reach their podium goals.

Finally, the Department continued its work to implement the Action Plan for Official Languages 2018–2023: Investing in Our Future, which encourages the vitality of official language minority communities, and promotes English and French across Canada. It also launched cross-country consultations to talk to Canadians about how to modernize the Official Languages Act, which marks its 50th anniversary in 2019.

We invite you to read more about these and many accomplishments of the Department over the past year.

The Honourable
Steven Guilbeault

Minister of
Canadian HeritageFootnote 1

The Honourable
Bardish Chagger

Minister of Diversity and
Inclusion and YouthFootnote 1

The Honourable
Mélanie Joly

Minister of Economic
Development and
Official Languages

Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

The Department of Canadian Heritage plays a vital role in the cultural, civic and economic life of Canadians. Our policies and programs promote an environment where Canadians can experience dynamic cultural expressions, celebrate our history and heritage and build strong communities. The Department invests in the future by supporting the arts, our official and Indigenous languages, our athletes and the sport system.

For more information on the department’s organizational mandate, see the Ministers’ mandate letters.

Operating context and key risks

Operating context

In 2018-19, the Department of Canadian Heritage continued its efforts to promote Canadian identity and values, cultural development, heritage, and sport both in a domestic and in a global context. The Department worked to create opportunities to share the lessons of Canada’s unique historical experience as a multicultural, bilingual nation with a strong foundation in the shared values of human rights. The Department placed an important focus on reconciliation with Indigenous populations, invested in the future by supporting the arts, our official and Indigenous languages, our athletes and the sport system, and continues to celebrate a cohesive and inclusive society that strengthens and sustains Canada’s social fabric, and promotes innovation and economic prosperity.

Reconciliation with Indigenous peoples remains a priority for the Department. The Department advanced several significant initiatives designed to support Indigenous languages and cultures, and to expand the role of sport in the social development of Indigenous communities. The Department looked at how it conducts business through its policies and programs in order to ensure ongoing and open discussions with Indigenous partners, to remove barriers, and to continue to strengthen and build communities.

Multiculturalism and diversity are fundamental characteristics of Canadian society. Canadian Heritage has worked to preserve and enhance multiculturalism by promoting and recognizing Canadians’ ethno-cultural diversity in its programs, policies and services. The Department took a leadership role in combatting racism, and consulted with a variety of Canadians, especially those Canadians with lived experiences of racism and discrimination, in order to help inform the development of a new federal anti-racism strategy, Building a Foundation for Change: Canada’s Anti-Racism Strategy 2019–2022, which was launched in June 2019. The Department has worked closely with communities that are facing discrimination, and continues to promote Canada’s multicultural advantage in a changing environment.

Changes to and new pressures in relations with key partners in the international and intergovernmental spheres require the Department to respond in a timely, strategic way to ensure it remains at the forefront of public policy and program development. Canadian Heritage supported a series of international trade missions in collaboration with Global Affairs Canada in which close to one hundred Canadian businesses across the creative sectors participated. Additionally, a new Creative Export Strategy will help Canadian creative entrepreneurs maximize their export potential.

As Canadian Heritage continues to ensure that its work is relevant and responsive to these drivers of change, it must also meet the changing expectations and needs of Canadians with respect to how we deliver our programs. The Department engaged in a medium-term policy exercise designed to inform its strategic direction for the coming year. Planning and research activities included critical analysis of social, technological and demographic trends that will in turn ensure robust and informed policy and program development in the coming year.

Respect for human dignity and the value of every person governs all of Canadian Heritage’s activities. The Department stands with artists, actors and creators across industries in saying that there is no tolerance for harassment. In order to achieve this, Canadian Heritage made important changes to promote workplace integrity in recipient organizations. The Department reviewed its funding instruments to ensure that recipients commit to providing safe and respectful workplaces free from any form of harassment, abuse and discrimination.

The Department continued to advance its work in support of innovation and experimentation with the goal of improving policy and program development, and improving the delivery of services to Canadians. The Department is investing in experiments across all business lines that are exploring potential solutions to existing problems, and to build on future possibilities. It is continually reviewing program design to ensure relevance to Canadians. All programs continue to assess the detailed experimentation plans identified for 2018-19, which build on the exploratory work of previous years.

Key risks

Until 2018-19, the Department continued its medium-term policy exercise to create innovative policy advice that acted as a basis to inform the way that Canadian Heritage policies and programs should proceed over the next five to ten years. In support of evidence-based decision-making, intra-departmental and multidisciplinary teams researched and produced multiple deliverables on various relevant and mandate-specific topics, resulting in nineteen well-rounded policy options rooted in strategic foresight.

In 2018-19, the Department continued to reduce the administrative burden in the delivery of its transfer payment programs by introducing a more streamlined business model for processing a significant number of low-dollar, low-risk grants. This model reduced superfluous information required in application forms resulting in improved applicant satisfaction, increased efficiency in decision-making and the overall expediency of program services. It is supported by a risk-based monitoring approach in which oversight duties are undertaken on a sampling basis, demonstrating a higher risk tolerance and easing the application process.

As part of its continuous modernization efforts, the Department used design-thinking to create a vision for expanding its online services and to further foster innovation. Through consultations and workshops with internal and external stakeholders, a journey map was created to depict their experience interacting with one another through various service delivery channels. The successes and lessons learned identified during these consultations and workshops were also identified using a client satisfaction survey. The results from these efforts were instrumental in either establishing or revisiting success indicators for several small and large-scale modernization initiatives.

From October 2018 to March 2019, the Department held engagement sessions across the country to gather input from Canadians, especially those with lived experiences of racism and discrimination, in order to help inform the development of a new federal anti-racism strategy. The engagement process consisted of 22 in-person forums that welcomed approximately 600 people and 443 organizations from across Canada. Sessions were held in partnership with racialized community groups and Indigenous Peoples including First Nations, Inuit and Métis. Through Budget 2018 funding to address the challenges faced by Black Canadian youth, engagement activities were held with approximately 600 youth across Canada to understand their lived experiences and explore approaches to address racism and discrimination.

Key risks
Risks Risk response strategy and effectiveness Link to department’s Core Responsibilities Link to mandate letter commitments and any government-wide or departmental priorities (as applicable)

Canadian Heritage’s funding programs and policy suite become:

  • less relevant to a shifting social and economic context;
  • insufficient in properly addressing the social or economic outcomes that the policies and programs are trying to contribute to; or,
  • inflexible or stagnant to respond to emerging social or economic challenges.

The Department proactively renews, adjusts, and iterates with its policy and program design approach through:

  • experimentation across all business lines, including individual experiments in every program;
  • medium-term policy development which informs strategic direction through critical analysis of social, technological and demographic trends; and,
  • ongoing evaluation and Terms and Conditions renewal efforts.
All n/a
Funding applicants and recipients experience problems with processing grants and contributions due to the Department’s operational shortcomings.

Continue to advance the Department’s grants and contributions modernization agenda by:

  • employing a risk-based approach to reduce low-value administrative burden;
  • using design-thinking to map and improve the applicant journey; and,
  • consulting applicants and recipients through design workshops and client satisfaction surveys.
All n/a
The Department is challenged to develop relevant and representative methods of meaningfully engaging with Canadians from all walks of life. Continue to follow-through with citizen-oriented consultation and engagement efforts. Additionally, continue to develop innovative mechanisms of collaboration, such as the co-development of Indigenous languages legislation with the Assembly of First Nations, the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, and the Métis National Council. Diversity and Inclusion

Co-develop an Indigenous Languages Act.

Assess barriers faced by minority groups in Canada through cross-country engagement and develop a new federal anti-racism strategy to combat discrimination and racism.

Results at a glance

In 2018-19, the Department of Canadian Heritage supported Minister Rodriguez, Minister Duncan and Minister Joly in carrying out their mandates and in achieving results to advance the Department’s core responsibilities. In 2018-19, the Department’s total actual spending amounted to $1,409,564,221 and its total actual full-time equivalents were 1,862.9. The Department’s results at a glance include:

Core responsibility 1: Creativity, arts and culture

Core responsibility 2: Heritage and celebration

Core responsibility 3: Sport

Core responsibility 4: Diversity and Inclusion

Core responsibility 5: Official Languages

For more information on Canadian Heritage’s plans, priorities and results achieved, see the “Results: what we achieved” section of this report.

Results: what we achieved

Core Responsibilities

Creativity, arts and culture

Description

Ensures that a wide range of Canadian artistic and cultural content is accessible at home and abroad. Provides opportunities for Canadians to participate and engage in Canada’s creative life, fostering a sense of belonging and inclusion. Fosters creativity, innovation, growth and employment opportunities in Canada’s cultural sector, and in the creative economy. Supports policy, legislative and regulatory measures; delivers funding programs that support creation, professional training, cultural infrastructure and arts presentation; business development and marketing initiatives; and the establishment of partnerships in Canada and abroad.

Results

In 2018-19, the Department undertook the following initiatives to advance this core responsibility:

The Creative Export Strategy was launched on June 26, 2018, with an investment of $125 million over five years to help Canadian creative entrepreneurs maximize their export potential. The Strategy expands market opportunities for Canadian creative industries and promotes Canada’s cultural sector abroad. Building on PromArt and Trade Routes, it proposes a modernized approach adapted to the challenges faced by the creative industries today.

The Strategy supported several activities in 2018-19 that helped Canadian creative entrepreneurs expand their global reach and further their international business objectives. For example:

Canadian Heritage increased federal funding to the Canada Media Fund to support jobs for Canadian writers, producers, directors, actors and technical crews. The Department implemented arrangements to put in place funding up to $172 million over five years, as announced in Budget 2018. In 2017-18Footnote 3, the Fund provided $284.6 million in funding for the production of 497 convergent stream projects that triggered $1.3 billion in production activity. According to the Canada Media Producers Association, the Fund supported 26,700 direct and spin-off jobs in 2017-18Footnote 4.

In order to conduct the review of both the Broadcasting Act and the Telecommunications Act, as announced in Budget 2017, the Department collaborated with Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada to establish the Broadcasting and Telecommunications Legislative Review Panel and to put in place a secretariat, resourced by both departments to support the Panel’s work.

The Parliamentary review of the Copyright Act was launched in March 2018 under the leadership of the Standing Committee of Industry, Science and Technology. To support the review, the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage conducted a study on remuneration models for artists and creative industries. Throughout the review process, officials at Canadian Heritage and Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada monitored committee meetings, analyzed stakeholder submissions and met with copyright stakeholders.

In 2018-19, the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund approved the investment of $72.6 million (including multi-year projects) in support of 178 cultural infrastructure projects, of which $19 million supported 11 creative hubFootnote 5 projects.

Among these projects, $2 million were invested towards the cooperative Méduse in Quebec City, a leading creative hub of producers and presenters dedicated to the arts, culture and community outreach, for the replacement of fire safety and security systems, heating and ventilation, the purchase of specialized equipment and the reconfiguration of the lobby and creation spaces to increase collaboration among members and offer a varied programming.

In April 2018, the Canada Cultural Investment Fund provided $252,000 to the Cultural Human Resources Council to support a series of initiatives to equip the cultural sector with the tools, practices and training for building and maintaining respectful workplaces under the title “Respectful Workplaces in the Arts.” These new tools and resources will be made available to over 1,750 arts organizations across Canada.

Experimentation

In 2018-19, the Department continued to test new approaches to support arts organizations and cultural industries through small-scale experiments, such as the First Spark Initiative, launched in 2018 by the Strategic Initiatives component of the Canada Cultural Investment Fund. Under this new initiative, arts and heritage organizations may apply for up to $5,000 to organize a collaborative problem-solving activity to address a common business challenge, with the goal of bringing together a team of community stakeholders from across sectors to explore creative solutions to issues facing arts and heritage organizations. In 2018-19, six proposals were approved through the First Spark Initiative for a total of $28,964 of funding to arts and heritage organizations to help them find creative solutions to current challenges.

Results achieved for Creativity, arts and culture
Departmental results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2018–19 Actual results 2017–18 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results
Creative industries are successful in the digital economy, foster creativity and contribute to economic growth. Gross domestic product of the Canadian cultural sector. $55 billion Mar-2019 53.1 53.8 53.8
Number of jobs in the cultural sector. 635,900 Mar-2019 666,474 652,406 652,406
Canadians are able to consume Canadian content on multiple platforms.

Growth of Canadian content on multiple platforms, by production levels:

Number of video games (entertainment software) produced by Canadian-based studios.

1,430 Mar-2019 ForthcomingFootnote 6 ForthcomingFootnote 6 For the video game industry, 2,100 projects completed in 2016 (reported in 2017)
Number of Canadian Television productions. 1,190 Mar-2019 ForthcomingFootnote 7 1,222 1,290
Number of Canadian theatrical feature films produced. 100 Mar-2019 105 105 112
Number of Canadian-authored books published. 6,000 Mar-2019 6,764 6,401 6,533
Number of magazines in Canada producing Canadian content. 1,673 Mar-2019 1,457 1,549 1,591
Number of non-daily newspapers in Canada 1,046 Mar-2019 1026 1,032 1,060

Growth of Canadian content on multiple platforms, by market share:

Market share of Canadian artists on top 2,000 domestic album sales chart.

22% Mar-2019 19% 19% 22%
Market share of Canadian artists on top 20,000 domestic streaming chart. 12% Mar-2019 10% 10% 12%
Creative industries are successful in global markets. Value of the creative exports. New data series, no target available. Official publication is expected 2018-19. Mar-2019 ForthcomingFootnote 8 n/a $16 billion
Canadians have access to cultural facilities in their communities. Number of communities with improved cultural facilities. 80 Mar-2019 93 n/a n/a
Percentage of Canadians with access to improved cultural facilities. 40 Mar-2019 41 n/a n/a
Canadians have access to festivals and performing arts series that reflect Canada's diversity. Percentage of funded festivals and performing arts series whose programming promotes diversity. 65 Mar-2019 65 n/a n/a
Budgetary financial resources (dollars) for Creativity, arts and culture
2018–19 Main Estimates 2018–19 Planned spending 2018–19 Total authorities available for use 2018–19 Actual spending (authorities used) 2018–19 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
455,263,886 455,263,886 491,698,764 486,408,233 31,144,347
Human resources (full-time equivalents) for Creativity, arts and culture
2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Actual full-time equivalents 2018–19 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
391.2 426.7 35.5

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Canadian Heritage’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.Footnote 9

Heritage and celebration

Description

Offers opportunities for Canadians to participate in celebrations and commemorations of national significance, and in local festivals and heritage events. Invests in the development of learning materials and experiences that give Canadians opportunities to enhance their understanding of Canada’s history. Facilitates access to heritage and provides support to heritage institutions to preserve and present heritage to all Canadians. Delivers projects, programs and services; grants, contributions and tax incentives; conducts research; provides authoritative information and expertise; and supports the implementation of heritage-related legislation.

Results

In 2018-19, the Department undertook the following initiatives to advance this core responsibility:

A total of 2,040 summer jobs and 320 internships, funded by Young Canada Works – Heritage, were provided to young Canadians to enable them to gain professional experience in museums and related heritage organizations. In 2018-19, the program received supplemental funding under Budget 2017 through the horizontal Youth Employment Strategy, led by Employment and Social Development Canada. This investment enabled the creation of 529 (of the 2,040) summer jobs for Canadian students and 248 (of the 320) internships for young Canadian graduates to gain professional experience in museums and related heritage organizations.

The Canadian Conservation Institute explored e-learning possibilities by converting the content of two of its regional on-site workshops: Training in Preservation Housekeeping for Heritage Sites and Small Museums, and Emergency and Disaster Preparedness for Cultural Institutions, are now ready to be delivered through e-learning modules or virtual workshops. After a successful pilot project held in February 2019 with the British Columbia Museums Association, the Canadian Conservation Institute will carry on with e-learning training development in partnership with the museum community by converting six others workshops by 2022.

Ten informative online videos related to many subjects in the realms of preventive conservation, conservation and the digital management of collections were developed and made accessible on the Canadian Conservation Institute’s YouTube channel.

The Canadian Conservation Institute completed the fourth year of the RE-ORG Canada training program, which focused on the Western region, and launched the fifth and final edition of the program in the Prairies and Northern region. Through webinar sessions and hands-on training, RE-ORG Canada has benefited 27 participating institutions, five host institutions and over 60 individual professionals directly, as well as 27 partner institutions indirectly. The heritage institutions who have gone through the program now benefit from better access to their collections in storage, and can make better use of them to engage their communities. In the coming years, the Institute will further strengthen the existing network by training RE-ORG coaches who will in turn organize hands-on workshops for other institutions across the country.

The Building Communities through Arts and Heritage program encouraged citizen engagement and social inclusion through arts and heritage by supporting 712 local festivals across the country. For example, the program provided funding to the Eel Ground First Nation Annual Powwow, which took place in Eel Ground, New Brunswick. The festival featured traditional Mi'kmaq drumming, dancing and ceremonies, promoting the work of 217 local artists, artisans and heritage performers. The festival took place with the help of 100 volunteers for an audience of 3,500 people.

The Building Communities through Arts and Heritage program also contributed to 44 projects celebrating and preserving the history and identity of Canada’s diverse local communities through its Community Anniversaries and Legacy Fund components.

The Legacy Fund also supported a commemorative art installation in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario, marking the 225th anniversary of the 1793 Act to Limit Slavery in Upper Canada and celebrating Chloe Cooley, a local slave who played an important part in the instigation of the Act. The installation was designed to engage, educate, and enrich local citizens and visitors on their understanding of how Black history impacted the community and shaped our country.

The Canada History Fund increased the diversity of client organizations and the number of post-secondary institutions by supporting projects from six recurring recipients and 12 new organizations, including four post-secondary institutions. The program used a variety of methods to encourage new applicants, which included promoting a standard application deadline and adding a special call for applications, as well as implementing both one-year and multi-year funding agreements to support clients. Many of these projects reflect the diversity of Canadian society and the history of Indigenous peoples in Canada. For example, the Fund supported Canadian Lesbian and Gay Archives (aka ArQuives) to produce a book entitled Queer Canadiana: LGBTQ2+ Moments & Movements in Canada. The Fund also supported projects from:

Other initiatives were funded to help citizens critically assess and become resilient against harmful online disinformation.

In order to inform policy and program design decisions the Department led a Survey of Heritage Institutions in 2017 which revealed the following information:

Canadian Heritage completed the returns of illegally exported cultural property to foreign states on behalf of Canada:

In 2018-19, Canadian Heritage launched commemorations for significant anniversaries in Canada:

Experimentation

The Building Communities through Arts and Heritage program continued to develop its experimentation project involving a new financial instrument (Outcome Achievement Payments) for commemorative capital projects to test moving from a multi-step funding process to a single payment that is made upon the achievement of predetermined outcomes. Specifically, the program conducted a detailed review of its data in order to determine at what moment during the process the funding will be allocated.

Results achieved for Heritage and celebration
Departmental results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2018–19 Actual results 2017–18 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results
Canadians feel a strong sense of belonging to Canada. Percentage of Canadians who report feeling a strong sense of belonging to Canada. 90 Mar-2021 Forthcoming 88 90
Canadians are engaged in celebrations and commem-orations of national signifi-cance Number of Canadians who participate in events and activities by attending or volunteering. 8.5 million Mar-2019 10,618,349 n/a n/a
Number of Canadians who participate in events and activities by viewing traditional and new media broadcasts or downloading related information materials. 1.5 million Mar-2019 14,140,000Footnote 10 n/a n/a
Canadians across the country are engaged in their communities through local arts and heritage. Number of performers and volunteers in Building Communities through Arts and Heritage funded arts and heritage projects each year. 170,000 Apr-2020 190,855Footnote 11 n/aFootnote 12 n/aFootnote 12
Total attendance for Building Communities through Arts and Heritage funded arts and heritage projects each year. 16,000,000 Apr-2020 21,207,443 n/a n/a
The public is provided with access to cultural heritage. Number of in-person and online visits to cultural heritage rendered accessible through heritage programs and services. 1,800,000 Mar-2019 2,263,910 2,205,169 2,034,405
Heritage objects and collections are preserved by heritage organizations for current and future generations. Number of heritage objects and collections whose preservation has been supported by heritage programs and services. 80,000 Mar-2019 446,436 325,362 109,754
Budgetary financial resources (dollars) for Heritage and celebration
2018–19 Main Estimates 2018–19 Planned spending 2018–19 Total authorities available for use 2018–19 Actual spending (authorities used) 2018–19 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
102,476,520 102,476,520 120,912,667 120,649,174 18,172,654
Human resources (full-time equivalents) for Heritage and celebration
2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Actual full-time equivalents 2018–19 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
390.0 346.7 -43.3

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Canadian Heritage’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Sport

Description

Promotes and enhances Canadian participation in sport, from initial introduction to sport to the highest levels through transfer payments and policy leadership. Ensures that all Canadians have access to quality aligned sport programs in a safe and welcoming environment regardless of race, gender or physical disability. Fosters the development of high-performance athletes, coaches, officials, leaders and organizations within the Canadian Sport System. Assists Canadian communities in hosting the Canada Games and international sport events.

Results

In 2018-19, the Department undertook the following initiatives to advance this core responsibility:

Budget 2018 put forth new investments in sport for 2018-19 and for years to come:

The Department contributed an additional $517,800 to its annual contribution of $6,138,700 to support the Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sport to ensure the Canadian Anti-Doping Program is not only compliant with the World Anti-Doping Code, but also with international standards.

The Minister’s Working Group on Gender Equity in Sport was launched to address participation challenges and to propose ideas, approaches, and strategies for eliminating barriers that prevent increased participation of women and girls in sport. This working group also provided perspectives and insights on how to achieve gender equity in sport by 2035, by discussing how to deliver programming specifically for women and girls in sport, addressing gender-based violence in sport, including sexual harassment, and how to increase the representation of women in sport leadership positions.

The work in the area of concussions has been an ongoing collaboration between Sport Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada since 2015, as identified in the two ministerial mandate letters. This collaboration includes activities under the Harmonized Approach on Concussions, endorsed by Federal, Provincial/Territorial Sport, Physical Activity and Recreation Ministers in 2016. The Harmonized Approach consists of five components: awareness, prevention, detection, management and surveillance. The Government has invested primarily in two of these components, detection and management, through the development of the Canadian Guideline on Concussion in Sport, and generic return-to-school and return-to-sport protocols. These generic protocols are a set of guidelines to help students and athletes gradually return to school and sport activities after sustaining a concussion. With funding from the Public Health Agency of Canada, the Canadian Guideline on Concussion in Sport and protocols were developed by Parachute, a national injury prevention organization.

The Public Health Agency of Canada also provided funding to Parachute to collaborate with national sport organizations in the development of such protocols. As a result, as of March 31, 2019, 43 of Canada’s national sport organizations now have sport-specific return-to-sport protocols in place. The Sport Information Resource Centre, with funding from Sport Canada, developed and implemented the We Are Headstrong awareness campaign to disseminate key messages to the Canadian public.

The 2019 Canada Winter Games were held in Red Deer, Alberta from February 15 to March 3, 2019. Over 3,600 participants, 5,000 volunteers, 20,000 visitors enjoyed 19 sports and 10 nights of cultural entertainment as part of Canada’s largest multisport and cultural event for youth. The Games included events for athletes with a disability, a Women in Coaching Program, an Aboriginal Apprentice Coach Program, and an Indigenous Officials Pilot Program. The 2019 Canada Games also hosted the launch of the Canada Games Council’s gender inclusion policy and responsible coach training program.

At the 2019 Canada Winter Games, the Federal, Provincial/Territorial Ministers endorsed the Red Deer Declaration for the Prevention of Harassment, Abuse and Discrimination in Sport, committing to increase awareness, prevention, identification, reporting and monitoring to address harassment, abuse and discrimination.

The 2019 Special Olympic World Summer Games were held from March 14 to 21, 2019, hosted by Abu Dhabi, United Emirates. Throughout the week, more than 7,500 athletes, from 200 nations competed in 24 sports. Over 100 of these athletes represented Team Canada. Special Olympics Team Canada was highly successful, achieving an overall medal count of 90 Gold, 37 Silver and 28 Bronze. Of special note were incredible performances by British Columbia’s swimmers Genevieve Verge and Kelsey Wyse, who each achieved three gold medals.

The 2018 Commonwealth Games were held on the Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia, between April 4-15, 2018. The 2018 Gold Coast Commonwealth Games were the most inclusive international games in history: the first such games to achieve gender equality by having the same number of medal events (133) for women and men.

In May 2018, over 300 Canadian athletes, guides, and coaches attended events at Rideau Hall and Parliament Hill to celebrate their achievements at the Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games of PyeongChang 2018. The celebrations included a Facebook Live “Team Canada Classroom Champion Chat,” providing youth across Canada with the opportunity to engage with Olympians and Paralympians from Rideau Hall. In addition, athletes, students and the public at Rideau Hall were able to try out sports such as Para ice hockey and snowboarding.

Extensive consultations were undertaken with the Canadian high performance sport community as part of the final drafting of the Canadian High Performance Sport Strategy. This included large-scale workshops in June and November of 2018. An important focus of the Strategy is to improve the sport culture and advance good governance that supports athletes, coaches, administrators and all others in sport organizations to achieve excellence. The high-performance sport community started to engage in the development of an Action Plan to support the Strategy.

In June 2018, additional clauses were integrated into the contribution agreements that raised the standards and expectations of funded sport organizations in preventing and responding to incidents of harassment and abuse, specifically in providing their members with access to an independent third party to review allegations, and mandatory training on preventing harassment and abuse.

Sport Canada provided funding to the Sport Dispute Resolution Centre of Canada to support two pilot initiatives: an Investigation Unit to support federally funded sport organizations to investigate harassment, abuse and discrimination complaints; and the Canadian Sport Helpline, which provides a safe place for victims and witnesses of harassment, abuse and discrimination in sport to report their concerns, receive guidance, or simply to speak in confidence with a neutral third party to get the help they need.

Also in March 2019, Sport Canada provided funding to the Coaching Association of Canada in hosting a series of nationwide consultations on the development of a model code of conduct, from March to April 2019, plus a national two-day summit in May 2019. All provinces and territories took part in these consultations, and an online survey was made available for those who could not attend in person.

Results achieved for Sport
Departmental results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2018–19 Actual resultsFootnote 13 2017–18 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results
Canadian athletes succeed at the highest levels of competition. Ranking of Canada relative to other countries in Combined Ranking Index for Olympic Sport. 7 Ongoing 9 9 7
Ranking of Canada relative to other countries in Combined Ranking Index for Paralympic Sport. 12 Ongoing 13 13 n/a
Canadian children and youth are enrolled in a sport activity. Number of Canadian children and youth enrolled in a sport activity. 5,000,000 Ongoing 4,594,540 4,594,540 4,594,540
Canadians, regardless of gender, physical ability and cultural background, who participate in sport activities are satisfied with the manner in which the activity is provided. Percentage of Canadians reporting that they experience sport in a welcoming environment. 90 Ongoing 86 86 Not in use
Percentage of Canadians reporting that they experience sport in a safe environment. 80 Ongoing 73 73 Not in use
Budgetary financial resources (dollars) for Sport
2018–19 Main Estimates 2018–19 Planned spending 2018–19 Total authorities available for use 2018–19 Actual spending (authorities used) 2018–19 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
215,874,018 215,874,018 238,523,934 228,061,688 12,187,670
Human resources (full-time equivalents) for Sport
2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Actual full-time equivalents 2018–19 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
105.4 104.8 -0.6

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Canadian Heritage’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Diversity and inclusion

Description

Focuses on celebrating Canada’s diversity, identity and multicultural heritage, promoting resilient communities and reinforcing the rights of Canadians, as a means to foster diversity and inclusion. Supports legislation on multiculturalism. Promotes and supports domestic implementation of international human rights treaties, constitutional and quasi-constitutional rights in Canada. Works in collaboration with a variety of Governmental and non-governmental organizations to support the provision of programs and services on matters of diversity and inclusion. Supports the engagement, participation and inclusion of Canadian youth in their communities and in exchange activities. Revitalizes, preserves and promotes Indigenous languages and cultures and celebrates achievements, and strengthens Indigenous communities through investments in a variety of initiatives.

Results

In 2018-19, the Department undertook the following initiatives to advance this core responsibility:

Budget 2017 invested $89.9 million over three years to support Indigenous languages and cultures; of this, Canadian Heritage received $63 million. The Aboriginal Peoples’ Program uses this investment to support community-based projects that facilitate communication in, and revitalization, preservation and promotion of, Indigenous languages and oral histories.

On February 5, 2019, the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Multiculturalism introduced Bill C-91, An Act respecting Indigenous languages, in the House of Commons, which received Royal assent on June 21, 2019, and an Order in Council brought certain sections of the Act into force on August 29, 2019.

Budget 2019 announced an investment of $333.7 million over the next five years, starting in 2019-20, with $115.7 million ongoing to support the implementation of the Indigenous Languages Act.

The Aboriginal Peoples’ Program supported 216 projects aimed at the revitalization, preservation and promotion of Indigenous languages and cultures, including 182 projects supported by the Aboriginal Languages Initiative. These projects provided opportunities for 9,039 people who completed 40,811 hours of instruction in 371 participatory activities. Most learners (83.4 percent) increased their level of fluency of an Indigenous language by engaging in participatory activities.

For the first time, the Aboriginal Languages Initiative provided multi-year funding to 87 organizations for 2018-19 and 2019-20, and approved two new third party delivery organizations to administer the initiative on behalf of the Department in Saskatchewan as well as in Ontario. The Aboriginal Languages Initiative supported the creation of 330 new resources for the revitalization, preservation and promotion of Indigenous languages. One of these resources was developed by the Urban Society for Aboriginal Youth of Calgary who created an online video game from the graphic novel “Ksistsikoom” (Thunder). The video game is now accessible online and allows users to learn basic Blackfoot language.

The Northern Aboriginal Broadcasting component increased the number of recipients supported from 20 in 2017–18 to 24 in 2018–19.

The Exchanges Canada Program offered opportunities for over 13,900 youth to enhance their knowledge and understanding of Canada; to create linkages with one another; and, to enhance their appreciation of the diversity and shared aspects of the Canadian experience. Through participation in forums and group exchanges, youth had the opportunity to connect with other youths and learned about Canada: its history, geography, industry, institutions, communities, cultures, and languages.

As a result of their participation in the Exchanges Canada Program, 90 percent of youth reported that they created new ties with people from other communities, 87 percent of youth participants reported that they enhanced their appreciation of how diverse Canada is, 83 percent agreed that they learned new things about Canada, 82 percent reported having a better understanding of what Canadians have in common, and 81 percent reported an increased sense of attachment to Canada.

For example, the Exchanges Canada Program funded Historica Canada’s Encounters with Canada initiative. The project provided over 3,200 youths (aged 14–17), with an opportunity to participate in one-week, residential, themed programs to gain an understanding of civics, leadership, and Canada and its people. This initiative operates over 27 weeks each year in both official languages, and attracts an average of 120 students and six teacher-monitors per week to the National Capital Region. Youth participants took part in guided tours of Parliament, the Supreme Court, Rideau Hall, and federal museums, such as the Canadian Museum of History, the Canada Science and Technology Museum and the National Gallery of Canada.

The Exchanges Canada Program also funded the YMCA Youth Exchanges Canada project. Through this project, over 1,500 young Canadians from schools or recognized community organizations are twinned based on their interests, and spend five days in each other’s communities. The project had an educational focus and included a community-engagement component, which allowed youth to learn the value of giving one’s time and talent while implementing projects that give back to the host community. Additionally, the Exchanges Canada Program and the Youth Take Charge Program supported projects that helped citizens critically assess and become resilient against harmful online disinformation.

A cross-country engagement process confirmed that combatting racism and discrimination must be a priority for government and citizens alike. Going forward, we will continue to engage racialized communities, religious minority communities and Indigenous Peoples, and meaningfully involve them in decision-making related to proposed government actions.

The Department also revised its policy and program goals/objectives for the Multiculturalism Program. Policy work is well underway to implement new policy structures and methodologies to support effective reporting against a new program direction designed to empower the communities served by the Program.

The Department expanded and rebranded the Multiculturalism grants and contributions program as the Community Support, Multiculturalism and Anti-Racism Initiatives Program, adding two new components: Community Capacity-Building and Support for Black Canadian Youth. These new components are aligned with new program directions, including those that address racism and discrimination against Indigenous Peoples and racialized women and girls. The Department launched a new federal anti-racism strategy, Building a Foundation for Change: Canada’s Anti-Racism Strategy 2019–2022, in June 2019.

In 2018-19, the University of Ottawa, the third party administrator of the modernized Court Challenges Program, completed the program’s implementation by recruiting employees and establishing terms of references for the Human Rights and the Official Languages Rights expert panels. Fourteen experts, recruited through a merit-based and transparent process, were divided evenly across the two panels. The program also launched a website where citizens can find information on how to apply for funding. The program has already funded 13 human rights cases out of 34 requests received, as well as 17 of the 27 Official Languages rights cases. Careful monitoring will be carried out in the coming years in order to capture the results achieved. However, it is already clear that the recently granted funding will contribute to further build the Canadian jurisprudence architecture and advance Human and Official Languages rights in Canada.

The Department continued to manage and coordinate Canada’s human rights reporting to international organizations, working in collaboration with federal departments, and with provincial and territorial governments. In May 2018, Canada made its third appearance at the United Nations (UN) under the Universal Periodic Review process, where Canada’s human rights record was reviewed by other UN Member States. The Department coordinated the preparations for the review and ensured that Canada’s delegation at the appearance, including representatives from the Department, was in a position to share information on measures adopted by federal, provincial and territorial governments on key human rights issues. Canada’s response to the recommendations received from Member States was submitted to the UN in September 2018. The Department coordinated and negotiated the response with relevant federal departments and with provincial and territorial governments. Canada’s response was also informed by engagement by the Department with civil society organizations and Indigenous representative groups, including through a series of sessions held across the country. Canada’s third Universal Periodic Review culminated with the adoption by the UN Human Rights Council in September 2018 of the outcome of Canada’s review.

The Department completed three reports submitted to the United Nations under international human rights treaties to which Canada is a party:

The Department completed these reports with negotiated input from federal departments and from provincial and territorial governments. The Department also engaged with civil society and Indigenous groups in the preparation of the Rights of the Child report and, together with the Public Health Agency of Canada and the Department of Justice, supported engagement with children to raise awareness of the Convention on the Rights of the Child and to hear their views on important human rights issues facing children in Canada.

Experimentation

The Multiculturalism Program removed a requirement that funded events have matching funds from other sources to allow for the Program to fund events which focused on a single cultural community. The number of applications made to the Program’s Events Component increased by 67 percent for the period from October 1, 2018, to March 31, 2019, as compared to the same period from the previous year.

Results achieved for Diversity and inclusion
Departmental results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2018–19 Actual results 2017–18 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results
Canadians value diversity. Percentage of Canadians who feel that ethnic and cultural diversity is a shared value.Footnote 14 89 Mar-2019 85 n/a n/a
Number of unique visitors to and down-loads from the Multicultural-ism Program's website.Footnote 15 200,000 Mar-2019 164,817 n/a n/a
Reversal of the current downward trend in the use and fluency of Indigenous languages. Percentage of First Nations who can conduct a conversation in an Indigenous language that is not their mother tongueFootnote 16. 4% increase in second language acquisition by 2021 May-2021 26.7Footnote 17 (Census 2016) 26.7 (Census 2016) 23.1 (Census 2011)
Percentage of Métis who can conduct a conversation in an Indigenous language that is not their mother tongueFootnote 16 4% increase in second language acquisition by 2021 May-2021 41.7Footnote 18 (Census 2016) 41.7 (Census 2016) 35.3 (Census 2011)
Percentage of Inuit speakers of an Inuit languageFootnote 16 63.3 May-2021 64.3 (Census 2016) 64.3 (Census 2016) 63.3 (Census 2011)
Number of participants in language-learning activities. 8,600 Apr-2020 9,039Footnote 19 4,131 5,177
Youth enhance their appreciation of the diversity and shared aspects of the Canadian experience. Percentage of participants in the Exchanges Canada Program who report having a better understanding of what Canadians have in common. 80 Feb-2021 82Footnote 20 80 84
Percentage of participants in the Exchanges Canada Program who report having a greater appreciation of how diverse Canada is. 85 Feb-2021 8718 87 85
Individuals or groups have access to funding to initiate or participate in test cases pertaining to rights and freedoms covered by the Court Challenges Program. Number of cases pertaining to Canadians' rights and freedoms funded by the Court Challenges Program. No targetFootnote 21 Mar-2019 30 Non-existing program Non-existing program
Canadians value human rights. Percentage of Canadians who feel that human rights are a shared value. Maintain at 90 or higher Mar-2019 forthcomingFootnote 22 n/aFootnote 23 n/aFootnote 23
Number of Canadians accessing the Government of Canada's website on human rights. 75,000 Mar-2019 390,429 428,066 148,280
Budgetary financial resources (dollars) for Diversity and inclusion
2018–19 Main Estimates 2018–19 Planned spending 2018–19 Total authorities available for use 2018–19 Actual spending (authorities used) 2018–19 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
90,049,755 86,115,871 104,335,021 96,275,855 10,159,984
Human resources (full-time equivalents) for Diversity and inclusion
2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Actual full-time equivalents 2018–19 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
133.8 140.3 6.5

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Canadian Heritage’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Official languages

Description

Supports the promotion of Canada’s two official languages in Canadian society as well as the development of official language minority communities by collaborating with voluntary organizations and provincial and territorial governments. Fosters a coordinated approach to ensure participation from across the federal government in the implementation of the Official Languages Act, and the coordination of related horizontal initiatives.

Results

In 2018-19, the Department undertook the following initiatives to advance this core responsibility:

The Action Plan for Official Languages 2018-2023 was announced on March 28, 2018. The Plan is the Government of Canada’s official languages strategy for the period from April 1, 2018, to March 31, 2023, and is composed of three pillars: strengthening our communities, strengthening access to services, and promoting a bilingual Canada.

The Action Plan provides communities with the tools they need to take advantage of existing programs, but also to seize new opportunities to develop, invest, and improve services. One of the objectives of the Action Plan is to increase the proportion of Francophones in minority communities outside Quebec from three to four percent of the total population by 2036, by supporting a strong, stable and resilient Canadian Francophonie.

The year 2018-19 is the first year of implementation of the Action Plan. To this end, the Department of Canadian Heritage has:

The new Action Plan for Official Languages 2018-2023 provides $67.2 million over five years in construction projects linked to educational and cultural infrastructures of official language minority communities. This is in addition to the $80 million over 10 years for community educational infrastructure announced in Budget 2017. This funding aims to support the construction and modernization of schools and other educational facilities, ensuring that various services and activities (e.g., daycare services, skills training and community programming) are accessible to members of official language minority communities. Eighteen infrastructure projects were funded in 2018-19 for a total of $16 million.

In 2018-19, the Department worked to advance the creation of a free, online service for learning and retaining English and French as second languages, as announced on May 28, 2019. CBC/Radio-Canada will design and implement this new program, named “The Mauril” in honour of the late federal M.P. Mauril Bélanger, a champion of Canada’s two official languages. Through this program, which will be available in early 2020, Canadians will have access to an online and mobile learning environment, showcasing exclusively Canadian content, materials based on current events in Canada, educational resources to help learners progress from a “basic” to an “advanced” level, and stimulating teaching tools to improve second-language comprehension and expression.

The Department worked with the Treasury Board Secretariat to ensure that all federal services are delivered in full compliance with the Official Languages Act leading, among other things, to the adoption in June 2019 of new Official Languages Regulations.

Negotiations with provincial governments on bilateral Minority-Language services agreements led to the signing of ten agreements, namely, agreements until 2022-23 with eight provinces, and the signing of a two-year extension of the 2013-18 agreement with Alberta (covering 2018-19 and 2019-20) and the signing of a one-year agreement with Quebec (2018-19).

Bilateral education agreements with all of the provinces and territories were extended for one year, until March 31, 2019. On March 19, 2019, Budget 2019 provided additional funding for the provinces and territories to enhance support for minority-language education, as of 2019-20, if the new Protocol and bilateral agreements included commitments regarding accountability with respect to the use of federal investments, and regular consultations with community stakeholders, including school boards. Negotiations for a new Protocol for Agreements for Minority-Language Education and Second-Language Instruction with the provinces and territories continued in 2018-19. Negotiations for new bilateral education agreements with provinces and all territories will begin after the conclusion of the new Protocol.

On December 6, 2018, the Collaboration Agreement for the Development of Arts and Culture in the Francophone Minority Communities of Canada was renewed for the period from 2018 to 2023. The Agreement aims to strengthen collaboration between Francophone minority communities (represented by the Fédération culturelle canadienne-française) and the federal signatory institutions (the Department of Canadian Heritage, National Arts Centre, Canada Council for the Arts, National Film Board of Canada, CBC/Radio-Canada and Telefilm Canada).

In 2018-19, federal institutions were asked to develop activities surrounding the 50th anniversary of the Official Languages Act. For example, the launch of Winterlude 2019 celebrations began with the unveiling of ice sculptures marking the 50th anniversary of the Official Languages Act.

Canadian Heritage is playing an ongoing role in coordinating the implementation of the Action Plan on Official Languages 2018-2023, while supporting federal institutions in their official languages activities.

Experimentation

In 2018-19, Canadian Heritage organized two hackathons in Montreal (Quebec) and Edmonton (Alberta) which brought together young Canadians from various fields to work together to create, over a given period of time, a mobile or Web application that proposes a solution to official languages issues:

Results achieved for Official languages
Departmental results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2018–19 Actual resultsFootnote 24 2017–18 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results
Canadians recognize and support Canada's official languages. Percentage of Canadians who agree that Canada's two official languages (English/ French) are an important part of what it means to be Canadian. 60 Mar-2019 60Footnote 25 70 70
Number of Canadians who can conduct a conversation in their second official language. 5,800,000 Mar-2019 6,216,070 6,216,070 Not in use
Maintenance of the 85% baseline of Official-Language Minority Communities who live within a 25 km radius of a cultural/artistic organization. 85 Mar-2019 89.8 89.8 89.8
Maintenance of the 85% baseline of Official-Language Minority Communities who live within a 25 km radius of a regional/local community development organization that offers services in the minority language. 85 Mar-2019 86 86 86
Federal institutions develop and implement policies and programs in accordance with Section 41 of the Official Languages Act. Percentage of federal institutions that report concrete results in their annual review in support of Section 41 of the Official Languages Act. 80 Mar-2019 100 100 n/a
Budgetary financial resources (dollars) for Official languages
2018–19 Main Estimates 2018–19 Planned spending 2018–19 Total authorities available for use 2018–19 Actual spending (authorities used) 2018–19 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
368,561,899 368,561,899 396,124,422 392,962,335 24,400,436
Human resources (full-time equivalents) for Official languages
2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Actual full-time equivalents 2018–19 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
144.5 151.4 6.9

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Canadian Heritage’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources the federal government considers services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The ten service categories are:

Results

In 2018-19, the Department continued to foster a healthy and respectful workplace by promoting the importance of mental health, focussing on increasing awareness of the mental health continuum and continuing to implement the 2017-2020 Canadian Heritage Workplace Well-being Action Plan.

As part of this Action Plan, and for the second consecutive year, the Department has used the 13 workplace psychosocial factors from the National Standard for Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace, and the results of the 2018 Public Service Employee Survey to create a scorecard for every branch. This scorecard provides an overview of the work units’ organizational health by identifying their strengths and blind spots. Over 270 employees also took part in interactive workshops to help develop concrete actions in order to improve the work environment.

As at March 31, 2019, 1,221 employees and 441 managers from Headquarters and the regions had completed the mandatory Working Mind training. This training, offered by the Mental Health Commission of Canada, dispels myths surrounding mental health in the workplace and introduces employees to the Mental Health Continuum.

Furthermore, for the fourth consecutive year, the Department made the most of the Not Myself Today mental health awareness campaign. Through peer learning events, tips and tricks posted on the intranet and workshops on mental health, the Department pursued this important dialogue with employees to demystify mental health in the workplace.

The Occupational Health and Safety Division has provided training to 77 percent of departmental managers, including Executive Committee members, on their occupational health and safety responsibilities, which directly contributes to the well-being of Canadian Heritage employees.

In 2018-19, the Labour Relations program continued to have safe and open conversations with managers on difficult or conflicting situations, discussing the mental health continuum with them, and encouraging them to make full use of the array of services offered to them and their employees (e.g. Employee Assistance Program, the Office of Values and Ethics, etc.). Through the provision of tools, the Program offered managers the support needed to prepare themselves for difficult conversations. Finally, having open and proactive discussions about well-being in the workplace has yielded positive results in addressing these types of situations informally.

In order to build workforce engagement and enhance management practices, the “Over to You” survey continued to be administered across the Department twice a year in order to measure some aspects of the Department’s organizational health. The results of this survey were posted on the intranet for the benefit of all Canadian Heritage employees, which enabled managers to propose actions to address specific issues within their organizations. For instance, one sector conducted 360-degree assessments and another sector organized skip-level meetings to better understand the issues and implement improvement measures.

The Department has also adopted a strategic recruitment plan with the following four pillars:

  1. promote Canadian Heritage as an employer of choice;
  2. increase the representation of employment equity groups;
  3. expand the visibility of the new post-secondary recruitment campaign and public service renewal; and
  4. support the Department’s regionalization initiative, which helps to promote Canadian Heritage programs.

Senior management has identified four competencies and areas of interest to support future recruitment, namely:

  1. innovation techniques;
  2. event management;
  3. distribution and entertainment technologies; and
  4. Indigenous people.

A graduate inventory has been posted for two years (October 2018 to 2020) to target talent in these professional areas.

In 2018–2019, the Department participated in the following three job fairs in three regions:

Canadian Heritage is committed to having a skilled workforce that reflects the diversity of the Canadian population we serve. As a result, it promotes employment equity and encourages candidates to voluntarily indicate on their application if they are a woman, an Indigenous person, a person with a disability or a member of a visible minority group.

2018–2019 was a turning point with respect to support for pay issues when the Department adopted the new pay-pod model. Under this service delivery model, employee files are reviewed as a whole, rather than processing individual transactions. The Department established a partnership with the Pay Centre by dedicating internal resources, which led to a significant decrease in the number of backlog cases. Open, transparent communication regarding Phoenix has also been maintained with employees, managers, the various governance committees and union representatives.

In 2018-19, the Department continued to invest in its data analytics capacity with a strong focus on leveraging Data Visualization platforms and methods to generate new insights and support better management decision making. In addition, the Department continued to explore the use of digital platforms to expand the breadth and scope of engagement, and pursue opportunities to collaborate with stakeholders to discuss issues affecting Canada and Canadians.

Canadian Heritage led an Open by Design pilot project that focused on opportunities to maximize the ongoing release of information across the Department by building digital delivery into its operations and service design. The Department will expand and leverage this work as it addresses its new proactive disclosure obligations under Bill C-58, An Act to amend the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act and to make consequential amendments to other Acts.

In 2018-19, the Department worked to provide Canadians with access to more than 37,000 documents linked to Canadian Heritage grants and contributions programs. The Department is committed to continuing to support and enhance the transparency of funding decisions for the general public, and of the processes involved in reviewing applications.

Canadian Heritage also leveraged artificial intelligence to monitor official language use by funding recipients. The pilot project applied artificial intelligence in order to learn how to assess all clients’ digital communications, and to provide real-time results. The software assessed websites and social media feeds to determine whether communication was provided in both official languages.

The Department employed advanced analytics to generate insights on economic activity in cultural sectors. This project aimed to uncover insights and trends automatically using data mining techniques. The software automatically analyzes datasets from the United Nations and Statistics Canada, among others, in order to identify new approaches for analyzing trade data.

Building on efforts since 2017, Canadian Heritage has progressed with implementing Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+) across the Department by establishing a centralized Gender-Based Analysis + Community of Practice that meets on a quarterly basis. This community supported the development and launch of the Gender-Based Analysis + Helper in Winter 2018, a comprehensive tool for the use of policy and program officers, and it led the planning and execution of learning events during Gender-Based Analysis + Awareness Week and Gender Equality Week. The Department now has a Statement of Intent to conduct Gender-Based Analysis + analysis on all departmental initiatives.

The Department has strong institutional capacity, including the equivalent of 5.85 Full Time Equivalents dedicated to Gender-Based Analysis + and gender equality. The role of the Gender-Based Analysis + Responsibility Centre is to support sectors in putting forth legislative and policy initiatives that take into consideration the lived realities of diverse groups of Canadians.

Strategies for measuring the application of GBA+ have been integrated into 93 percent of the Department’s activities. In 2018-19, more than 80% of Memoranda to Cabinet and Treasury Board submissions included Gender-Based Analysis +; of the Cabinet proposals that do not integrate Gender-Based Analysis +, these typically relate to a Government response pertaining to the mandate of one of the Portfolio organizations, or seeking a financial authority instrument, for which a Gender-Based Analysis + annex is not required.

Furthermore, a number of initiatives successfully integrated Gender-Based Analysis +, including Winterlude 2019, the Canada Arts Presentation Fund’s Development Component, the renewal of Young Canada Works in Heritage Program Terms and Conditions, the Community Support, Multiculturalism and Anti-Racism Initiatives Program, in addition to all of the new initiatives contained in the Action Plan for Official Languages 2018-23: Investing in Our Future.

Four initiatives were identified as aligning with the Gender Results Framework, which provides strategic direction on advancing gender equality in Canada, namely: Increasing the number of women in key roles on Canadian Media Fund productions; Legislation making the National Anthem gender neutral; Community Support, Multiculturalism and Anti-Racism Initiatives Program; and Gender Equality in Sport.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018–19 Main Estimates 2018–19 Planned spending 2018–19 Total authorities available for use 2018–19 Actual spending (authorities used) 2018–19 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
78,596,841 82,530,725 84,643,262 85,206,936 2,676,211
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Actual full-time equivalents 2018–19 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
723.1 693.0 -30.1

Analysis of trends in spending and human resources

Actual expenditures

Departmental spending trend graph

The increase in spending for 2017-18 is mainly due to funding related to initiatives celebrating the 150th anniversary of Confederation, as well as the celebrations of the 375th anniversary of Montreal and by the overall increase in salary costs for employees including retroactive salary payments, following the ratification and signing of collective agreements. The increase in 2017-18 is also explained by new funding received through Budget 2016 and 2017. These initiatives include cultural infrastructure, the promotion of Canadian artists and cultural industries abroad, the support of French-language services and Indigenous languages in the Territories, the renewed Court Challenges program, the Aboriginal Languages Initiative to support the revitalization, preservation, and promotion of Indigenous languages, the support for high-performance athletes and the Youth Employment Strategy.

The decrease in 2018-19 actuals is mainly the result of the conclusion of the funding profile for the Celebration of Canada’s 150th anniversary of Confederation initiative and funding for the two-year investment in cultural infrastructure. These reductions are partially offset by new investments announced in Budget 2017 in the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund in order to strengthen cultural infrastructure and funding to invest in community educational infrastructure in the provinces and territories and by the funding to support Canada’s Creative Export Strategy, Gender Equality in Sport, and the five-year Action Plan for Official Languages, to name a few.

The decrease in 2020-21 and 2021-22 planned spending is mainly due to the temporary funding for the Aboriginal Languages Initiative and to strengthening Multiculturalism which sunsets March 31, 2020. New Budget 2019 announcements for these two initiatives will be reflected in future years’ authorities.

Budgetary performance summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services (dollars)
Core Responsibilities and Internal Services 2018–19 Main Estimates 2018–19 Planned spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2020–21 Planned spending 2018–19 Total authorities available for use 2018–19 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used)
Creativity, Arts and Culture 455,263,886 455,263,886 474,894,788 471,485,472 491,698,764 486,408,233 512,166,821 498,249,905
Heritage and Celebration 102,476,520 102,476,520 100,278,571 93,448,628 120,912,667 120,649,174 236,909,609 188,286,880
Sport 215,874,018 215,874,018 231,116,623 232,344,861 238,523,934 228,061,688 219,441,888 210,650,707
Diversity and Inclusion 90,049,755 86,115,871 100,241,414 65,766,615 104,335,021 96,275,855 81,372,443 52,699,212
Official Languages 368,561,899 368,561,899 435,398,291 433,171,082 396,124,422 392,962,335 364,304,521 365,928,904
Subtotal 1,232,226,078 1,228,292,194 1,341,929,687 1,296,216,658 1,351,594,808 1,324,357,285 1,414,195,282 1,315,815,608
Internal Services 78,596,841 82,530,725 74,179,084 76,061,626 84,643,262 85,206,936 84,871,350 77,452,315
Total 1,310,822,919 1,310,822,919 1,416,108,771 1,372,278,284 1,436,238,070 1,409,564,221 1,499,066,633 1,393,267,923

Creativity, Arts and Culture: The increase in funding and peak spending in 2017-18 is due to the time limited investment for the social infrastructure projects under the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund in 2016-17 and 2017-18. Starting in 2018-19, funding decreases and stabilizes with the Budget 2017 new ten-year investments to strengthen cultural infrastructure. Additional funding was received in 2017-18 to promote Canadian artists and cultural industries abroad as well as a five year investment, starting in 2018-19, to support Canada’s Creative Export Strategy which aims to foster the export of Canadian creative works. Funding was received for Canada Media Fund in Budget 2018 to compensate for the decline in funds from Canada’s Broadcasting Distribution Undertakings. This is reflected in 2018-19 actuals but not yet in future years’ authorities, explaining the decreases in the 2019-20 and 2020-21 planned spending.

Heritage and Celebration: The fluctuation observed in the actual spending is mainly attributable to the Celebration and Commemoration Program—particularly for Canada’s 150th anniversary of Confederation activities as well as the celebration of Montreal’s 375th anniversary. The related funding peaks in 2017-18 and then sunsets in 2018-19. The Canadian Conservation Institute’s roof repair also adds to 2017-18’s increased spending. Furthermore, the rise in actual spending in 2017-18 and 2018-19 is partly due to time-limited Budget 2017 funds for the Youth Employment Strategy. This funding is reduced in 2019-20 and sunsets in 2020-21. Finally, one-time payments were made in 2018-19 for the Vancouver Foundation for improving access to the justice system in Canada as well as for the Centre of Excellence to create a permanent research body to promote shared understanding of the Canadian federal community, explaining a decrease in future years’ planned spending.

Sport: The increase observed in the 2017-18 actuals is due to new funding for the Athlete Assistance Program and the Next Generation of Canadian Olympic and Paralympic athletes. The observed increase in the 2018-19 spending is in part owed to newly sought funds for the one-year funding towards the support for the bid to the Calgary Corporation to host the 2026 Olympic and Paralympic Winter games, the 3-year temporary support for the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) Men’s World Cup in 2026, the ongoing funding to increase sport participation for persons with an intellectual disability and for new funding related to Gender Equality in Sport (Budget 2018).

Diversity and Inclusion: The increase observed in the 2017-18 and 2018-19 actuals and 2019-20 planned spending is mainly due to funding for the Aboriginal Languages Initiative to support the revitalization, preservation and promotion of Indigenous languages and cultures received in 2017-18 (ending in 2019-20). Also, Canadian Heritage invested in the co-development of the Indigenous Languages Act which received Royal Assent in June 2019. Time-limited funding to the strengthening Multiculturalism to address racism and discrimination explains the increase in 2018-19 actuals spending as well as 2019-20 planned spending. Lastly, the in-year approved funding profile for the Rideau Hall Foundation under the Youth Take Charge Program adds to 2017-18’s and 2018-19’s expenditures.

Official Languages: The Official Languages Program actual spending has been at a similar level for 2016-17 and 2017-18 due to internally funded complementary projects and a ten-year investment to support educational infrastructure projects for Official Languages Minority Communities in the provinces and territories (Budget 2017). Further, the new ongoing funding sought for the Action Plan for Official Languages from 2018 to 2023 is the reason for the increase observed in 2018-19 actuals spending and 2019-20 to 2020-21 planned spending. This funding will help strengthen official language minority communities, improve access to services in both official languages, and promote a bilingual Canada.

Internal Services: The actual spending in 2017-18 and 2018-19 is relatively stable. Due to the Department’s commitment to best mitigate against Phoenix problems that affected many of its employees along with its pledge to innovate, the Department is strengthening, revitalizing and transforming a part of its Internal Services and in particular its Human Resources directorate. This mainly explains the difference between planned and actuals spending for 2018-19. The decrease between 2018-19 actuals and future years planned spending is mainly due to the funding for Grants and Contributions Modernization Project which sunsets in 2018-19.

Actual human resources

Human resources summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services (full-time equivalents)
Core Responsibilities and Internal Services 2016–17 Actual full-time equivalents 2017–18 Actual full-time equivalents 2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Actual full-time equivalents 2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents 2020–21 Planned full-time equivalents
Creativity, Arts and Culture 374.6 388.2 391.2 426.7 414.1 415.1
Heritage and Celebration 411.2 414.1 390.0 346.7 334.4 331.4
Sport 95.4 93.9 105.4 104.8 122.2 122.2
Diversity and Inclusion 69.2 124.8 133.8 140.3 153.7 106.7
Official Languages 146.5 143.9 144.5 151.4 150.7 149.7
Subtotal 1096.9 1164.9 1164.9 1169.9 1175.1 1125.1
Internal Services 643.6 655.3 723.1 693.0 707.4 707.4
Total 1740.5 1820.2 1888.0 1862.9 1882.5 1832.5

Creativity, Arts and Culture: The observed increase in actual full-time equivalents since 2016-17 is mainly the result of the current social infrastructure projects under the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund and the approved initiative to promote Canadian artists and cultural industries abroad. Further, the 2018-19 peak in actual full-time equivalents is explained by a five year investment to support Canada’s Creative Export Strategy which is also reflected in future years planned full-time equivalents. In addition, more human resources were invested in 2018-19 for the Broadcasting Act Review. For 2019-20 and 2020-21, full-time equivalents are relatively stable.

Heritage and Celebration: The large decrease in full-time equivalents levels starting in 2018-19 mirrors that of its Budgetary Resources Table which is mainly attributable to the conclusion of Canada’s 150th anniversary of Confederation activities.

Sport: The increase starting in 2018-19 full-time equivalents and 2019-20 and stabilizing in 2020-21 is due to the program’s need to ensure enough support is available to carry out its mandate while providing the appropriate level of resources for some of the new initiatives mentioned previously in the budgetary planning summary.

Diversity and Inclusion: A significant portion of the full-time equivalents increase seen from 2017-18 to 2018-19 actuals and 2019-20 planned is due to the Aboriginal People’s Program whose temporary funding for the Aboriginal Languages Initiative to support the revitalization, preservation and promotion of Indigenous languages and cultures, spans three years starting in 2017-18.

Official Languages: The Official Languages core responsibility shows a similar level of full-time equivalents from year to year. The slight increase is attributable to the new funding sought for the Action Plan for Official Languages from 2018 to 2023.

Internal Services: Due to the Department’s commitment to best mitigate against Phoenix problems that affected many of its employees along with its pledge to innovate, the Department is strengthening, revitalizing and transforming a part of its Internal Services and in particular its Human Resources and Finance directorates. In addition, a light growth is associated with the creation of a new branch, incorporating and consolidating one new function (innovation and experimentation) and reflecting sustained demands on a medium-term policy exercise; all which correlate with the increase levels of actuals full-time equivalents in 2018-19 as well as planned full-time equivalents in 2019-20 and 2020-21.

Expenditures by vote

For information on the Canadian Heritage’s organizational voted and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2018–2019.Footnote 26

Government of Canada spending and activities

Information on the alignment of the Canadian Heritage’s spending with the Government of Canada’s spending and activities is available in the GC InfoBase.

Financial statements and financial statements highlights

Financial statements

The Canadian Heritage’s financial statements (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2019, are available on the departmental website.

Financial statements highlights

Condensed Statement of Operations (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2019 (dollars)
Financial information 2018–19 Planned results 2018–19 Actual results 2017–18 Actual results Difference (2018–19 Actual results minus 2018–19 Planned results) Difference (2018–19 Actual results minus 2017–18 Actual results)
Total expenses 1,339,018 1,438,472 1,530,865 99,454 (92,393)
Total revenues 10,026 10,116 10,887 90 (771)
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 1,328,992 1,428,356 1,519,978 99,364 (91,622)

The Department’s total net cost of operations before government funding and transfers decreased from the previous year’s total by $91.6 million (six percent) and is largely due to:

Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited) as of March 31, 2019 (dollars)
Financial Information 2018–19 2017–18 Difference (2018–19 minus 2017–18)
Total net liabilities 450,512 502,920 (52,408)
Total net financial assets 437,370 488,670 (51,300)
Departmental net debt 13,190 14,266 (1,076)
Total non-financial assets 22,755 18,863 3,892
Departmental net financial position 9,565 4,597 4,968

Total net liabilities were $450.5 million at the end of 2018–19, a decrease of $52.4 million (10%) over the previous years’ total liabilities of $502.9 million. The decrease is mainly explained by accounts payable and accrued liabilities related to contribution agreements ($53.2 million) that have been paid or completed prior to closing of the fiscal year.

Total non-financial assets were $22.8 million at the end of 2018–19, an increase of $3.9 million (21%) from the previous year’s total non-financial assets of $18.9 million. The increase is largely explained by the costs associated with the development of the software for the Grants and Contributions Modernization Project, Procure to Pay (P2P), Business Intelligence and GCDOCS.

Supplementary information

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate ministers:
  • The Honourable Pablo Rodriguez, P.C., M.P., Minister of Canadian Heritage and Multiculturalism
  • The Honourable Kirsty Duncan, P.C., M.P., Minister of Science and Sport
  • The Honourable Mélanie Joly, P.C., M.P., Minister of Tourism, Official Languages and La Francophonie
Institutional head:
  • Hélène Laurendeau
Ministerial portfolio:
  • Department of Canadian Heritage
Enabling instrument:
Year of incorporation / commencement:

Reporting Framework

The Canadian Heritage Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory of record for 2018–19 are shown below and are also available in text version.

Canadian Heritage Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory 2018-19

Supporting information on the Program Inventory

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Canadian Heritage’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on the Canadian Heritage’s website:

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures.Footnote 27 This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Canadian Heritage
15 Eddy Street
Gatineau QC  K1A 0M5
Canada

Email
PCH.info-info.PCH@canada.ca
Website
https://www.canada.ca/en/canadian-heritage.html
Telephone
819-997-0055
Toll-free*
1-866–811-0055
TTY** (Toll-free)
1-888-997-3123

*The toll-free lines have agents available to answer your questions, Monday to Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (Eastern Time).

**The TTY is a telecommunication device for people who are deaf, hard of hearing, or speech-impaired.

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Core Responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the Department with respect to a Core Responsibility are reflected in one or more related Departmental Results that the Department seeks to contribute to or influence.
Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)
A report on the plans and expected performance of an appropriated department over a three-year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.
Departmental Result (résultat ministériel)
A Departmental Result represents the change or changes that the department seeks to influence. A Departmental Result is often outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.
Departmental Result Indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)
A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a Departmental Result.
Departmental Results Framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)
Consists of the department’s Core Responsibilities, Departmental Results and Departmental Result Indicators.
Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
A report on an appropriated department’s actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
experimentation (expérimentation)
Activities that seek to explore, test and compare the effects and impacts of policies, interventions and approaches, to inform evidence-based decision-making, by learning what works and what does not.
full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+])
An analytical process used to help identify the potential impacts of policies, Programs and services on diverse groups of women, men and gender differences. We all have multiple identity factors that intersect to make us who we are; GBA+ considers many other identity factors, such as race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability.
government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2018–19 Departmental Results Report, those high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada’s Strength; and Security and Opportunity.
horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)
An initiative where two or more departments are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.
non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
plan (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
planned spending (dépenses prévues)

For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.

priority (priorité)
A plan or project that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s) or Departmental Results.
program (programme)
Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within the department and focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.
result (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.
statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, 2019
Catalogue No. CH1-38E-PDF
ISSN: 2560-8827

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