Departmental Results Report 2019-20 — Canadian Heritage

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The Honourable Steven Guilbeault, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Canadian Heritage

The Honourable Bardish Chagger, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Diversity and Inclusion and Youth

The Honourable Mélanie Joly, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Economic Development and Official Languages

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Message from the Ministers

Steven Guilbeault
Bardish Chagger
Mélanie Joly

As ministers, we are pleased to present the Departmental Results Report 2019–20 for the Department of Canadian Heritage. At a time when Canadians are facing unprecedented challenges due to the COVID-19 pandemic and are coming together to build a society that is stronger and prouder of its diversity, we are more determined than ever to work together on behalf of arts, culture, heritage, and sport, while fostering the values of respect and inclusion, and promoting Canada’s official and Indigenous languages.

On June 21, 2019, the Indigenous Languages Act received royal assent. This historic Act has allowed us to fulfil our Government’s commitment to work with Indigenous Peoples to develop legislation to preserve, protect, and revitalize First Nations, Inuit, and Métis languages. Canadian Heritage continues to work with Indigenous partners through a joint implementation steering committee to fully implement the Act and Budget 2019 investments of $333.7 million over five years, and $115.7 million per year thereafter.

In 2019‒20, Canadian Heritage supported the arts and culture sector in a number of ways. Through our Creative Export Strategy, we invested nearly $7.2 million in 23 projects to help our creators stand out in the global marketplace. Preparations continued for the Frankfurt Book Fair, an international showcase for Canadian talent. Despite the pandemic, in 2020, Canada began its virtual participation as guest of honour. By 2021, it will be ready to ensure a full, strong, and engaging presence in Frankfurt, again as guest of honour. Canada also supported the creation of the Francophone digital platform TV5MONDEplus.

Canadian Heritage has encouraged projects that showcase our history and collective heritage. Among the many celebrations we have supported, a number are particularly noteworthy. In 2019, television, radio, and online broadcasts of National Indigenous Peoples Day celebrations reached millions of people. We marked the 50th anniversary of the decriminalization of homosexuality in Canada. We also supported the work of museum and heritage organizations and provided funding to new recipients to ensure that Canadian history is presented from a variety of perspectives.

In the area of sport, our Government worked to promote diversity and inclusion for all—including young people, Indigenous people, and members of equity-seeking groups—as well as to foster harassment-free environments and to prevent injuries. To this end, Canadian Heritage launched the Canadian High Performance Sport Strategy in May 2019, and Sport Canada supported the development of the Universal Code of Conduct to Prevent and Address Maltreatment in Sport. The Department has also encouraged the participation of girls and women in sport, both as athletes and leaders. Despite the postponement of the 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games in Tokyo, our commitment to all Canadian athletes, particularly high-performance athletes, remains intact.

Canadian Heritage continues to support diversity and inclusion, as they are both fundamental to a more inclusive society, where all Canadians are able to participate and thrive. The Department introduced Canada’s Anti-Racism Startegy, which includes several new measures and the Anti-Racism Action Program. As part of the Strategy, we also established the Federal Anti-Racism Secretariat. In addition to funding hundreds of projects to foster diversity and inclusion across the country, Canadian Heritage was given a new mandate to host and support the activities of two secretariats. The LGBTQ2 Secretariat ensures that the rights of LGBTQ2 communities are protected and promotes their rich contribution to society, while the activities of the Youth Secretariat include coordinating meetings of the Prime Minister’s Youth Council and recruiting the next cohort of young people for the Council.

The promotion of Canada’s two official languages remains at the top of our list of priorities. Implementation of the Action Plan for Official Languages 2018‒2023 is ongoing, and we are on track to offer the Mauril program online and free of charge by the end of 2020. This program was created in honour of Mauril Bélanger to encourage Canadians to become proficient in their second official language. It will present entirely Canadian cultural content. In addition, we used the 50th anniversary of the Official Languages Act to emphasize its importance in building Canadian identity and to lay the groundwork for its modernization.

These are only a few examples of the work of Canadian Heritage in 2019‒20. We invite you to continue reading to learn more. You will notice our unwavering commitment as ministers to Canadians, as well as the Department’s determination to draw on the creativity of its staff in order to achieve the objectives of the Government of Canada—in any situation.

The Honourable
Steven Guilbeault

Minister of
Canadian Heritage

The Honourable
Bardish Chagger

Minister of Diversity and
Inclusion and Youth

The Honourable
Mélanie Joly

Minister of Economic
Development and
Official Languages

Results at a glance and operating context

In 2019–20, the Department of Canadian Heritage supported Minister Guilbeault, Minister Chagger, and Minister Joly—as well as Minister Rodriguez and Minister Duncan prior to the 2019 federal elections—in carrying out their mandates and achieving results to advance the Department’s core responsibilities. The Department’s total actual spending in 2019–20 amounted to $1,550,574,951 and its total actual full-time equivalents were 1,843.3. The Department’s results at a glance include:

Core responsibility 1: Creativity, arts and culture

In its second year, the Creative Export Strategy helped Canadian creative entrepreneurs maximize their export potential by distributing nearly $7.2 million in funding to support 23 export-ready projects, providing support for trade-related programming and activities on the margins of several international trade events, and holding 58 cultural events and 11 literary events in Germany in the lead up to Canada’s Guest of Honour year at the Frankfurt Book Fair.

The Creative Marketplace Lab hosted a Rights Data and Registration Symposium, as a novel way to bring stakeholders, experts and innovators together to improve and incentivize copyright registration by developing solutions together. This exercise included hands-on workshops designed to engage technological and collaborative opportunities with industry stakeholders.

The Local Journalism Initiative was launched in 2019–20, with an investment of $50 million over five years. The Initiative supports the creation of original civic journalism that covers the diverse needs of underserved communities across Canada.

In the context of Canada’s approach to protect its democracy, the Digital Citizen Initiative contributed $7 million over 9 months to 23 projects, which engaged 12 million Canadians across the country.

The Government of Canada supported the creation of a French-language digital platform with TV5MONDE public broadcasters with an investment of $14.6 million over five years starting in 2019–20.

Core responsibility 2: Heritage and Celebration

In 2019–20, the Celebration and Commemoration Program funded 207 National Indigenous Peoples Day events across Canada, reaching close to 3.3 million Canadians. The Program provided $1.3 million in funding to the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network (APTN) to organize and host the 2019 APTN Indigenous Day Live in Winnipeg, Whitehorse and Calgary.

The 50th anniversary of the decriminalization of homosexuality in Canada and the 50th anniversary of the Official Languages Act were highlighted in the 2019 edition of the Sound and Light show on Parliament Hill. This comprised inclusive imagery and text of LGBTQ2 communities and a segment featuring representatives from official language minority communities across Canada.

The Building Communities through Arts and Heritage Program provided support to encourage citizen engagement and social inclusion within communities across Canada. For example, the Mount Pearl Frosty Festival encourages local community engagement throughout winter through musical and dance performances, dance workshops and dinner theatre, which promote the work of 540 local artists and engage more than 1,600 volunteers and 65,000 attendees.

In June 2019, the Legacy Fund supported the centennial anniversary of the Winnipeg General Strike, funding a major monument across from Winnipeg’s City Hall in the shape of a tipped streetcar, a reference to “Bloody Saturday” on June 21, 1919. This was a defining moment in Winnipeg and Canadian history, which contributed to the advancement of workers’ rights.

As a pilot project undertaken with the Ontario Museums Association, the Canadian Conservation Institute delivered online e-learning modules based on its “Preservation Housekeeping for Heritage Sites and Small Museums” regional on-site workshop. Seven additional videos related to preventive conservation, restoration and digital management of collections were created and made accessible on the CCI-CHIN YouTubeFootnote 1 channel.

The Canada History Fund supported diverse new recipients who enrich Canadian history with a variety of inclusive perspectives, such as the Sikh Heritage Museum of Canada, The ArQuives, and the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, who produced 20 new video interviews that document the Inuit connection to the land, and the links between the land, history and culture of Inuit Nunangat, the Inuit homeland in Canada.

Core responsibility 3: Sport

The Department provided funding to establish mechanisms to increase the participation of girls and women in sport as athletes and leaders. These included support for a Gender Equity in Sport Strategy, the creation of a Gender Equity Secretariat, and Innovation Initiative funding for pilot projects addressing participation challenges for girls and women in sport.

Sport Canada provided leadership and financial support to the Coaching Association of Canada to conduct a series of nationwide consultations and a National Safe Sport Summit. These led to the drafting of the Universal Code of Conduct to Prevent and Address Maltreatment in Sport by the Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sport, which will be integrated into the organizational policies and procedures of all funded sport organizations.

The Department led the development of and launched the Canadian High Performance Sport Strategy in May 2019, which will guide the national high performance stakeholders’ policies and priorities in support of 13 high performance objectives of the Canadian Sport Policy.

Core responsibility 4: Diversity and inclusion

Through its Multiculturalism Programs, the Department allocated over $30 million of funding for 116 projects, 372 events, 56 Community Support for Black Canadian Youth initiatives, a National Anti-Black Racism Education and Awareness Campaign and 77 Community Capacity Building initiatives.

Funding for the Black Canadian Youth Approach supported collaboration with the Public Health Agency of Canada to research challenges faced by Black Canadians. Four research papers on issues pertinent to Black Canadians were supported, providing direction for areas of further potential research. In addition, the Black Canadian Youth Initiatives-funded projects aimed to combat discrimination through awareness raising and digital literacy, provide opportunities for Black Canadian youth and empower them through the promotion of Black history, culture and identity, and develop leadership skills and civic engagement.

After the completion of cross-country engagements, a new federal Anti-Racism Secretariat was established to address the complex challenges of racism and discrimination through new initiatives aimed at removing barriers to full participation in Canadian society.

The Human Rights Program coordinated input between federal, provincial and territorial governments to submit a report in February 2020 to the United Nations, Canada’s Interim Report under the Convention Against Torture.

Court Challenges Program activities continued throughout the year. The Program is implemented and administered by the University of Ottawa, an independent organization at arm’s length from the Government. Funding decisions are made by two independent expert panels—one for official languages rights and one for human rights.

The Indigenous Languages Act received Royal Assent on June 21, 2019, completing an important commitment to bring forward the Act, co-developed with Indigenous Peoples, with the goal of supporting Indigenous Peoples efforts to reclaim, revitalize, maintain and strengthen First Nations, Inuit and Métis languages. A Joint Implementation Steering Committee, made up of the Assembly of First Nations, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, the Métis National Council and Canadian Heritage was created to help implement the Act and Budget 2019 investments, and establish the Office of the Commissioner of Indigenous Languages.

In 2019–20, the Youth Take Charge Program supported the citizen-focused activities component of the Digital Citizen Initiative through four funded projects, which aimed to strengthen Canadians’ digital media literacy and critical thinking skills, in order to better understand online deceptive practices, recognize disinformation, and be less susceptible to online manipulation.

After its November 2019 transfer to Canadian Heritage, the Youth Secretariat continued to implement Canada’s Youth Policy and pursued interdepartmental meetings on the youth portfolio to support its implementation across the federal government. The Secretariat provided departmental support to coordinate and plan meetings of the Prime Minister’s Youth Council and selection process to engage the next cohort of youth.

The LGBTQ2 Secretariat supported the Department of Justice Canada in developing Bill C-6, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (conversion therapy) to ban the harmful practice of conversion therapy in Canada, which to date, has gone through its first (October 1, 2020) and second (October 26-28, 2020) readings.

Core responsibility 5: Official languages

To mark the 50th anniversary of the Official Languages Act in 2019–20, Canadian Heritage organized a number of activities, including: the Symposium on the 50th Anniversary of the Official Languages Act; the creation of the new Awards for Excellence and Leadership in Official Languages; a segment during the fifth edition of the “Northern Lights” show on Parliament Hill; and the creation of a special visual identity and banners for this occasion.

The establishment of the Canadian Cultural Program for English and French Second Language Learning, paying tribute to the Honourable Mauril Bélanger, is on track. A vignette of the Mauril program was presented to the public on May 28, 2019. The Mauril program will help increase the rate of bilingualism among Canadians by giving them access to an environment where they can learn their second official language.

On January 22, 2020, an agreement for the funding of the Université de l’Ontario français was signed with the Government of Ontario and the first cohort of students is expected to attend the institution as early as September 2021.

Internal Services

In 2019–20, the Human Resources and Workplace Management Branch focused on implementing many initiatives, such as supporting efforts to prevent and resolve pay system issues by taking necessary measures to ensure employees are paid correctly and on time; advancing employment equity, diversity and inclusion across the Department; and implementing the Canadian Heritage’s Workplace Well-Being Action Plan 2017–2020.

The Department of Canadian Heritage continued to improve its information management and technology infrastructure for its employees. For instance, collaborative tools such as SharePoint and MS Teams were implemented for certain users across the Department. The increase of bandwidth and remote connections (VPN) allowed for greater telework capacity and increased its digital presence. In addition, the Chief Information Officer Branch implemented a client services relationship management function.

In 2019–20, the Department developed the PCH Data Strategy, with four pillars and key activities for each pillar and related documents. As an overarching document, the data strategy encompasses all issues related to data collection, stewardship, and use as related to Canadian Heritage’s mandate and all core responsibilities.

For more information on the Department of Canadian Heritage’s plans, priorities and results achieved, see the “Results: what we achieved” section of this report.

Results: what we achieved

Core responsibility 1: Creativity, arts and culture

Description: Ensures that a wide range of Canadian artistic and cultural content is accessible at home and abroad. Provides opportunities for Canadians to participate and engage in Canada’s creative life, fostering a sense of belonging and inclusion. Fosters creativity, innovation, growth and employment opportunities in Canada’s cultural sector, and in the creative economy. Support policy, legislative and regulatory measures; deliver funding programs that support creation, professional training, cultural infrastructure and arts presentation; business development and marketing initiatives; and the establishment of partnerships in Canada and abroad.

Results

The Department contributes to Core Responsibility 1 through several programs: Arts; Cultural Marketplace Framework; and Cultural Industries Support and Development. Canadian Heritage fosters a vibrant Canadian artistic sector by increasing opportunities for Canadians to connect with the arts, explore artistic excellence and become full partners in supporting a resilient arts sector. The Department encourages the creation of and access to Canadian cultural content, and fosters the competitiveness of Canada’s music, book publishing and periodical industries, and film and video. Canadian Heritage supports marketplace conditions for a strong, innovative, competitive and equitable cultural sector. The Department also contributes to the promotion of discoverability and distribution of Canadian programming in French at home and abroad through the TV5 program. For more details on Canadian Heritage programs, please consult the Supplementary information tables associated with this report, and the Canadian Heritage website.

The actual spending budget allocated to this core responsibility was $542,853,062 and was supported by a total of 423.9 actual full-time equivalents.

Supporting creative industries in the digital economy, fostering creativity and contributing to economic growth

The Creative Export Canada program distributed nearly $7.2 million in funding to support 23 projects, including multi-year projects beginning in fiscal year 2018–2019, from all major creative industries, for which more than a quarter were from the audiovisual and interactive digital media sectors.

In its second year, the Creative Export Strategy helped over 700 Canadian creative entrepreneurs maximize their export potential by expanding market opportunities and promoting Canada’s cultural sector abroad. The Strategy supported several activities in 2019–20 that helped Canadian creative entrepreneurs expand their global reach and further their international business objectives.

In 2019–20, the Canada Media Fund successfully launched some of the most impactful updates to the program since its establishment in 2010, including an expansion of eligible funding criteria to include Canadian online platforms, the establishment of new support for creators at the early stage of project development for activities like scriptwriting, and the creation of a new component of the Fund dedicated to efforts intended to develop the sector by undertaking targeted measures and addressing key gaps such as gender parity and Indigenous production.

The Creative Marketplace Lab established the Artificial Intelligence and the Creative Marketplace Policy Interdepartmental Working Group, which included Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada, Global Affairs Canada, Canadian Intellectual Property Office, Shared Services Canada and Crown Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada. The Lab also contributed to a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council Partnership Grant application with Concordia University, the European Union’s Directorate-general for Communications Networks, Content and Technology (EU DG Connect), and academics from around the world. The “RE-CREATE: Research-Creation as Culture and Practice” strategic partnership proposal aligns with the Lab’s emphasis on research and engagement, and substantive focus examining how artificial intelligence might help creators enforce and manage their rights, enabling them to better commercialize their works in the creative marketplace.

Supporting Canadian content creator right holders

During 2019–20, an independent expert panel undertook an extensive outreach and engagement process to hear what Canadians had to say about updating the Broadcasting Act, the Telecommunications Act, and the Radiocommunications Act. On January 29, 2020, the panel published its final report entitled “Canada’s Communications Future: Time to Act,” which includes 97 recommendations for addressing key issues facing the Canadian broadcasting and telecommunications sectors. Canadian Heritage examined the panel’s findings, and continues to pursue its analysis in this regard, to support the development of proposals to renew the Broadcasting Act for the digital age.

In the context of the review of the Copyright Act, the Broadcasting, Copyright and Creative Marketplace Branch’s Creative Marketplace Lab supported the Copyright policy team by providing internal data analysis on issues of charitable exception and commercial radio exception, and commissioned research by external experts on the subjects of extended collective licensing, and revision and termination rights in Canada.

The Department contributed to the adoption of Bill C-4, an Act to implement the Agreement between Canada, the United States of America and the United Mexican States, which replaced the North American Free Trade Agreement. Following its adoption and coming into force on July 1, 2020, Canada will have until the end of 2022 to extend its general term of copyright protection from 50 years to 70 years after the life of the author.

In partnership with Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada, the Canadian Intellectual Property Office and an external facilitator, the Creative Marketplace Lab hosted a Rights Data and Registration Symposium, as a novel way to bring stakeholders, experts and innovators together to improve and incentivize copyright registration by developing solutions together. This exercise, including hands-on workshops designed to engage technological and collaborative opportunities, reflects experimentation in engaging industry stakeholders to complement the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology, and the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage reports on the future of rights managements and the registration system in Canada.

To meet Canadian creators and consumers’ need for educational resources on copyright information, the Creative Marketplace Lab commissioned Pacific Legal Education and Outreach to deliver an operational copyright digital self-testing tool prototype tailored for creators. At the end of the project, results from preliminary testing through focus groups with artists showed that 100% found the prototype useful and learned something new about copyright.

Creative industries in global markets

In January 2020, Canadian Heritage announced the Creative Industries Trade Mission to Europe (Berlin, Amsterdam, Stockholm)—its third large, multi-sector trade mission under Canada’s Creative Export Strategy. The mission was scheduled for May 25 to June 2, 2020, and planning was well underway, but it was postponed due to COVID-19. Canadian Heritage remains deeply committed to this important initiative, and is currently looking at rescheduling this trade mission in the first quarter of 2021 and adding a virtual pre-mission component for the fall of 2020.

Throughout the year, Canadian Heritage provided support for trade-related programming and activities on the margins of several international trade events held abroad and in Canada. This included facilitating business-to-business interactions with international counterparts, pitch sessions, networking opportunities, and market briefings during a number of events, including: the Edinburgh Festivals 2019 (United Kingdom); Cervantino Performing Arts Festival 2019 (Mexico); Womex-World Music Expo 2019 (Finland); HotDocs International Documentary Festival 2019 (Toronto); Banff World Media Festival 2019; Montreal International Documentary Festival 2019; and Kidscreen Miami 2020 (United States).

Canadian Heritage led a delegation of approximately 70 representatives from 41 partners in industry, and federal, provincial and territorial governments to the Frankfurt Book Fair in October 2019. On the last day of the fair, Canada participated in a handover ceremony with Guest of Honour Norway, formally beginning our own Guest of Honour year (rescheduled to 2021 due to COVID-19). As a measure of reach within German media, Canada was mentioned more than 480 times during the event.

As part of the lead up to Canada’s Guest of Honour year at the Frankfurt Book Fair, 58 cultural events and 11 literary events were held in Germany, which promoted Canada’s creative industries to international markets, particularly in Europe.

In support of the Frankfurt Initiative, Canadian Heritage has developed more than 30 partnerships at the federal, provincial and territorial levels, who continue to demonstrate a keen interest and solid engagement in the project. These partnerships will help leverage Canada’s Guest of Honour status as an opportunity to promote our literary and creative industries.

Throughout 2019–20, the Canada Arts Presentation Fund supported the engagement of professional Canadian presenters in a number of international events, to participate in partnerships with a variety of federal partners such as Global Affairs Canada, the Canada Council for the Arts, and the International Trade Branch, as well as provincial agencies like Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec and the Ontario Arts Council. Events included the Edinburgh Festivals in Scotland, the Cervantino Festival in Mexico, and the Marché des arts du spectacle d’Abidjan in Côte d’Ivoire. At each event, Canadian tour-ready professional artists were highlighted and the international networking opportunities for Canadian arts professionals were strong, resulting in increased interactions with international presenters, artists, and other arts professionals.

In August 2019, the Government of Canada announced an investment of $14.6 million over five years to support the creation of TV5MONDEplus, a French-language digital platform, to be launched worldwide in the fall of 2020. With this investment, Canada aims to increase the online presence of French-language content and provide enhanced visibility of Canadian content while offering additional outreach opportunities for Canadian artists and producers. This new platform will further enable “discoverability” and ease of access for French-language and Canadian programming on the world stage.

Reflecting Canada’s diversity through training in the arts

The Canada Arts Training Fund committed to co-developing a multiyear initiative with Indigenous organizations, to examine and determine what measures are best suited to increase the application and retention rates, and ultimately increase the number of successful graduates from Indigenous training organizations. In January 2020, an agreement on project objectives was reached among participating Indigenous schools, including: strengthening inclusivity of Indigenous communities, Elders, teachings and cultural knowledge, and home territories across Canada in training artists and defining art practices; exploring resources that can emerge from connecting more effectively with established Indigenous companies who could provide practicum placements and mentorships for Indigenous arts students; identifying ways to improve the training environment and long-term success of graduating students; and increasing student enrollment, retention and successful career initiation of graduating students in each of the Indigenous schools.

An Indigenous Trainers’ Caucus Meeting was hosted at The Talking Stick Festival in Vancouver, February 24–27, 2020. Ways to improve the learning environment were identified, including: increasing access to space and facilities as well as Indigenous faculty, particularly relating to technical and backstage resources, stage and production managers, designers and administrative staff; improving means to travel to connect with other Indigenous groups and communities; establishing secure and sustainable student supports; developing pre-professional training programs that could feed into existing institutions; increasing access to recognized senior artists and masters in their field of expertise; and providing additional resources to enable the current training organizations to collaborate with each other and include new faculty members from the field.

Emerging issues in Canada’s cultural landscape

As part of the approach to protect Canada’s democracy, the Digital Citizen Initiative contributed $7 million over 9 months to 23 projects, reaching more than 12 million Canadians, and delivered by Canadian civil society stakeholders that strengthened citizens’ critical thinking about online disinformation, their ability to be more resilient against online disinformation, as well as their ability to get involved in democratic processes. The Digital Citizen Initiative also established a multi-stakeholder working group with the mandate to develop guiding principles on diversity of content online as a means to help build citizen resilience to disinformation and contribute to greater social cohesion. The multi-stakeholder working group is comprised of countries such as Australia, Finland, France, and Germany, and representatives from online platforms, and civil society. This working group contributes towards the building of partnerships to support a healthy information ecosystem.

Gender-based analysis plus

Gender and diversity considerations are taken into account in the development of Creative Export Strategy activities, which aim to support Canadian creative exporters by improving the economic situation of Canadians working in this sector. For example, applications or projects that include plans or commitments to implement gender or diversity considerations in staffing, leadership and decision-making roles are given careful consideration during the assessment process of the Creative Export Canada program.

Furthermore, gender equality, diversity and inclusiveness are taken into consideration in the development of new initiatives led by Canada within the TV5 partnership. These considerations are also taken into account for the composition of the Board of Directors of TV5 Québec Canada and TV5 NUMÉRIQUE.

The Music Policy and Programs Directorate undertook a study to better understand the barriers and challenges facing the Indigenous music community, which was a follow-up report to the National Indigenous Music Impact Study it contributed to in 2018–19. In 2020–21, the Department will review the recommendations to inform future program development of the Canada Music Fund. The Fund was allocated $100,000 in 2019–20, to strengthen the program’s capacity to research challenges faced by artists and entrepreneurs of different gender groups and ethnic backgrounds and report on the demographics of their applicants.

Experimentation

The Strategic Initiatives component of the Canada Culture Investment Fund launched in November 2018 an experimental project called The First Spark Initiative, which ended on November 15, 2019. Arts and heritage organizations could request funding to organize a participatory problem-solving activity to meet a shared business challenge. The goal was to bring together a team of community stakeholders from various sectors to explore creative solutions to the problems faced by arts and heritage organizations. The aim of the initiative was to provide a “first spark” for the development of projects based on the needs of the sector and which have solid partnerships in place. In 2019–20, 37 requests were approved for a total of $176,509 in support of arts and heritage organizations. These activities took place in Alberta, British Columbia, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Ontario, Quebec and Yukon.

In the fall of 2019, the Canada Arts Presentation Fund launched a new initiative to accept applications from non-incorporated organizations and ad hoc groups from ethno-cultural and Indigenous communities. The initiative was the subject of numerous departmental working sessions to identify the strategies most likely to reach the targeted groups. Work to raise awareness and support project development continued throughout the year. Results on the number of applications received and types of proposed projects will be available in 2020–21.

In 2018–19, the Department embarked on a three-phase foresight project on the future of entertainment and information media systems by 2038. In 2019–20, departmental officials moved forward with the second phase of the project, which consisted of analyzing the four future scenarios developed in the first phase of the exercise to identify relevant subjects and partnerships for future-oriented policy development. This exercise positions the Department to anticipate shifts in the media landscape, the social impact of media, and connects media to other broader emergent issues. This process was used to ensure that policy-making remains forward-looking and can be further built upon to develop effective and relevant partnerships and policies.

Creative Export Canada program experimented with new and innovative program tools, such as a referral service for projects to other federal institutions. As part of the analysis of the applications received, a working group was created to consult various specialists in the creative industries in order to obtain their expertise on projects deemed to have potential. Consultations were held with the Broadcasting, Copyright and Creative Market Branch, Canada Book Fund, Canada Music Fund, Canada Arts Presentation Fund, Quebec regional office and International Trade Operations. External consultations were also held with Public Services and Procurement Canada and Telefilm.

Results achieved for Creativity, arts and culture
Departmental results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18 Actual results 2018–19 Actual results 2019–20 Actual results
Creative industries are successful in the digital economy, foster creativity and contribute to economic growth. Gross domestic product (GDP) of the Canadian cultural sector. $55 billion March 2020 $53.8 billionFootnote 2 $53.1 billionFootnote 3 n/aFootnote 4
Number of jobs in the cultural sector. 635,900 March 2020 652,406Footnote 5 666,474Footnote 6 n/aFootnote 7
Canadians are able to consume Canadian content on multiple platforms. Number of video games (entertainment software) produced by Canadian-based studios.Footnote 8 1,430 March 2020 n/aFootnote 8 n/aFootnote 8 n/aFootnote 8
Number of Canadian Television productions. 1,190 March 2020 1,222 1,098 n/aFootnote 9
Number of Canadian theatrical feature films produced. 100 March 2020 105Footnote 10 105Footnote 11 n/aFootnote 12
Number of Canadian-authored books published. 6,000Footnote 13 March 2020 6,401 6,764 n/aFootnote 14
Number of magazines in Canada producing Canadian content. 1,673 March 2020 1,549 1,457 1,380
Number of non-daily newspapers in Canada producing Canadian content. 1,046Footnote 15 March 2020 1,032 1,026 1,047
Market share of Canadian artists on top 2,000 domestic album sales chart. 20 March 2022 19 19 22
Market share of Canadian artists on top 20,000 domestic streaming chart. 15 March 2022 10 10 10
Creative industries are successful in global markets. Value of creative exports. New data series, no target available. March 2022 n/a n/aFootnote 16 n/aFootnote 17
Canadians have access to cultural facilities in their communities. Number of communities with improved cultural facilities. 80 March 2020 n/a 93 96
Percentage of Canadians with access to improved cultural facilities. 40 March 2020 n/a 41 40
Canadians have access to festivals and performing arts series that reflect Canada’s diversity. Percentage of funded festivals and performing arts series whose programming promotes diversity. 65 March 2020 n/a 65 63
Budgetary financial resources (dollars) for Creativity, arts and culture
2019–20 Main Estimates 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) 2019–20 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
474,894,788 474,894,788 548,682,706 542,853,062 67,958,274
Human resources (full-time equivalents) for Creativity, arts and culture
2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Actual full-time equivalents 2019–20 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
414.1 423.9 9.8

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Department of Canadian Heritage’s Program Inventory is available in GC InfoBaseFootnote 18.

Core responsibility 2: Heritage and celebration

Description: Offers opportunities for Canadians to participate in celebrations and commemorations of national significance, and in local festivals and heritage events. Invests in the development of learning materials and experiences that give Canadians opportunities to enhance their understanding of Canada’s history. Facilitates access to heritage and provides support to heritage institutions to preserve and present heritage to all Canadians. Delivers projects, programs and services; grants, contributions and tax incentives; conducts research; provides authoritative information and expertise; and supports the implementation of heritage-related legislation.

Results

The Department contributes to Core Responsibility 2 through several programs: National Celebrations, Commemorations and Symbols; Community Engagement and Heritage; Preservation of and Access to Heritage; and Learning about Canadian History. Canadian Heritage offers opportunities for Canadians to participate in celebrations and commemorations of national significance, recognizes notable people, places, symbols, anniversaries and accomplishments of national significance across Canada, offers events and activities in the National Capital Region, and promotes and protects Canadian symbols. The Department provides funding in support of local festivals, community anniversaries and capital projects. Canadian Heritage ensures that Canada’s cultural heritage is preserved and accessible to Canadians today and in the future, assists Canadian museums in documenting and managing their collections, provides Canadians access to Canadian and international heritage through the circulation of artefacts and exhibitions in Canada, and helps Canadian heritage institutions compete with foreign institutions for the loan of prestigious international exhibitions. Finally, the Department encourages Canadians to learn about Canada’s history, civic life, and public policy. For more details on Canadian Heritage programs, please consult the Supplementary information tables associated with this report, and the Canadian Heritage website.

The actual spending budget allocated to this core responsibility was $123,860,201 and was supported by a total of 319.4 actual full-time equivalents.

Celebrations and commemorations of national significance

In the 2019 edition of the Sound and Light show, the Department recognized the 50th anniversary of the decriminalization of homosexuality in Canada by adding images of LGBTQ2 couples and families, and text inclusive of LGBTQ2 communities to the narration in the “Pride and Vision” book of Northern Lights.

Furthermore, the Capital Interpretation Program worked closely with The ArQuives and historian Tom Hooper, who specializes in queer history in Canada, to develop and launch Standing Up, Standing Out: Selections from the National Portrait Collection of The ArQuives, a temporary exhibit that profiled trailblazing members of LGBTQ2 communities in Canada. One version of the exhibit was on display on the Château Laurier Terrace from late May to late October.

To mark the 175th anniversary of the birth of Louis Riel and the 150th anniversary of the Red River Resistance, Commemorate Canada provided approximately $300,000 to projects such as a bilingual symposium with guest speakers, a play on the life of Louis Riel, a Métis educational resource kit distributed to several schools, as well as an open Canada Day event that focused on Métis dance, music and culture, and educational programming for students.

Budget 2019 provided $7 million over two years to recognize and commemorate the legacy of residential schools. In 2019–20, Commemorate Canada invested over $2.2 million of this additional funding in six large-scaled initiatives aimed at advancing reconciliation and raising awareness of the legacy and hardship of residential schools. For example, the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network (APTN) hosted a televised Day for Truth and Reconciliation Commemorative Concert on September 30 to honour survivors of residential schools, their families and communities. The event featured ceremonies with elders, survivors and special guests, and included cultural and musical performances. The network also developed an awareness campaign on social media platforms and television, which included vignettes, public service announcements, testimonies and special programming. Other projects included a bilingual podcast series, a conference, a multi-platform educational program and a four-day national gathering and celebration.

During the Celebrate Canada period from June 21 to July 1, 2019, the Celebration and Commemoration Program funded over 1,800 events and activities that engaged approximately 8 million participants in celebrations of national significance. For National Indigenous Peoples Day, 207 events across Canada were supported, reaching close to 3.3 million Canadians. The Program provided $1.3 million in funding to APTN to organize and host the 2019 APTN Indigenous Day Live in Winnipeg, Whitehorse and Calgary. This celebration was broadcast to an estimated audience of 2.9 million on television, radio and online. On Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day, the Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day Committee in Montréal hosted a parade and show that reached approximately 1.2 million Francophones and Francophiles through various multimedia platforms. For Canadian Multiculturalism Day, 151 supported celebrations reached over 250,000 Canadians. On Canada Day, the Program funded 1,367 events across Canada, which reached approximately 6 million Canadians. For National Acadian Day, the Program received additional support over two years to help fund celebrations for National Acadian Day on August 15, reaching almost 65,000 Canadians. The highlight for National Acadian Day was the televised concert held during the Congrès mondial acadien, which drew 18,000 Canadians.

To highlight Canada’s diversity and inclusiveness within Winterlude programming, the Department implemented a new vision that focuses on partnerships. Winterlude 2020 partners came together to offer dynamic and inclusive programming on a wide range of themes. The Department experienced an overwhelming positive response with increased collaborations with over 40 different partners, including federal, municipal and national partners, business improvement areas, tourism organizations, as well as museums and cultural institutions. Youth, Indigenous cultures, diversity and inclusion, and LGBTQ2 communities were reflected throughout the partners’ programming and events. Collaboration among partners allowed for inclusive thematic crossover, enhancing the overall experience.

Engaging Canadians through local arts and heritage

The Building Communities through Arts and Heritage Program provided support to 775 projects, to encourage citizen engagement and social inclusion within communities across Canada. For example, the Mount Pearl Frosty Festival—supported since 2007–08—encourages local community engagement throughout winter through musical and dance performances, dance workshops and dinner theatre, which promote the work of 540 local artists and engage more than 1,600 volunteers and 65,000 attendees.

In June 2019, the Legacy Fund supported the centennial anniversary of the Winnipeg General Strike, funding a major monument across from Winnipeg’s City Hall in the shape of a tipped streetcar, a reference to “Bloody Saturday” on June 21, 1919. This was a defining moment in Winnipeg and Canadian history, which contributed to the advancement of workers’ rights.

The Sikh Heritage Museum’s Sikhs in Canada Timeline Exhibit visited several Canadian cities with approximately 2,500 attendees in Oakville, Ontario and 1,300 attendees in Winnipeg, Manitoba. The Museum also worked extensively on the development of the Canadian Sikh Heritage Trail app and website. Launch activities for the National Exhibition and the app were put on hold due to the COVID-19 pandemic response.

Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami produced 20 new video interviews that document the Inuit connection to the land, and the links between land, history and culture of Inuit Nunangat, the Inuit homeland in Canada. Collectively, the new videos have been viewed 54,628 times.

The Canada History Fund supported 10 organizations with approximately $4 million as part of the Digital Citizen Initiative. Projects included national awareness campaigns, learning materials, and activities designed to help Canadians build resilience to online misinformation. For instance, MediaSmarts created Break the Fake, a national public service campaign that included online learning materials and content to help Canadians spot online disinformation, which generated more than one million views.

Public access to and preservation of cultural heritage

In January 2020, the Canadian Heritage Information Network rendered the Nomenclature for Museum CatalogingFootnote 19 free for download in a number of formats, thereby completing a key online initiative to maximize the use and dissemination of information regarding Canadian collections of cultural heritage. The resource is now available as linked open data; thus users no longer need to purchase a book or electronic file to stay current with the standard, and software vendors no longer need to pay a licensing fee for its use.

The Canadian Heritage Information Network continued to advance the development of its semantic-based model for validating, reconciling, enriching and publishing museum collections data in a linked open data format. This work is informing the modernization of applications such as Makers in Canada and Artefacts Canada.

As part of the departmental priority to preserve Indigenous culture and languages, the Canadian Conservation Institute nearly completed the restoration of a rare Cree prayer book originating from The Pas region in Manitoba. Concluding steps in the treatment, such as the fabrication of a custom box and the encapsulation of loose enclosures, were halted in March 2020 due to COVID-19 restrictions.

Gender-based analysis plus

By funding activities that promote broad perspectives and practical understanding of all Canadian identities across Canada, programs continue to encourage intersectional analysis and social inclusion. These activities promote participation of all Canadians and showcase Canada’s linguistic, cultural, Indigenous and regional diversity in all of its dimensions.

Events organized by the Major Events, Commemorations and Capital Experience Branch, such as Canada Day, Winterlude and the Sound and Light show, are free, open to the public, and aim to be accessible to all Canadians. The gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) related data collection is done periodically through public opinion research. Surveys conducted typically include demographic questions related to gender, age, household income, education level, language and employment status.

Experimentation

The Building Communities through Arts and Heritage program continued to develop its experimentation project involving a new financial instrument (Outcome Achievement Payments) designed to reduce the administrative burden on funding recipients for commemorative capital projects, through the Legacy Fund component. Specifically, the program conducted a detailed review of its data in order to establish milestone outcomes upon which payments could be based. The program subsequently began exploring methodologies for assigning market values to the milestone outcomes. The development phase is near completion and will conclude in the following year.

As a pilot project undertaken with the Ontario Museums Association, in 2019–20 the Canadian Conservation Institute delivered online e-learning modules based on its “Preservation Housekeeping for Heritage Sites and Small Museums” regional on-site workshop. The Canadian Conservation Institute also delivered a webinar version of its “Emergency and Disaster Preparedness for Cultural Institutions” regional on-site workshop to ensure a better preservation of objects and collections, in collaboration with the Museum Association of Newfoundland and Labrador. Seven additional online information videos on subjects related to preventive conservation, restoration and digital management of collections were created and made accessible on the CCI-CHIN YouTube channel.Footnote 1

Results achieved for Heritage and celebration
Departmental results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18 Actual results 2018–19 Actual results 2019–20 Actual results
Canadians feel a strong sense of belonging to Canada. Percentage of Canadians who report feeling a strong sense of belonging to Canada. 90 March 2021 90 90 90Footnote 20
Canadians are engaged in celebrations and commemora-tions of national significance Number of Canadians who participate in events and activities by attending or volunteering. 8.5 million March 2020 n/a 10,618,349 9,763,947
Number of Canadians who participate in events and activities by viewing traditional and new media broadcasts or downloading related information materials. 1.5 million March 2020 n/a 14,140,000Footnote 21 19,071,892
Canadians across the country are engaged in their communities through local arts and heritage. Number of performers and volunteers in Building Communities through Arts and Heritage funded arts and heritage projects each year. 190,122 March 2020 n/a 190,855 204,698Footnote 22
Total attendance for Building Communities through Arts and Heritage funded arts and heritage projects each year. 18,549,685 March 2020 n/a 21,207,443 20,295,082
The public is provided with access to cultural heritage. Number of in-person and online visits to cultural heritage rendered accessible through heritage programs and services. 1,800,000 March 2020 2,205,169 2,263,910 1,504,563
Heritage objects and collections are preserved by heritage organizations for current and future generations. Number of heritage objects and collections whose preservation has been supported by heritage programs and services. 80,000Footnote 23 March 2020 325,362 446,436 169,836
Budgetary financial resources (dollars) for Heritage and celebration
2019–20 Main Estimates 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) 2019–20 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
100,278,571 100,278,571 126,697,904 123,860,201 23,581,630
Human resources (full-time equivalents) for Heritage and celebration
2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Actual full-time equivalents 2019–20 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
334.4 319.4 -15.0

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Department of Canadian Heritage’s Program Inventory is available in GC InfoBaseFootnote 24.

Core responsibility 3: Sport

Description: Promotes and enhances Canadian participation in sport, from initial introduction to sport to the highest levels through transfer payments and policy leadership. Ensures that all Canadians have access to quality aligned sport programs in a safe and welcoming environment regardless of race, gender or physical disability. Fosters the development of high-performance athletes, coaches, officials, leaders and organizations within the Canadian Sport System. Assists Canadian communities in hosting the Canada Games and international sport events.

Results

The Department contributes to Core Responsibility 3 through the Sport Development and High Performance Program. Sport Canada aims to establish Canada as a leading sport nation at home and abroad, where all Canadians and their communities enjoy, value and celebrate the benefits of active participation and excellence in sport. It contributes to advancing the goals of the Canadian Sport Policy, funds eligible organizations to deliver sport for social development projects in Indigenous communities in Canada, and supports and promotes gender equity in Sport. The Department further provides direct support to Canadian athletes to foster the development of high-performance athletes, and assists sport organizations to host the Canada Games and international sport events in Canada. For more details on Canadian Heritage programs, please consult the Supplementary information tables associated with this report, and the Canadian Heritage website.

The actual spending budget allocated to this core responsibility was $243,114,183 and was supported by a total of 103.5 actual full-time equivalents.

Canadian athletes at the highest levels of competition

In support of a key commitment to “foster a national culture of safe sport, including physical safety, sporting environments free of harassment, promoting diversity and inclusion in sport,” the Department launched the Canadian High Performance Sport Strategy in May 2019. The strategy will guide the national high performance stakeholders’ policies and priorities in support of the 13 high performance objectives of the Canadian Sport Policy. The national high performance stakeholders developed an action plan to support the implementation of the strategy.

The Government of Canada accompanied and supported Team Canada during the 2019 Pan Am Games, where Canadian athletes were awarded 152 medals, and at the 2019 Parapan Am Games where Canadian athletes were awarded 60 medals.

The Department also supported Team Canada’s planned participation at the 2020 Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Games, primarily through funding to National Sport Organizations for National Team preparation. These Games have been postponed to July 2021 due to COVID-19.

Increasing sport participation in a safe and healthy manner

Canadian Heritage continued work to support research and promote women’s and girls’ participation in sport, expand the use of sport for social development in more than 300 Indigenous communities, and provide additional support for ParticipACTION. These activities align with the Budget 2017 and 2018 commitments to develop additional programming to increase Canadians’ participation in sport, with a particular focus on Indigenous Peoples.

The Department provided funding to establish mechanisms to increase the participation of girls and women in sport as athletes and leaders. These included: supporting a Gender Equity in Sport Strategy aimed at increasing representation and participation; creation of a Gender Equity Secretariat at Sport Canada to support gender equity initiatives and programs, and to look at innovative ways of addressing the challenges of participation and retention of girls and women in sport; support to Canadian Women and Sport to design and deliver a Gender Equity Playbook service, scale up successful existing programs, and develop an empathy-based campaign to create a more welcoming and inclusive sport system; and funding through the Innovation Initiative for pilot projects specifically addressing participation challenges for girls and women in sport.

The Department supported efforts to reduce harassment, abuse and discrimination by providing funding to National Sport Organizations, Multisport Service Organizations and Canadian Sport Centres related to their commitments to preventing and addressing maltreatment. These include providing organization members with access to a third party to report incidents of maltreatment, adjusting internal policies and procedures, and providing mandatory training to prevent and address maltreatment.

Other efforts include: support to the Coaching Association of Canada to enhance their National Coaching Certification Program and develop minimum coaching standards on maltreatment; and financial support to the Coaching Association of Canada to conduct a series of nationwide consultations and a National Safe Sport Summit. These led to the drafting of the Universal Code of Conduct to Prevent and Address Maltreatment in Sport by the Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sport with financial support from Sport Canada, which will be adopted and integrated into the organizational policies and procedures of all funded sport organizations.

Additionally, the Department provided funding to the Sport Dispute Resolution Centre for a pilot project to implement the Canadian Sport Helpline to support victims and witnesses of maltreatment in sport, and an independent Investigations Unit to support sport organizations in managing and investigating allegations of maltreatment.

Canadian Heritage addressed concussions in sport through funding to National Sport Organizations and targeted Multisport Service Organizations to ensure that their sport-specific protocols were harmonized with the latest Canadian Guideline on Concussion in Sport and that they introduced activities to prevent concussions in sport, specifically in the areas of rules of the game, training methods and behaviours. The Department also supported these organizations to ensure their concussion policies referenced the areas of intervention identified in the Federal-Provincial and Territorial Harmonized approach (Awareness, Prevention, Detection, Management, and Surveillance). It also facilitated greater alignment of sport organizations’ concussion resources including return-to-sport protocols, with their Provincial/Territorial Sport Organizations. Finally, the Department provided funding to the Sport Information Resource Centre towards an awareness campaign, online infrastructure and events.

Canadian Heritage contributed to improving anti-doping efforts through support to the Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sport, Canada’s national anti-doping organization responsible for administering the Canadian Anti-Doping Program, to ensure Canada’s compliance with existing standards, namely the World Anti-doping Code and other international standards.

In 2019, the Indigenous Sport Unit was created within Sport Canada. This Unit manages program funding to foster the participation of Indigenous Peoples in sport to achieve both sport development and social development outcomes including funding support to the Aboriginal Sport Circle, Sport for social development funding to Provincial/Territorial Aboriginal Sport Bodies, other Indigenous and non-Indigenous delivery organizations and Hosting Program funding for the Arctic Winter Games and the North American Indigenous Games.

Gender-based analysis plus

The Department’s Gender Equity in Sport Strategy aims to increase the representation and participation of women and girls in sport. This strategy is implemented and monitored by the Gender Equity Secretariat and all Sport Canada staff are required to complete GBA+ training. The Department works closely with key stakeholders who have expertise in gender and sport, in implementing the strategy, and this expertise is used in analyzing the programming results.

The Gender Equity Secretariat also undertakes the monitoring of multiple funding agreements to increase women in coaching, officiating, and leadership positions in sport, deliver measures to increase the participation of girls and women in sport, address gender-based violence in sport, and improve the availability of research and data to support evidence-based decision—making. The Secretariat oversees the co-chairing of the Federal-Provincial/Territorial Sport Committee Implementation Work Group on Women and Girls in Sport and regular participation in outreach activities to promote the Strategy and the various supporting initiatives.

The Department conducted a Report Card exercise that examined the diversity and inclusion policies of funded sport organizations, including the gender balance within management and leadership. This review also examined how GBA+ principles are implemented throughout operations, programming and relevant reporting.

Innovation programming invited proposals to focus on underrepresented communities such as LGBTQ2 and Indigenous groups.

Experimentation

Budget 2018 invested funding support for research and to introduce innovative practices to promote women and girls’ participation in sport, and to encourage greater inclusion of women and girls in all facets of sport as well as generate data in this area.

The Department’s Innovation Initiative funded special projects that focused on engaging youth and equity seeking communities to participate in sport. Results of this experimentation will be analyzed in the next fiscal year and results of the innovation projects will be reviewed for efficacy.

Results achieved for Sport
Departmental results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18 Actual results 2018–19 Actual results 2019–20 Actual results
Canadian athletes succeed at the highest levels of competition. Ranking of Canada relative to other countries in Combined Ranking Index for Olympic Sport. 7 June 2020 9 9 9
Ranking of Canada relative to other countries in Combined Ranking Index for Paralympic Sport. 12 June 2020 13 13 10
Canadian children and youth are enrolled in a sport activity. Number of Canadian children and youth enrolled in a sport activity. 4,000,000 June 2020 4,594,540 4,594,540 4,594,540Footnote 25
Canadians, regardless of gender, physical ability and cultural background, who participate in sport activities are satisfied with the manner in which the activity is provided. Percentage of Canadians reporting that they experience sport in a welcoming environment. 90 June 2020 86 86 82
Percentage of Canadians reporting that they experience sport in a safe environment. 80 June 2020 73 73 82
Budgetary financial resources (dollars) for Sport
2019–20 Main Estimates 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) 2019–20 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
231,116,623 231,116,623 245,848,685 243,114,183 11,997,560
Human resources (full-time equivalents) for Sport
2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Actual full-time equivalents 2019–20 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
122.2 103.5 -18.7

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Department of Canadian Heritage’s Program Inventory is available in GC InfoBaseFootnote 26.

Core responsibility 4: Diversity and inclusion

Description: Focuses on celebrating Canada’s diversity, identity and multicultural heritage, promoting resilient communities and reinforcing the rights of Canadians, as a means to foster diversity and inclusion. Supports legislation on multiculturalism. Promotes and supports domestic implementation of international human rights treaties, constitutional and quasi-constitutional rights in Canada. Works in collaboration with a variety of Governmental and non-governmental organizations to support the provision of programs and services on matters of diversity and inclusion. Supports the engagement, participation and inclusion of Canadian youth in their communities and in exchange activities. Revitalizes, preserves and promotes Indigenous languages and cultures and celebrates achievements, and strengthens Indigenous communities through investments in a variety of initiatives.

Results

The Department contributes to Core Responsibility 4 through several programs: Multiculturalism; Human Rights; Indigenous Languages and Cultures; and Youth Engagement. Through these programs, the Department seeks to build an integrated, socially cohesive society, and to engage in discussions on multiculturalism, inclusion and diversity at the domestic and international level. Canadian Heritage also seeks to strengthen and maintain one of the core values relating to Canadian identity—respect for human rights—by addressing barriers to active participation that arise from a lack of awareness, understanding and access to rights. The Department aims to increase awareness among youth participants of the importance of being active and engaged citizens, increase youth knowledge and understanding of Canada, and strengthen their sense of belonging to Canada, thereby strengthening their sense of shared Canadian identity. Canadian Heritage also focuses on keeping Indigenous languages and Indigenous identity as living elements of Canadian society. By providing investments, it contributes to the efforts of Indigenous communities to reclaim, revitalize, maintain and strengthen their Indigenous languages and develop and deliver innovative and culturally appropriate projects under the Indigenous Languages and Cultures Program, Northern Aboriginal Broadcasting, Territorial Language Accords, National Indigenous Peoples’ Day, and Indspire.

Following the 2019 election, two secretariats were transferred to the Department of Canadian Heritage. The Youth Secretariat is responsible for the federal implementation of the Youth Policy and supporting the Prime Minister’s Youth Council. The Secretariat engages across the federal government to provide advice on youth initiatives and to encourage the inclusion of youth voice in government decision-making. As one of the Youth Policy commitments, the Secretariat is also responsible for the State of Youth Report, which will explore how young people in Canada are doing and which will be published every four years. The LGBTQ2 Secretariat promotes LGBTQ2 equality and rights, and works with partners to help address discrimination against LGBTQ2 communities. It does so by working with LGBTQ2 stakeholders to identify issues important to LGBTQ2 people in Canada, and by working across government with other federal departments and agencies to incorporate LGBTQ2 considerations into the development and review of laws, policies and programming to make them more inclusive.

For more details on Canadian Heritage programs, please consult the Supplementary information tables associated with this report, and the Canadian Heritage website.

The actual spending budget allocated to this core responsibility was $132,989,704 and was supported by a total of 164.1 actual full-time equivalents.

Anti-racism in Canada

In 2019–20, the Community Support, Multiculturalism and Anti-racism Initiative Program allocated over $30 million for 621 projects, including 372 events, 116 projects, 56 Community Support for Black Canadian Youth Initiative projects, a National Anti-Black Racism Awareness and Education Campaign project to address racism faced by Black Canadians and 77 Community Capacity Building Initiatives.

During 2019–20, the Department contracted the Turner Consulting Group to produce four research reports on salient issues affecting Black Canadians: Needs Assessment; Jurisdictional Scan; Best Practices; and Recommendations. The research highlighted the overall lack of programs and research specifically for Black youth in Canada. Regular coordination meetings are held with the Public Health Agency of Canada on the joint Black Canadian Youth Approach funding. In addition, as part of the Approach, the 56 Community Support for Black Canadian Youth Initiative projects were funded for $4.75 million. These projects aim to combat discrimination through awareness raising and digital literacy, provide opportunities for Black Canadian youth and empower them through the promotion of Black history, culture and identity, and develop leadership skills and civic engagement.

Since the official launch of Building a Foundation for Change: Canada’s Anti-Racism Strategy 2019–2022, in June 2019 the Department began to implement its key components, including the establishment of the federal Anti-Racism Secretariat, new mechanisms to deliver community-based projects and programming, and approaches to build awareness through improved data and evidence building. Under the Strategy, $30 million was allocated to empower communities through funding under the Multiculturalism Programs. Half of these funds will be delivered through the Community Support, Multiculturalism and Anti-Racism Initiatives Program. The other half will be delivered through the new Anti-Racism Action Program that was created under the Strategy with a three-year funding life cycle.

Supporting Indigenous languages

Canadian Heritage advanced the mandate letter commitment to bring forward an Indigenous Languages Act, which was developed in collaboration with Indigenous Peoples and received Royal Assent on June 21, 2019. A Joint Implementation Steering Committee was created by Canadian Heritage with the Assembly of First Nations, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami and the Métis National Council to work collaboratively to implement Budget 2019 investments and the Indigenous Languages Act. Canadian Heritage has also engaged self-governing First Nations as well as other Indigenous organizations, including those located in urban areas. In March 2020, Canadian Heritage launched consultations in Whitehorse to implement the Indigenous Languages Act. These sessions were paused due to the pandemic but will resume in 2020–21.

Budget 2019 committed $333.7 million over five years, and $115.7 million per year thereafter to support the reclamation, revitalization, maintenance and strengthening of Indigenous languages and the implementation of the Act, including the establishment of the Office of the Commissioner of Indigenous Languages. Through these new investments, project funding increased from 181 to 363 projects and the number of participants increased from 9,301 to 12,223.

Canadian Heritage also supported events for the 2019 International Year of Indigenous languages, and worked collaboratively with the United Nations Education Scientific and Cultural Organization, Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada, and the Indigenous co-chairs of the 2019 International Year of Indigenous Languages Steering Committee.

The Department began negotiations with the Government of Nunavut and Nunavut Tunngavik Incorporated to co-develop an agreement under the Act to increase the number of proficient Inuktut-speaking Inuit educators, demonstrating the flexibility of this legislation.

Canadian Heritage also provided funds to Library and Archives Canada for community projects to reclaim Indigenous languages as part of their Indigenous Heritage Action Plan. These funds supported projects that would digitize existing recordings related to Indigenous cultures and languages, and build the skills, knowledge and resources needed to digitize and preserve Indigenous culture and language recordings.

Youth engagement in Canadian society

In 2019–20, the Youth Take Charge Program received $1.5 million from the Digital Citizen Initiative, which helped support four projects that met the objective of the Initiative’s citizen-focused activities component. These projects included a youth-led civic literacy campaign to encourage informed action in elections, the development of a policy newsletter and activities to support youth in becoming literate, active digital citizens. Through their participation in the projects, youth had opportunities to build resilience against online disinformation and to support a healthy information ecosystem, learning about the importance of the democratic process and contributing to social cohesion.

The Youth Take Charge Program supported the project Jeunes Citoyens d’impact (Institut du Nouveau Monde), to increase the civic impact of young people from throughout Quebec by engaging them in three successive project phases: mobilization, civic education and action. During the mobilization phase, four workshops were held with 103 recent immigrant youth in Welcome Classes and in community organizations, demystifying the importance of citizen participation.

The Exchanges Canada Program offered opportunities for approximately 12,000 youth to learn about Canada, to create linkages with one another, and to enhance their appreciation of the diversity and shared aspects of the Canadian experience. One example is the Forum national des jeunes ambassadeurs (Français pour l’avenir), held in Montréal, which brought together 30 young Francophones and Francophiles from across Canada to participate in interactive conferences and workshops focused on themes and discussions such as leadership, identity construction and bilingualism.

In September 2019, while still with the Privy Council Office, the Youth Secretariat supported a youth-led dialogue facilitated by a member of the Prime Minister’s Youth Council in their home community of Etobicoke, Ontario. The event centred on discussions of gun and gang violence in that community. Continuing its work within Canadian Heritage, in February 2020, the Youth Secretariat supported another youth-led dialogue that focused on the same theme of gun and gang violence in Montréal, Quebec. The outcome of these youth-led dialogues has been positive, helping to engage and inform youth on the efforts made by the Government to support them in communities across Canada.

Since the transfer of the Youth Secretariat from the Privy Council Office to the Department of Canadian Heritage in November 2019, the Youth Secretariat has held four meetings with the Prime Minister’s Youth Council to discuss key issues such as diversity and inclusion, youth engagement, racism and COVID-19. Young Canadians provided non-partisan advice on issues of importance to them, and the Youth Secretariat continued to support the work of the Council and the selection process of future members to ensure that the current and next cohort of members are provided the opportunity to discuss issues that matter to them, their peers, their communities and their country.

The Youth Policy was announced in May 2019 during the Canada Youth Summit. Since the Secretariat’s transfer in November 2019, implementation of the Policy is ongoing and interdepartmental meetings on the youth portfolio continue to take place to ensure that the Policy is being implemented across the federal government.

The Court Challenges Program

The Court Challenges Program continues to provide financial support to individuals and groups in Canada to bring before the courts cases of national importance related to certain constitutional and quasi-constitutional official language and human rights. The Program is implemented and administered by the University of Ottawa, an independent organization at arm’s length from the Government. In 2019–20, out of 78 Program funded cases, 46 of these cases dealt with section 15 (Equality rights) and five cases dealt with section 27 (Multicultural heritage) of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

The percentage of funding allocated to ethnic, racial or religious communities or initiatives varies each year as funding decisions are made by two independent expert panels—one for official languages rights and one for human rights. However, it can be expected that a significant portion of the program budget will go to causes that directly touch on issues of diversity and inclusion.

Human rights in Canada

The Human Rights Program continues to manage and coordinate Canada’s human rights reporting to international organizations, in cooperation with federal departments and provincial and territorial governments. In February 2020, a report was submitted to the United Nations under the international human rights treaties to which Canada is a party, Canada’s Interim Report under the Convention Against Torture. The Human Rights Program completed this report with negotiated input from federal departments and provincial and territorial governments.

The Department’s human rights work continues to be informed by the views of civil society organizations and Indigenous representative groups. For example, in June 2019, representatives of the Coordinating Committee of Officials on Human Rights met with a small group of stakeholders at their annual face-to-face meeting in Ottawa. In addition, the Senior Officials Committee Responsible for Human Rights met to further advance issues raised at the 2017 conference of federal, provincial and territorial ministers responsible for human rights.

The Human Rights Program continues to promote awareness, understanding, respect and enjoyment of human rights, through a variety of activities, including: managing and coordinating the human rights portal on the Canada.ca platform; distributing printed copies of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the Canadian Bill of Rights; and hosting events. For example, in October and November 2019, the Program collaborated with the Public Health Agency of Canada and Justice Canada to fund the organization and delivery of two national engagement workshops for National Child Day 2019, commemorating the 30th anniversary of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child.

LGBTQ2 Secretariat

The LGBTQ2 Secretariat delivered its 2019–20 results in part while housed within the Privy Council Office, prior to its relocation in fall 2019 within Canadian Heritage. In 2019–20, the Secretariat worked with Women and Gender Equality Canada to successfully design and launch the LGBTQ2 Community Capacity Fund to support LGBTQ2 community organizations in building their capacity to work with and serve LGBTQ2 communities.

The Secretariat also supported Justice Canada in developing Bill C-6, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (conversion therapy) to ban the harmful practice of conversion therapy in Canada, which went through its first reading on October 1, 2020, and its second reading on October 26-28, 2020. In addition, the LGBTQ2 Secretariat worked with the Public Health Agency of Canada to include LGBTQ2 considerations in its work around sexual and mental health, sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections and stigma reduction. Activities also included working with Global Affairs Canada on issues surrounding LGBTIFootnote 27 rights in an international context, and with Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada on LGBTI refugees. Finally, in 2019–20, the Secretariat also played a central role in advancing Schedules K (Consultations) and L (Records) of the LGBT Purge Class Action Settlement.

Gender-based analysis plus

The Multiculturalism Program activities and funding touch on issues that affect various groups differently across Canada in consideration of GBA+, which is a factor in research projects and for grants and contributions project funding.

The focus of the Multiculturalism Program and Canada’s Anti-Racism Strategy is on communities that have experienced racism and discrimination, such as racialized groups, religious minorities and Indigenous Peoples—while considering intersectionality, including women and girls. One of the ultimate outcomes of the Strategy is increasing the percentage of Canadians who feel that ethnic and cultural diversity is a shared value. Present and future generations will benefit from Strategy initiatives, which foster diversity and inclusion as well as address systemic barriers faced by the most disadvantaged groups.

The Joint Implementation Steering Committee to support the implementation of the Indigenous Languages Act functioned under the principle that Indigenous Peoples are best positioned to take the leading role in reclaiming, revitalizing, maintaining and strengthening their languages. This collaborative work enabled the Department to collaborate with its Indigenous partners in a new way—taking into account a diversity of perspectives and achieving more inclusive outcomes—and develop ways of working that were more respectful of the evolving relationship between the Government of Canada and Indigenous Peoples. Canadian Heritage will continue to adapt its approach with partners to promote the success of the co-implementation process.

The Indigenous Languages and Cultures Program considers distinctions (First Nation, Inuit and Métis) and place of residence (province or territory) in allocating its funding. Communities implement activities for different age groups that are equally accessible to women, men and people with other gender identities. Also, given that Indigenous peoples tend to reside more than other Canadians in rural areas, and that the median age of Indigenous populations is 30.6, the Program results will contribute to the Government’s broader objectives towards the well-being of young Canadians and the economic development of rural, remote and northern communities.

The Exchanges Canada Program and Youth Take Charge Program assessed applications against the reach, diversity and number of youth involved in the proposals. Overall, youth-serving organizations funded by the Exchanges Canada Program delivered projects on a geographic and demographic scope and scale reflective of the overall Canadian youth population, which helped ensure gender and demographic diversity in programming.

In addition, as part of the Exchanges Canada and Youth Take Charge funding agreements, organizations were required to submit demographic information on participants, which ranges between participant ages, sex, province/territory of residence, and language as well as Indigenous, racialized and disability status, and rural or official-language minority community. These data were tracked and monitored by the Programs, and were used to ensure that a range of demographic groups, and youth from throughout Canada, had opportunities to be included in funded activities.

The Exchanges Canada Program contribution agreements with recipients included targets for participant representation that is comparable to the Canadian population (as established by the latest Statistics Canada census data). In 2019–20, targets for the Program’s five demographic groups were all exceeded, with the exception of visible minority youth, underrepresented by about 4 points. Indigenous youth represented 12% of participants; rural youth represented 33%; youth with disabilities represented 5%; youth from low-income householdsFootnote 28 represented 37%; and 18% were visible minority youth.Footnote 29

A youth lens was applied to policy papers, analyses and initiatives that were developed and/or reviewed by the Youth Secretariat to ensure that considerations of age and youth were undertaken as part of the policy and program analysis, as the youth population represent the full spectrum of Canadian diversity, individuals having multiple intersecting identities, such as ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability. Stakeholder consultation and engagement approaches continued to focus on developing approaches to reach youth furthest from opportunity, racialized youth, as well as First Nations, Métis, and Inuit youth.

Since transferring to Canadian Heritage, the Youth Secretariat has planned for and developed a coordinated approach to obtain youth perspectives for the State of Youth Report and to ensure that the report adopts an intersectional approach that includes race.

Experimentation

Exchanges Canada and Youth Take Charge conducted experiments aimed at improving survey response rates for online post-participation surveys for youth. The Exchanges Canada Program concluded its experimentation. The project achieved reliable results, and the Program began delivering all post-participation surveys online. However, the Youth Take Charge Program cancelled its pilot project due to changing needs, and the Program will explore alternative sustainable options to improve response rates to its post-participation surveys.

Results achieved for Diversity and inclusion
Departmental results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18 Actual results 2018–19 Actual results 2019–20 Actual results
Canadians value diversity Percentage of Canadians who feel that ethnic and cultural diversity is a shared value. 89 March 2020 85 85 n/aFootnote 30
Number of unique visitors to and downloads from the Multiculturalism Program’s websiteFootnote 31 200,000 March 2020 n/a 164,817 209,183
Reversal of the current downward trend in the use and fluency of Indigenous languages. Percentage of First Nations people who can conduct a conversation in an Indigenous language that is not their mother tongue. 4% increase in the number of First Nations people who can conduct a conversation in an Indigenous language that is not their mother tongue March 2021 26.7Footnote 32
(Census 2016)
26.7
(Census 2016)
26.7
(Census 2016)
Percentage of Métis people who can conduct a conversation in an Indigenous language that is not their mother tongue. 4% increase in the number of Métis people who can conduct a conversation in an Indigenous language that is not their mother tongue March 2021 41.7Footnote 33
(Census 2016)
41.7
(Census 2016)
41.7
(Census 2016)
Percentage of Inuit speaking in an Inuit language 63.3 March 2021 64.3
(Census 2016)
64.3
(Census 2016)
64.3
(Census 2016)
Number of participants in language-learning activities.Footnote 34 8,600 March 2020 4,131 9,039Footnote 35 12,223Footnote 36
Youth enhance their appreciation of the diversity and shared aspects of the Canadian experience. Percentage of participants in the Exchanges Canada Program who report having a better understanding of what Canadians have in common. 80 February 2020 80 82 82Footnote 37
Percentage of participants in the Exchanges Canada Program who report having a greater appreciation of how diverse Canada is. 85 February 2020 87 87 87Footnote 38
Individuals or groups have access to funding to initiate or participate in test cases pertaining to rights and freedoms covered by the Court Challenges Program. Number of cases pertaining to Canadians’ rights and freedoms funded by the Court Challenges Program. No targetFootnote 39 March 2020 Non-existing program 30 78
Canadians value human rights. Percentage of Canadians who feel that human rights are a shared value. 90 March 2020 n/a n/a n/aFootnote 40
Number of Canadians accessing the Government of Canada’s website on human rights. 100,000 March 2020 428,066 390,429 684,994
Budgetary financial resources (dollars) for Diversity and inclusion
2019–20 Main Estimates 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) 2019–20 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
100,241,414 100,241,414 144,037,019 132,989,704 32,748,290
Human resources (full-time equivalents) for Diversity and inclusion
2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Actual full-time equivalents 2019–20 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
153.7 164.1 10.4

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Department of Canadian Heritage’s Program Inventory is available in GC InfoBaseFootnote 41.

Core responsibility 5: Official languages

Description: Supports the promotion of Canada’s two official languages in Canadian society as well as the development of official-language minority communities by collaborating with voluntary organizations and provincial and territorial governments. Fosters a coordinated approach to ensure participation from across the federal government in the implementation of the Official Languages Act, and the coordination of related horizontal initiatives.

Results

The Department contributes to Core Responsibility 5 through the Official Languages Program. This Program supports the promotion of both official languages in Canadian society, as well as the development of official-language minority communities, by collaborating with community organizations and provincial and territorial governments. It fosters a coordinated approach to ensure participation from all institutions of the federal government in the implementation of the Official Languages Act, and the coordination of whole-of-government initiatives on Official Languages. The Department also coordinates the implementation of the Action Plan for Official Languages 2018–2023: Investing in our future, a horizontal Government of Canada strategy for official languages. For more details on Canadian Heritage programs, please consult the Supplementary information tables associated with this report, and the Canadian Heritage website.

The actual spending budget allocated to this core responsibility was $423,334,498 and was supported by a total of 150.8 actual full-time equivalents.

Canadians recognizing and supporting Canada’s two official languages

The second year of implementation of the Action Plan for Official Languages 2018–2023 made it possible to finalize the effective implementation of all initiatives for existing enhanced measures and new measures. In particular, the Department put in place the new Community Spaces Fund, the Fund for English-Speaking Communities in Quebec, and the Teacher Recruitment and Retention Strategy for French language minority schools and teachers in French Immersion and French Second-Language Programs.

Through third-party agreements with community organizations, several initiatives were launched: PassepART cultural micro-grants through the Fédération culturelle canadienne-française, and ArtistsInspire Grants through the English-Language Arts Network-Québec; Vice-Versa micro-grants to enrich civic community schools with identity-building activities through the Fédération de la jeunesse canadienne-française; Community Media Strategic Support Fund via the Association de la presse francophone; the Ottawa Bilingual micro-grants program through the Association des communautés francophones d’Ottawa; and the Bursaries for Postsecondary Studies in French as a Second Language program via the Association des collèges et universités de la francophonie canadienne.

In addition, on January 22, 2020, an agreement for the funding of the Université de l’Ontario français was signed with the Government of Ontario and the first cohort of students is expected to attend the institution as early as September 2021.

To mark the 50th anniversary of the Official Languages Act in 2019–20, the Department organized several initiatives, including: the Symposium on the 50th Anniversary of the Official Languages Act; the creation of the new Awards for Excellence and Leadership in Official Languages; a highlight in the Northern Lights show on Parliament Hill; and the creation of a special visual identity and banners for the occasion.

In the fifth edition of the Northern Lights show, a 90-second segment highlighting the 50th anniversary of the Official Languages Act was developed in collaboration between the Official Languages Branch and the Commemorate Canada program. The segment featured representatives from official language minority communities across Canada speaking about the importance of the Act and the diversity that exists within these communities.

The modernization of the Official Languages Act review was finalized, taking the form of a major national conversation in the spring of 2019 that brought together nearly 1,500 Canadians from across the country through a public meeting, five forums, and 12 round tables, and also through an online questionnaire. This dialogue culminated with the Symposium on the 50th Anniversary of the Official Languages Act in May 2019 in Ottawa, which brought together close to 500 people from all walks of life to highlight past achievements, celebrate our two official languages and develop strategies for the future. A document available on Canadian Heritage’s website, “Engaging Canadians as a step towards modernizing the Official Languages Act,”Footnote 42 outlines the key findings from all stakeholders, and was released in September 2019.

Additionally, in 2019–20, the Department coordinated the pan-Canadian and interdepartmental programming of initiatives to mark the 50th anniversary of the Official Languages Act, and collaborated with the Department of Justice Canada and the Treasury Board Secretariat in organizing the Symposium on the 50th Anniversary of the Official Languages Act.

The establishment of the Canadian Cultural Program for English and French Second Language Learning, which will pay tribute to the Honourable Mauril Bélanger, is on track. A vignette of the Mauril program was presented to the public on May 28, 2019, during the Symposium. Developed by CBC/Radio-Canada, the Mauril program will be available to certain target groups by the end of 2020 and will contribute to increasing the rate of bilingualism among Canadians. The general public launch is scheduled for 2021.

In February 2020, the Protocol for Agreements for Minority-Language Education and Second-Language Instruction 2019–2020 to 2022–2023, between the Government of Canada and the Provinces and Territories, with the exception of Quebec, came into force. Subsequently, a bilateral education agreement was concluded with each province and territory, including the province of Quebec. The duration of the signed agreements varies between one and four years.

Multi-year bilateral services agreements were concluded with the majority of provinces and territories. The agreements with Quebec and Alberta expired in March 2020 and will be subject to further negotiations for renewal until 2022–23.

On July 10, 2019, the final amendments to the (new) Official Languages Regulations were published in Part II of the Canada Gazette. This will allow Canadians to have better access to federal services in both official languages once the Regulations gradually come into force, that is, after the next census of the Canadian population, scheduled for 2021.

Supporting federal institutions in accordance with Section 41 of the Official Languages Act

Canadian Heritage continued to coordinate the implementation of the Action Plan for Official Languages 2018–2023 and the Collaboration Agreement for the Development of Arts and Culture in the Francophone Minority Communities of Canada, while providing ongoing support to federal institutions in their official languages activities. Within this framework, the Department maintained its network coordination activities and the smooth operation of the official languages governance committees.

Canadian Heritage also made available and promoted to the general public its “Toolkit” to help federal institutions take measures to foster the development of official-language minority communities and the promotion of both official languages, including: the Guide on Part VII of the Official Languages Act: Support for Communities and Promotion of English and French; a Reflection Tool on the Implementation of Section 41 of the Official Languages Act; a list of “Key Questions” to facilitate decision-making that may have an impact on the implementation of section 41 of the Official Languages Act; and a new tool entitled “Guiding Principles for the Consultation Process with Official Language Minority Communities.” These tools are also part of the “Crossroads of Official Languages,” launched in 2019–20, which centralizes official-languages resources from all federal institutions on a single website, the Language Portal of Canada,Footnote 43 for public dissemination.

Gender-based analysis plus

In 2019–20, Canadian Heritage coordinated a GBA+ follow-up exercise with the federal partners of the 2018–2023 Action Plan for Official Languages. The exercise documented how GBA+ considerations were taken into account in the implementation of initiatives, as well as the collection of disaggregated data.

In addition to the GBA+ follow-up exercise, conducted in the context of the implementation of the Action Plan for Official Languages 2018–2023, GBA+ is systematically integrated into policy and program development in the area of official languages. Disaggregated data for different population groups also enable the application of a GBA+ lens on the attainment of results.

Experimentation

In 2019–20, Canadian Heritage collaborated with CBC-Quebec to organize an innovation challenge called Co-LAB for youth from Quebec’s English-speaking community. The event, held at Bishop’s University (Sherbrooke), brought together community organizations, students and other participants to develop innovative solutions to the challenges facing the community. CASA Gaspé was awarded a $2,500 prize in recognition of the excellence of its Destination-U project, which will help young people facing isolation by enabling them to become involved in and feel a sense of belonging to their community.

The Department also piloted the Bilingual Advantage Initiative, a micro-financing initiative available to French-as-a-second-language teachers wanting to offer concrete experiences to students outside the classroom so that they can be exposed to the French language and Francophone culture. During the three years of testing the initiative, a total of 178 projects were funded for a total of $166,858, whereas the initial budget for this innovative initiative was only $50,000 per fiscal year. Following a review of the results achieved and the delivery model for the initiative in 2019–20, the Department will offer this initiative again in 2020, albeit using a simplified delivery model.

In the summer of 2019, a new component of the Explore program of the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada called Mini-Explore, was piloted for the first time. Mini-Explore targets a new audience of young Canadians aged 13 to 15 in a three-week language immersion program. The demand for Mini-Explore (1,211 applications) far exceeded the number of available spaces (321 places). The Council and the host institutions are currently doing everything possible to increase the offer so that more young people can benefit from this program as early as the summer of 2021.

In addition, third-party organizations from official language minority communities have been mandated, from a “by and for (the communities)” perspective, to ensure the implementation and delivery of new initiatives under the Action Plan for Official Languages 2018–2023. This experimentation process calls for the Fédération de la jeunesse canadienne-française, the Fédération culturelle canadienne-française, the English Language Arts Network, the Association de la presse francophone, the Association des collèges et universités de la francophonie canadienne and the Association des communautés francophones d’Ottawa to design and deliver, in consultation with the Department, initiatives that meet the needs and specific context of official language minority communities in order to promote linguistic duality and encourage youth participation.

Results achieved for Official languages
Departmental results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18 Actual results 2018–19 Actual results 2019–20 Actual results
Canadians recognize and support Canada’s official languages. Percentage of Canadians who agree that Canada’s two official languages (English/French) are an important part of what it means to be Canadian. 60 March 2020 70 60 60Footnote 44
Number of Canadians who can conduct a conversation in their second official language. 6,200,000 March 2021 6,216,070 6,216,070 6,216,070Footnote 45
Maintenance of the 85% baseline of Official-Language Minority Communities who live within a 25 km radius of a cultural/artistic organization. 85 March 2020 89.8 89.8 89.8
Maintenance of the 85% baseline of Official-Language Minority Communities who live within a 25 km radius of a regional/local community development organization that offers services in the minority language. 85 March 2020 86 86 86
Federal institutions develop and implement policies and programs in accordance with Section 41 of the Official Languages Act. Percentage of federal institutions that report concrete results in their annual review in support of Section 41 of the Official Languages Act. 80Footnote 46 March 2020 100 100 n/aFootnote 47
Budgetary financial resources (dollars) for Official languages
2019–20 Main Estimates 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) 2019–20 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
435,398,291 435,398,291 451,739,244 423,334,498 -12,063,793
Human resources (full-time equivalents) for Official languages
2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Actual full-time equivalents 2019–20 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
150.7 150.8 0.1

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Department of Canadian Heritage’s Program Inventory is available in GC InfoBaseFootnote 48.

Internal services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are

  1. Acquisition Management Services
  2. Communication Services
  3. Financial Management Services
  4. Human Resources Management Services
  5. Information Management Services
  6. Information Technology Services
  7. Legal Services
  8. Material Management Services
  9. Management and Oversight Services
  10. Real Property Management Services

Results

In 2019–20, Canadian Heritage undertook the following activities to support its internal services:

Human Resources Management Services

To deepen efforts and increase resources dedicated to the review of salary transactions, ensuring punctual resolutions, while ensuring that our human resources and workplace programs were aligned with central agency policies and requirements:

To provide personalized support to employees affected by pay issues, and continue working with the Public Services and Procurement Pay Centre on the new pilot initiative that focuses on solving individual employee pay issues rather than transaction-based issues:

To develop an employment equity, diversity and inclusion strategy that focuses on the four pillars of: innovative approaches to staffing and recruitment, identification of barriers, dedicated governance and awareness-building:

To implement the third year of the Canadian Heritage Workplace Well-being Action Plan and engage employees in its renewal in order to support mental health and workplace well-being:

To continue to address harassment and discrimination using the Safe Workspaces report as a guide for improvements; making use of Public Service Employee Survey results to identify key concerns, and preparing for the implementation of new harassment and violence in the workplace legislation:

Information Management and Information Technology Services

To continue to identify and integrate technologies to enhance efficiencies and to facilitate, support and enhance decision-making and improve services for Canadians:

To continue the modernization of the delivery of grants and contributions, and of business functions, internal processes; and strengthen the use of technology to provide more online and timely services to Canadians:

Management and Oversight Services

To strengthen management decision-making by enhancing and leveraging data analytics across the Department:

To increase the number and percentage of the Department’s open data sets and information available online and participate in a more open and transparent Government:

To enable and support the Canadian Heritage workforce to support the Government digital and data strategy:

Budgetary financial resources (dollars) for Internal services
2019–20 Main Estimates 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used)* 2019–20 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
74,179,084 74,179,084 83,373,058 84,423,303 10,244,219
Human resources (full-time equivalents) for Internal services
2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Actual full-time equivalents 2019–20 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
707.4 681.6 -25.8

Analysis of trends in spending and human resources

Actual expenditures

The following graph presents planned (voted and statutory) spending over time.

Departmental spending 2017-18 to 2022-23 in millions of dollars
Text version follows
Departmental spending 2017-18 to 2022-23 in millions of dollars - text version
This table presents the data from the graph of planned (voted and statutory) departmental spending over time between 2017-18 to 2022-23.
Fiscal year 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23
Statutory 25 26 26 27 27 27
Voted 1,474 1,384 1,525 1,508 1,488 1,472
Total 1,499 1,410 1,551 1,535 1,515 1,499

The significant decrease in spending for 2018–19 is mainly due to funding related to initiatives celebrating the 150th anniversary of Confederation, which came to an end in 2018–19.

The increase observed in 2019–20 is a result of substantial new funding received by the Department. This additional funding supports the Enhancement of Official Languages Program and Minority-Language Education in Canada through initiatives that improve access to second languages and promote bilingualism in Canada. Furthermore, it enables new projects in the Indigenous Languages and Cultures Program, which are helping to preserve, promote and revitalize Indigenous languages. New funding also supports artists and cultural events in order to foster a more cohesive Canadian identity. Funding was also received to allow the Sport Program to successfully launch new initiatives for social development in Indigenous communities, Gender equality and Ensuring a Safe and Healthy Sport System. Moreover, the Strengthening Multiculturalism and New Anti-Racism Strategy as well as the Young Canada Works temporary funding also contribute to this increase in funding.

For future years, the planned spending decreases mainly as a result of the funding announced in budget 2018 for the Canada Media Fund which is not reflected in future years’ authorities as funding is only accessed on a yearly basis, and due to the sunset of time-limited funding such as the support for Artists, Cultural Events and Commemoration. These reductions are partially offset by ongoing funding received to preserve, promote and revitalize Indigenous languages.

Budgetary performance summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services (dollars)
Core responsibilities and Internal Services 2019–20 Main Estimates 2019–20 Planned spending 2020–21 Planned spending 2021–22 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2018–19 Actual spending (authorities used) 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used)
Creativity, arts and culture 474,894,788 474,894,788 513,243,111 495,806,545 548,682,706 512,166,821 486,408,233 542,853,062
Heritage and celebration 100,278,571 100,278,571 111,012,915 93,599,096 126,697,904 236,909,609 120,649,174 123,860,201
Sport 231,116,623 231,116,623 249,554,510 245,610,649 245,848,685 219,441,888 228,061,688 243,114,183
Diversity and inclusion 100,241,414 100,241,414 131,234,805 150,528,741 144,037,019 81,372,443 96,275,855 132,989,704
Official languages 435,398,291 435,398,291 449,167,574 450,774,850 451,739,244 364,304,521 392,962,335 423,334,498
Subtotal 1,341,929,687 1,341,929,687 1,454,212,915 1,436,319,881 1,517,005,558 1,414,195,282 1,324,357,285 1,466,151,648
Internal Services 74,179,084 74,179,084 80,924,496 78,790,037 83,373,058 84,871,350 85,206,936 84,423,303
Total 1,416,108,771 1,416,108,771 1,535,137,411 1,515,109,918 1,600,378,616 1,499,066,633 1,409,564,221 1,550,574,951

Creativity, Arts and Culture

The decrease in spending in 2018–19 is due to the time-limited investment in Budget 2016 for the social infrastructure projects under the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund which sunsetted in 2017–18 but was partially compensated with a ten-year investment announced in Budget 2017 for the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund to construct, renovate and better equip cultural spaces and creative hubs. This decrease is partially offset by new funding confirmed in Budget 2018 for the Canada Media Fund to compensate for the decline in funds from Canada’s Broadcasting Distribution Undertakings. This is reflected in 2018–19 and 2019–20 actuals but not yet in future years’ authorities as the amount is only confirmed on a yearly basis. As well, a 5-year investment, starting in 2018–19 to support Canada’s Creative Export Strategy which aims to foster the export of Canadian creative works, contributes to the increase in spending. The peak in 2019–20 actual spending is also explained by time-limited funding received to support the production of original civic journalism for underserved communities, to enhance the production and distribution of accessible digital books by Canadian independent book publishers, to increase Canadians’ access to artists through the Canada Music Fund and Canada Arts Presentation Fund and funding to invest in a Francophone Digital Platform (TV5). The Harbourfront Centre also received a one-time funding in 2019–20 for priority infrastructure projects to modernize presentation and recreation facilities and to address operational improvements starting in 2021–22.

Heritage and Celebration

The reduction observed in the 2018–19 actual spending portrayed in this core responsibility is mainly attributable to the sunsetting in 2018–19 of Canada’s 150th anniversary of Confederation initiative and related funding. This decrease is partially offset by an increase resulting from the one-time funding in 2018–19 for the Vancouver Foundation to improve access to the justice system in Canada as well as the Centre of Excellence on the Canadian Federation to create a permanent research body to promote shared understanding of the Canadian federal community. New funding was received in 2019–20 and 2020–21 to support artists, cultural events and commemorations initiatives, such as the commemorations linked to residential schools, contributing to the reduction in planned spending in 2021–22. The decrease in 2020–21 planned spending is further explained by the decrease in funds for the Digital Democracy Project and the Youth Employment Strategy.

Sport

The increase observed in the 2018–19 actual spending is due to the one-year funding obtained to support the bid to the Calgary Corporation to host the 2026 Olympic and Paralympic Winter games. The increase observed in the 2019–20 actual spending as well as the 2020–21 and 2021–22 Planned Spending is due to the following items: new funding for Sport for Social Development in Indigenous Communities, increase in funding for Gender Equality in Sport (sun setting in 2021–22) and a new time-limited funding towards Ensuring a Safe and Healthy Sports System.

Diversity and Inclusion

The increase observed in the 2018–19 and 2019–20 actual spending is in part due to funding for the Indigenous Languages and Cultures Program to support the preservation and revitalization of Indigenous languages (ending in 2019–20). In addition, time-limited funding to strengthen Multiculturalism to address racism and discrimination mainly explains the increase in 2018–19 and 2019–20 actual spending as well as 2020–21 and 2021–22 planned spending. Other time-limited funding was sought to address racism and discrimination, more specifically to provide funding for projects to build capacity in Black Canadian communities (ending in 2020–21) and to support the creation of an Anti-Racism Secretariat (ending in 2021–22). The observed increase in the 2021–22 planned spending is due to the five-year funding received to preserve, promote and revitalize Indigenous languages and the implementation of the proposed Indigenous Languages Act.

Official languages

The increase in actual spending for 2018–19 and 2019–20 and future planned spending is due to the implementation of the Action Plan for Official Languages 2018–2023. This funding will help strengthen official-language minority communities, improve access to services in both official languages and promote a bilingual Canada. Also contributing to the increase is the ten-year investment to support educational infrastructure projects for Official Languages Minority Communities in the provinces and territories (Budget 2017) and the 4-year funding to Enhance Support for Minority-Language Education in Canada.

Internal Services

The actual spending displayed from 2017–18 to 2019–20 is relatively stable. The decrease in planned spending in 2020–21 and 2021–22 is mainly due to the sunset of funding dedicated to investments in departmental transformation efforts to modernize departmental processes.

Actual human resources

Human resources summary for Core responsibilities and Internal services
Core responsibilities and Internal Services 2017–18 Actual full-time equiva-lents 2018–19 Actual full-time equiva-lents 2019–20 Planned full-time equiva-lents 2019–20 Actual full-time equiva-lents 2020–21 Planned full-time equiva-lents 2021–22 Planned full-time equiva-lents
Creativity, arts and culture 388.2 426.7 414.1 423.9 430.3 428.1
Heritage and celebration 414.1 346.7 334.4 319.4 326.5 326.5
Sport 93.9 104.8 122.2 103.5 103.5 103.5
Diversity and inclusion 124.8 140.3 153.7 164.1 185.4 176.4
Official languages 143.9 151.4 150.7 150.8 156.7 156.7
Subtotal 1,164.9 1,169.9 1,175.1 1,161.7 1,202.4 1,191.2
Internal Services 655.3 693.0 707.4 681.6 704.3 703.3
Total 1,820.2 1,862.9 1,882.5 1,843.3 1,906.7 1,894.5

Creativity, Arts and Culture

A large portion of the increase starting in 2018–19 actual full-time equivalents is explained by a five-year investment to support Canada’s Creative Export Strategy, which is also reflected in future years’ planned full-time equivalents, and the Broadcasting Act Review that required additional support in 2019–20. The increase in planned full-time equivalents observed in future years is mainly due to the Protecting Canada’s Democracy initiative for which funding will sunset in 2022–23.

Heritage and Celebration

The large decrease starting in the 2018–19 actual full-time equivalents is mainly attributable to the National Celebrations, Commemorations and Symbols Program particularly due to Canada’s 150th anniversary of Confederation initiative ending in 2018–19.

Sport

The increase observed in the 2018–19 full-time equivalents and which then stabilizes in subsequent years is due to the program’s need to ensure enough support is available to carry out its mandate while providing the appropriate level of resources for some of the new initiatives mentioned previously in the budgetary planning summary: Gender Equality in Sport, Sport for Social Development in Indigenous Communities and Investing in Indigenous Youth and Sport.

Diversity and Inclusion

A significant portion of the full-time equivalents increase starting in 2018–19 is due to the temporary funding received in Budget 2017 and ongoing funding received in Budget 2019 to enable new projects in the Indigenous Languages and Cultures Program which are helping to preserve, promote and revitalize Indigenous languages. In addition, the Youth and the LGBTQ2 Secretariats transferred from the Privy Council Office contributed to the increase in full-time equivalents starting in 2019–20. Furthermore, time-limited funding to strengthen Multiculturalism to address racism and discrimination, more specifically to build capacity in Black Canadian communities (ending in 2020–21) and to support the creation of an Anti-Racism Secretariat (ending in 2021–22), contributes to the slight decreases in 2021–22.

Official languages

Full-time equivalents are at a similar level from year to year. The slight increase starting in 2018–19 is attributable to the funding received for the Action Plan for Official Languages 2018–2023.

Internal Services

The fluctuation of full-time equivalents in 2018–19 and 2019–20 is mainly due to investments in departmental transformation efforts to modernize departmental processes. The full-time equivalents count increases and stabilizes in subsequent years to ensure proper support is available to carry out the Departmental mandate.

Expenditures by vote

For information on the Department of Canadian Heritage’s organizational voted and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2019–2020.Footnote 50

Government of Canada spending and activities

Information on the alignment of the Department of Canadian Heritage’s spending with the Government of Canada’s spending and activities is available in GC InfoBase.Footnote 51

Financial statements and financial statements highlights

Financial statements

The Department of Canadian Heritage’s financial statements (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2020, are available on the departmental website.

Financial statement highlights

The financial highlights presented within this Departmental Results Report are intended to serve as a general overview of Canadian Heritage’s financial position and the net cost of operations before government funding and transfers. The unaudited financial statements have been prepared using the Government’s accounting policies, which are based on Canadian public sector accounting standards.

The significant events and conditions that informed the financial statements include the transfer of the Youth Secretariat and the LGBTQ2 Secretariat from the Privy Council Office as well as changes to Canadian Heritage’s senior management personnel in the fall of 2019. Also, the implementation of Phoenix in 2015 as part of the pay transformation initiative continued to have a significant impact on operations. In order to better support its employees experiencing under and over payments, Canadian Heritage issued emergency salary advances to affected employees, and continued to strengthen and invest in its Internal Services, particularly in the Human Resources and Financial Management branches.

In March 2020, the World Health Organization declared the outbreak of a novel coronavirus (COVID-19) as a global pandemic, which continues to spread in Canada and around the world. At that time, Canadian Heritage activated its Business Continuity Plan, and only the Department’s critical services were maintained. As the pandemic was declared just before the end of the current fiscal year, management estimates its impact on the financial statements for fiscal year ending on March 31, 2020 to be minimal. However, the impacts of COVID-19 are expected to be more significant for 2020–21.

Condensed Statement of Operations (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2020 (thousands of dollars)
Financial information 2019–20 Planned results* 2019–20 Actual results 2018–19 Actual results Difference (2019–20 Actual results minus 2019–20 Planned results) Difference (2019–20 Actual results minus 2018–19 Actual results)
Total expenses 1,448,712 1,588,485 1,438,472 139,773 150,013
Total revenues 10,052 8,967 10,116 (1,085) (1,149)
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 1,438,660 1,579,518 1,428,356 140,858 151,162

The Department’s total net cost of operations before government funding and transfers increased from the previous year’s total by $151.2 million (11%) and is largely due to the following:

Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited) as of March 31, 2020 (thousands of dollars)
Financial information 2019–20 2018–19 Difference (2019–20 minus 2018–19)
Total net liabilities 418,684 450,512 (31,828)
Total net financial assets 404,314 437,370 (33,056)
Departmental net debt 14,491 13,190 1,301
Total non-financial assets 16,390 22,755 (6,365)
Departmental net financial position 1,899 9,565 (7,666)

Total net liabilities were $418.7 million at the end of 2019–20, a decrease of $31.8 million (7%) over the previous years’ total liabilities of $450.5 million. The decrease is mainly explained by accounts payable and accrued liabilities related to contribution agreements not paid out prior to closing of the fiscal year or existing agreements pending the receipt of the recipient’s final report to issue the final payment. Most of the contribution agreements were related to Federal/Provincial and Territorial agreements in the Official Languages program.

Total non-financial assets were $16.4 million at the end of 2019–20, a decrease of $6.4 million (28%) from the previous year’s total non-financial assets of $22.8 million. The decrease is largely explained by a portion of the costs associated with the development of the Grants and Contributions Modernization Project that were written off because of a reduction in scope of the project. The reduced scope resulted in a new solution “My PCH Online” and certain components developed for the Grants and Contributions Modernization Project solution were no longer required.

Additional information

Organizational profile

Appropriate ministers:
  • The Honourable Steven Guilbeault, P.C., M.P.,
    Minister of Canadian Heritage
  • The Honourable Bardish Chagger, PC, M.P.,
    Minister of Diversity and Inclusion and Youth
  • The Honourable Mélanie Joly, P.C., M.P.,
    Minister of Economic Development and Official Languages
Institutional head:
Hélène Laurendeau
Ministerial portfolio:
Department of Canadian Heritage
Enabling instrument:
Department of Canadian Heritage Act
Year of incorporation/commencement:
The Department of Canadian Heritage was created in June 1993. However, the Department of Canadian Heritage Act received Royal Assent in June 1995.

Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do” is available on the Department of Canadian Heritage’s website.

For more information on the Department’s organizational mandate letter commitments, see the Ministers’ mandate letters.Footnote 52

Reporting framework

Canadian Heritage’s Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory of record for 2019–20 are shown below. They are also available in text version.

Link to the text version of Canadian Heritage’s Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory in the preceeding paragraph

Supporting information on the Program Inventory

Financial, human resources and performance information for Canadian Heritage’s Program Inventory is available in GC InfoBase.Footnote 53

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures.Footnote 54 This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Mailing address

Canadian Heritage
15 Eddy Street
Gatineau, QC  K1A 0M5
Canada

Telephone:
819-997-0055
Toll-freeFootnote 55:
1-866-811-0055
TTYFootnote 56
(Toll-free):
1-888-997-3123
Email:
PCH.info-info.PCH@canada.ca
Website:
www.canada.ca/en/canadian-heritage.html

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
core responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a core responsibility are reflected in one or more related departmental results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.
Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)
A report on the plans and expected performance of an appropriated department over a 3-year period. Departmental Plans are usually tabled in Parliament each spring.
departmental priority (priorité)
A plan or project that a department has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired departmental results.
departmental result (résultat ministériel)
A consequence or outcome that a department seeks to achieve. A departmental result is often outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.
departmental result indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)
A quantitative measure of progress on a departmental result.
departmental results framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)
A framework that connects the department’s core responsibilities to its departmental results and departmental result indicators.
Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
A report on a department’s actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
experimentation (expérimentation)
The conducting of activities that seek to first explore, then test and compare the effects and impacts of policies and interventions in order to inform evidence-based decision-making, and improve outcomes for Canadians, by learning what works, for whom and in what circumstances. Experimentation is related to, but distinct from innovation (the trying of new things), because it involves a rigorous comparison of results. For example, using a new website to communicate with Canadians can be an innovation; systematically testing the new website against existing outreach tools or an old website to see which one leads to more engagement, is experimentation.
full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. For a particular position, the full-time equivalent figure is the ratio of number of hours the person actually works divided by the standard number of hours set out in the person’s collective agreement.
gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+])
An analytical process used to assess how diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people experience policies, programs and services based on multiple factors including race ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability.
government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2019–20 Departmental Results Report, those high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2019 Speech from the Throne, namely: Fighting climate change; Strengthening the Middle Class; Walking the road of reconciliation; Keeping Canadians safe and healthy; and Positioning Canada for success in an uncertain world.
horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)
An initiative where two or more federal organizations are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.
lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, two-spirit (LGBTQ2) (lesbienne, gai, bisexuel, transgenre, queer et bispirituel [LGBTQ2])
This is the designation used by the Government of Canada to refer to the Canadian community. The internationally recognized designation is lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex (LGBTI). LGBTQ2 terminology is continuously evolving. For further information, refer to the LGBTQ2 Secretariat’s webpage for a glossary and common acronyms.Footnote 57
non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
plan (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally, a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead to the expected result.
planned spending (dépenses prévues)

For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.

program (programme)
Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within the department and focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.
program inventory (répertoire des programmes)
Identifies all the department’s programs and describes how resources are organized to contribute to the department’s core responsibilities and results.
result (résultat)
A consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.
statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an appropriation act. The vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, 2020
Catalogue No. CH1-38E-PDF
ISSN: 2560-8827

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