Details on transfer payment programs of $5 million or more — Departmental Results Report 2019-20

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Canada Arts Presentation Fund

Name of transfer payment program
Canada Arts Presentation Fund
Start date
2001-02
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Grants and contributions
Type of appropriation
Annually through Main Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2019-20
Core Responsibility
Core Responsibility 1: Creativity, Arts and Culture
Link to department’s Program Inventory
Arts: Canada Arts Presentation Fund
Description
The Canada Arts Presentation Fund gives Canadians access to a variety of professional artistic experiences in their communities. It provides financial assistance to Canadian not-for-profit organizations that professionally present arts festivals or performing arts series, as well as their support organizations. The Canada Arts Presentation Fund also supports emerging presenters and presenter support organizations whose activities target underserved communities or artistic practices. The goal is to allow Canadians from all regions of the country to engage in and value a variety of professional artistic experiences. As well, a supplement to the Canada Arts Presentation Fund through the Creative Export Strategy will stimulate Canadian cultural export by increasing the visibility and discoverability of Canadian artists internationally as well as strengthen the ability of Canadian presenters to offer more diverse programming for Canadians. This program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants under the Canada Arts Presentation Fund and Contributions under the Canada Arts Presentation Fund.
Results achieved

Canadians have access to and experience the work of Canadian artists

  • Number of attendees to arts events funded by the Canada Arts Presentation Fund

Result: 19,771,627

In 2019-20, the Canada Arts Presentation Fund helped to further the Department’s goal of providing Canadians with access to a wide variety of professional artistic experiences in their communities through the delivery of 623 grants and 108 contributions to arts presenters and presenter support organizations. A total of 19.8 million attendees participated in arts events funded by the program during 2019-20.

In 2019-20, 63% of funded festivals and performing arts series programming promoted diversity. The following example illustrates results achieved by an organization funded by the Canada Arts Presentation Fund:

The Canada Arts Presentation Fund provided $50,800 in 2019-20 to the initiative Prismatic Arts Festival, which is an annual multidisciplinary arts festival that showcases contemporary art by leading Indigenous and culturally diverse artists. The 11th edition took place in Halifax and Ottawa, and featured an International Arts Market to promote and facilitate the export of Canadian work to international buyers and presenters. Programming included performances in dance, theatre, music, spoken word, literature, media and visual arts. Other activities included workshops, masterclasses, artist talk-back sessions, panel discussions on various topics, such as the challenges and opportunities facing marginalized artists, and outreach events in the community.

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20
No audit project completed in 2019-2020 and no specific audit project planned in 2020-2021.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

The last Grouped Arts Evaluation: Canada Arts Presentation Fund, Canada Cultural Spaces Fund and Canada Cultural Investment Fund 2013-14 to 2017-18 was approved on August 20, 2019.

The Canada Arts Presentation Fund increased access to a variety of professional artistic experiences across Canada.

On average, the Canada Arts Presentation Fund achieved its annual targets for distribution of funding among disciplines, 2013-14 to 2017-18.

The three programs, which also complemented other sources of federal, provincial/territorial, and municipal funding. aligned with Canadian Heritage and federal government priorities and responsibilities by:

  • Supporting access to Canadian arts and culture experiences, community investment, and advancing the use of digital technology;
  • Supporting cultural industries and infrastructure, celebrating heritage and diversity, and supporting Indigenous arts and heritage.

The arts programs achieved their expected long-term outcomes while delivering their programs efficiently and within the established service standards. The 2017 results showed increased achievement when compared to 2012.

All three programs were delivered efficiently, and the costs incurred were consistent with ratios reported in past evaluations.

The programs met service standards for acknowledging receipt of applications.

Though all programs struggled to meet service standards related to the timeliness of funding decisions in the initial years of the evaluation (2013-14 to 2014-15), all three improved their timeliness in the last two years (2016-17 and 2017-18).

Some program design challenges remained such as:

  • Continued barriers accessing program funding among smaller and underserved organizations due to: a lack of awareness of funding opportunities, organizations not being considered professional under program guidelines, and limited organizational capacity.
  • Issues with processes for performance data collection, monitoring, reporting, and reliability due to: unclear indicators and outcome statements, methodological inconsistencies, gaps in data collection, procedures and tools, and internal database (unclear or inconsistent definitions, poor comparability across years, missing data).
Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20
In addition to ongoing activities, such as posting current guidelines on the website and guiding applicants by phone, email and site visits, the Canada Arts Presentation Fund also engages with program stakeholders throughout the year by attending relevant conferences and showcasing events; and by holding meetings with representatives from the arts presentation community.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 15,939,912 16,223,985 19,750,000 19,314,142 19,314,142 -435,858
Total contributions 18,194,890 13,353,952 12,727,742 20,710,666 20,710,666 7,982,924
Total program 34,134,802 29,577,937 32,477,742 40,024,808 40,024,808 7,547,066
Explanation of variances
The overall variance of $7.5M is mainly explained by the new funding of $7.8M received for Expanding Support for Artists and Cultural Events (Budget 2019), and a transfer of ($0.1M) to Canada Council for the Arts to support multilateral cooperation on French-language theatre project, as well as to ensure Canada's participation in meetings of the Commission international du théâtre francophone, and a transfer of ($0.2M) to other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities. Within the program's authorities, $7.7M was transferred from Grants to Contributions.

Canada Cultural Spaces Fund

Name of transfer payment program
Canada Cultural Spaces Fund
Start date
2001-02
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Grants and contributions
Type of appropriation
Annually through Main Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2017-18
Core Responsibility
Core Responsibility 1: Creativity, Arts and Culture
Link to department’s Program Inventory
Arts: Canada Cultural Spaces Fund
Description
The Canada Cultural Spaces Fund seeks to improve the physical conditions for arts- and heritage-related creation, collaboration, presentation, preservation and exhibition. The Program also aims to increase and improve access for Canadians to arts and culture. To achieve these objectives, the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund provides financial assistance in the form of grants and contributions for infrastructure projects for professional, not-for-profit organizations as well as municipal and provincial/territorial governments and agencies with a mandate for arts and heritage or to create and manage creative hubs, and equivalent Indigenous peoples’ organizations. The goal is to provide Canadians in all regions, including underserved communities, with access to new or improved cultural facilities in their communities for creation, collaboration, presentation, preservation and exhibition. This program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants under the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund and Contributions under the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund.
Results achieved

Canadians have access to cultural facilities in their communities

  • Number of communities with improved cultural facilities

Result: 96

In 2019-20, the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund approved the investment of $57.6 million (including funding to multi-year projects) in support of 185 cultural infrastructure projects. Of this amount, $4.9 million was invested in support of 10 creative hubs projects.

The Canada Cultural Spaces Fund approved an investment of $3 million in a project led by the City of Niagara Falls in support of the construction of a new 21,000 square feet multi-use creative hub.

The creative hub, which will be located in the heart of the city and adjacent to the Niagara Falls History Museum, will consist of two connected facilities – the Studio Building which will house a woodworking studio, a communal café, and lounge/performance area and include 28 open concept artist studio spaces and a public art gallery. The Market Hall, which will consist of a storage area and a hall that will host the community's weekly Farmers Market and serve as a mid-sized, multi-configurable professional performance space and lecture hall with the capacity to seat between 100 and 200 people. Also, an exterior programming space, the Main Street Civic Plaza, will be created to accommodate larger presentations such as outdoor festivals. The need for this kind of facility was identified by the City after numerous studies and community consultations.

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20

An audit was completed in 2019-2020. Based on the audit findings, the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund Program Management Control Framework is in place and controls are, for the most part, working as intended. Accountabilities and authorities were understood across the regions and in headquarters. Program documentation was aligned with and supported the policy direction provided by the Government of Canada for creative hubs. The audit did identify areas that would benefit from additional program management support and oversight, which includes ensuring that:

  • The program’s governance framework is supported by clear mandates, roles and responsibilities;
  • Regions maintain up-to-date agile and flexible Regional Investment Strategies (RIS) that feed into a national program strategy, including Program outreach;
  • Guidance, training and tools are provided to support project assessment and project monitoring;
  • A collaborative approach is adopted for ensuring that risks to the achievement of Program objectives are identified, assessed and mitigated on a regular basis; and
  • Performance measurement is being enhanced to support the achievement of the objectives and outcomes of the program.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

The last Grouped Arts Evaluation: Canada Arts Presentation Fund, Canada Cultural Spaces Fund and Canada Cultural Investment Fund 2013-14 to 2017-18 was approved on August 20, 2019.

The Canada Cultural Spaces Fund responded to the demand for modern arts and heritage spaces that reflect changing cultural, accessibility, and technical equipment needs. Funded organizations featured programming that included a variety of disciplines, programming for young audiences, and those located in rural or remote regions.

The three programs, which also complemented other sources of federal, provincial/territorial, and municipal funding. aligned with Canadian Heritage and federal government priorities and responsibilities by:

  • Supporting access to Canadian arts and culture experiences, community investment, and advancing the use of digital technology;
  • Supporting cultural industries and infrastructure, celebrating heritage and diversity, and supporting Indigenous arts and heritage.

The arts programs achieved their expected long-term outcomes while delivering their programs efficiently and within the established service standards. The 2017 results showed increased achievement when compared to 2012.

All three programs were delivered efficiently, and the costs incurred were consistent with ratios reported in past evaluations.

The programs met service standards for acknowledging receipt of applications.

Though all programs struggled to meet service standards related to the timeliness of funding decisions in the initial years of the evaluation (2013-14 to 2014-15), all three improved their timeliness in the last two years (2016-17 and 2017-18).

Some program design challenges remained such as:

  • Continued barriers accessing program funding among smaller and underserved organizations due to: a lack of awareness of funding opportunities, organizations not being considered professional under program guidelines, and limited organizational capacity.
  • Issues with processes for performance data collection, monitoring, reporting, and reliability due to: unclear indicators and outcome statements, methodological inconsistencies, gaps in data collection, procedures and tools, and internal database (unclear or inconsistent definitions, poor comparability across years, missing data).
Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20
The Department engages applicants and recipients through activities such as updating regional investment strategies, interacting with recipients, site visits and posting current guidelines on the website.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 5,035,512 3,617,760 7,000,000 4,613,678 4,613,676 -2,386,324
Total contributions 99,042,512 53,059,268 48,268,717 51,192,748 50,462,856 2,194,139
Total program 104,078,024 56,677,028 55,268,717 55,806,426 55,076,532 -192,185
Explanation of variances
Funding was fully spent as planned. Within the program's authorities, $2.4M was transferred from Grants to Contributions.

Canada Arts Training Fund

Name of transfer payment program
Canada Arts Training Fund
Start date
1997-98
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Contributions
Type of appropriation
Annually through Main Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2018-19
Core Responsibility
Core Responsibility 1: Creativity, Arts and Culture
Link to department’s Program Inventory
Arts: Canada Arts Training Fund
Description
The Canada Arts Training Fund contributes to the development of Canadian creators and future cultural leaders of the Canadian arts sector by supporting the training of artists with high potential through institutions that offer training of the highest caliber. It provides financial assistance to Canadian not-for-profit institutions that specialize in delivering focused, intensive and practice-based arts studies. These schools offer professional training at the highest level in disciplines such as dance, theatre, circus arts, visual arts and music (opera, orchestral). It also provides financial support to training in Indigenous and ethnocultural artistic practices. Canadians and the world benefit from high-quality artistic achievements by Canadian artists trained in Canada at institutions funded through the program. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Contributions to the Canada Arts Training Fund.
Results achieved

Graduates of arts training institutions have professional careers in Canada and internationally.

  • Minimum percentage of arts graduates of institutions supported by the Canada Arts Training Fund that are employed professionally in their field in Canada or abroad.

Result: 86

In 2019-20, the Canada Arts Training Fund helped to further the Department’s goal of training artists with high potential through the delivery of 35 contributions in the amount of $22.8 million, supporting Canada’s top arts training schools specializing in a wide variety of artistic disciplines.

Results from internal Public Opinion Research conducted in 2019 indicate that 90% of employers rated graduates of Canada Arts Training Fund funded institutions as being well prepared for professional careers, surpassing the target set at 80%. This attests to the high quality of the training provided by the funded institutions that foster excellence in the arts.

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20
No audit project completed in 2019-2020 and no specific audit project planned in 2020-2021.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

The last Evaluation of the Canada Arts Training Fund 2012-13 to 2017-18 was approved on February 20, 2019.

Due to the impacts of COVID-19, the Evaluation Services Directorate has had to limit its activities in order to allow programs to administer the Emergency Support Fund for Cultural, Heritage and Sport Organizations. Consequently, the 2020-21 to 2024-25 Departmental Evaluation Plan has had to be revised. The fiscal year of the next planned evaluation will therefore be determined once Canadian Heritage announces the end of its business continuity plan and the Directorate is fully operational again.

Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20
The Department engages applicants and recipients through activities such as regular communications, site visits of funded training programs and posting current guidelines on the website. As of 2015, applications for funding are submitted through an online system. The program also conducts public opinion research of performing arts employers every four to five years.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 22,879,000 22,697,225 22,779,440 22,789,835 22,786,894 7,454
Total program 22,879,000 22,697,225 22,779,440 22,789,835 22,786,894 7,454
Explanation of variances
Funding was fully spent as planned.

Canada Cultural Investment Fund

Name of transfer payment program
Canada Cultural Investment Fund
Start date
2001-02
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Grants and contributions
Type of appropriation
Annually through Main Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2018-19
Core Responsibility
Core Responsibility 1: Creativity, Arts and Culture
Link to department’s Program Inventory
Arts: Canada Cultural Investment Fund
Description
The Canada Cultural Investment Fund encourages private sector investment, partnership and sound business practices to help arts and heritage organizations become better rooted and recognized in their communities. This is achieved through three components. The Endowment Incentives component encourages private donors to contribute to endowment funds for professional arts organizations, so they can access new sources of funding in the future. The component provides matching funds of up to one dollar for every dollar raised from private donors. The Strategic Initiatives component provides financial assistance for projects involving multiple partners that will help arts and heritage organizations improve their business practices and diversify their revenues. By supporting collaborative projects, Strategic Initiatives encourages knowledge and resource sharing and strategic use of technologies that will strengthen the business operations of arts and heritage organizations, helping them make stronger contributions to Canadian society and the economy. The Limited Support to Endangered Arts Organizations component provides financial assistance in those rare instances where a professional arts organization faces the prospect of closure but there is a high degree of support for its continuation and a viable business/restructuring plan. Assistance through this component can enable an arts organization to restructure, so it can continue to contribute to the community it is serving. This program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants to the Canada Cultural Investment Fund and Contributions to the Canada Cultural Investment Fund.
Results achieved

Arts and heritage organizations demonstrate sound organizational, administrative and financial health.

  • Minimum dollar amount, in millions, raised through private-sector donations by arts organizations applying to and eligible for Endowment Incentives component.

Result: 28,066,959

In 2019-20, private sector donations were $28,1 million, surpassing the target of $20 million.

The Strategic Initiatives component of the Canada Culture Investment Fund launched in November 2018 an experimental project called The First Spark Initiative, which ended on November 15, 2019.

In 2019-20, 37 requests were approved under this initiative, for a total of $176,509 in support of arts and heritage organizations to help them find creative solutions to current challenges. These activities were held in the provinces of Alberta, British Columbia, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Ontario, Quebec and the Yukon.

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20
No audit project completed in 2019-2020 and no specific audit project planned in 2020-2021.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

The last Grouped Arts Evaluation: Canada Arts Presentation Fund, Canada Cultural Spaces Fund and Canada Cultural Investment Fund 2013-14 to 2017-18 was approved on August 20, 2019.

The Canada Cultural Investment Fund encouraged private funding in arts organizations and helped arts and heritage organizations improve their business practices, capacity, and partnerships.

The three programs, which also complemented other sources of federal, provincial/territorial, and municipal funding, aligned with Canadian Heritage and federal government priorities and responsibilities by:

  • Supporting access to Canadian arts and culture experiences, community investment, and advancing the use of digital technology;
  • Supporting cultural industries and infrastructure, celebrating heritage and diversity, and supporting Indigenous arts and heritage.

The arts programs achieved their expected long-term outcomes while delivering their programs efficiently and within the established service standards. The 2017 results showed increased achievement when compared to 2012.

All three programs were delivered efficiently, and the costs incurred were consistent with ratios reported in past evaluations.

The programs met service standards for acknowledging receipt of applications.

Though all programs struggled to meet service standards related to the timeliness of funding decisions in the initial years of the evaluation (2013-14 to 2014-15), all three improved their timeliness in the last two years (2016-17 and 2017-18).

Some program design challenges remained such as:

  • Continued barriers accessing program funding among smaller and underserved organizations due to: a lack of awareness of funding opportunities, organizations not being considered professional under program guidelines, and limited organizational capacity.
  • Issues with processes for performance data collection, monitoring, reporting, and reliability due to: unclear indicators and outcome statements, methodological inconsistencies, gaps in data collection, procedures and tools, and internal database (unclear or inconsistent definitions, poor comparability across years, missing data).
Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20
The Department engages applicants and recipients through activities such as meetings with representatives from the arts and heritage sector, posting guidelines on the website and liaising with applicants about component funding requirements.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 18,904,193 18,995,994 20,000,000 18,727,898 18,727,898 -1,272,102
Total contributions 3,065,512 2,976,157 1,972,205 3,244,307 3,227,488 1,255,283
Total program 21,969,705 21,972,151 21,972,205 21,972,205 21,955,386 -16,819
Explanation of variances
Funding was fully spent as planned. Within the program's authorities, $1.3M was transferred from Grants to Contributions.

Creative Export Canada

Name of transfer payment program
Creative Export Canada
Start date
2018
End date
2023
Type of transfer payment
Contribution
Type of appropriation
2018-2019 to 2022-2023 Treasury Board Transfer Payment to support the Creative Export Strategy
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2018-19
Core Responsibility
Core Responsibility 1: Creativity, Arts and Culture
Link to department’s Program Inventory
Cultural Marketplace Framework: Creative Export Canada
Description

Creative Export Canada program offers annual funding for projects that help our creative industries reach more people around the world.

As more and more creative content is made available, Canadian creators and entrepreneurs are eager to stand out and have their works discovered by consumers everywhere.

This program supports projects that generate export revenues and help Canadian works shine whatever the platform or format. Due to its competitive nature, it focuses on high-potential projects, and encourages partnerships and innovative ideas. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Contributions under the Creative Export Canada program.

Results achieved

In its second year, the Creative Export Canada program distributed nearly $7.2 million in funding to support 23 projects, including multi-year projects beginning in fiscal year 2018-19, from all major creative industries, for which more than a quarter were from the audiovisual and interactive digital media sectors.

  • 11 projects were multi-year projects from the first cohort (2018-19); and
  • 12 projects were from the second cohort (2019-20).

The program offers multiyear funding (maximum of two fiscal years), which explains the higher number of funded projects in its first cohort. Funding increased export activities through direct support to Canada's creative industries, as well as a notable increase in the export revenues of recipients.

Almost one third of funded projects targeted the audiovisual industry (28%), followed by interactive digital media in combination with another creative industry (25%), performing arts (19%), design (13%), music (9%) and publishing (6%).

The majority of funded projects were from recipients based in Montréal, Toronto and Vancouver as these locations are considered to be Canada’s main creative hubs with a high number of export-ready applicants that meet the program’s objectives. The program also received applications from all regions across Canada, including from rural and remote communities.

Projects that were funded targeted multiple international export markets, such as in Asia, North America and Europe.

The Creative Export Canada program is waiting to receive final reports showing 2019-2020 results. Interim reports show the progress of each project and the impact of 2019-2020 funding on their revenues. The final reports will confirm the impact and export revenues generated by the funded projects.

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20
No audit project completed in 2019-2020 and no specific audit project planned in 2020-2021.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

The Creative Export Strategy has never been evaluated (new program).

Due to the impacts of COVID-19, the Evaluation Services Directorate has had to limit its activities in order to allow programs to administer the Emergency Support Fund for Cultural, Heritage and Sport Organizations. Consequently, the 2020-21 to 2024-25 Departmental Evaluation Plan has had to be revised. The fiscal year of the next planned evaluation will therefore be determined once Canadian Heritage announces the end of its business continuity plan and the Directorate is fully operational again.

Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20
In 2019-2020, the Creative Export Canada program supported and engaged applicants and recipients through: targeted email updates; timely application assistance; the use of social media; information seminars; the distribution of promotional materials; and meetings with industry representatives.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 0 7,788,750 7,000,000 7,275,000 7,170,955 170,955
Total program 0 7,788,750 7,000,000 7,275,000 7,170,955 170,955
Explanation of variances
The variance of $0.2M is explained with transfers from other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.

Harbourfront Centre Funding Program

Name of transfer payment program
Harbourfront Centre Funding Program
Start date
March 1, 2006
End date
March 31, 2026
Type of transfer payment
Contribution
Type of appropriation
Annually through Main Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2019-20
Core Responsibility
Core Responsibility 1: Creativity, Arts and Culture
Link to department’s Program Inventory
Arts: Harbourfront Centre Funding Program
Description
The Harbourfront Centre Funding Program is a single-recipient program that provides operating funding to the Harbourfront Centre. The Harbourfront Centre creates cultural and artistic events and activities to enliven, educate and entertain the public on Toronto’s waterfront. Its mission is to present, commission and incubate the work of contemporary artists in all disciplines, foster learning and innovation through inter-disciplinary and international artistic exchange, deliver accessible, inspiring, and relevant artistic, cultural, educational, and recreational experiences and steward the transformation of its campus and strengthen Toronto’s identity as an international waterfront city. This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Contribution to the Harbourfront Centre.
Results achieved

Cultural, recreational and educational programs are organized and delivered at the Harbourfront Centre.

In 2019-20, the Harbourfront Centre Funding Program provided operational funds in support of 4,203 events related to culture, recreation and education events and 201 cultural, recreational and educational programs at Harbourfront Centre.

Note: There was a change in methodology. The program went from counting all sub-programs and related activities to strictly accounting for program series.

Although the cancellations due to COVID-19 pandemic came close to the year-end, it included the March Break Camps and School Visits, which are a large part of both events and programs. These numbers also reflect a continuation of the change in methodology that reclassifies activities more accurately into events and/or programs.

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20
No audit project completed in 2019-2020 and no specific audit project planned in 2020-2021.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

The last evaluation of the Harbourfront Centre Funding Program 2014-15 to 2017-18 was approved on September 14, 2018.

Due to the impacts of COVID-19, the Evaluation Services Directorate has had to limit its activities in order to allow programs to administer the Emergency Support Fund for Cultural, Heritage and Sport Organizations. Consequently, the 2020-21 to 2024-25 Departmental Evaluation Plan has had to be revised. The fiscal year of the next planned evaluation will therefore be determined once Canadian Heritage announces the end of its business continuity plan and the Directorate is fully operational again.

Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20
Only one named recipient is eligible for funding from Harbourfront Centre Funding sub-program, the Harbourfront Corporation.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000 12,500,000 12,500,000 7,500,000
Total program 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000 12,500,000 12,500,000 7,500,000
Explanation of variances
The variance is explained by new funding of $7.5M received for priority infrastructure projects to modernize presentation and recreational facilities, including those related to health, safety and accessibility, in order to enhance the experience of audiences and artists and increase the potential for self-generated revenues.

Canada Media Fund

Name of transfer payment program
Canada Media Fund
Start date
2010-11
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Contributions
Type of appropriation
Annually through Main Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2010-11
Core Responsibility
Core Responsibility 1: Creativity, Arts and Culture
Link to department’s Program Inventory
Cultural Industries Support and Development: Canada Media Fund
Description
The Canada Media Fund is funded by the Government of Canada and the cable, satellite distributors and Internet Protocol Television (IPTV). It supports the creation of digital content across multiple platforms such as television, wireless devices or the Internet. The Canada Media Fund focuses investments on the creation of content Canadians want, and harnesses the opportunities provided by new technologies to deliver content to Canadians where and when they want it. Organizations supported by the Canada Media Fund include, but are not limited to, Canadian television and digital media production companies. Canadians as consumers of convergent programs and creators of leading-edge content and applications represent the ultimate target group. Indigenous communities, official-language minority communities and other diverse language groups are also targeted by specific production funding envelopes. This Program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Contributions under the Canada Media Fund.
Results achieved

Innovative Canadian content and software applications are created for commercial potential or public use.

  • Minimum number of innovative Canadian content and software application projects supported by the Canada Media Fund.
    • There were 175 innovative Canadian content and software application projects supported by the Canada Media Fund. The number of projects supported varies over time depending on a number of factors, including average budgets and other industry trends. The difference between the minimum target (60) and the actual result speaks to the level of interest in this program.

Canadians watch or interact with Canada Media Fund-supported television programs or digital convergent content.

  • Number of hours viewed hours (in millions of hours annually) for Canada Media Fund-funded English-language television productions.
    • There were 1,305,471,000 hours tuned on linear and on-demand measurement (ODM) platforms. The failure to reach the target (1.9 billion hours) is believed to be the combined result of a change in CRTC’s primetime exhibition requirement made after the target was set, and the continued shift in viewing habits towards digital platforms and away from traditional broadcasting platforms.
  • Number of hours viewed (in millions of hours annually) for Canada Media Fund-funded French-language television productions.
    • There were 1,284,443,000 hours tuned on linear and ODM platforms. This exceeds the target of 1.1 billion hours, which illustrates the success of Canada Media Fund-supported content with audiences in the French market and reflects the slower rate of impact of the shift to digital platforms in this key Canadian market.
Findings of audits completed in 2019–20
No audit project completed in 2019-2020 and no specific audit project planned in 2020-2021.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

The last Evaluation of the Canada Media Fund 2010-11 to 2013-14 was approved on July 9, 2015.

An evaluation in underway, which started in January 2019.

Due to the impacts of COVID-19, the Evaluation Services Directorate has had to limit its activities in order to allow programs to administer the Emergency Support Fund for Cultural, Heritage and Sport Organizations. Consequently, the 2020-21 to 2024-25 Departmental Evaluation Plan has had to be revised. The evaluation completion date will therefore be determined once Canadian Heritage announces the end of its business continuity plan and the Directorate is fully operational again.

Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20
The Canada Media Fund corporation is required to conduct ongoing, formal, meaningful consultations, which it conducts annually. It is in this context that the Canada Media Fund does a cross-country series of outreach sessions to present changes to the budget, guidelines, and program deadlines for that year to stakeholders.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 134,146,077 151,106,077 134,146,077 157,793,710 157,793,710 23,647,633
Total program 134,146,077 151,106,077 134,146,077 157,793,710 157,793,710 23,647,633
Explanation of variances
The variance of $23.7M is explained by the new funding of $23.5M (Budget 2018) received as an increase in ongoing funding to stabilize its funding in order to better financially support Canadian creators and producers and a transfer of $0.2M from other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.

Canada Music Fund

Name of transfer payment program
Canada Music Fund
Start date
2001-02
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Grants and contributions
Type of appropriation
Annually through Main Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2020-21
Core Responsibility
Core Responsibility 1: Creativity, Arts and Culture
Link to department’s Program Inventory
Cultural Industries Support and Development: Canada Music Fund
Description

The Canada Music Fund aims to foster an environment where a diversity of Canadian music artists connect with audiences everywhere by enhancing the career development of Canadian artists, the promotion of their music and the overall competitiveness of the Canadian independent music sector at home, abroad and on digital platforms. The program achieves its objectives through grants and contributions in support of the production and marketing of a wide range of music by new, emerging and established Canadian music artists, including national and international touring and showcasing activities, digital distribution, artist and business development, music publishing, music management, award shows and professional conferences.

This support is delivered through the following components:

  1. Individual Initiatives: Helps ensure that diverse Canadian musical works are created and promoted by supporting activities of Canadian music artists and entrepreneurs ranging from sound recording production / marketing, music publishing, artist management, live performances and business development initiatives that are central to Canadian artist development, promotion and audience building.
  2. Collective Initiatives: Helps Canadian artists and music entrepreneurs to gain a greater profile at home and abroad, increase artistic and business skills and build export-readiness and competitiveness. It supports music conferences, awards shows, export missions, digital market development initiatives, industry research and intensive skills development (Bootcamps).

This Program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants and Contributions under the Canada Music Fund.

Results achieved

In 2019-2020, the Canada Music Fund helped to further the Department's goal of supporting the creation and dissemination of Canadian cultural content through:

  • Contributions to 19 Canadian sound recording firms, 21 Canadian music publishing firms and 4 Canadian music industry associations through the Music Entrepreneur Component (MEC);
  • Contributions to two third-party administrators (FACTOR for the English-language market and Musicaction for the French-language market) for the delivery of the New Musical Works (NMW) and Collective Initiatives (CI) components; and
  • A Memorandum of Understanding with Library and Archives Canada to carry out activities related to the preservation of Canada's musical heritage as part of the Canadian Music Memories component.

As announced in the 2019 Federal Budget, the Canada Music Fund received an additional $20 million over two years, starting in 2019-2020, to enhance its support for the production, promotion and distribution of Canadian music. This investment helps to support more Canadian musicians and music entrepreneurs with the rising costs of marketing and promotion necessary in the music industry.

In 2019-2020, the Canada Music Fund provided album production support which resulted in 646 albums, produced and released by MEC recipients (176 albums released in 2019-2020) or by NMW recipients (470 production projects approved in 2019-2020). This represents an increase of 25% compared to the average number of recordings supported in the previous five years (515). The albums spanned a variety of genres, such as rock (26%), pop (16%), roots & folk (16%), urban & worldbeat (13%), classical (9%) and electronica (6%).

NMW supported 105 production projects by French-language artists and 365 by English-language artists. For MEC supported productions, 43 were French-language, 97 English-language and 36 were instrumental or in other languages.

The Canada Music Fund helped Canadian artists connect with audiences at home and abroad by providing marketing, touring and showcasing support to more than 3,100 projects in 2019-2020 through NMW and funding to over 300 projects through the Collective Initiatives component (increases of 32% and 10% respectively compared to the average over the previous 5 years. It is important to note that through Budget 2016, the CMF received an additional $2.5 million per year for 5 years for trade specific activities. This additional investment is to be used to enhance existing export-related activities that are highly oversubscribed such as those mentioned above as well as to implement intensive professional development sessions (also called Bootcamps).

In 2019-2020, seven Bootcamps were supported, where 40 artists as well as 30 promising professionals managing and promoting several other Canadian artists participated. Participants benefitted from mentorship services, networking activities, performance competencies, operational training and other similar activities, which contribute to enhancing artists' export readiness and building international audiences.

In 2019, 21.8% of sales generated by the top 2,000 albums in Canada were by Canadian artists, an increase compared to the 18.7% share recorded in 2018. The domestic market share of albums by Canada Music Fund-supported artists increased from 9.6% in 2018 to 10.7% in 2019. Among the top 20,000 songs streamed in Canada, 9.6% were songs by Canadian artists in 2019, a decrease compared to the year before (10.4%). The domestic market share of streams by Canada Music Fund-supported artists remained stable at 3.5% in 2019 (3.4% in 2018).

The 40 sound recording and music publishing firms who have received MEC funding in 2019-2020 reported having generated a total of 101.5 million dollars in eligible revenues by Canadian artists over the last fiscal year. Eligible revenues refer to those derived from activities targeting the development of Canadian artists. Of this 101.5 million dollars, 63% were revenues generated in Canada while 37% were generated from outside of Canada.

The talent of Canada Music Fund-supported artists is recognized at national and international award ceremonies. Just under half of 2020 JUNO Award recipients (45%) and nominees (48%) had benefited from Canada Music Fund funding at some point in their career within categories funded by the Canada Music Fund. The Polaris Music Prize rewards the most critically acclaimed album of the year by a Canadian artist regardless of music genre or sales. Eight of the 10 albums shortlisted for the 2019 award were by artists that received Canada Music Fund support at one point in their career, including Haviah Mighty, whose album 13th Floor won the award. On an international level, artists who had received Canada Music Fund support at some point in their career were nominated for Grammy awards in 2020, including Daniel Caesar (nominated for the best R&B performance award for his collaboration with Brandy), and Marie Davidson (nominated for best remixed recording).

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20
No audit project completed in 2019-2020 and no specific audit project planned in 2020-2021.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

The last evaluation of the Canada Music Fund 2012-13 to 2017-18 was approved on July 26, 2019.

The operating costs of the Canada Music Fund were stable over the evaluation period.

Immediate Outcomes:

  • Increasing number of conferences, award shows and events funded;
  • 23.3%: Increase in the average number of Canadian artists represented by MEC recipients;
  • 498: Average number of albums produced and released each year by the program recipients;
  • 46.4%: Increase in the number of NMW projects funded;
  • 123%: Increase of CI international marketing projects;
  • Targets of acquisition and digitization of Canadian musical works exceeded.

Intermediate Outcomes:

  • 8%: Domestic target of market share for recipients' albums, achieved through evaluation period;
  • 6%: Domestic target of market share for recipients' streaming of songs by 2022, well on the way of achievement.

Ultimate Outcome:

  • Canada ranked as third largest music exporter.

The music industry has undergone significant changes and challenges:

  • Growing popularity of online streaming services (46% of the total sound recording revenues in 2017 in Canada was comprised of streaming revenues. Revenues are increasingly concentrated in the hands of larger players and artists are getting the smallest slice of the pie.)
  • The lines between creation, production, promotion, distribution and consumption of sound recordings are blurred.
  • There are new and innovative ways to connect creators with consumers.

Due to these challenges, the need for the Canada Music Fund to modernize has been widely acknowledged. The program recently received approval to implement significant changes including:

  • Simplification of the structure
  • Administration exclusively through FACTOR and Musicaction
  • Program components reduced from 4 to 2. New components:
  • Collective Initiatives
  • Individual Initiatives
  • Immediate outcomes reduced from 5 to 3. New immediate outcomes:
  • Canadian music artists and entrepreneurs are provided with opportunities to build skills and knowledge as well as to experiment and innovate.
  • Supported entrepreneurs invest in the development of Canadian artists.
  • Canadian artists are showcased in collective domestic and international promotional activities and performances.
  • These changes to the Canada Music Fund should:
  • Improve efficiency and flexibility;
  • Support a more diverse clientele and on a much broader basis;
  • Address internal incoherencies and reduce the “patchwork effect.”
Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20

When the program application guide for each funding stream is released, the Department communicates with potential and past recipients in the following ways:

  • Posting the application guide and application forms on the program website;
  • Emailing organizations identified as potential applicants notifying them that application documents are available;
  • Emailing professional associations for which members are targeted by the program notifying them that application documents are available;
  • Emailing third party administrators of the New Musical Works component so that they can post on their websites that the application forms are available;
  • Sending reminder emails shortly in advance of the funding application deadline.

The Department also engages with program stakeholders throughout the year in the following ways:

  • Guiding applicants by phone and email (including toll-free phone number and program e-mail address available to applicants and recipients);
  • Attending industry conferences and holding meetings with industry representatives.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 0 0 2,000,000 0 0 -2,000,000
Total contributions 27,289,309 26,407,595 24,799,231 36,389,231 36,389,231 11,590,000
Total program 27,289,309 26,407,595 26,799,231 36,389,231 36,389,231 9,590,000
Explanation of variances
The overall variance of $9.6M is explained by the new funding of $10.1M received for Expanding Support for Artists and Cultural Events (Budget 2019), the transfer of ($0.4M) to Library and Archives Canada to support the acquisition, cataloguing and preservation of Canadian sound recordings, and a transfer of ($0.1M) to other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities. Within the program's authorities, $2.0M was transferred from Grants to Contributions.

Canada Book Fund

Name of transfer payment program
Canada Book Fund
Start date
2010-11
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Grants and contributions
Type of appropriation
Annually through Main Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2015-16
Core Responsibility
Core Responsibility 1: Creativity, Arts and Culture
Link to department’s Program Inventory
Cultural Industries Support and Development: Canada Book Fund
Description

The Canada Book Fund supports the activities of Canadian book publishers and other sectors of the book industry to ensure access to a broad range of Canadian-authored books. Through an additional investment of $22.8 million over 5 years (2019-20 to 2023-24), the Canada Book Fund has undertaken an initiative to support the sustainable production and distribution of accessible digital books that can be used by everyone, including persons with print disabilities. This support is delivered through the following streams of funding:

  1. Support for Publishers, which provides funding distributed primarily through a formula that rewards success in delivering content that Canadians value. This funding contributes to the ongoing production and marketing of Canadian-authored books by offsetting the high costs of publishing in Canada and building the capacity and competitiveness of the sector.
  2. Support for Organizations, which provides funding to develop the Canadian book industry and the market for its products by assisting industry associations and related organizations to undertake collective projects offering broad benefits to the industry and, ultimately, to readers everywhere.

This Program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants under the Canada Book Fund and Contributions under the Canada Book Fund.

Results achieved

The $400 million in sales of Canadian-authored books ($276 million in Canada and $124 million abroad) by Canada Book Fund recipients are 14.2% above the target of $350 million. The result for 2019-20 constitutes an increase of 2.8% from last year’s figure of $389 million ($269 million in Canada and $120 million abroad).

Funding from the Canada Book Fund helped around 300 businesses and not-for-profit organizations in the Canadian book industry to undertake initiatives in publishing, marketing, professional development, technology-driven collective projects and other areas in support of departmental objectives.

The Canada Book Fund continued to support a broad range of industry activities across the country, including the work of 251 Canadian-owned publishers, in more than 80 Canadian towns and cities, which directly employ close to 2,500 Canadians. Publishers supported by the Canada Book Fund realized an aggregate profit margin of 5%.

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20
No audit project completed in 2019-2020 and no specific audit project planned in 2020-2021.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

The last evaluation of the Canada Book Fund 2012-13 to 2017-18 was approved on July 31, 2019.

The Canada Book Fund aligned with the Government of Canada and Canadian Heritage’s vision for the creative industries: maintaining a viable and competitive industry that creates and provides access to a diverse range of cultural content in Canada and abroad.

Canada Book Fund Recipients played an economic and culturally significant role.

Without the Canada Book Fund, funding some, particularly small publishers, would not have been viable.

Support for Organizations has a high level of commitment to recurring projects. There is little flexibility to accept new innovative projects or new applicants.

Greater focus is needed on increasing the visibility of Canadian books.

Support from the Canada Book Fund enabled a broad range of Canadian-owned publishers to produce, market and distribute a diversity of Canadian authored books nationally and internationally.

During the evaluation period, $183.6M was allocated to 246 publishers annually, representing both official languages, all regions, different market segments, and including Indigenous and Official Languages Minority publishers.

The Canada Book Fund funding supported publishers in marketing their books internationally.

The Support for Publishers funding formula is an objective and efficient mechanism to distribute funding to a wide range of recurrent applicants. Support for Organizations introduced measures to increase efficiency, or to reduce the administrative burden on the recipients; however, there are opportunities for Support for Organizations to increase its efficiency.

Support for Organizations opportunities for greater efficiency:

  • Increase the use of a streamlined process for the review of files.
  • Increase the use of multi-year funding.

Support for Organizations bettered its service standard for the number of weeks to reach a funding decision between 2015-16 and 2017-18, reaching under 28 weeks.

The Canada Book Fund:

  • Helped the Government of Canada to fulfill its responsibility to promote both official languages by funding both English and French-language publishing sectors.
  • Specifically targeted Indigenous and Official Languages Minority publishers.
  • Supported Canadian Heritage’s innovation and experimentation initiative by undertaking experimentation projects.
  • Will support the Government of Canada to fulfill commitments associated with the adoption of the Marrakesh Treaty in 2016.
Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20

When the program application guide for each funding stream component is released, the Department communicates with potential applicants and past recipients in the following ways:

  • Posting application information on the program website;
  • Emailing potential applicants to
    1. notify them that application forms and other related documents are available and
    2. inform them about key program changes.
  • Sending a reminder email shortly in advance of the funding application deadline.

The Department also engages with stakeholders throughout the year in the following ways:

  • Guiding applicants by phone and email (a toll-free phone number and a program email address are made available to program applicants and recipients);
  • Holding an annual consultation with industry stakeholders and organizing ad hoc meetings with recipients and potential applicants;
  • Attending industry events to improve the visibility and understanding of the program.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 1,689,206 1,401,138 8,300,000 1,963,191 1,963,191 -6,336,809
Total contributions 36,324,934 35,481,585 28,866,301 39,961,865 38,619,164 9,752,863
Total program 38,014,140 36,882,723 37,166,301 41,925,056 40,582,355 3,416,054
Explanation of variances
The overall variance of $3.4M is mainly explained by the new funding of $4.0M received for Inclusion of Canadians with Visual Impairments and Other Print Disabilities (Budget 2019) and by $0.7M transferred from other departmental programs. An amount of $1.3M was lapsed as the Canadian Book Fund did not have sufficient time to evaluate and approve all of the applications due to the activation of the Departmental Pandemic Business Continuity Plan. Within the program's authorities, $6.3M was transferred from Grants to Contributions.

Canada Periodical Fund

Name of transfer payment program
Canada Periodical Fund
Start date
2010-11
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Grants and contributions
Type of appropriation
Annually through Main Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2010-11
Core Responsibility
Core Responsibility 1: Creativity, Arts and Culture
Link to department’s Program Inventory
Cultural Industries Support and Development: Canada Periodical Fund
Description

The Canada Periodical Fund supports the activities of Canadian paid magazine and non-daily newspaper publishers and organizations to ensure that Canadians have access to diverse Canadian magazines and non-daily newspapers.

The Fund is delivered through the following components:

  1. Aid to Publishers: provides formula funding to Canadian paid print magazines and non-daily newspapers to support publishing activities, such as distribution, content creation, online activities and business development
  2. Business Innovation: provides funding to print magazines and digital periodicals for business development and innovation projects
  3. Collective Initiatives: provides funding to Canadian magazines and non-daily newspaper organizations for industry-wide projects to increase the overall sustainability of the Canadian magazine and non-daily newspaper industries.

This Program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants under the Canada Periodical Fund and Contributions under the Canada Periodical Fund.

Results achieved

In 2019-20, the Canada Periodical Fund funded 729 periodicals (compared to 728 in 2018-2019) through the Aid to Publishers component. Of this amount, 403 consisted of magazines (up from 391 in 2018-2019), while 326 were non-daily newspapers (down from 337 in 2018-2019). The leading types of periodicals funded were consumer – general interest (383), consumer – special interest (202) and trade – business (68). The remaining types of periodicals funded belonged to the categories of religious (33), arts & literary (23), farm (18) and scholarly (2).

With respect to equity-seeking groups, in 2019-20 the Canada Periodical Fund provided funding to 73 ethnocultural (55 in 2018-19), 22 OLM (24 in 2018-19), 17 aboriginal (16 in 2018-19) and 1 LGBTQ2 (1 in 2018-19) publications. More than half of the periodicals funded through the ATP component were published in the English language (489). The remainder consisted of French-language periodicals (145), bilingual periodicals (20), and periodicals published in other languages (75).

In 2019-20, 102,470,869 copies of periodicals funded by the Canada Periodical Fund through the Aid to Publishers component were distributed to Canadians per year. This number represents a 4% decrease from 2018-19, when 106,927,820 copies were distributed. This drop in copies provided to Canadian households is consistent with declining print circulation and publishing frequency as a result of the steady decline of advertising revenues and the influx of online content.

The Canada Periodical Fund funded 72 projects in 2019-20 through the Business Innovation component, namely 41 print magazine and 31 digital magazine projects (including 11 digital start-ups). Among the digital projects were 4 ethnocultural and 1 LGBTQ2 magazines, while the print projects involved 6 ethnocultural magazines. Notably, Business Innovation funds went toward initiatives relating to podcasting (e.g., The New Quarterly Literary Society Inc., Revue qui fait quoi inc.), branding (e.g., Culturerus Corporation), marketing (e.g., L’école branchée, Dobbernationloves) and digital innovation (e.g., Franconnection G.P., Up Here Publishing Limited).

The Canada Periodical Fund also funded 15 projects through the Collective Initiatives component in 2019-20. One popular theme among many of the submitted projects (Magazines Canada, Canada News Media Association, Journalists for Human Rights and Saskatchewan Weekly Newspaper Association) was the need to identify fake news and disinformation, a serious problem in today’s digital age.

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20
No audit project completed in 2019-2020 and no specific audit project planned in 2020-2021.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

The last evaluation of the Canada Periodical Fund 2010-11 to 2014-15 was approved on June 23, 2015.

An evaluation is underway, which started in June 2019.

Due to the impacts of COVID-19, the Evaluation Services Directorate has had to limit its activities in order to allow programs to administer the Emergency Support Fund for Cultural, Heritage and Sport Organizations. Consequently, the 2020-21 to 2024-25 Departmental Evaluation Plan has had to be revised. The evaluation completion date will therefore be determined once Canadian Heritage announces the end of its business continuity plan and the Directorate is fully operational again.

Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20

When the program application guide for each funding stream is released, the Department communicates with potential and past recipients in the following ways:

  • Posting the application guide and application forms on the program website;
  • Emailing recent recipients and organizations identified as potential applicants, notifying them that application documents are available;
  • Sending reminder emails shortly in advance of the funding application deadline;
  • Engaging with industry organizations so that they publicize program information to their members.

The Department also engages with program stakeholders throughout the year in the following ways:

  • Guiding applicants by phone and email (including toll-free phone number and program e-mail address available to applicants and recipients);
  • Holding informal meetings with various stakeholders to explain how the Canada Periodical Fund works and to listen to issues and concerns;
  • Attending various industry events to improve the visibility and understanding of the program;
  • Updating the Canada Periodical Fund website with program information.

This year, in 2019-20, program officials also held meetings with members of several large industry associations to discuss changes brought about by the upcoming modernization of the Canada Periodical Fund.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 67,572,677 70,684,635 72,775,054 71,283,009 71,283,009 -1,492,045
Total contributions 7,216,609 3,669,740 4,074,544 4,010,073 4,010,073 -64,471
Total program 74,789,286 74,354,375 76,849,598 75,293,082 75,293,082 -1,556,516
Explanation of variances
The overall variance of ($1.6M) represents money transferred to other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.

Local Journalism

Name of transfer payment program
Local Journalism
Start date
2019-20
End date
2023-24
Type of transfer payment
Grants and contributions
Type of appropriation
Annually through Main Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2019-20
Core Responsibility
Core Responsibility 1: Creativity, Arts and Culture
Link to department’s Program Inventory
Cultural Industries Support and Development: Local Journalism Initiative
Description

The Local Journalism Initiative supports the creation of original civic journalism that covers the diverse needs of underserved communities across Canada.

Funding is available to eligible Canadian media organizations to hire journalists or pay freelance journalists to produce civic journalism for underserved communities.

To protect the independence of the press, not-for-profit organizations representing different segments of the news industry have been mandated to administer the Initiative. These organizations will redistribute funding to media outlets charged with directly addressing coverage gaps through the hiring, freelancing and/or retention of journalists.

Results achieved

According to the preliminary reports of the Administrative Organizations, 186 journalists have been hired so far. The Administrative Organizations have launched additional calls for applications, the final results of which are expected in September 2020.

According to preliminary reports from the Administrative Organizations, more than 134 underserved communities and/or municipalities are covered to date. Additional calls for applications have been issued and final results are expected in September 2020.

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20
No audit project completed in 2019-2020 and no specific audit project planned in 2020-2021.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

The Local Journalism Initiative has never been evaluated (new program).

Due to the impacts of COVID-19, the Evaluation Services Directorate has had to limit its activities in order to allow programs to administer the Emergency Support Fund for Cultural, Heritage and Sport Organizations. Consequently, the 2020-21 to 2024-25 Departmental Evaluation Plan has had to be revised. The evaluation completion date will therefore be determined once Canadian Heritage announces the end of its business continuity plan and the Directorate is fully operational again.

Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20
As part of respecting the independence of the press, the Administering Organizations must solicit applications from all regions of Canada and communicate with their current and potential Ultimate Recipients in a variety of ways, including publishing program changes, application forms, application deadlines, etc. on their websites.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 0 0 0 10,000,000 10,000,000 10,000,000
Total program 0 0 0 10,000,000 10,000,000 10,000,000
Explanation of variances
The variance represents new funding of $10M ($50M over 5 years in Budget 2018) for the new program Local Journalism Initiative, to support the production of original civic journalism materials for underserved communities.

TV5

Name of transfer payment program
TV5
Start date
1990-91
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Grants and contributions
Type of appropriation
Annually through Main Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2019-20
Core Responsibility
Core Responsibility 1: Creativity, Arts and Culture
Link to department’s Program Inventory
Cultural Industries Support and Development: TV5
Description

TV5 supports the international TV5 partnership with France, Fédération Wallonie-Bruxelles, Switzerland, Québec and Canada. TV5 enables Canadian productions to be broadcast around the world through TV5MONDE. Moreover, through TV5 Québec Canada, it provides Canadians with access to a rich diversity of programming from the international Francophonie.

The additional investment to the Program announced in 2019 to support the creation, development and launch of a Francophone digital platform with TV5MONDE public broadcasters will provide an opportunity to increase its goals regarding the online presence and visibility of French-language content and the “discoverability” of Francophone Canadian content on the international stage.

This Program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grant to TV5MONDE and Contribution to TV5 Québec Canada.

Results achieved

TV5MONDE reached 364 million households worldwide in 2019. The presence of Canadian content on TV5MONDE in 2019-2020 has fostered international outreach for artisans of the French Canadian television, film and multimedia. The percentage of Canadian content shown on TV5MONDE resulted at 10.53 percent for this fiscal year, which is well above the target of 7 percent.

In March 2020, TV5 Québec Canada has reached 10.3 million households in Canada. TV5 programming in Canada continues to offer Canadians unique access to international Francophonie content with 85 percent of its programming coming from international Francophonie partners, a result similar to the previous years.

The year 2019-2020 has mainly been marked by the creation of the new Francophone digital platform, called TV5MONDEplus, an initiative developed as part of the digital transformation of the organization. The target is set at 2500 hours by March 2024. The launch of the platform is scheduled for the fall 2020 and will suggest a catalogue of French content, including Canadian programming.

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20
No audit project completed in 2019-2020 and no specific audit project planned in 2020-2021.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

The last evaluation of the funding allocated by the department of Canadian Heritage to the TV5 program 2011-12 to 2016-17 was approved on October 29, 2019.

The Government of Canada’s participation in TV5 remains relevant because it showcases francophone culture in Canada and around the world. It is also a diplomatic tool for promoting Canadian priorities; it is critical to the cultural development of Canada, its unification and its emancipation.

The Government of Canada’s participation in TV5 ensures the:

  • Preservation of the French language and culture in Canada;
  • Mutual enhancement of Canada’s francophone communities;
  • Promotion of francophone Canadian culture throughout the world;
  • Influence within the Francophonie and promotion of Canadian priorities.

The Government of Canada’s funding has facilitated recognition of the value of cultural diversity and the advancement of the broadcast of Canadian content.

Canadian Heritage’s funding has allowed TV5 to achieve the expected results.

While the Program is profitable, some challenges arise:

  • Digital shift
  • Lack of detailed data on ratings for Canadian content around the world
  • Increased costs of releasing Canadian programming rights
  • GBA+: very little in-depth data collected and available
  • Benefits very little from other data collected by Canadian Heritage
Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20
Only two named recipients are eligible for funding from TV5 Program, TV5MONDE and TV5 Québec Canada.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 7,993,100 7,789,917 8,000,000 7,325,103 7,325,103 -674,897
Total contributions 2,960,900 2,960,900 2,960,900 9,110,900 9,110,900 6,150,000
Total program 10,954,000 10,750,817 10,960,900 16,436,003 16,436,003 5,475,103
Explanation of variances
The variance of $5.5M is explained by the new funding of $6.0M (Fall 2018 economic update) received to support the creation, development and launch of a French-language digital platform bringing together public broadcasters that are members of TV5MONDE and a transfer of ($0.5M) to other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities. Within the program's authorities, $0.7M was transferred from Grants to Contributions.

Museums Assistance Program

Name of transfer payment program
Museums Assistance Program
Start date
1972-73
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Grants and contributions
Type of appropriation
Annually through Main Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2011-12
Core Responsibility
Core Responsibility 2: Heritage and Celebration
Link to department’s Program Inventory
Preservation of and Access to Heritage: Museums Assistance Program
Description
The Museums Assistance Program supports heritage institutions and workers in the preservation and presentation of heritage collections. The Museums Assistance Program provides financial assistance to Canadian museums and related institutions for activities that facilitate Canadians’ access to our heritage, foster the preservation of Canada’s cultural heritage, including the preservation of representative collections of Indigenous cultural heritage, and foster professional knowledge, skills and practices related to key museum functions. In support of the Youth Employment and Skills Strategy, the Museums Assistance Program helps heritage organizations create summer employment and internship opportunities for Canadian youth through the heritage components of Young Canada Works. The Museums Assistance Program also provides grants through the Movable Cultural Property Program to assist designated institutions in acquiring cultural property threatened with export or available on international markets. This program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants under the Museums Assistance Program and Contributions under the Museums Assistance Program.
Results achieved

The following are highlights of the results achieved in 2019–20 by the Museums Assistance Program’s three funding streams:

  1. the Museums Assistance Program,
  2. Young Canada Works - Heritage, and
  3. Movable Cultural Property Grants.

The Museums Assistance Program supported 97 venues to present 58 exhibitions as well as 556 public programming activities and 245 public programming products. A total of 890,624 visitors attended exhibitions and programming activities supported by the Museums Assistance Program.

A total of 1,420 individuals attended 49 professional learning opportunities funded by the Museums Assistance Program. Of those who responded to the participant survey, 99% reported improvement in their knowledge, skills and practices related to key museum functions.

In 2019-20, a total of 1,805 summer jobs and 276 internships, funded by Young Canada Works - Heritage, were provided to young Canadians to enable them to gain professional experience in museums and related heritage organizations. Of the youth who responded to the evaluation questionnaire, 98% reported improvement in knowledge and skills in a heritage field.

In 2019-20, Young Canada Works - Heritage received supplemental funding under Budget 2017 and Budget 2019 through the Youth Employment and Skills Strategy, led by Employment and Social Development Canada. These supplements enabled the creation of 574 (of the 1,805) summer jobs for Canadian students and 226 (of the 276) internships for young Canadian graduates to gain professional experience in museums and related heritage organizations.

The preservation of 167,343 heritage objects was supported through the Museums Assistance Program. This support was achieved through the funding of collections storage solutions. The preservation of 3 heritage objects was supported though Movable Cultural Property Grants. Of the institutions that received the Museums Assistance Program funding to support a storage solutions project, 100% indicated improvement in the preservation of their collections. Of the institutions that received Museums Assistance Program funding to support a collections management systems project, 100% indicated improvement in the management of their collections.

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20
No audit project completed in 2019-2020 and no specific audit project planned in 2020-2021.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

The last evaluation of the Museums Assistance Program 2008-2009 to 2012-2013 was approved on December 10, 2015.

An evaluation is underway, which started in July 2019.

Due to the impacts of COVID-19, the Evaluation Services Directorate has had to limit its activities in order to allow programs to administer the Emergency Support Fund for Cultural, Heritage and Sport Organizations. Consequently, the 2020-21 to 2024-25 Departmental Evaluation Plan has had to be revised. The evaluation completion date will therefore be determined once Canadian Heritage announces the end of its business continuity plan and the Directorate is fully operational again.

Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20
Updated information for the Museums Assistance Program, Young Canada Works-Heritage Programs and Movable Cultural Property grants is available on the Department’s website. When additional communication activities are required, the national office delivers messages through the regional offices, delivery organizations, professional associations, etc. for dissemination to targeted organizations, or directly to applicants and recipients. Department representatives also promote heritage programs by participating in national and provincial museums associations’ conferences and meetings. Every five years, recipients and stakeholders are invited to contribute to program evaluation exercises.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 2,797,103 2,545,659 4,663,680 2,853,042 2,853,042 -1,810,638
Total contributions 17,461,100 17,615,782 14,051,884 18,428,097 18,329,504 4,277,620
Total program 20,258,203 20,161,441 18,715,564 21,281,139 21,182,546 2,466,982
Explanation of variances
The variance of $2.5M is explained by the transfer of funds of $2.6M received from Employment and Social Development Canada for the Youth Employment Strategy and a transfer of ($0.1M) to Library and Archives Canada to support de dissemination of a national study to describe the economic and social value of the galleries, libraries, archives and museums. Within the program's authorities, $1.8M was transferred from Grants to Contributions.

Celebration and Commemoration Program

Name of transfer payment program
Celebration and Commemoration Program
Start date
1996-97
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Grants and contributions
Type of appropriation
Annually through Main Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2012-13
Core Responsibility
Core Responsibility 2: Heritage and Celebration
Link to department’s Program Inventory
National Celebrations, Commemorations and Symbols: Celebration and Commemoration Program
Description
The Celebration and Commemoration Program provides funding through grants and contributions to organizations for community-based activities celebrating National Indigenous Peoples Day on June 21, Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day on June 24, Canadian Multiculturalism Day on June 27 and Canada Day on July 1. Funding is also available for commemorations with a national scope that commemorate and celebrate nationally significant historical figures, places, events, and accomplishments. The program provides opportunities for Canadians to participate in national celebrations and commemorations and strengthen understanding of shared history. This program includes the following transfer payments: Grants and contributions in support of the Celebration and Commemoration Program and Contributions in support of the Celebration and Commemoration Program.
Results achieved
  1. Canadians participate in commemorations and celebrations of national significance.
  2. Number of participants at celebration and commemoration events/activities
  3. Canadians have access to events and activities across Canada that celebrate Canadian identity.
  4. Number of opportunities for Canadians to celebrate during the Celebrate Canada period (June 21 to July 1).

In 2019-20, the Celebration and Commemoration Program continued to provide Canadians from coast to coast to coast with opportunities to come together and appreciate the country’s cultural, ethnic, linguistic and geographic diversity, as well as its history, heritage, achievements and contributions to the world.

During the Celebrate Canada period from June 21 to July 1, 2019, the Program supported over 1,800 events and activities that engaged approximately 8 million participants in celebrations of national significance. These important national celebrations were open to the public, free of charge and connected Canadians to their communities and to each other.

  • National Indigenous Peoples Day (June 21) is a day for all Canadians to recognize and celebrate the unique heritage, diverse cultures and outstanding contributions of First Nations, Inuit and Métis Peoples. In 2019-20, 380,000 people attended over 200 celebrations across Canada, including Indigenous Day Live 2019 events delivered in partnership with Aboriginal Peoples Television Network (APTN) in Winnipeg, Whitehorse and Calgary. The Indigenous Day Live celebrations were also broadcast to an estimated 2.9 million more people on television, radio and online.
  • Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day (June 24) is a key celebration in Francophone and Francophile communities in Canada. In 2019-20, almost 1.4 million Canadians took part in just over 100 Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day events that highlighted Francophone culture, heritage and history across the country.
  • Canadian Multiculturalism Day (June 27) is an opportunity to appreciate the contribution of diverse cultural communities to the country. In 2019-20, 260,000 Canadians took part in over 150 events that showcased Canada’s rich cultural heritage.
  • For Canada Day on July 1, 2019, approximately 6 million people in over 1,300 communities came together in celebrations across the country.

Also, in 2019-20, the Program received additional two-year funding to fund celebrations for National Acadian Day (August 15). This funding went towards over 50 events that reached over 60,000 Canadians.

Participation rates in initiatives marking anniversaries of national significance remained high, with over 2 million people taking part in commemorative activities and events.

In 2019-20, Commemorate Canada provided funding to various projects aimed at promoting Canada’s diversity and celebrating anniversaries that contribute to making Canada a more inclusive society, such as the 50th anniversary of the decriminalization of homosexuality, the 50th anniversary of the Official Languages Act, the 175th anniversary of the birth of Louis Riel and the 150th anniversary of the Red River Resistance. Overall, the program provided over $2M in funding to over a dozen projects marking these important anniversaries.

For example, Egale Canada engaged Canadians in an interactive bilingual e-module, a travelling photo exhibit in ten cities across Canada and a documentary. The project aimed to engage Canadians and increase awareness on the people, actions and struggles that led to the decriminalization of homosexuality. Meanwhile, the Canadian Centre for gender and sexual diversity created 75 one-day, art-based educational forums to engage participants in learning about the history behind this anniversary.

Meanwhile, Historica created a bilingual education guide and four educational videos intended to engage youth by providing them with the opportunity to create a video expressing their thoughts around the importance of bilingualism in Canada. La Fondation canadienne pour le dialogue des cultures explored the evolution of linguistic duality in Canada, through the production of a series of podcasts and a documentary, as well as through the creation of a travelling virtual exhibit.

Of note, in 2019-20, as part of additional two-year funding of $7 million announced in Budget 2019, Commemorate Canada also funded six large-scale initiatives totaling over $2.2 million that aim to advance reconciliation and to raise awareness of the legacy and hardship of residential schools. The projects led by APTN, Historica Canada, the National Center for Truth and Reconciliation, the Royal Canadian Geographic Society and the Orange Shirt Society, and the 4R Youth Movement, all aimed to raise awareness of this issue and to honour survivors through various events and platforms. Together, these projects engaged approximately 2 million Canadians.

For example, this funding allowed APTN to host a televised Day for Truth and Reconciliation Commemorative Concert on September 30th to honour survivors of residential schools, their families and communities. The event featuring ceremonies with elders, survivors and special guests also included cultural and musical performances that were seen by over 80,000 Canadians.

Finally, the Program continued to engage other federal government organizations through its Interdepartmental Commemorations Committee, a forum that brings together representatives of over 25 departments and agencies to share information and expertise on commemoration priorities and cross-promote events and activities. Meetings were held to enhance collaboration with various federal departments and institutions, including Women and Gender Equality Canada, Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada, Parks Canada, and Veterans Affairs Canada, and created synergies and maximized the reach and impact of planned events, activities and communications efforts.

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20
No audit project completed in 2019-2020 and no specific audit project planned in 2020-2021.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

The last evaluation of the Celebration and Commemoration Program 2011-12 to 2015-16 was approved on March 27, 2018.

Due to the impacts of COVID-19, the Evaluation Services Directorate has had to limit its activities in order to allow programs to administer the Emergency Support Fund for Cultural, Heritage and Sport Organizations. Consequently, the 2020-21 to 2024-25 Departmental Evaluation Plan has had to be revised. The evaluation completion date will therefore be determined once Canadian Heritage announces the end of its business continuity plan and the Directorate is fully operational again.

Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20
The Department engages applicants and recipients by communicating program information through the departmental website and though written and verbal communication with current funding recipients and interested parties.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 16,013,215 5,898,562 8,000,000 7,916,735 7,859,482 -140,518
Total contributions 106,251,876 7,094,468 2,494,367 13,326,270 12,063,158 9,568,791
Total program 122,265,091 12,993,030 10,494,367 21,243,005 19,922,640 9,428,273
Explanation of variances
The overall variance of $9.4M is explained by the following: new funding of $9.2M received for Expanding Support for Artists and Cultural Events(Budget 2019), new funding of $0.2M received for an awareness initiative piloted by Pride Toronto in the context of the 50th anniversary of the decriminalization of homosexuality, as well as two transfers totalling $0.3M, one from "Women and Gender Equality" for project "A duty to remember: the commemoration of the 30th anniversary of the Polytechnic killings" and one from "Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs" for the promotion of public awareness and community participation in National Indigenous Peoples Day activities. Finally, other departmental programs transferred $1.0M to adjust for emerging priorities. Due to the large amount of planning and preparatory work required to develop a larger-scale project, funds of $1.2M were reprofiled for the new initiative recognizing and commemorating the legacy of residential schools delivered through existing programs on the proposed National Day for Truth and Reconciliation. Within the program's authorities, $7.3M was transferred from Grants to Contributions.

Building Communities through Arts and Heritage

Name of transfer payment program
Building Communities through Arts and Heritage
Start date
2007-08
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Grants and contributions
Type of appropriation
Annually through Main Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2013-14
Core Responsibility
Core Responsibility 2: Heritage and Celebration
Link to department’s Program Inventory
Community Engagement and Heritage: Building Communities through Arts and Heritage
Description

The Building Communities through Arts and Heritage Program provides grants and contributions in support of local festivals, community anniversaries and capital projects. Funding is made available to stakeholders presenting arts and heritage festivals and events that emphasize local engagement. Its objective is to engage citizens in their communities through performing and visual arts as well as through the expression, celebration and preservation of local historical heritage. Building Communities through Arts and Heritage Program has three components:

  1. Local Festivals supports recurring festivals that involve the whole community and give opportunities to local artists and artisans to engage in their communities and/or celebrate local history and heritage;
  2. Community Anniversaries supports one-time commemorations through activities that celebrate a major anniversary (100 years and then increments of 25 years) of a significant local person or event; and
  3. Legacy Fund supports tangible, lasting capital projects that commemorate or celebrate a major anniversary (100 years and then increments of 25 years) of a significant local person or event.

Projects are funded through the following transfer payments: Grants in support of the Building Communities through Arts and Heritage Program and Contributions in support of the Building Communities through Arts and Heritage Program.

Expected results and indicators in 2019-20 Departmental Plan:

  1. Canadians across the country are engaged in their communities through local arts and heritage.
    • Average number of volunteer hours per project.
    • Number of performers and volunteers in Building Communities through Arts and Heritage funded arts and heritage projects each year.
  2. Local organizations receive financial resources to carry out local festival, community anniversary and / or legacy projects in their communities.
    • Number of communities in which local festival / community anniversary / legacy projects take place.
Results achieved

The Building Communities through Arts and Heritage Program encouraged citizens across the country to connect with one another and engage in their local communities through performing and visual arts, as well as through the expression, celebration, and preservation of local historical heritage.

The Program achieved its objective by carrying out the administration of grants and contributions, providing funding to 775 projects which included 726 local festivals and 49 community anniversary and commemorative capital projects.

Based on a 78% response rate, an average of 4,867 volunteer hours per project were contributed by 99,871 volunteers. Funded projects also provided opportunities for 104,827 local artists artisans and heritage performers to engage in their communities with events and projects taking place in 431 communities across the country.

For example, the Mount Pearl Frosty Festival – an event that embodies the Building Communities through Arts and Heritage Program spirit and objectives – has received funding from the Program since 2007-2008 and has grown and developed each year as a result. The event encourages local community engagement throughout the winter. Activities include musical and dance performances, dance workshops and dinner theatre, all of which, together, promote the work of 540 local artists and engage more than 1,600 volunteers and 65,000 attendees.

The Legacy Fund supported the centennial anniversary of the Winnipeg General Strike, in June 2019, through funding a major public artwork piece across from Winnipeg’s City Hall. The monument takes the shape of a tipped streetcar, a reference to “Bloody Saturday” on June 21, 1919 and includes interpretive plaques in both official languages. The project works to educate the public about this defining moment in Winnipeg and Canadian history, which contributed to the advancement of workers’ rights.

*Most recent data: Given that final reports from recipients are compiled once per year, statistics provided here reflect 2018-19 final reports.

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20
No audit project completed in 2019-2020 and no specific audit project planned in 2020-2021.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

The last evaluation of the Building Communities through Arts and Heritage program 2011-12 to 2014-15 was approved on October 17, 2016.

Due to the impacts of COVID-19, the Evaluation Services Directorate has had to limit its activities in order to allow programs to administer the Emergency Support Fund for Cultural, Heritage and Sport Organizations. Consequently, the 2020-21 to 2024-25 Departmental Evaluation Plan has had to be revised. The evaluation completion date will therefore be determined once Canadian Heritage announces the end of its business continuity plan and the Directorate is fully operational again.

Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20

Overall, the program provides information to applicants and recipients through the departmental website and regional offices. In addition, recurring applicants receive a reminder email in advance of each intake deadline. This email is sent via the Canadian Heritage Online System (CHOS).

In 2019-20, the Building Communities through Arts and Heritage program continued outreach activities with an eye on vulnerable and underrepresented communities, such as the LGBTQ2 and Indigenous communities. This includes clarifying on the Program’s website, the eligibility of LGBTQ2 Pride festivals and Indigenous cultural celebrations under the Local Festivals component.

For its September 2019 intake, Building Communities through Arts and Heritage Program reached out to 170 Pride festival organizers informing them of the funding opportunities offered by the Program. It did so in collaboration with Fierté Canada Pride (FCP), the national association of Canadian Pride organizations.

In preparation for the same intake, in August 2019, the Program conducted a series of webinars, in collaboration with the Chief Information Officer Branch, informing applicants on how to use the Canadian Heritage Online System (CHOS).

In February 2020, Building Communities through Arts and Heritage Program representatives attended the FCP National Conference and annual general meeting in Regina, Saskatchewan, where they engaged with stakeholders and informed potential applicants of funding opportunities.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 9,113,149 9,889,985 14,355,000 13,916,598 13,892,638 -462,362
Total contributions 7,930,436 7,361,718 3,300,000 10,884,654 10,753,176 7,453,176
Total program 17,043,585 17,251,703 17,655,000 24,801,252 24,645,814 6,990,814
Explanation of variances
The variance of $7.0M is explained by the new funding of $7.0M received for Expanding Support for Artists and Cultural Events (Budget 2019). Within the program's authorities, $7.4M was transferred from Grants to Contributions.

Canada History Fund

Name of transfer payment program
Canada History Fund
Start date
1984
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Grants and contributions
Type of appropriation
Annually through Main Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2013-14
Core Responsibility
Core Responsibility 2: Heritage and Celebration
Link to department’s Program Inventory
Learning About Canadian History
Description
The Canada History Fund encourages Canadians to learn about Canada’s history, civic life, and public policy. The Fund provides funding through agreements in support of the development and/or enhancement of learning materials, the organization of learning activities and the establishment and maintenance of networks. Through various partnerships within government and through national history and civics sector organizations and post-secondary educational institutions, the Fund gives Canadians opportunities to enhance their understanding of Canada, thus building an informed and engaged citizenry. This Fund uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants in support of the Canada History Fund and Contributions in support of the Canada History Fund.
Results achieved

The Canada History Fund exposed Canadians to knowledge on Canada’s history, civics and public policy.

The Program achieved its objective by carrying out the administration of grants and contributions, providing funding to 19 projects that developed learning materials, activities and networks related to Canada’s history, civics and public policy.

The number of Canadians accessing learning materials was 12,265,215. The number of Canadians accessing learning and developmental activities was 385,917. The number of participants involved in networks was 7,734.

For example, Canada History Fund, in partnership with Veterans Affairs Canada supported the Memory Project, a volunteer speakers bureau that arranges for veterans and Canadian Forces members to share their stories of military service at schools and community events across the country. In 2018-2019, it fulfilled more than 1,200 in-person visit requests reaching over 236,000 Canadians. The Memory Project is an initiative of Historica Canada.

*Most recent data: Given that final reports from recipients are compiled once per year, statistics provided here reflect 2018-19 final reports.

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20
No audit project completed in 2019-2020 and no specific audit project planned in 2020-2021.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

The last evaluation of the Canada History Fund 2009-10 to 2013-14 was approved on July 14, 2015.

An evaluation is underway, which started in November 2019.

Due to the impacts of COVID-19, the Evaluation Services Directorate has had to limit its activities in order to allow programs to administer the Emergency Support Fund for Cultural, Heritage and Sport Organizations. Consequently, the 2020-21 to 2024-25 Departmental Evaluation Plan has had to be revised. The evaluation completion date will therefore be determined once Canadian Heritage announces the end of its business continuity plan and the Directorate is fully operational again

Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20
The Canada History Fund did not open an intake in 2019 as program funds had previously been committed to multi-year projects. The next application intake deadline, as currently posted on the website, is September 30, 2020 for projects beginning in 2021-22. The Canada History Fund posts information on its website about the Program, eligibility guidelines and Canada History Week. The Canada History Fund responds to all inquiries received through the generic email inbox and by telephone, and liaises with stakeholders to advise of opportunities like the Digital Citizen Initiative.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 0 10,000,000 1,150,060 0 0 -1,150,060
Total contributions 4,381,956 4,237,339 6,287,330 8,411,390 8,411,355 2,124,025
Total program 4,381,956 14,237,339 7,437,390 8,411,390 8,411,355 973,965
Explanation of variances
The variance of just under $1.0M is explained by and a transfer of $0.9M from other departmental programs for the Digital Citizen's initiative and for the Governor General's Leadership Conference of Canada.

Hosting Program

Name of transfer payment program
Hosting Program
Start date
1967
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Contribution
Type of appropriation
Annually through Main Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2012-13
Core Responsibility
Core Responsibility 3: Sport
Link to department’s Program Inventory
Sport Development and High Performance: Hosting Program
Description
The Hosting Program is a key instrument in the Government of Canada’s overall approach to sport development in Canada and aims to enhance the development of sport excellence and the international profile of sport organizations by providing assistance for the hosting of the Canada Games and international sport events in Canada. The Hosting Program offers Canada-at-large a planned and coordinated approach to realizing direct and significant benefits, from bidding and hosting projects in the areas of sport development, economic, social, and cultural and community impacts, across a broad range of government priorities. This program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Contributions for the Games’ Hosting program.
Results achieved

The Hosting Program provided funding for 92 International Single Sport Events. These events provided participation opportunities to over 4,800 athletes, coaches and officials. There were 1764 Male athletes, 1592 female athletes, 738 coaches and 785 officials (data on the number of coaches is submitted by National Sport Organizations. Not all coaches and officials captured in this data necessarily have Canadian citizenship.)

Participation numbers are lower than the previous year as there were no Canada Games or International Major Multisport Games in 2019. The Arctic Winter Games (scheduled for March 2020), were postponed to 2022, due to COVID-19 concerns. Anticipated participation at the Arctic Winter Games was nearly 2,000 athletes, coaches, mission staff, officials and cultural performers. The next Canada Games are scheduled for August 2022 and the host societies for the North American Indigenous Games (fiscal 2020-2021), the Arctic Winter Games and the Canada Games all received funding during last fiscal year in preparation for their respective events.

In 2019-2020, hosted competitions led to the development of 25 improved and 3 new sport venues which could be used for future games or athlete development.

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20
No audit project completed in 2019-2020 and no specific audit project planned in 2020-2021.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

The last grouped evaluation of Sport Canada Programs: Sport Support Program, Hosting Program and Athlete Assistance Program 2010-11 to 2014-15 was approved on March 30, 2016.

An evaluation is underway, which started in October 2019.

Due to the impacts of COVID-19, the Evaluation Services Directorate has had to limit its activities in order to allow programs to administer the Emergency Support Fund for Cultural, Heritage and Sport Organizations. Consequently, the 2020-21 to 2024-25 Departmental Evaluation Plan has had to be revised. The evaluation completion date will therefore be determined once Canadian Heritage announces the end of its business continuity plan and the Directorate is fully operational again

Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20
The Department engages applicants and recipients by communicating program information through: the departmental website; formal written communication to current funding recipients and interested parties; and informal verbal and written communication between program officers and current funding recipients/interested parties.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 19,753,493 25,714,604 23,386,765 21,309,570 19,609,323 -3,777,442
Total program 19,753,493 25,714,604 23,386,765 21,309,570 19,609,323 -3,777,442
Explanation of variances
The overall variance of ($3.8M) is explained by a year-end surplus of ($1.7M) due to the Canadian Soccer Association (CSA) significant delays in preparation to host the 2026 FIFA World Cup. In addition, ($2.1M) was transferred to the Sport Support Program to adjust for emerging priorities.

Sport Support Program

Name of transfer payment program
Sport Support Program
Start date
1961
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Contribution
Type of appropriation
Annually through Main Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2011-12
Core Responsibility
Core Responsibility 3: Sport
Link to department’s Program Inventory
Sport Development and High Performance: Sport Support Program
Description
The Sport Support Program is the primary funding vehicle for initiatives associated with the delivery of the Government of Canada’s commitments to the Canadian Sport Policy. Funding is aimed at developing athletes and coaches at the highest international levels; providing sound technically-based sport programming for all athletes; increasing the number of Canadians from all segments of society involved in sport; and advancing Canadian interests and values in Canada and abroad. This funding is provided to eligible organizations, such as National Sport Organizations in support of programming that supports the goals of the Canadian Sport Policy. This program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Contributions for the Sport Support program.
Results achieved

The Sport Support Program provided strong policy leadership, as well as support for quality-based sport programming to increase the number of Canadians from all segments of society involved in sport. It is estimated (based on previous years) that in 2019-2020, approximately 4,594,540 (target is 5 million) Canadian children and youth were enrolled in a sport activity.

Investments in quality-based sport programs ensure that Canadians, regardless of gender, physical ability and cultural background, who participate in sport activities, are satisfied with the manner in which the activity is provided. 82% of Canadians reported that they experience sport in a welcoming environment, and 82% responded that they experience sport in a safe environment.

Despite an increasingly competitive international environment, Canada succeeded at the highest levels of competition and maintained the 9th rank in the Combined Ranking Index for Olympic Sport and 10th rank in the Combined Ranking Index for Paralympic sport.

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20
No audit project completed in 2019-2020 and no specific audit project planned in 2020-2021.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

The last grouped evaluation of Sport Canada Programs: Sport Support Program, Hosting Program and Athlete Assistance Program 2010-11 to 2014-15 was approved on March 30, 2016.

An evaluation is underway, which started in October 2019.

Due to the impacts of COVID-19, the Evaluation Services Directorate has had to limit its activities in order to allow programs to administer the Emergency Support Fund for Cultural, Heritage and Sport Organizations. Consequently, the 2020-21 to 2024-25 Departmental Evaluation Plan has had to be revised. The evaluation completion date will therefore be determined once Canadian Heritage announces the end of its business continuity plan and the Directorate is fully operational again.

Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20
The Department engages applicants and recipients by communicating program information through: the departmental website; formal written communication to current funding recipients and interested parties; and informal verbal and written communication between program officers and current funding recipients/interested parties.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 154,016,129 156,919,195 162,211,064 179,975,740 179,975,740 17,764,676
Total program 154,016,129 156,919,195 162,211,064 179,975,740 179,975,740 17,764,676
Explanation of variances
The variance of $17.8M is mainly explained by the following: new funding of $6.0M received for Ensuring a Safe and Healthy Sport System (Budget 2019), $8.9M received in new funding (Budget 2018) to increase the use of Sport for social development in over 300 Aboriginal communities, and a transfer of ($0.5M) to Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council for research to inform policy. In addition, $3.4M was transferred from other Sports Programs to adjust for emerging priorities.

Athlete Assistance Program

Name of transfer payment program
Athlete Assistance Program
Start date
1971
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Grants
Type of appropriation
Annually through Main Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2012-13
Core Responsibility
Core Responsibility 3: Sport
Link to department’s Program Inventory
Sport Development and High Performance: Athlete Assistance Program
Description
The Athlete Assistance Program contributes to the pursuit of excellence through its support for improved Canadian athlete performances at major international sporting events, enabling athletes to combine their sport and academic or working careers while training intensively in pursuit of world-class performances. To this end, the Program identifies and supports athletes already at or having the potential to be in the top 16 in the world in their sport. This Program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants to the Athlete Assistance Program.
Results achieved

The Athlete Assistance Program provided support to 683 current and formerly carded athletes so that they could pursue their academic goals by providing tuition grants.

In the 2019-2020 fiscal year, there were no Olympic or Paralympic Games.

During the 2019 World Championships, 233 athletes receiving Athlete assistance Program funding achieved a combined total of 322 top 8 finishes.

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20
No audit project completed in 2019-2020 and no specific audit project planned in 2020-2021.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

The last grouped evaluation of Sport Canada Programs: Sport Support Program, Hosting Program and Athlete Assistance Program 2010-11 to 2014-15 was approved on March 30, 2016.

An evaluation is underway, which started in October 2019.

Due to the impacts of COVID-19, the Evaluation Services Directorate has had to limit its activities in order to allow programs to administer the Emergency Support Fund for Cultural, Heritage and Sport Organizations. Consequently, the 2020-21 to 2024-25 Departmental Evaluation Plan has had to be revised. The evaluation completion date will therefore be determined once Canadian Heritage announces the end of its business continuity plan and the Directorate is fully operational again

Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20
The Department engages applicants and recipients by communicating program information to funding recipients and National Sports Organizations, through: the departmental website; formal written communication to current funding recipients and interested parties; and informal verbal and written communication between program officers and current funding recipients/interested parties.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 32,998,500 32,098,389 33,000,000 31,424,969 31,424,968 -1,575,032
Total contributions 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 32,998,500 32,098,389 33,000,000 31,424,969 31,424,968 -1,575,032
Explanation of variances
The unspent funds for the Athlete Assistance Program have been transferred to the Sport Support Program to adjust for emerging priorities.

Community Support, Multiculturalism, and Anti-Racism Initiatives Program

Name of transfer payment program
Community Support, Multiculturalism, and Anti-Racism Initiatives Program
Start date
1982-83
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Grants and contributions
Type of appropriation
Annually through Main Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2019-20
Core Responsibility
Core Responsibility 4: Diversity and Inclusion
Link to department’s Program Inventory
Multiculturalism: Multiculturalism Program
Description

The Multiculturalism Interaction Program was rebranded in 2018 to the Community Support, Multiculturalism and Anti-Racism Initiative Program (CSMARI).

The objectives of the Community Support, Multiculturalism, and Anti-Racism Initiatives Program are

  1. Support communities in confronting racism and discrimination, promoting intercultural and interfaith understanding and fostering equitable opportunities to participate fully in Canadian society;
  2. Promote and engage in discussions on multiculturalism, diversity, racism and religious discrimination at the domestic and international levels; and
  3. Strengthen research and evidence to build understanding of the disparities and challenges faced by racialized and religious minority communities, and Indigenous peoples.

The Program provides grants and contributions that support these objectives for the following program components and initiative: Projects, Events, Community capacity building and Community Support for Black Canadian Youth and the Paul Yuzyk Award.

Results achieved

In 2019-20,

  • 372 Community Support, Multiculturalism and Anti-Racism Initiative Program Events were supported for a total of $8.7 million.
  • 20 Interaction Projects were supported for $2.9 million. This was year 2 for these projects).
  • 96 Community Support, Multiculturalism and Anti-Racism Initiative Program Projects were supported for $9.3 million. These are all two-year agreements, so this was year 1 funding.
  • 56 Community Support for Black Canadian Youth Initiative projects were supported for a total of $4.75 million. These are all two-year agreements, so this was year 1 funding.
  • 77 Community Capacity Building projects were supported for $4.7 million. These were all single year funding agreements.
Findings of audits completed in 2019–20
No audit project completed in 2019-2020 and no specific audit project planned in 2020-2021.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

The last evaluation of the Multiculturalism Program 2011-12 to 2016-17 was approved on March 29, 2018.

Due to the impacts of COVID-19, the Evaluation Services Directorate has had to limit its activities in order to allow programs to administer the Emergency Support Fund for Cultural, Heritage and Sport Organizations. Consequently, the 2020-21 to 2024-25 Departmental Evaluation Plan has had to be revised. The evaluation completion date will therefore be determined once Canadian Heritage announces the end of its business continuity plan and the Directorate is fully operational again.

Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20

The program consults and engages with applicants and clients in different ways including:

  • During program launch to create awareness and provide information about the program;
  • Once program area receives applications to request outstanding documentation or clarify the project;
  • Directly with clients to ensure the project is on track.
  • By posting program guidelines and application forms on website, as well as sending call letters to stakeholders.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 2,875,638 4,674,836 9,656,352 11,816,398 11,816,398 2,160,046
Total contributions 5,115,303 6,146,080 8,065,766 21,842,329 18,869,866 10,804,100
Total program 7,990,941 10,820,916 17,722,118 33,658,727 30,686,264 12,964,146
Explanation of variances
The variance of $13M is explained by the following elements: new funding of $9.7M received for Introducing a New Anti-Racism Strategy (Budget 2019), $4.5M for Addressing challenges faced by Black Canadians and $2.5M resulting from a reprofile for Strengthening Multiculturalism (from 2018-19). In addition, ($0.8M) was transferred to other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities. The new Anti-Racism Action Program did not have sufficient time to evaluate and approve all of the applications due to the activation of the Departmental Pandemic Business Continuity Plan, resulting in a lapse of $3.0M. Within the program's authority, $3.9M was transferred from grants to contributions.

Indigenous Languages and Cultures Program

Name of transfer payment program
Indigenous Languages and Cultures Program
Start date
1971-72
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Grants and Contributions
Type of appropriation
Annually through Main Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2012-13
Core Responsibility
Core Responsibility 4: Diversity and Inclusion
Link to department’s Program Inventory
Indigenous Languages and Cultures: Indigenous Languages and Cultures Program
Description
The Indigenous Languages and Cultures Program focuses on keeping Indigenous languages and Indigenous identity as living elements of Canadian society. By providing investments, it contributes to the efforts of Indigenous communities to reclaim, revitalize, maintain and strengthen their Indigenous languages and develop and deliver innovative and culturally appropriate projects under the Indigenous Languages component, Northern Aboriginal Broadcasting, Territorial Language Accords, National Indigenous Peoples’ Day, and Indspire. This program is funded through the following transfer payments: Grants in support of the Indigenous Languages and Cultures Program and Contributions in support of the Indigenous Languages and Cultures Program.
Results achieved

On June 21, 2019, the Indigenous Languages Act obtained Royal Assent. Developed in collaboration with Indigenous Peoples, the Act commits the Government of Canada to establish measures to facilitate the provision of adequate, sustainable and long-term funding to reclaim, revitalize, maintain and strengthen Indigenous languages.

Following this, the program was renamed the Indigenous Languages and Cultures Program (ILCP). The Aboriginal Language Initiative (ALI) program component also changed names and became the Indigenous Language Component (ILC).

Budget 2019 committed $333.7 million over five years, starting in 2019-2020 with an increase to existing ILC funding by $10.6 million. This provided a new total of $29.6 million in funding in 2019-20 aimed at reclamation, revitalization, and maintenance and strengthening of Indigenous languages.

The ILCP continued to invest in core activities designed to reclaim, revitalize, maintain and strengthen Indigenous languages and cultures. The program was able to support 100% more projects than the previous year with the additional funding. Overall, the Program provided investments to 400 Indigenous communities and organizations for projects that encourage Indigenous individuals and groups to engage in community-driven activities and programming that incorporates Indigenous cultures and languages.

2019-2020 initiatives include:

Scholarships and Youth Initiatives / National Aboriginal Achievement Awards: Canadian Heritage provided funding to Indspire to support post-secondary scholarships for Indigenous students, and to support Indigenous high school students to participate in an Indigenous Youth Career Conference in Calgary, Alberta to increase knowledge, build skills, and bring awareness to opportunities available for Indigenous youth. The conference took place in conjunction with the Indspire Awards Gala in Calgary, where 12 outstanding recipients were honoured. The Gala was produced and organized by Indspire and broadcast on the Aboriginal Peoples’ Television Network (APTN) and on the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC).

Indigenous Language Component: Canadian Heritage provided financial support to 363 community-driven projects across Canada for the revitalization and preservation of First Nation, Métis, and Inuit languages, which directly benefited 12,223Footnote 1 participants in 2018-19. 87.8%Footnote 2 of participants in language-learning projects reported an improvement in their ability to use an Indigenous language in interpersonal communication.

National Indigenous Peoples’ Day: This project provided funding for the National Indigenous Peoples’ Day events in the National Capital Region (June 20-23, 2019), which included celebrations, educational events for students, educators and families, and performances and events by Indigenous artists and entertainers.

Northern Aboriginal Broadcasting: Funding was provided to 30 Indigenous communication organizations to produce over 85,815 hours of new radio content, which included over 44,416 hours of Indigenous language programming and over 76 hours of new Indigenous television contentFootnote 3.

Territorial Language Accords: The governments of Nunavut and the Northwest Territories continued implementing their 4-year bilateral agreements. In Yukon, three non-self-governing First Nations continued to receive funding for the revitalization of Indigenous languages.

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20
No audit project completed in 2019-2020 and no specific audit project planned in 2020-2021.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

The last evaluation of the Aboriginal Peoples' Program 2009-10 to 2013-14 was approved on March 30, 2016.

An evaluation is underway, which started in September 2019.

Due to the impacts of COVID-19, the Evaluation Services Directorate has had to limit its activities in order to allow programs to administer the Emergency Support Fund for Cultural, Heritage and Sport Organizations. Consequently, the 2020-21 to 2024-25 Departmental Evaluation Plan has had to be revised. The evaluation completion date will therefore be determined once Canadian Heritage announces the end of its business continuity plan and the Directorate is fully operational again.

Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20

The Program provides information through the departmental website and program officers. An email is sent to a list of potential stakeholders.

Consultations to implement the Indigenous Languages Act started in March 2020 in the Yukon.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 33,229,626 41,115,757 38,847,542 52,078,744 52,078,744 13,231,202
Total program 33,229,626 41,115,757 38,847,542 52,078,744 52,078,744 13,231,202
Explanation of variances
The variance of $13.2M is explained with the new funding of $14.6M received for Preserving, Promoting and Revitalizing Indigenous Languages (Budget 2019) and two transfers, ($1.2M) to Library and Archives Canada to support the preservation of Indigenous Languages and Cultures program and ($0.1M) to Public Services and Procurement Canada to build capacity in translation, transcription and interpretation in Indigenous languages. In addition, ($0.1M) was transferred to other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.

Exchanges Canada Program

Name of transfer payment program
Exchanges Canada Program
Start date
2000-01
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Grants and contributions
Type of appropriation
Annually through Main Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2010-11
Core Responsibility
Core Responsibility 4: Diversity and Inclusion
Link to department’s Program Inventory
Youth Engagement: Exchanges Canada Program
Description
The Exchanges Canada Program provides grants and contributions in support of youth participation initiatives that allow young Canadians to learn about Canada, create linkages with each other and better appreciate the diversity and shared aspects of the Canadian reality. The transfer payment program supports not-for-profit organizations to provide Canadian youth with a range of exchange and forum activities to strengthen their sense of belonging to Canada and therefore their sense of Canadian identity. The transfer payment program has two components: Youth Exchanges Canada (YEC) and Youth Forums Canada (YFC). YEC funds reciprocal homestay exchanges for youth, and includes the Summer Work / Student Exchange sub-component, which provides summer job opportunities for 16 and 17 year-olds in their second official language. YFC enables young Canadians to connect with one another through forums, study sessions and workshops on a range of relevant topics. This transfer payment program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants in support of Innovative Youth Exchange Projects and Contributions in support of the Exchanges Canada Initiative.
Results achieved

Exchanges Canada Program, a sub-activity of the Youth Engagement Program, offered opportunities for approximately 12,000 youth to enhance their knowledge and understanding of Canada; to create linkages with one another; and to enhance their appreciation of the diversity and shared aspects of the Canadian experience. Through participation in forums and group exchanges, youth learned about Canada, its history, geography, industry, institutions, communities, cultures, and official languages as well as had the opportunity to connect with other youth.

In 2019⁠–⁠20, funded projects focused on reconciliation, diversity and inclusion, and official-language minority communities. For example, the Forum national des jeunes ambassadeurs (Français pour l’avenir), held in Montréal, brought together 30 young Francophones and francophiles from across Canada to participate in interactive conferences and workshops focused on themes and discussions such as leadership, identity construction and bilingualism. The youth participants took part in guided visits to Radio-Canada’s studios, where they created a show of their team news. They also attended various cultural activities. Through their participation in the project, the youth learned about their role as ambassadors of bilingualism and becoming bilingual leaders in Canadian society through promotion of French learning.

In 2019–20, the Exchanges Canada Program also funded the National Youth Reconciliation Forum (Canadian Roots Exchange), a three-day forum held in Montréal. The forum brought together Indigenous and non-Indigenous youth, aged 15 to 25, from across Canada to engage in reconciliation-based leadership activities. The activities celebrated the contribution of First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples, and aimed to promote a more inclusive and united Canada. Youth explored Métis traditions and addressed the topic of Indigenous peoples coming into contact with European and other cultures. Pre-contact history, treaties, land claims, the residential school system, mental health, addictions, wellness, cultural and spiritual practices and the Truth and Reconciliation movement were also explored in depth. Participants shared their stories through live discussion and arts-based techniques, and participated in workshops and training to equip them with facilitation skills to return home and share their new knowledge with their communities.

As a result of their participation in the Exchanges Canada Program, 91% of youth reported that they created new ties with people from other communities, 87% of youth participants reported that they enhanced their appreciation of how diverse Canada is, 87% agreed that they learned new things about Canada, 82% reported having a better understanding of what Canadians have in common, and 82% reported an increased sense of attachment to Canada. These results are in line with established targets. Footnote 4

Support was provided to youth exchanges and forums in 2019-20 through 26 single-and multi-year grant and contribution agreements with not-for-profit organizations.

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20
No audit project completed in 2019-2020 and no specific audit project planned in 2020-2021.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

The last evaluation of the Exchanges Canada Program 2009-10 to 2013-14 was approved on February 5, 2016.

An evaluation in underway, which started in September 2019.

Due to the impacts of COVID-19, the Evaluation Services Directorate has had to limit its activities in order to allow programs to administer the Emergency Support Fund for Cultural, Heritage and Sport Organizations. Consequently, the 2020-21 to 2024-25 Departmental Evaluation Plan has had to be revised. The evaluation completion date will therefore be determined once Canadian Heritage announces the end of its business continuity plan and the Directorate is fully operational again.

Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20
The Program sends an invitation letter annually to prospective applicants to submit a funding application to the Youth Forums Canada component of the Exchanges Canada Program. It also sends out notifications via the social media sites Twitter and Facebook. The Program works with recipients to ensure that all youth participants receive a message from the Minister congratulating them on participation in projects funded by the Exchanges Canada Program.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 40,000 50,000 100,000 57,000 57,000 -43,000
Total contributions 18,368,651 18,345,090 18,086,359 18,186,972 18,178,443 92,084
Total program 18,408,651 18,395,090 18,186,359 18,243,972 18,235,443 49,084
Explanation of variances
Funding was fully spent as planned.

Development of Official Languages Communities Program

Name of transfer payment program
Development of Official Languages Communities Program
Start date
February 2015
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Grants and contributions
Type of appropriation
Annually through Main Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2015-16
Core Responsibility
Core Responsibility 5: Official Languages
Link to department’s Program Inventory
Official Languages: Development of Official Languages Communities Program
Description

Under section 43 of Part VII of the Official Languages Act, the Development of Official Language Communities Program promotes the vitality of the country's Anglophone and Francophone minorities and enables them to participate fully in all aspects of Canadian life. The program has two components:

  • Through grants and contributions, the Community Life component supports the delivery of activities and services to official-language minority communities by non-profit community organizations working in various fields, particularly in the arts, culture and heritage, and youth. Through inter-governmental contribution agreements, this component also supports the delivery of provincial and territorial services in the minority language.
  • Through intergovernmental contribution agreements, the Minority-Language Education component supports the delivery of provincial and territorial programs and activities aimed at learning at all levels of education in the official language of the minority. This includes all levels of education. This program also aims to increase the production and dissemination of innovative knowledge, methods and tools to support minority-language education. Finally, through contributions to non-profit organizations in the non-governmental sector, the Minority-Language Education component also supports these organizations working to promote English and French as minority languages.
Results achieved

Members of official language minority communities have access to programs and services in their language in their community.

  • 89.8% of members of official language minority communities living within 25 km of a cultural/artistic organization that offers services in the language of the minority.
  • 97.9% of members of official language minority communities living within 25 km of a minority-language elementary school or minority-language secondary school.
  • 86% of members of official language minority communities living within 25 km of a regional/local community development organization that offers services in the minority language.

In 2019-2020, the Department has invested more than $270 million in the Development of Official Language Communities program, including more than $154 million for minority-language education agreements with provincial and territorial governments, more than $25 million for provincial and territorial minority-language services, and more than $42 million to support the initiatives of non-profit organizations working for the development and vitality of official-language minority communities (Cooperation with the Community Sector subcomponent).

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20
No audit project completed in 2019-2020 and no specific audit project planned in 2020-2021.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

The last evaluation of Official Languages Support Programs 2013-2014 to 2016-2017 was approved on May 16, 2017.

Due to the impacts of COVID-19, the Evaluation Services Directorate has had to limit its activities in order to allow programs to administer the Emergency Support Fund for Cultural, Heritage and Sport Organizations. Consequently, the 2020-21 to 2024-25 Departmental Evaluation Plan has had to be revised. The evaluation completion date will therefore be determined once Canadian Heritage announces the end of its business continuity plan and the Directorate is fully operational again.

Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20
  • Conducted dialogue sessions with representatives of community organizations and provincial and territorial governments on the implementation parameters of the new initiatives of the Action Plan for Official Languages 2018-2023;
  • Sent call letters to client organizations and provincial and territorial governments;
  • Informed client organizations of the deadlines (Canadian Heritage Web site);
  • Awarded grants and contributions to eligible community organizations and other applicants; and
  • Negotiated and administered agreements with provincial and territorial governments.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 12,388,453 16,082,264 59,312,973 18,102,915 18,102,915 -41,210,058
Total contributions 218,169,576 240,481,277 224,841,079 276,453,603 252,205,899 27,364,820
Total program 230,558,029 256,563,541 284,154,052 294,556,518 270,308,814 -13,845,238
Explanation of variances
The overall variance of ($13.8M) is mainly explained by an amount of $1.9M that was not spent for the Territorial agreements on French-language services and a reprofile of $22.4M for various initiatives, namely the new funding received to improve support for minority-language education by providing more support to the provinces and territories, the “Teacher recruitment and retention strategy in French minority-language schools” initiative and infrastructure projects mainly as a result of delays given the COVID-19 pandemic. The actual spending also take into account $15.0M in new funding received to improve support for minority-language education by providing more support to the provinces and territories, a transfer of $0.6M received from Employment and Social Development Canada for the Young Canada Works and a transfer of $0.2M received from Justice Canada for the commemorative symposium for the 50th anniversary of the Official Languages Act. Within the program's authority, $41.0M was transferred from Grants to Contributions.

Enhancement of Official Languages Program

Name of transfer payment program
Enhancement of Official Languages Program
Start date
February 2015
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Grants and contributions
Type of appropriation
Annually through Main Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2015-16
Core Responsibility
Core Responsibility 5: Official Languages
Link to department’s Program Inventory
Official Languages: Enhancement of Official Languages Program
Description

The Enhancement of Official Languages Program (EOLP), which stems from section 43 of the Official Languages Act, promotes a better understanding and appreciation of the benefits of linguistic duality among Canadians. The program has two components:

  • Through grants and contributions to not-for-profit organizations, the Promotion of Linguistic Duality component supports activities and projects to enhance official languages and bring Canadians closer together, showcase French-speaking language and culture in Canada, and increase the availability of services in both official languages from organizations in the non-governmental sectors.
  • Through intergovernmental contribution agreements, the Second-Language Learning component supports the delivery of provincial and territorial programs and activities aimed at learning English and French as second official languages among young Canadians. And, through contributions to non-profit organizations in the non-governmental sector, the Second-Language Learning component also supports these organizations working to promote English and French as second languages.
Results achieved

Canadians have a better understanding and appreciation of the benefits of Canada's two official languages.

  • 6,216,070 Canadians who can carry on a conversation in their second official language.
  • 66% of the population who recognize that Canada's two official languages are a source of cultural enrichment.

In 2018-2019, the Department invested more than $131 million in the Enhancement of Official Languages Program, including more than $86 million for education agreements with provincial and territorial governments to support second-language learning and more than $6.4 million to support initiatives by non-profit organizations working to promote linguistic duality and second-language learning.

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20
No audit project completed in 2019-2020 and no specific audit project planned in 2020-2021.
Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

The last evaluation of Official Languages Support Programs 2013-2014 to 2016-2017 was approved on May 16, 2017.

Due to the impacts of COVID-19, the Evaluation Services Directorate has had to limit its activities in order to allow programs to administer the Emergency Support Fund for Cultural, Heritage and Sport Organizations. Consequently, the 2020-21 to 2024-25 Departmental Evaluation Plan has had to be revised. The evaluation completion date will therefore be determined once Canadian Heritage announces the end of its business continuity plan and the Directorate is fully operational again.

Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20
  • Conducted dialogue sessions with representatives of community organizations and provincial and territorial governments on the implementation parameters of the new initiatives of the Action Plan for Official Languages 2018-2023;
  • Sent call letters to client organizations and provincial and territorial governments;
  • Informed client organizations of the deadlines (Canadian Heritage Web site);
  • Awarded grants and contributions to eligible community organizations and other applicants; and
  • Negotiated and administered agreements with provincial and territorial governments.
Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 1,170,330 1,132,250 17,014,842 1,406,498 1,406,498 -15,608,344
Total contributions 116,469,438 118,467,347 113,623,289 135,129,167 129,697,578 16,074,289
Total program 117,639,768 119,599,597 130,638,131 136,535,665 131,104,076 465,945
Explanation of variances
The overall variance of $0.5M is mainly explained by a transfer of $0.6M received from Employment and Social Development Canada for the Young Canada Works. As for spending, an amount of $5.4M was not spent under the initiative “Teacher Retention and Recruitment Strategy for French Immersion and French Second-Language Programs” mainly as a result of delays given the COVID-19 pandemic. Within the program’s authority, $15.0M was transferred from Grants to Contributions.
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