Advisory of the Military Recruitment Process

ACE
Age, Citizenship, Education
ADM(PA)
Assistant Deputy Minister (Public Affairs)
ADM(RS)
Assistant Deputy Minister (Review Services)
AOR
Area of Responsibility
ARA
Authorities, Roles and Accountabilities
CAF
Canadian Armed Forces
CFAT
Canadian Forces Aptitude Test
CFB
Canadian Forces Base
CFRG
Canadian Forces Recruiting Group
CFRIMS 2
Canadian Forces Recruiting Information Management System Version 2
CL
Competition List
DAOD
Departmental Administrative Orders and Directives
Det
Detachment
DMA
Director Marketing and Advertising
DND
Department of National Defence
ETP
Enrolment Transfer Posting
FY
Fiscal Year
HQ
Headquarters
LSC
Learning Support Centre
MCC
Military Career Counsellor
MILPERSCOM
Military Personnel Command
MILPERSGEN
Military Personnel Generation
NCM
Non-commissioned member
NCO
Non-commissioned officer
NVA
Non-value added
OPI
Office of Primary Interest
QC
Quality Control
RMO
Recruit Medical Office
RS
Reliability Screening
SIP
Strategic Intake Plan
SSE
Canada’s defence policy: Strong, Secure, Engaged
VA
Value added

Overall Assessment

Overall attraction and recruitment strategies support the CAF in achieving its recruitment targets. There is a requirement to establish and communicate clear internal stakeholder authorities, roles and accountabilities (ARA) for both the attraction strategies and the recruitment process. Further, there is a need to identify information and performance expectations required to measure the success of attraction strategies and to identify and minimize inefficiencies in the recruitment process.

Figure 1
Figure 1. Military Recruitment Process. This figure outlines the steps in the attraction and the military recruitment process and who is responsible for each part of the process. *BMQ – Basic Military Qualification, BMOQ – Basic Military Officer Qualification

Figure 1 Details - Military Recruitment Process

Innovative Practice

To appeal to the interests of younger generations, Virtual Reality Goggles have been introduced at recruitment centres. These allow participants to simulate various activities of military occupations such as skydiving, flying a fighter jet and driving a tank.

Figure 2
Figure 2. Key Stakeholders. This figure illustrates the key stakeholders and their accountabilities through the various types of attraction campaigns.

Figure 2 Details - Key Stakeholders

Noteworthy Practice

Women in Force program gave 100 women the opportunity to experience life in the CAF for three days. Eighteen women applied and enrolled in the Regular Forces from this program.

ADM(RS) Recommendation

Noteworthy Practice

At one recruitment centre examined, a multi-disciplinary team comprised of the various roles in the recruitment process was created to identify high potential applicants and expedite them through the process. This identified process efficiencies and proposed solutions to recruitment process issues.

Table 1 Details - Applicant Drop-Off Rates
Figure 3
Figure 3. Duration of Activities and Delays in the Recruitment Process. This figure illustrates the duration in days and the percentage of the total process the VA and NVA activities represent. It also further breaks down the duration of the delays (NVA) in days and the percentage of the causes of the delays.
 
Figure 3 Details - Duration of Activities and Delays in the Recruitment Process
ADM(RS) Recommendation

ADM(RS) Recommendation (Moderate Significance)

ADM(RS) Recommendation (Moderate Significance)

ADM(RS) Recommendation (Moderate Significance)

Table D-1 Details - Recruitment Process CFRIMS Steps versus Detailed Procedural Tasks
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