Defence Team

Description

Recruit, develop and support an agile and diverse Defence team, within a healthy workplace free from harmful behaviour; support military families; and meet the needs of all retiring military personnel, including the ill and injured. Strengthen Canadian communities by investing in youth.

Planning highlights

People continue to be at the core of everything the Defence team does to ensure Canada remains strong, secure and engaged in the world. Our mission success depends on having healthy, resilient, well-trained and motivated Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) personnel supported by talented and dedicated defence civilians working within the Department of National Defence (DND). This integrated civilian-military Defence team is the heart of our institution.

Looking forward, we will consolidate our successes and continue working to ensure that the entire Defence team has the care, services and support it requires in a workplace free from both harassment and discrimination. The challenges of the present day confirm our goal of assembling a Defence team that supports wide-ranging perspectives, cultural and linguistic diversity, gender balance, age and other distinctive traits. By building a Defence team with these characteristics, we will be better able to respond effectively. Building a Defence team with these characteristics will be central to continuing to attract and retain the people we need to ensure the CAF and DND are successful into the future. A Defence team with a broader range of outlooks and experiences will be better able to respond effectively to challenges on the global stage. Investing in our people is the single most important commitment we can make and our focus on our people must be unwavering throughout their entire careers within the Defence team. A key component of ensuring that the Defence team can remain mission focused and reducing unnecessary work related stress is properly supporting them when they experience a conflict or complaint, at the outset of the issue. The Defence team will be supported with modernized policies and approaches to conflict resolution so they are able to deal with conflicts early, locally and informally, when appropriate, as well as support the formal complaint mechanisms when they are required to resolve an issue.

The CAF has a commitment not only to our members, but to their families as well. Our people serve in complex environments which can pose a high threat level. The knowledge that we continue to deliver essential programs and services gives our troops comfort realizing their families are being looked after. We will listen and adapt to ensure that any new programs are reflective of the needs and concerns of our members and their families.

National Defence has a long and proud history of supporting youth through the Cadet and Junior Canadian Rangers programs. DND is committed to strengthening support and expanding the reach of these important programs so more Canadian youth can benefit from these positive development opportunities and communities across Canada continues to be strengthened by the presence of the cadet and Junior Canadian Rangers Programs in their community.

Under the auspices of the Innovation for Defence Excellence and Security (IDEaS) program, we will pursue the following research projects:

  • Understanding and addressing Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD): seeks novel tools and methods to assess, address and treat PTSD resulting from defence and security operations. This includes the integrated dimensions of diagnosis, prevention, training, education, resilience and moral injury treatment. This project is active with nine innovators engaged;
  • Recruit, retain and reach 25% representation of women in the CAF by 2026: seeks to develop recommendations on how the CAF can increase the recruitment and retention of women, including in non-traditional occupations in which women are under-represented. This project is active with two innovators engaged;
  • An integrated human resources data management solution: seeking novel tools and methods to seamlessly and securely access, share, integrate and analyze disparate types and sources of human resources management data residing in different applications and storage systems. This project is active with four innovators engaged;
  • Beyond the classroom: Innovative language learning and retention: seeking innovative solutions that will motivate and support individuals who are outside of the formal, language training system to acquire, use and retain their second official language. This project is awaiting proposals from innovators and is planned to commence this year; and
  • Improving the experience of CAF member transition to civilian life: seeking novel approaches and tools to help support members of the CAF and facilitate their transition to civilian life. This project is being initiated and a call for proposals from innovators is planned for FY 2020-21.

Gender-based analysis plus (GBA+)

The Defence team will continue to institutionalize the use of GBA+ and increase capacity and accountability for the development and implementation of policies, directives, programs and operations that are informed by a GBA+. This analytical tool is used in the Government of Canada to assess the potential impacts of policies, programs or initiatives on diverse groups of women and men, girls and boys by taking into account gender and other identity factors. The “plus” highlights that the analysis goes beyond gender to include the examination of other intersecting factors such as age, education, language, geography, culture and income.

More information on GBA+ pertaining to its governance structures, human resources and planned initiatives can be seen in the “GBA+ Supplementary Information Table” under the Supplementary information tables section of this report.

Experimentation

Additional Defence related experimentation activities are outlined in this report under Core Responsibility 4 – Future Force Design.

Departmental Result 3.1 – Canadian Armed Forces is growing towards its end state of 101,500 personnel

Recruiting: Through the implementation of Operation GENERATION, we will continue to examine the end-to-end process of attraction, recruiting, selection and individual training up to the operational functional point, where new CAF members are employed in their chosen military career.

  • Plans to meet recruiting objectives include:
    • Increase throughput to support regular force growth to 71 500 and an increased Strategic Intake Plan that coincides with the desired growth and timelines;
    • Build on the success of the Royal Canadian Navy’s (RCN) annual Great Lakes Deployment (Operation KAIROS PASSANTFootnote lxxxiii), an annual attraction initiative that sees a RCN Frigate visit several ports along the St. Lawrence and Great Lakes. In 2020-21 the recruiting efforts will focus on moving towards achieving our ten-year plan to have women represent 25% of the CAF. We will continue to synchronize and coordinate strategic public engagements and with social media influencers to align recruiting efforts into a single, focused operation;
    • Increase our use of research and analysis to target specific geographical regions to attract visible minorities and Indigenous Peoples in order to meet our diversity targets;
    • Improve outreach on social media platforms to ensure Canadians are well-informed of the wide variety of employment opportunities available in the CAF;
    • Improve social media collaboration and identify key responsibilities within each group to ensure messaging is consistent and efforts are aligned and complementary;
    • Increase virtual support to improve the recruitment process and establish authentic, timely and bi-directional conversations with potential recruits;
    • Develop partnerships with post-secondary institutions to attract skilled and semi-skilled applicants into high priority trades;
    • Leverage third-party analytics capabilities to recognize, analyse and react to trends in user traffic to the CAF’sFootnote lxxxiv website, quickly tailoring media and messaging to reflect current trends and developments;
    • Improve the Canadian Forces Recruit Information Management System to enable real time tracking of military occupations by gender and diversity targets; and
    • Identify and implement short, medium and long term measures in our continued effort to sustain the pilot occupation. This will include reviewing the military employment structure to provide additional career options to Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) personnel while keeping more pilots in flying positions, improving intake targets, improving the efficiency of the pilot training delivery model and leveraging prior learning to maximize the intake of skilled and semi-skilled pilot enrollees.

Retention: We will work towards building the workforce for the future by supporting the CAF and their families with a more compassionate, dependable, safe and healthy workplace. This includes undertaking a comprehensive review of conditions of service and career paths to allow more personalized career choices and flexibility in career paths, as well as a seamless transition to post-military life.

Planned results

Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016–17
Actual results
2017–18
Actual results
2018–19
Actual results
3.1 Canadian Armed Forces is growing towards its end state of 101,500 personnel* % of Regular force positions that are filled 95 – 100 % 31 March 2026 98% 98.7% 99.23%
% of Reserve force positions that are filled** 95 – 100% 31 March 2026
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
77.09%
% of occupations with critical shortfalls Less than 5% 31 March 2021
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
16.50%

Notes:

* Departmental Result of 101,500 personnel represents the CAF Regular Force and the Reserve Force. The Reserve Force represents Primary Reserves.

** The Reserve Force structure is currently being updated to meet SSE intent therefore the target will be updated once the new structure is approved.

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces’ Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBaseFootnote lxxxv.

Departmental Result 3.2 – The health and well-being of the Defence team is well supported

  • Move towards the modernized Canadian Forces Health Services Group structure, in order to better meet the health care needs of CAF members both at home and when deployed on operations, while also improving efficiency and effectiveness.
  • Optimize health care resources through the implementation of a new integrated governance framework and enhancing Health Services’ ability to monitor and improve health system performance and health care quality.
  • Improve specific Health Services capabilities in support of Strong, Secure, Engaged: Canada’s Defence Policy (SSE) initiatives. This includes enhancing Health Services’ ability to provide health care coordination to CAF members during their transition out of uniform.
  • Enhance Health Services’ capabilities to support concurrent CAF operations including continually rebalancing operational medical countermeasures and vaccines to ensure preparedness for the operational ambition expressed in SSE.
  • Provide standardized, high quality, consistent, personal and administrative support through the newly established CAF Transition Group to CAF personnel. Through an integrated and personalized service delivery model, the CAF Transition Group will continue to develop policies and procedures towards this goal. Support will be provided during all phases of recovery, rehabilitation and reintegration on return to service, or transition to release for all injured and ill CAF personnel, former personnel, their families and the families of the deceased.
  • Pursue greater integration between stakeholders within and external to the CAF for transitioning CAF members.
  • Implement a more comprehensive wellbeing survey mechanism that enables a better/fuller understanding of the Defence team wellbeing.
  • Continue to build upon our Suicide Prevention Action Plan through the hiring of additional subject matter experts in suicide prevention and support.
  • Enhance and sustain a forward aeromedical evacuation capability to extract the injured from the battlefield.
  • Ensure appropriate use of the established mechanisms for the integrated delivery of conflict and complaint management services to provide support resolution that is early, local and informal. Concurrently, continue to address harassment complaints in a clear and timely manner through simplified formal harassment complaint procedures that are aligned with the requirements of Bill C-65Footnote lxxxvi.
  • DND will continue to enhance its policies and procedures to meet the requirements and responsibilities set out by Bill C-65 in order to build healthy, safe and harassment-free workplaces.
  • The Office of Disability Management will be expanded nationally to improve the management and reporting of illness, injury and impairment of civilian employees in DND/CAF.
  • The Employee Assistance Program (EAP) will be enhanced to create a deliberate approach to program planning, implementation and ongoing evaluation to better ensure employee well-being and a supportive work environment.

Planned results

Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016–17
Actual results
2017–18
Actual results
2018–19
Actual results
3.2 The health and well-being of the Defence team is well supported % of military personnel who are medically fit for their occupation 90%* 31 March 2021 Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
90.51%
% of military personnel who feel that the Canadian Armed Forces provides a reasonable quality of life for themselves and their families 85%* 31 March 2021
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
53.20%
% of Canadian Armed Forces members who report a high level of workplace well-being 69%* 31 March 2021 Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
64.30%
% of civilian employees who describe the workplace as psychologically healthy To be determined by 31 March 2021** To be determined by 31 March 2021** Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
59%

Notes:

* Targets are revisited yearly as further data becomes available to better understand the realities and drivers of these indicators.

** This indicator is taken from the Public Service Employee Survey (PSES). Target and date to achieve for departments have not yet been established. We will consider establishing one for the next amendment cycle.

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces’ Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBaseFootnote lxxxvii.

Departmental Result 3.3 – The Defence team reflects the values and diversity of Canadian society

  • Complete the implementation of the 10 recommendations of the External Review Authority by former Justice Deschamps through Operation HONOUR.
  • Implement the CAF Culture Realignment Strategy for Sexual Misconduct, including an Operation HONOUR Campaign Plan and Performance Measurement Framework.
  • Collectively, the Strategy and Campaign Plan include initiatives to achieve long-term and enduring culture change; improve processes around reporting, responding to and investigating incidents of sexual misconduct; and continue to learn through stakeholder and subject matter expert engagement.
  • Complete the National Victim Support Strategy and Implementation Plan.
  • Expansion of the Response and Support Coordination program to full operating capacity.
  • Develop the Independent Legal Advice program for victims.
  • Operate the Contribution Program in Support of Various Sexual Assault Centres in Canada.
  • Implement Defence Team Diversity and Inclusion Action Plans to enable increased operational effectiveness by capitalizing on the experiences, knowledge and abilities of our people within a respectful and inclusive environment.
  • Reflect the diversity and inclusion values of Canadian society through commitment to the Employment Equity Act and CAF annual report, the Multiculturalism Act and annual report and the development of a Defence Team Diversity and Inclusion Strategy and action plans (2020-21). During FY 2020-21 the department will:
    • Continue the CAF’s commitment to the Employment Equity Act through initiatives and reporting in order to identify and address significant employment equity gaps across the department;
    • Implement the current Canadian Armed Forces Employment Equity Plan (2015-20); and
    • Develop the next Canadian Armed Forces Equity Plan (2020-25), setting clear objectives for Diversity and Inclusion, reviewing the Canadian Armed Forces Employment Equity Regulations and ongoing consultation with CAF members through the Defence Advisory Groups.
  • Implement initiatives aimed at addressing past injustices while endeavouring to foster a culture/attitude of respect and fairness within DND/CAF and including initiatives linked to the Heyder/Beattie and LGBTQ2+ litigation.

Operation DISTINCTIONFootnote lxxxviii: The CAF will support Government of Canada led military commemoration events throughout Canada and in key international locations during FY 2020-21 in order to meet Government of Canada National Commemoration Program objectives and to recognize the service excellence of the CAF. Events include the National Sentry Program at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, domestic and international ceremonies to commemorate the 75th Anniversary of the Liberation of the Netherlands and Victory in Europe Day and a domestic ceremony to mark the 75th Anniversary of Victory over Japan Day.

Planned results

Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016–17
Actual results
2017–18
Actual results
2018–19
Actual results
3.3 The Defence team reflects the values and diversity of Canadian society % of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) who self-identify as a woman 25.1% 31 March 2026 15.2% 15.6% 15.7%
% of civilians in the Defence team who self-identify as a woman 39.1% 31 March 2026
40.9% 40.0% 40.4%
% of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) who self-identify as a visible minority 11.8% 31 March 2026 7.6% 8.4% 8.7%
% of civilians in the Defence team who self-identify as a visible minority 8.4% 31 March 2026 7.5% 7.8% 8.9%
% of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) who self-identify as an indigenous person 3.5% 31 March 2026 2.7% 2.8% 2.8%
% of civilians who self-identify as an indigenous person 2.7% 31 March 2026 3.2% 3.1% 3.4%
% of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) who self-identify as victims of harassment Less than 11.9% 31 March 2021 Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
17.7%
% of civilians who self-identify as victims of harassment To be
determined by
31 March 2021*
To be determined
by 31 March 2021
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
16%
% of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) who self-identify as victims of discrimination Less than 9.2% 31 March 2021 Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
14.9%
% of civilians who self-identify as victims of discrimination To be
determined by
31 March 2021*
To be determined
by 31 March 2021
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
7%
Annual number of reported incidents of sexual misconduct in the Defence team To be
determined by
31 March 2021**
To be determined
by 31 March 2021
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
256
Number and type of actions taken in response to reported sexual misconduct incidents by the Defence Team To be
determined by
31 March 2021**
To be determined
by 31 March 2021
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
256
Number of Defence team members who have attended a training session related to sexual misconduct (Operation HONOUR) To be
determined by
31 March 2021**
To be determined
by 31 March 2021
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
Not Available
% of civilians in the Defence team who have completed mandatory harassment training To be
determined by
31 March 2021*
To be determined
by 31 March 2021
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
Not Available

Notes:

* The delay in target setting for these indicators is because of ongoing legal activity that will directly affect the target. Data has been collected on this indicator for the previous FY’s and once the legal activity has concluded, a realistic target using the previous year’s data as a baseline will be put in place.

** DND is still establishing how to approach the process around Operation HONOUR. Targets will be established as the indicator matures. Additional information is available on the Operation HONOURFootnote lxxxix website.

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces’ Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBaseFootnote xc.

Departmental Result 3.4 – Military families are supported and resilient

  • Improve services for CAF members and their families as they relocate to different locations across Canada, as part of the Seamless Canada initiative. We will address frequent areas of dissatisfaction, such as medical care for dependents, vehicle registrations and provincial licensure for spouses in regulated professions.
  • Work towards providing fully aligned benefits to both service and non-service attributable claims similar to Veterans Affairs Canada programs, further closing the seam between Veterans Affairs Canada and DND/CAF. This ultimately improves the transition experience for medically releasing CAF members to civilian life and avoids benefit gaps.
  • Ensure necessities of national and local services and programs to enhance the well-being of military families through the Military Family Services Program that empower and encourage strong independent individuals and families. The Military Family Services Program will be assessed to align service delivery with family needs by updating Military Family Resource Centre governance, establishing formalized partnerships for emerging family requirements and redistributing resources to balance needs and outcomes.
  • Aim to achieve family resilience through community engagement that revolves around the intimate relationship between the CAF, Canadian Forces Morale and Welfare Services, Military Family Resource Centres and collaborations with external partners in actively supporting the unique challenges associated with the military lifestyle. In FY 2020-21, focus will be placed on community and provincial engagement and stakeholder alignments to address a Seamless Canada philosophy.
  • Build on the Comprehensive Military Family Plan framework in order to align resources, services and outcomes and enhance the Military Family Services Program. In FY 2020-21, DND/CAF will continue to enhance the areas of mental health, children and youth services, family resilience, employment support, deployment services, relocation support, special needs and access to health care. In addition, teams will be formalized at wings and bases across Canada to prevent and respond to gender-based and intimate partner violence.

Planned results

Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016–17
Actual results
2017–18
Actual results
2018–19
Actual results
3.4 Military families are supported and resilient % of Canadian Armed Forces families who feel they meet the challenges of military life 85% 31 March 2021 Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
87.60%
% of Canadian Armed Forces members who are satisfied with the overall support their family receives from the Canadian Armed Forces 85% 31 March 2021
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
71%

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces’ Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBaseFootnote xci.

Departmental Result 3.5 – Youth in Canada are provided with experience and opportunities that enable a successful transition to adulthood

In FY 2020-21, the department will:

  • Launch two major communications campaigns from the program’s Identity Project to continue expanding reach and awareness both within the department and with external influencers, stakeholders and target audiences;
  • Continued commitment to rejuvenating the civilian workforce by being a leader in student employment in the Public Service;
  • Initiate implementation of the Management Action Plan in response to the Evaluation of the Cadets and Junior Canadian Rangers (Youth Program) targeting improvements to institutional and community level support capabilities; and
  • Expand strategic relationships with other cadet organizations of our allied countries and other youth development organizations to identify opportunities to deliver the best youth program experience and value to Canadians.

EXPERIENCES YOU CAN’T GET ANYWHERE ELSE

The Canadian Cadet Organizations offer youth engagement programs based on solid fundamentals and possesses a proud and valued legacy. There are five defining principles which characterize these programs: Invite all Canadian Youth; Instill Canadian Military Values; Develop Citizenship, Leadership and Fitness; Balance Safety and Challenge; and Leave a Positive Lifelong Impact. These programs contribute greatly to the development of several thousands of young Canadians from diverse backgrounds by providing them with exhilarating and unique experiences you simply can’t get anywhere else.

The photo depicts a Staff Junior Canadian Ranger wearing a bright yellow baseball cap and long sleeved shirt interacting with a Course Junior Canadian Ranger who is a smilling young girl. They appear to be playing Rock, Paper, Scissors.

 

Captain Chris Demerchant, four Canadian Ranger Patrol Group Junior Canadian Ranger Training Officer, looks on as a Staff Junior Canadian Ranger (left) interacts with a Course Junior Canadian Ranger (right) during the National Leader Enhanced Training Session in British Columbia on 7 August 2019.


Planned results

Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016–17
Actual results
2017–18
Actual results
2018–19
Actual results
3.5 Youth in Canada are provided with experience and opportunities that enable a successful transition to adulthood % of the target Canadian youth population that participates in Cadets and Junior Canadian Rangers At least 2% 31 March 2021 Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
2.05%

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces’ Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBaseFootnote xcii.

Planned budgetary financial resources

2020–21 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates)
2020–21 Planned spending
2021–22 Planned spending 2022–23 Planned spending
3,416,850,794 3,444,253,339 3,442,743,021 3,524,278,188

Financial, human resources, and performance information for the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces' Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBaseFootnote xciii.

Planned human resources

2020–21 Planned full-time equivalents 2021–22 Planned full-time equivalents
2022–23 Planned full-time equivalents
20,838 21,025 21,180

Financial, human resources, and performance information for the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces' Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBaseFootnote xciv.

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