Sustainable Bases, Information Technology Systems and Infrastructure

Description

Develop and manage modern, operational and sustainable bases and infrastructure. Contribute to the achievement of federal environmental targets.

Planning highlights

Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) bases and wings are at the centre of military life across Canada and abroad. They are essential to supporting our soldiers, sailors, airmen and airwomen to ensure the CAF is ready to successfully conduct and support operations when called upon by the Canadian Government. Bases and wings are home to operational and support units and many serve as training facilities. As such, bases will provide essential support services to enable personnel to fulfill their occupational and training requirements, to support defence activities and to sustain military operations. These support services will vary across bases, but may include operational and emergency services, logistic and technical support services, information technology services, safety and environment services, and administration and personnel services such as food and accommodation services.

We are committed to supporting the CAF with modern, efficient, environmentally sustainable and functional infrastructure in which our personnel can train and operate. Providing our military personnel with the facilities and tools they need to perform their work is one of our foremost priorities — we must deliver.

The Defence team manages the largest infrastructure portfolio in the federal government. Maintaining modern and sustainable infrastructure that supports military requirements, improves efficiency, and reduces our environmental footprint, is a critical enabler for CAF operations.

The Department of National Defence (DND)/CAF will continue to modernize the real property portfolio to ensure the efficient and effective use of DND resources. This includes lowering energy costs by improving the efficiency of our infrastructure, reducing the overall cost of our real property by consolidating buildings with a similar function and making effective use of space and land and realizing a right-sized infrastructure portfolio through a comprehensive and integrated national real property plan.

DND/CAF information technology systems are essential in delivering timely, trusted and secure information to decision makers. Through its Cyber Security Engineering Program, DND will provide secure and resilient enterprise-level system solutions to respond to the evolving cyber threat environment. Through its Command, Control, Communications, Computer and Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (C4ISR) engineering and integration program, DND will provide enterprise-level information technology system solutions to advance Allied communication capabilities, support the integration of Joint Targeting systems, improve the resilience of the DND/CAF Command and Control infrastructure and help propel DND/CAF forward with modern technologies.

The department will work continuously with Shared Services Canada to improve the sustainability of the information technology systems that Shared Services Canada manages for the Government of Canada. This includes core networking infrastructure, telecommunications, networking, collaboration, mobile services and data centre reliability.

United Nations’ 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

In support of the Government of Canada’s commitment to green its operations, DND/CAF have developed the Defence Energy and Environment StrategyFootnote cxviii (DEES). The DEES describes the department’s environmental actions towards supporting the United Nations’ 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and Canada’s Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS). Building on our environmental commitments in Strong, Secure, Engaged: Canada’s Defence Policy (SSE), the DEES provides a common vision and goals to help us improve energy efficiency and reduce environmental impacts across Defence activities.

Reporting on the 2016-19 DEES will conclude in March 2020. The next iteration, DEES 2020-23, will be tabled in Parliament by June 2020 and will reflect our continued efforts to achieve the environmental commitments in the United Nations’ 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, FSDS and SSE. Notable goals include:

  • Contaminated Sites:
    • Reduce DND’s contaminated sites liabilities by assessing and remediating contaminated sites as per the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (UN SDG 3.9).
  • Procurement:
    • Define criteria to reduce the environmental impact and ensure best value in procurement decisions (FSDS Chapter on Greening Government and UN SDG 12.7).
  • Low-Carbon Fleet and Real Property:
    • Reduce greenhouse gas emissions from federal government facilities and light duty commercial fleets by 40% (2030) and 80% (2050) with an aspiration to be carbon neutral (SSE 101, FSDS Chapter on Greening Government and UN SDG 13.2).
    • The potential use of alternative energy options in national safety and security-related fleet operations will be examined (SSE 102: Examine alternative energy options and their potential use for operations, FSDS Chapter on Greening Government and UN SDG 13.2).
  • Adaptation to Climate Change:
    • Develop measures to reduce climate change risks to assets, services and internal operations (linked to FSDS Chapter on Greening Government and UN SDG 13.3).

Experimentation

Additional Defence related experimentation activities are outlined in this report under Core Responsibility 4 – Future Force Design.

Key Corporate Risk(s)

There are many risks associated with the Sustainable Bases, Information Technology Systems and Infrastructure Core Responsibility. Two of the Key Corporate Risks are articulated below:

Physical Environment – There is a risk that changes to the physical environment of Canada and the world will impact the type, frequency and conduct of DND/CAF activities.

Infrastructure Procurement – There is a risk that DND/CAF may have difficulty procuring/building infrastructure at the right level to support operations.

The risks above can affect the department’s ability to achieve the Departmental Results of this the Sustainable Bases, Information Technology Systems and Infrastructure Core Responsibility.

As the Defence Departmental Results Framework reflects a chain of delivery from conceiving of the required armed forces, to developing them and then executing operations, the activities to mitigate the risks of the Sustainable Bases, Information Technology Systems and Infrastructure Core Responsibility can also be found in other Core Responsibilities which deliver building blocks that enable the results of Sustainable Bases, Information Technology Systems and Infrastructure.

Departmental Result 6.1 – Naval, Army and Air Force Bases enable military operations and defence activities

  • In FY 2020-21, two new performance indicators will be used as initial measures of the effective delivery of food services and the availability of single quarters’ accommodation on CAF bases and wings. Both indicators speak to the ability of bases and wings to effectively deliver basic services in a way that enables the bases and wings to optimize support to CAF needs. Additional emphasis will be placed on promoting the National Standardized Cycle Menu and offering healthy and vegetarian choices at CAF dining facilities to maintain personnel’s optimal health to meet the physical and mental demands of CAF operations, training and support. The Canadian Army, with 21 bases and training establishments located across the country, will place specific focus on food and accommodations services as part of their larger multi-year approach to optimize internal business processes related to the delivery of base services. These efforts will include a study on food and accommodation services to help inform the establishment of performance indicators and targets.

For information, refer to the following webpages:

Planned results

Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016–17
Actual results
2017–18
Actual results
2018–19
Actual results
6.1 Naval, Army and Air Force Bases enable military operations and defence activities % of single quarters accommodations that can be used 90% 31 March 2021 Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
Not Available*
% deviation of average daily meal cost from the standard allowance Less than 15% 31 March 2021
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19

Notes:

* The FY 2018-19 actual result is not available for this performance indicator due to the absence of a methodology/relevant data. To correct this deficiency, a working group was established to identify common service areas that enable military operations and defence activities as a basis for improving the performance indicator. Further, an evaluation was completed and will serve as a reference to assist with establishing a foundational starting point. A refined performance indicator and relevant data will be available for FY 2020-21.

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces’ Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBaseFootnote cxxii.

Departmental Result 6.2 – Defence infrastructure is well-managed throughout its lifecycle

  • Implement low-risk housing investment plans to improve the overall condition and suitability of the DND housing portfolio, with the aim of providing safe and accessible accommodation, based on CAF requirements.
  • Improve infrastructure on bases and wings, including required off-base/wing office space and housing for CAF personnel and their families.
  • Continue to dispose of underused or obsolete buildings to improve the efficiency of the infrastructure portfolio while helping us accelerate the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions.
  • Continue to transform the real property and portfolio management capacity by adapting the organization’s structure and processes to better align with the Corporate Real Estate Model and industry best practices, while ensuring it continues to deliver infrastructure programs that enable and support the Defence mandate.
  • Explore ways to partner with the private sector through performance-based contractual agreements, in consultation with employees, stakeholders, local communities and public sector unions.

For more information, consult the Investing in Infrastructure and Infrastructure ProjectsFootnote cxxiii webpage.

Planned results

Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016–17
Actual results
2017–18
Actual results
2018–19
Actual results
6.2 Defence infrastructure is well-managed throughout its lifecycle % of infrastructure in suitable condition 60 – 80% 31 March 2021 85.49% 86.22% 66%
% of maintenance and repair investment in relation to the infrastructure portfolio value At least 1.4%* 31 March 2021
1.31% 1.1% 1.05%
% of the total real property value that is identified as surplus Between 1% and 2% 31 March 2021
0.35% 0.60% 0.82%

Notes:

* This value reflects an industry benchmark for best practices in sustainment of infrastructure portfolios.

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces’ Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBaseFootnote cxxiv.

Departmental Result 6.3 – Defence activities are carried out in a safe and environmentally responsible manner

  • Implement the DEES, which outlines DND-led initiatives in support of Canada’s greenhouse gas emissions reductions commitments and obligations for the protection and stewardship of the environment.
  • Seek out opportunities to purchase clean power and alternative energy options for infrastructure at bases and wings.
  • All new construction and major recapitalization projects will meet the Silver Leadership in Energy and Environment Design standard or equivalent.

For more information, refer to the Greening DefenceFootnote cxxv webpage.

Planned results

Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016–17
Actual results
2017–18
Actual results
2018–19
Actual results
6.3 Defence activities are carried out in a safe and environmentally responsible manner % of Defence Energy and Environment Strategy commitments that are met or exceeded At least 80% 31 March 2021 Not Available
New indicator as
of 2017-18
72% 67%
% of greenhouse gas emissions reduction relative to a 2005 baseline At least 40% 31 March 2030
21.7% 31% 32%
% of light-duty vehicle fleet that is hybrid, plug-in hybrid and/or electric At least 30% 31 March 2021
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2017-18
19% 27%
% of reduction in contaminated sites liability based on the closing liability of the previous year At least 7% 31 March 2021
9.2% 19.4% 19.8%

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces’ Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBaseFootnote cxxvi.

Planned budgetary financial resources

2020–21 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates)
2020–21 Planned spending
2021–22 Planned spending 2022–23 Planned spending
3,665,573,962 3,680,697,534 3,515,136,435 3,626,990,238

Financial, human resources, and performance information for the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces' Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBaseFootnote cxxvii.

Planned human resources

2020–21 Planned full-time equivalents 2021–22 Planned full-time equivalents
2022–23 Planned full-time equivalents
14,843 14,913 14,971

Financial, human resources, and performance information for the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces' Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBaseFootnote cxxviii.

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