Operations

Description

Detect, deter and defend against threats to or attacks on Canada. Assist civil authorities and law enforcement, including counter-terrorism, in support of national security, domestic disasters or major emergencies, and conduct search and rescue operations.

Detect, deter and defend against threats to or attacks on North America in partnership with the United States, including through NORAD.

Lead and/or contribute forces to NATO and coalition efforts to deter and defeat adversaries, including terrorists, to support global stability. Lead and/or contribute to international peace operations and stabilization missions with the United Nations, NATO and other multilateral partners. Engage in capacity building to support the security of other nations and their ability to contribute to security and the security of Canadians abroad. Assist civil authorities and non-governmental partners in responding to international and domestic disasters or major emergencies.

Planning highlights

To deliver on Canada’s defence objectives, the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) must be able to undertake its eight core missions, as set out in Strong, Secure, Engaged: Canada’s Defence Policy (SSE), to ensure Canada remains Strong at home, Secure in North America and Engaged in the world.

Operations are managed over large physical spaces as well as across several emerging domains (i.e. Cyber, Space and Information). The department will develop a Global Integration capability to advance the CAF’s pan-domain understanding of the operating environment.

To ensure continued mission success, the Department of National Defence (DND)/CAF will use an outcome-based decision-making model called Joint Targeting to improve DND/CAF’s ability to gather and analyze information, determine where to focus resources and develop plans to achieve operational and strategic objectives. In FY 2020-21, the Defence team will support strategic effects governance through the implementation of the Strategic Effects Management Board outcomes, as well as continue to develop its own targeting governance and structure to enhance the CAF’s ability to deliver full-spectrum targeting effects in support of military operations. Further, the CAF will improve interoperability in joint targeting and effects by participating in allied targeting and information operations forums and working groups.

The Defence team will identify clear objectives and performance metrics to inform operational assessments that will allow the CAF to measure success and identify and rectify shortcomings as required in a timely manner. We will collaborate with our Five Eyes Allies and NATO Partners to foster regional coherence and improve situational awareness to better understand and deal with emerging threats and crises. In addition to increased efforts to synchronize and optimize our efforts on a regional scale, the attention paid to ongoing and emerging missions will remain steadfast.

CAF will continue participation in the Evolution of North American Defence (EvoNAD) Study to analyze current and emerging threats, plans and initiatives to identify, develop and recommend modifications and investments to close the capability gaps across the air, maritime, cyber, space, information and land domains.

We will expand pan-domain awareness in the Arctic in support of continental defence and NORAD missions through innovative options for Northern Approaches Surveillance. This includes but is not limited to the renewal of the North Warning System and delivering on the All Domain Situational Awareness Executive Group mandate.

The CAF will assume an assertive posture in the cyberspace domain. We will develop effective and capable cyber forces that will establish and seek to preserve our freedom to manoeuvre within cyberspace and provide the Government of Canada with flexible cyber response options.

The following capability development activities are planned for 2020-21 to improve Command and Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (C4ISR) capabilities:

  • Operationalize NATO Battlefield Information Collection and Exploitation System, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Network to include conducting live operations with NATO;
  • Leverage cooperation with the Five Eyes Allies and NATO Partners in evolving the CAF Joint Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance and Targeting capabilities;
  • Acquire contracted multi-source Airborne Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance platforms to support operations;
  • Establishing a CAF Joint Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance Enterprise Architecture; and
  • Incorporate new intelligence collection capabilities to enhance the CAF’s joint intelligence surveillance and reconnaissance expertise.

The department will synchronize development efforts with our allies in order to foster interoperability and strengthen intelligence sharing relationships with our closest partners. DND/CAF will also further coordinate intelligence sharing with allies and partners to amplify desired effects within the information domain. DND/CAF will collaborate with applicable stakeholders to implement an Information Operations Force Employment Concept. Additionally, the department plans to conduct regular Regional Operational Outlook conferences with our partners to better understand emerging threats and crisis, as well as fostering regional coherence and effectiveness.

DND/CAF will collaborate with Shared Services Canada and the Canadian Centre for Cyber Security to maintain cyber superiority across all operations.

Planned Costs for Major Canadian Armed Forces OperationsFootnote xxxiv and information on current CAF operations and exercisesFootnote xxxv are available on the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces’ website.

Gender-based analysis plus (GBA+)

The Defence team uses GBA+ to apply gender perspectives in the conduct of all our operations. Every named operation in the CAF employs either a full-time Gender Advisor, or a part-time Gender Focal Point to assist commanders in applying gender perspectives within their operating environment. As well, the CAF has several organizations with full-time Gender Advisors which further ensures that GBA+ is applied in the planning and preparation of all our operations.

Integrating gender perspectives into the planning and conduct of operations ensures we are cognizant of the gender considerations to be factored in which provides a strategic advantage that supports mission success. By improving our situational and cultural awareness through the integration of gender perspectives and GBA+, we broaden our perspectives and increase our understanding of the effects of operations on vulnerable groups.

Experimentation

In FY 2020-21, DND/CAF will continue experimentation for the improvement of operations, including through two key initiatives: Agile Pan-domain Command and Control eXperiment and Coalition Warrior Interoperability eXperiment. Agile Pan-domain Command and Control eXperiment will develop innovative solutions to help evolve CAF planning and Command and Control (C2) for the conduct of Pan-Domain Campaigning. In support of this, Coalition Warrior Interoperability eXperiment will explore methods of improving information sharing capabilities and C2 functions between NATO, Allies and select non-NATO entities. This will assist with the development of concepts, organizational designs and doctrine for assigned joint challenges.

Additional Defence related experimentation activities are outlined in this report under Core Responsibility 4 – Future Force Design.

Key Corporate Risk(s)

There are many risks associated with the Operations Core Responsibility. Two of the Key Corporate Risks directly associated with Operations are articulated below:

Physical Environment – There is a risk that changes to the physical environment of Canada and the world, including changes due to climate change, will impact the type, frequency and conduct of DND/CAF activities.

Cyber Intrusion – There is a risk of serious harm (e.g. loss of sensitive data, disruption to the network, physical electronic damage, loss of confidence in institution/reputation, etc.) resulting from a cyber intrusion.

The risks above can affect the department’s ability to achieve the Departmental Results of the Operations Core Responsibility.

As the Defence Departmental Results Framework reflects a chain of delivery from conceiving of the required armed forces, to developing them and then executing operations, the activities to mitigate the risks to Operations can also be found in other Core Responsibilities which deliver building blocks that enable the results of Operations.

Departmental Result 1.1 – Canadians are protected against threats to and attacks on Canada

  • Conduct Operation LIMPID to detect threats to Canada’s security as soon as possible. The CAF will keep routine watch over Canada’s air, maritime, land, space and cyber domains and, when authorized, will maintain a physical presence in order to protect Canadians and Canadian national interests.
  • Respond to Requests for Assistance as directed by the Government of Canada for a range of domestic emergencies by providing military support. Respond to Medical evacuations and other humanitarian emergencies as directed by the Government of Canada. Respond to Provincial requests for assistance for disaster response through Operation LENTUS on an as-needed basis and only at the request of the provincial authority through the Minister of Public Safety. Of note, the CAF remains the force of last resort to respond to these emergencies.
  • Work with other authorities and agencies in support of Law Enforcement and National Security. Ongoing operations include support to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) for the eradication of illicit cannabis (Operation SABOT) and other counter-drug operations and support to Parks Canada for avalanche control (Operation PALACI).
  • Strengthen our collaboration with and support to, other government departments and agencies to maintain a cooperative National Security community by increasing and improving communication and coordination efforts. Work to improve CAF Joint Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance capabilities, along with other national initiatives, to detect threats to Canada. With better detection abilities, any threats to Canadians and Canadian interests will then be deterred and degraded through a whole-of-government approach.
  • Conduct operational-level engagement with other government departments and agencies to enhance interoperability and mutual support as outlined in the Federal Emergency Response Plan and in support of CAF operations. Liaison officers are co-located at the Government Operating Centre and the RCMP. This inter-agency collaboration will grow in importance as we face emerging threats across multiple domains.
  • Assume an assertive posture in the cyber domain to ensure our ability to defend, as well as improve the capability to conduct active cyber operations against potential adversaries in the context of government-authorized military missions. We will continue to work with our Government of Canada colleagues mandated to provide cyber security across the government, ensuring our combined cyber capabilities are aligned. It is essential that our cyber equities are fully protected and can be effectively defended.
  • The Canadian Special Operations Forces Command remains positioned to identify and defeat threats to Canadians and Canadian interests at home and abroad through a cooperative joint interagency and multinational approach.

Planned results

Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016–17
Actual results
2017–18
Actual results
2018–19
Actual results
1.1 Canadians are protected against threats to and attacks on Canada % of requests for assistance that are fulfilled 100% 31 March 2021 Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
100%
% of force elements that are deployed within established timelines 100%
31 March 2021
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
100%
% of operations that meet stated objectives 100%
31 March 2021
100%
100%
92%
Extent to which the Canadian Armed Forces is effective in domestic operations The Canadian Armed Forces is effective in the conduct of domestic operations 31 March 2021 Not Available
New qualitative
indicator as of
2019-20*
Not Available
New qualitative indicator as of
2019-20*
Not Available
New qualitative indicator as of
2019-20*

Notes:

* This is a new indicator that will produce a qualitative assessment of the overall effectiveness of the CAF in conducting domestic operations.

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces’ Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBaseFootnote xxxvi.


A graphic that reads, "Search and Rescue in Canada". Every year, the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) recieves thousands of calls from people in need. Working with partners, the CAF conducts search and rescue from the air, and coordinates search and rescue from the water. The hashtag is #ThatOthersMayLive. A map of canada is shown with various spots pointed out where operations took place. It also shows that there are Joint Rescue Coordination Centres in Victoria, Trenton, and Halifax. The bottom image is three service people in front of a large orange helicopter two of which are hauling a stretcher and the last has a backpack.

Departmental Result 1.2 – People in distress receive effective search and rescue response

  • In Canada, Search and Rescue (SAR) is a shared responsibility. Many partners are involved due to the country’s immense size, range of terrain and weather. The list of partners is made up of government, military, volunteer and industry groups. They all work together to provide SAR services across the nation. This is known as the National Search and Rescue ProgramNote en fin xxxvii.
  • Focus on our primary responsibilities of providing aeronautical SAR and coordinating the aeronautical and maritime SAR system. CAF SAR crews are on standby 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
  • Searches for missing persons, including those who are lost or overdue on land or inland waters — commonly known as Ground Search and Rescue — are a provincial and territorial responsibility, often delegated to the police service of jurisdiction. The provincial, territorial or municipal authority have the responsibility to request CAF assistance when required. The CAF, which includes Canadian Rangers and Primary Reserve members, will assist in ground SAR efforts.

Planned results

Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016–17
Actual results
2017–18
Actual results
2018–19
Actual results
1.2 People in distress receive effective search and rescue response % of coordinated maritime, aeronautical and joint response to search and rescue incidents deemed effective 100% 31 March 2021 100% 100% 100%
% of requests for Canadian Armed Forces aeronautical search and rescue assistance that are fulfilled 100%
31 March 2021
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
100%
% of Canadian Armed Forces aeronautical search and rescue operations that meet established standards 100%
31 March 2021
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
95.2%

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces’ Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBaseFootnote xxxviii.

Departmental Result 1.3 – Canada’s Arctic sovereignty is preserved and safeguarded

  • Conduct training and presence operations to improve mobility, reach and footprint and enhance surveillance capabilities in Canada’s North demonstrating the ability to project and sustain land, maritime and air forces in the region. In support of this, the activities conducted as part of the Arctic Campaign Plan will strengthen domain awareness, enhance Canadian presence and ensure the defence, security and safety of Canada’s Arctic and Northern regions.
  • Enhance the CAF’s ability to operate in the Arctic and conduct Arctic activities to develop partnerships and improve readiness of its participants, to reinforce our role as a key partner and expert in Arctic safety, security and defence matters — not only in Canada’s North but in the circumpolar strategic context. A more persistent presence in the North through Operation NANOOK will enhance surveillance and control of the Arctic region.
  • Operation NANOOKNote en fin xxxix activities for FY 2020-21 will include:
    • Conduct an interagency exercise in Nunavut and east entrance to the Northwest Passage in response to a simulated major maritime incident;
    • Conduct a multinational maritime live exercise safety and security activity;
    • Exercise domain presence, surveillance and awareness over Canada’s northernmost regions supported by Canadian Rangers; and
    • Project and sustain forces in a high Arctic environment in a combined-joint security context.
  • Remain an effective capability-building partner by aiding other government departments and agencies, inclusive of Territorial and Indigenous Governments, to fulfill their mandates and to increase our familiarity and situational awareness on Arctic activities and to achieve success of CAF operations in harsh operating environments. Operation LIMPID will remain an important activity to achieve this aim.
  • Improve surveillance and control in the Arctic. DND/CAF will collaborate with the United States to develop new technologies and capabilities that will provide surveillance and detection capabilities of pan-domain threats at a range that allows decision-makers to operate at the speed of relevance.
  • Advance interoperability, situational awareness and information sharing initiatives through collaboration with NORAD and the United States Northern Command (USNORTHCOM), NATO engagements, the Arctic Security Forces Roundtable, the Arctic Security Working Group and the Arctic Capabilities Advisory Working Group.
  • The CAF Arctic Training Centre in Resolute BayNote en fin xl, Nunavut, is a primary hub for the CAF, Federal and Territorial whole-of-government elements in the High Arctic region, as it is strategically situated to best provide support for land and air forces working in the Joint Task Force North Area of Operations. In 2020-21, in addition to supporting our governmental partners who operate in the region and in training, such as the delivery of courses for Canadian Armed Forces Search and Rescue and Canadian Armed Forces Survival Aircrew Training, the centre will focus on supporting the delivery of Arctic Operations, including during Operation NANOOK.
  • Complete the construction of a docking and fuelling facility at Nanisivik, Nunavut with the intention of reaching full capability in 2020.
  • During FY 2020-21, the Army will update and promulgate, on behalf of the CAF, the Army domestic Arctic operating concept to project Land Power and ensure alignment with SSE. Along with other strategic direction, this updated concept will provide guidance for capability development, addressing the following SSE Arctic initiatives:
    • SSE 43: Acquire all-terrain vehicles, snowmobiles and larger tracked semi-amphibious utility vehicles optimized for use in the Arctic environment;
    • SSE 106: Enhance the mobility, reach and footprint of the CAF in Canada’s North to support operations, exercises and the CAF’s ability to project force into the region;
    • SSE 108: Enhance and expand the training and effectiveness of the Canadian Rangers to improve their functional capabilities within the CAF; and
    • SSE 110: Conduct joint exercises with Arctic allies and partners and support the strengthening of situational awareness and information sharing in the Arctic, including with NATO.

Planned results

Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016–17
Actual results
2017–18
Actual results
2018–19
Actual results
1.3 Canada’s Arctic sovereignty is preserved and safeguarded % of Arctic operations and exercises that meet stated objectives 100% 31 March 2021 100% 100% 100%

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces’ Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBaseFootnote xli.

Departmental Result 1.4 – North America is defended against threats and attacks

  • To ensure North America is defended against threats and attacks, the CAF will employ conventional and special operations capabilities and collaborate with allies, regional partners and other Canadian government departments and agencies to position itself to deter, detect, confront and defeat pan-regional threats from nation-states and violent extremist organizations.
  • Being an active and equal partner in the collective defence of Canada and the United States, the CAF will execute maritime warning, aerospace warning and aerospace control missions in accordance with the NORAD Agreement. Maritime and aerospace warning missions involve the monitoring of aerospace and maritime activity from a continental perspective while maintaining — when authorized — awareness in the land, space, cyber and information domains to detect and characterize threats against Canada or the United States. To respond to unauthorized airborne activities, the CAF will execute the NORAD Contingency Plan 3310 and Operation NOBLE EAGLE missions. To ensure Contingency Plan 3310 is relevant and meets the defence needs of Canada and the United States, NORAD will complete a thorough review of Contingency Plan 3310 in FY 2020-21.
  • With the shifting balance of power, the changing nature of conflict and the rapid evolution of technology, the CAF is committed to implementing initiatives and developing policies and protocols to defend North America. One of these efforts is the CAF’s participation in the Evolution of North American Defence (EvoNAD) Study to analyze pan-domain current and emerging threats, plans and initiatives to identify, develop and recommend modifications and investments to close the capability gaps across the air, maritime, cyber, space and land domains. In 2020-21, the EvoNAD Study will focus on:
    • Monitoring the implementation of the Maritime and Cyberspace Domain initiatives;
    • Studies in the Space and Land Domains;
    • Re-initiating the Air Domain chapter to combine Air and Aerospace considerations; and
    • Evaluating the Information Environment as a new chapter for development.
  • Operation CARIBBENote en fin xlii: Fight illicit trafficking by transnational organized crime in the Caribbean Basin, the Eastern Pacific Ocean and the coastal waters of Central America by working with partners in the multinational campaign (Operation MARTILLO).
  • To continue the implementation of SSE and address the current and emerging defence and security challenges to North America, the CAF will outline the requisite capabilities and areas of investments required to effectively execute the Continental defence missions and fully define SSE Initiatives 109 and 111, North Warning System renewal and NORAD Modernization.

More details on SSE Initiatives can be found in the Strong, Secure, Engaged: Canada’s Defence PolicyNote en fin xliii.

Planned results

Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016–17
Actual results
2017–18
Actual results
2018–19
Actual results
1.4 North America is defended against threats and attacks % of continental operations that meet stated objectives 100% 31 March 2021 100% 100% 100%
% of Canada’s commitments and obligations to the North American Aerospace Defence Command agreement that are met 100%
31 March 2021
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
100%
Extent to which the Canadian Armed Forces is effective in continental operations The Canadian Armed Forces is effective in the conduct of continental operations 31 March 2021
Not Available
New qualitative
indicator as of
2019-20*
Not Available
New qualitative
indicator as of
2019-20*
Not Available
New qualitative
indicator as of
2019-20*

Notes:

* This is a new indicator that will produce a qualitative assessment of the overall effectiveness of the CAF in conducting domestic operations.

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces’ Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBaseFootnote xliv.

Departmental Result 1.5 – Canadian Armed Forces contribute to a more stable and peaceful world

Underwritten by being STRONG at home and SECURE in North America, through secure power projection infrastructure, DND and the CAF will contribute to a more stable, peaceful world by maintaining ongoing commitments with regional partners around the globe. This will be accomplished by enabling early warning of emerging crises, in conjunction with our Five Eyes Allies and NATO Partners, via timely and credible intelligence processing, exploitation and dissemination. During FY 2020-21, we will contribute to the following missions:

  • Operation ACKEE: Collaborate with Global Affairs Canada, to mentor, enable and create opportunities for the Jamaica Defence Force to grow as a Special Operations Forces leader to more effectively combat trans-regional threats in the Caribbean Basin. Other regional partners include Belize, the Bahamas, Barbados, Trinidad and Tobago and Guyana.
  • Operation ARTEMISFootnote xlv: Make Middle Eastern waters more secure and help stop terrorism in the Red Sea, the Gulf of Aden, the Gulf of Oman and the Indian Ocean. In FY 2020-21 the CAF will:
    • Provide a Commander, command staff and CAF assets to Combined Task Force 150 for a four to six month period.
  • Operation CALUMETFootnote xlvi: Provide key leaders for the Multinational Force and Observers headquarters. The Multinational Force and Observers is a peacekeeping operation in the Sinai Peninsula.
  • Operation FOUNDATIONFootnote xlvii: Collaborate with the United States and other countries to counter terrorism. As part of this operation, the CAF has personnel located in the Middle East, North Africa and Southwest Asia.
  • Operation GLOBEFootnote xlviii: Assist other Government of Canada departments with various tasks or to participate in Government of Canada activities outside of Canada.
  • Operation IMPACTFootnote xlix: Train Iraqi security forces and strengthen Iraqi military education institutions so that Iraqi forces can prevent the return of Daesh. In FY 2020-21, the CAF will:
    • Contribute to a whole-of-government approach to security, stabilization, humanitarian and development assistance in response to the crises in Iraq and Syria and their impact on Jordan and Lebanon; and
    • Focus our efforts on training, intelligence gathering and sharing and aiding humanitarian support in Iraq and Syria.
  • Operation KOBOLDFootnote l: Provide logistic and headquarters support in the NATO-led peace-support operation to maintain a safe and secure environment in Kosovo.
  • Operation NABERIUSFootnote li: Collaborate with Global Affairs Canada, to train, mentor and enable Nigerien Military and Security Forces to address terrorism within Niger and regionally as part of pan-Sahel and pan-African efforts.
  • Operation NEONFootnote lii: Support the implementation of United Nations Security Council sanctions imposed against North Korea. In FY 2020-21, the CAF will:
    • Deploy Halifax Class Frigates and Long Range Patrol Aircraft into the Indo-Asian Pacific.
  • Operation OPEN SPIRITFootnote liii: Clear explosive remnants of war in the Baltic Sea. The three Baltic nations: Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia, take turns hosting the operation with a number of other countries taking part.
  • Operation PRESENCEFootnote liv: Provide support to United Nations operations and to provide airlift capability in support of the United Nations missions in South Sudan and the Democratic Republic of Congo. In FY 2020-21, the CAF will:
    • Deploy a Tactical Airlift Detachment from Entebbe, Uganda. This will assist the United Nations Regional Support Centre by transporting personnel, equipment and supplies to sustain ongoing missions in the region; and
    • The CAF will contribute to the United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA) through specialized staff officers in MINUSMA Headquarters.
  • Operation PROJECTIONFootnote lv: Enhance relationships with Canada’s allies and partners in maritime environments around the world through conducting training, exercises and engagements with foreign navies and other international security partners. It also supports NATO Maritime Command, United States Naval Forces and other allied operations to make the world more secure. In FY 2020-21, the CAF will:
    • Deploy Halifax Class Frigates to the Pacific Region and develop military capability and ensure responsiveness between Canada and its allies in the Pacific region; and
    • Deploy Kingston Class Patrol Vessels to assist maritime nations enhance their capability to provide security against threats of piracy and migrant smuggling and reinforce Search and Rescue capabilities in Western Africa.
  • Operation PROTEUSFootnote lvi: Contribute to the Office of the United States Security Coordinator in Jerusalem. The United States Security Coordinator provides training advice and support to the Palestinian Authority Security Forces.
  • Operation REASSURANCEFootnote lvii: Conduct assurance and deterrence missions as part of NATO. This includes leading NATO’s multinational enhanced Forward Presence (eFP) Battle Group in Latvia. In FY 2020-21, the CAF will:
    • Deploy a Halifax Class Frigate as part of the Maritime Task Force;
    • Provide and command force elements for a robust multinational battle group in Latvia; and
    • Support, on a rotational non-permanent basis, NATO enhanced air policing in Romania.
  • Operation UNIFIERFootnote lviii: Assist with security force training. The CAF will support the Security Forces of Ukraine to improve and build their capability and capacity. In FY 2020-21, the CAF will:
    • Provide military training and capacity building support to Ukrainian security forces’ personnel, including Combined Arms training up to Brigade level; Combat Engineer and Explosive Ordnance Disposal training; Military Police training; Combat First Aid/Combat Medic Training; Junior Officers and Non-Commissioned Officers; and
    • Provide additional resources to Ukrainian Security Sector Reform efforts, including professional development, sniper training, logistics systems modernization and Maritime capacity building.

Operation REASSURANCE: enhanced Forward Presence (eFP)

Canada leads a robust multinational NATO battle group in Latvia, one of four such battle groups deployed in the Baltics and Poland. Canada will contribute to NATO’s eFP until March 2023.

Canadian Armed Forces members from NATO's eFP Battle Group Latvia, participate in Exercise URBAN REAPER in the training area of Camp Ādaži, Latvia, 17 October 2019. The black and white photo shows 6 soldiers on a staircase breaching a building

Canadian Armed Forces members from NATO's eFP Battle Group Latvia, participate in Exercise URBAN REAPER in the training area of Camp Ādaži, Latvia, 17 October 2019.

Photo: Corporal Djalma Vuong-De Ramos


  • Work in close collaboration with Global Affairs Canada on strategic level initiatives that support Ukraine at the institutional level. These initiatives will supplement the tactical-level training and capacity building provided by the CAF under Operation UNIFIER. DND/CAF will continue to develop international engagements with a view to advancing Canada’s broader foreign and defence policy objectives to achieve a more peaceful and stable world.
  • The CAF will continue to play an important role in United Nations peacekeeping in contribution to broader government objectives and whole-of-government efforts to prevent conflict, stabilize fragile situations and combat threats. In support of this, staff officers will continue to be deployed to United Nations Force Headquarters in Mali (Operation PRESENCE (Mali)), Democratic Republic of Congo (Operation CROCODILE), South Sudan (Operation SOPRANO), Cyprus (Operation SNOWGOOSE) and the Middle East (Operation JADE). The “Innovative Training” line of effort is a specific initiative focused on addressing systemic United Nations training needs related to peace operations.
  • Elsie InitiativeFootnote lix: Develop a combination of approaches to overcome barriers to women’s meaningful participation in United Nations Peace Support Operations. Global Affairs Canada has identified Ghana and Zambia as the partner nations for Canada in building defence capacity. A Training Needs Assessment will identify where CAF resources/expertise may be applied to overcome these barriers.
  • In accordance with the United Nations’ Uniformed Gender Parity Strategy 2018-2028, the United Nations has set a target of 25% female representation in the United Nations Military Observer and Staff Officer positions by 2028. This will be achieved by increasing the percentage of women on United Nations missions in these roles by 1% a year. The target for 2019 was 16%, which the CAF achieved. The target for 2020 will be 17%, which the CAF is on track to achieve.
  • Additionally, within the contributions of contingent troops, the United Nations has set a target of 15% female representation by 2028. The United Nations has requested that each infantry battalion element contain an Engagement Team (platoon size), and this Engagement Team must have a minimum composition of 50% women. The department will support the United Nations in identifying and developing training for personnel deploying as members of Engagement Teams on United Nations operations in order to support this growth in female representation within formed contingents.
  • The Chief of the Defence Staff (CDS) will continue to chair the United Nations Women, Peace and Security Chiefs of Defence (WPS CHODs) Network until Canada hands over the Chair of the United Nations WPS CHODs Network to Bangladesh in 2020.
  • The United Nations WPS CHODs Network is a network of likeminded CHODs, who promote the integration of gender perspectives into armed forces and peacekeeping operations in order to further the implementation of United Nations Security Council Resolutions (UNSCR) 1325. By the end of his tenure as chair, the CDS intends to enhance amongst allies the integration of gender perspectives and effectiveness of military operations through a focus on three lines of effort:
    • Engagement: Increase and formalize membership of the WPS CHODs Network;
    • Enhance the Mandate: Institutionalization of balanced gender perspectives capacity; and
    • Education: Increase awareness of UNSCR 1325 and the Women, Peace and Security agenda through training and speaking events.

Planned results

Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016–17
Actual results
2017–18
Actual results
2018–19
Actual results
1.5 Canadian Armed Forces contribute to a more stable and peaceful world % of international operations that meet stated objectives 100% 31 March 2021 98% 97% 93%
Extent to which the Canadian Armed Forces is effective in international operations The Canadian Armed Forces is effective in the conduct of international operations
31 March 2021
Not Available
New qualitative
indicator as of
2019-20*
Not Available
New qualitative
indicator as of
2019-20*
Not Available
New qualitative
indicator as of
2019-20*

Notes:

* This is a new indicator that will produce a qualitative assessment of the overall effectiveness of the CAF in conducting domestic operations.

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces’ Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBaseFootnote lx.

Planned budgetary financial resources

2020–21 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates)
2020–21 Planned spending
2021–22 Planned spending 2022–23 Planned spending
1,075,628,685 1,080,817,402 1,084,690,693 1,115,625,002

Financial, human resources, and performance information for the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces' Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBaseFootnote lxi.

Planned human resources

2020–21 Planned full-time equivalents 2021–22 Planned full-time equivalents
2022–23 Planned full-time equivalents
2,860 2,886 2,910

Financial, human resources, and performance information for the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces' Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBaseFootnote lxii.

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