Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy, 2020 to 2023, Environment and Climate Change Canada

Updated January 2021

Section 1: Context for the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

The 2019 to 2022 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) presents the Government of Canada’s sustainable development goals and targets, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act. In keeping with the purpose of this Act – to provide the legal framework for developing and implementing a Federal Sustainable Development Strategy that will make environmental decision-making more transparent and accountable to Parliament – Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) supports the goals laid out in the FSDS through the activities described in this Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy (DSDS).

Section 2: Sustainable Development Vision and Context in Environment and Climate Change Canada

As the lead federal department for a wide range of environmental issues, ECCC contributes to and supports sustainable development through programs and related activities in support of its four core responsibilities. The Department pursues its responsibilities through a range of actions, including:

ECCC’s programs focus on: advancing innovation in clean growth and sustainable development; reducing greenhouse gas emissions and adapting to climate change; minimizing threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution; equipping Canadians to make informed decisions based on weather, water and climate conditions; conserving and restoring Canada’s natural environment, wildlife and biodiversity; and protecting the quality of air and water. ECCC’s programs reflect the interdependence of environmental sustainability, economic well-being and overall quality of life, including the importance of the environment in Indigenous cultural traditions and ways of life. ECCC’s domestic actions are complemented by its active leadership and engagement on the international front through the implementation of over 30 environmental cooperation agreements and free-trade agreements with partner countries.

This Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy (DSDS) sets out ECCC’s three-year plan for contributing to achievement of the following 2019–22 FSDS goals, which will be reviewed and validated annually:

Goal 1 icon

FSDS Goal 1: Effective Action on Climate Change

ECCC will maintain a lead federal role in taking effective action on climate change, including transitioning to a low-carbon economy, in partnership with provinces, territories, Indigenous peoples, industry and international organizations. For example, the Pan-Canadian approach to pricing carbon pollution will ensure that carbon pollution pricing will be applied to key emissions sources across Canada as an incentive for shifts to a clean, efficient and competitive economy. As a leader in international agreements and initiatives on climate change, ECCC will push for global action to implement the Paris Agreement and to support the integration of sustainable development considerations in international trade and other agreements. This will include leadership to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs), including carbon dioxide and short-lived climate pollutants (such as hydrofluorocarbons and methane) under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.

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FSDS Goal 2: Greening Government

ECCC will contribute to a low-carbon government with a focus on reducing emissions from its buildings and fleets. To support lower emissions in its buildings, the largest source of emissions from the Department’s operations, ECCC will take action on a number of fronts, including making operational improvements and energy improvements that reduce emissions. To reduce emissions from its vehicles, the Department will adopt a strategic approach to decarbonize its fleet, including through purchase of zero-emissions vehicles or hybrids, by purchasing based on essential needs and departmental targets, and through vehicle-sharing. ECCC will also play an active role in promoting and supporting the achievement of the Government’s Zero Plastic Waste Strategy, and related efforts to increase the reuse, recycling and recovery of wastes from government operations, diversion from landfills, and prevention of release of waste into the environment, consistent with the global movement toward a “circular economy”. ECCC will provide science and guidance to other federal departments and agencies in support of a more comprehensive, consistent and evidence-based government-wide approach.

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FSDS Goal 3: Clean Growth

ECCC will invest in clean technologies through the Low Carbon Economy Fund and the Climate Action Incentive Fund to support initiatives that deploy and adopt clean technologies, and will collaborate with partners to deliver Canadian Plastics Innovation Challenges to support the growth of clean technologies that reduce plastic waste.

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FSDS Goal 5: Clean Energy

ECCC will support a growing clean technology industry in Canada and transition to a low-carbon economy by working with partners, including the Federation of Canadian Municipalities (by investing in the Green Municipal Fund), to increase energy efficiency in buildings, and through the Climate Action Incentive Fund and the Low Carbon Economy Fund to support initiatives that decrease energy use, save money and reduce carbon pollution.

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FSDS Goal 6: Healthy Coasts and Oceans

ECCC will continue to play a leadership role in protecting ocean and coastal resources. For example, under the new Oceans Protection Plan, the Department will increase its 24/7 emergency response capacity to ensure the environment is protected in the event of an oil spill. ECCC will continue to oversee and issue permits for disposal at sea under Canadian and international legislation, and will develop new tools and capacity to strengthen protection of these resources. The Department works closely with Fisheries and Oceans Canada to promote and support the establishment of marine National Wildlife Areas and other protected areas in Canada’s coastal regions. ECCC will play a lead role in advancing the Zero Plastic Waste Strategy, and will collaborate closely with Fisheries and Oceans Canada in pursuing measures to support the Oceans Plastics Charter, for which Canada is a founding leader.

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FSDS Goal 7: Pristine Lakes and Rivers

To improve water quality in key ecosystems, ECCC will continue to work with partners across Canada and with the U.S. The Department will conduct and share results of scientific research and monitoring, contribute science expertise and funding to improve local ecosystems, and develop and enforce regulations to protect freshwater from harmful substances. For example, ECCC will continue to administer and enforce the general pollution prevention provision of the Fisheries Act and effluent regulations for municipal wastewater, pulp and paper mills, and the metal mining industry. ECCC will also work with the U.S. through the International Joint Commission to improve management of water important to both countries. ECCC will provide leadership and support to provinces, local governments and community organizations, and environmental NGOs in taking action to clean up and restore freshwater lakes and river, including the Great Lakes, the Lake Winnipeg basin and the St. Lawrence River. The Eco-Action Community Funding Program will support numerous community-based prevention and clean-up actions, many of which focus on water systems and wetlands.

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FSDS Goal 8: Sustainably Managed Lands and Forests

ECCC will continue to work with partners in its leadership role to protect and conserve natural spaces, including by establishing and managing federal protected areas (such as national wildlife areas and migratory bird sanctuaries). ECCC will lead efforts under the $1.3 billion Nature Legacy initiative to encourage and support actions by provinces and territories, land trusts and foundations, Indigenous peoples and others to establish protected and conserved areas in fulfillment of the objectives of doubling the amount of protected terrestrial lands and inland waters in Canada in order to conserve natural ecosystems and biodiversity. ECCC continues to implement the Canada Nature Fund to help enable partners to protect and conserve more lands and freshwater. The Department will also continue to administer the Ecological Gifts Program to enable habitat conservation on private land by encouraging landowners to donate ecologically sensitive land for conservation. It is also working with other federal departments (e.g., National Defence) and private land owners (e.g., forestry companies, ranchers) to designate existing eligible lands as other effective conservation measures (OECMs).

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FSDS Goal 9: Healthy Wildlife Populations

ECCC plays a federal leadership role in maintaining wildlife populations. The Department will continue to implement the Species at Risk Act, one of its main strategies for protecting wildlife species at risk and their habitat. ECCC will collaborate with Indigenous peoples, non-government organizations and other partners in Canada and around the world to extend its capacity and reach to protect and conserve habitat and species. For example, the Department will pursue its work in Canada and internationally to protect the 450 bird species that Canada hosts seasonally, under the Migratory Birds Convention Act. ECCC will also encourage the protection of wetlands important to birds and other wildlife by implementing the Ramsar Convention in Canada, as well as the North American Waterfowl Management Plan. ECCC will also provide advice under the Impact Assessment Act to minimize negative impacts of development projects on wildlife. A major focus will be implementation of the Pan-Canadian Approach to Transforming Species at Risk Conservation in Canada, supported by the $1.3 billion Nature Legacy initiative, placing the emphasis of wildlife protection and conservation efforts with partners and stakeholders on agreed-upon priority species, priority spaces and priority threats.

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FSDS Goal 12: Connecting Canadians with Nature

ECCC will focus its contributions to this goal by collaborating with key partners. For example, the Department will work with the Nature Conservancy of Canada to increase private land conservation and protect important habitat in southern Canada. ECCC will also work with Nature Canada to inspire urban residents to connect with nature in ECCC’s National Wildlife Areas.

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FSDS Goal 13: Safe and Healthy Communities

ECCC will continue to play a leadership role in work with partners to improve air quality and protect Canadians from harmful substances in air, water and on land. For example, the Department will develop and enforce regulations to reduce air pollution from high pollution-emitting industries, such as the oil and gas sector. ECCC will also conduct scientific assessments on chemical substances already in use in Canada, as well as new substances proposed for use, to determine their risks to the environment. Based on the results of assessments, the Department will identify if and how the risk will be managed. ECCC will continue to collaborate with provinces and territories in the development and adoption of Canada-wide standards—and associated prevention and mitigation strategies—for a number of the most serious threats to human health and the environment, and will continue to play a lead role in actions that promote and support both indoor and outdoor air quality.


ECCC also indirectly supports Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s leadership on federal activities that contribute to the FSDS Goal of Sustainable Food (goal 11), and particularly with regards to international work on phytosanitary measures targeting Invasive Alien Species (IAS). While ECCC has a hand in policy coordination to enhance and promote action on IAS generally, it does not support activities that directly target this particular FSDS goal. As such, FSDS Goal 11 is not treated in the current strategy.

Section 3: Commitments for Environment and Climate Change Canada

Goal 1 large icon

FSDS Goal 1, Effective Action on Climate Change: A low-carbon economy contributes to limiting global average temperature rise to well below two degree Celsius and support efforts to limit the increase to 1.5 degrees Celsius

Responsible Minister: Minister of Environment and Climate Change; supported by a whole-of-government approach to implementation

Effective Action on Climate Change

FSDS target(s)

FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Contribution of each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target

Starting point(s)

Performance indicator(s)

Target(s)

Program(s) in which the departmental actions will occur

By 2030, reduce Canada’s total GHG emissions by 30%, relative to 2005 emission levels. Use legislation and regulations to limit greenhouse gas emissions

Take regulatory action on emissions from the transportation sector including:

  • strengthening regulations to limit GHG emissions from post-2018 heavy-duty trucks;
  • implementing regulations amending the Heavy-duty Vehicle and Engine GHG Emission Regulations; and
  • finalizing and publishing Canada’s midterm evaluation on standards for model years 2022 to 2025 under the light-duty vehicle GHG regulations.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS targets or goal:

Regulating GHG emissions and pricing carbon pollution will ensure that emissions from key sources are reduced in order to contribute to Canada’s reduction targets. A price on carbon pollution provides an incentive for climate action and clean innovation while protecting competitiveness. Carbon pricing is efficient and cost effective because it allows businesses and households to decide for themselves how best to reduce pollution and often save money in the process. Proceeds from pricing carbon pollution will be returned to the jurisdiction of origin in order to reduce cost impacts on households and vulnerable sectors, and may drive further GHG emission reductions.

Several key regulations and other instruments will reduce GHG emissions from the oil and gas, transportation, electricity and other industrial sectors that contribute significantly to total GHG emissions in Canada:

  • The Heavy-duty Vehicle and Engine Greenhouse Gas Emission Regulations are estimated to lead to annual CO2e emission reductions of about 6Mt from all heavy-duty vehicles in 2030.
  • The Regulations Respecting Reduction in the Release of Methane and Certain Volatile Organic Compounds (Upstream Oil and Gas Sector), 2018 will reduce fugitive and venting emissions of methane, a potent GHG and a short-lived climate pollutant that contributes to climate change. Between 2018 and 2035, the cumulative GHG emissions reductions attributable to the regulations are estimated to be approximately 232 Mt of CO2e. The regulations will deliver on the government of Canada’s March 2016 commitment to reduce emissions of methane from the upstream, oil and gas sector by 40% to 45% below 2012 levels by 2025.
  • Coal-fired electricity generating units are the highest emitting stationary sources of GHGs and air pollutants in Canada. Amendments to the Reduction of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Coal-fired Generation of Electricity Regulations, published in December 2018, are expected to reduce GHG emissions by 12.8Mt of CO2e in 2030.
  • The Ozone-depleting Substances and Halocarbon Alternatives Regulations will prevent the release of HFCs, which are powerful short-lived climate pollutants that contribute to climate change. These controls are expected to prevent the release of 1Mt of CO2 equivalents in 2020 and 7Mt in 2030. The HFC phase-down is in effect as of January 1, 2019.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goals:

UN SDG 7: Affordable and clean energy (Target 7.2)

UN SDG 8: Decent work and economic growth (Target 8.4)

UN SDG 13: Climate Action (Target 13.2)

Starting point:
GHG emissions from heavy-duty vehicles from the 2010 model year.

Performance Indicator: Percentage improvement in GHG emissions performance for manufacturer model year 2018–2020 reporting (heavy-duty vehicles)

Target: For December 2018-2020 Model Years

  • 13%—heavy-duty pick-up trucks and vans
  • 11%—Combination tractors
  • 5%—Vocational vehicles

Note: This indicator is aligned to the FSDS target “reduce Canada’s total GHG emissions.” This measure assesses the effectiveness of regulations on heavy-duty vehicles.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Clean Growth and Climate Change Mitigation

Continue to implement regulations to phase down hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) consumption in line with the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol and to prohibit the import and export of certain products that contain or are designed to contain HFCs.

Continue to implement Canada’s Strategy on Short-lived Climate Pollutants (SLCPs), by:

  • publishing a progress report on commitments under the SLCP Strategy; and
  • continuing to advance domestic and international work to reduce SLCPs.

Starting point: Annual HFC consumption baseline of 18,008,795 tons CO2e calculated from the average HFC consumption over the years 2011-2013.

Performance Indicator: HFC emissions.

Target: Total reduction of 15,307,475 tons of CO2e from the annual HFC consumption baseline by 2036 (85% reduction).

Note: This indicator is aligned to the FSDS target “reduce Canada’s total GHG emissions.” The consumption reduction of HFC is a good indicator as it provides a direct measurement of actual reduction in the quantities of HFCs consumed annually. The reduction in HFC consumption correlates to reductions of GHG emissions. The consumption reduction schedule follows international obligations under the Montreal Protocol. This measure assesses the effectiveness of regulations on HFC emissions.

Continue to take action on carbon pollution, including by implementing pan-Canadian pricing of carbon pollution, working with provinces and territories.

Starting point: 4 of 13 provinces and territories had in place carbon pollution pricing as of October 2016.

Performance Indicator: Carbon pricing systems are in place in Canada.

Target: 13 provinces and territories have in place carbon pollution pricing that meets the federal benchmark or federal system applies by July 2019.

Note: This indicator is aligned to the FSDS Target “reduce Canada’s total GHG emissions.” This measure assesses the application of carbon pollution pricing systems to a broad set of emission sources throughout Canada and with increasing stringency over time either through a rising price or declining caps.

Take action on coal-fired electricity emissions from electricity generation, including by:

  • accelerating the phase out of traditional coal-fired electricity units, and proposing regulations to reduce methane emissions in the oil and gas sector;
  • implementing amended coal-fired electricity regulations to accelerate the phase out of traditional coal-fired electricity generation by 2030; and
  • implementing new performance standards imposing emissions limits on natural-gas-fired electricity generation.

Starting point: 100% in 2018-19.

Performance Indicator: Percentage of coal-fired electricity generation units meeting their regulated GHG emissions intensity performance requirement

Target: 100% by December 2021.

Note: This indicator is aligned to the FSDS Target “reduce Canada’s total GHG emissions” and demonstrates progress toward achieving the Government of Canada’s commitment to the 2030 targets on GHG emissions reduction. This measure specifically assesses the effectiveness of regulations on coal-fired electricity.

Take action on emissions from the oil and gas sector by:

  • continuing to implement regulations reducing the release of methane and certain Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) from the upstream oil and gas sector that aim to reduce methane emissions;
  • implementing amendments to coal-fired electricity generation regulations that will reduce GHG emissions, as well as natural gas-fired electricity generation regulations;
  • implementing new performance standards imposing emissions limits on natural-gas-fired electricity generation; and
  • implementing regulations to reduce methane emissions from the oil and gas sector by 40–45% by 2025.

Starting point: 45 Mt CO2e in 2012.

Performance Indicator: Reduced methane emissions from the oil and gas sector

Target: 40-45% methane emission reduction from upstream oil and gas by 2025.

Note: The Regulations Respecting Reduction in the Release of Methane and Certain Volatile Organic Compounds (Upstream Oil and Gas Sector), will reduce fugitive and venting emissions of methane, a potent GHG and a short-lived climate pollutant that contributes to climate change. Between 2018 and 2035, the cumulative GHG emissions reductions attributable to the regulations are estimated to be approximately 232 Mt of CO2e. The regulations will deliver on the government of Canada’s March 2016 commitment to reduce emissions of methane from the upstream, oil and gas sector by 40% to 45% below 2012 levels by 2025.

Develop a Clean Fuel Standard to reduce Canada’s GHG emissions through the increased use of lower-carbon fuels and alternative technologies.

Publish proposed regulations for liquid fuels class in 2020, and final regulations in 2021, followed by regulations for the gaseous and solid classes in 2023.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

ECCC will develop a Clean Fuel Standard to promote the use of clean technologies through its collaboration with partners in Canada and internationally. These collaborations foster the exchange of ideas and knowledge that can be leveraged to find ways to increase the use of clean technologies, which will contribute to reduce GHG emissions. Better data will inform GHG-related decisions thus resulting in more effective actions to reduce GHG emissions to reduce the lifecycle carbon intensity of liquid fuels used in Canada, incent the innovation and adoption of clean technologies and the development and use of low-carbon fuels throughout the economy.Footnote 1

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure (Target 9.4)

UN SDG 13: Climate Action (Target 13.2)

Starting point: GHG emissions in 2016.

Performance Indicator:

Emissions reductions are being achieved under the Clean Fuel Standard building on the Renewable Fuels Regulations

Target: Over 20 Mt of annual GHG emissions reductions by 2030.

Note: This indicator is aligned to the FSDS Target “reduce Canada’s total GHG emissions.” This measure assesses the effectiveness of regulations on fuels that are used in transportation, industry, and buildings.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Clean Growth and Climate Change Mitigation
Work with partners on climate change

Work closely with provincial, territorial, municipal, and Indigenous partners as well as businesses, non-governmental organizations, academics, experts, Canadians, and other stakeholders to meet ECCC climate change objectives, including by:

  • engaging and collaborating with Indigenous peoples on policies, programs and other priorities, including through distinctions-based bilateral tables with First Nations, Inuit, and the Métis Nation;
  • working with other partners, including international organizations, to address GHG emissions from the transportation sectors;
  • supporting the Canadian Institute for Climate Choices, an independent non-profit organization focused on clean growth and climate change to generate, communicate, and mobilize trusted information, policy advice, and best practices for Canadians, governments, and stakeholders;
  • providing support through the Climate Action Incentive Fund for projects and measures undertaken by small and medium enterprises (SME Project stream), municipalities, universities, schools and hospitals (MUSH Sector), and not for profit organizations; Note: Please also refer to the departmental action that speaks to the delivery of the Champions and Partnerships streams of the Low Carbon Economy Challenge Fund (Goal 1);
  • working with partners to implement projects that reduce GHG emissions through the Low Carbon Economy Fund; Note: Please also refer to the departmental action that speaks to the implementation of the Low Carbon Economy Fund (Goal 1); and
  • leading Government-wide efforts to develop a plan to achieve a prosperous net-zero emissions future by 2050 and set legally binding, five-year emissions-reduction milestones.Footnote 2

Engage partners, in particular the Canadian private sector, in projects that advance the role of clean technology in addressing emissions of air pollutants and/or GHGs, including by:

  • collaborating with provinces and territories to improve the consistency of emission data across Canadian jurisdictions;
  • expanding the collection of facility data to enable integration in the national GHG inventory; and
  • working with provinces and territories to ensure carbon pollution pricing applies to a broad set of emission sources across Canada with increasing stringency over time.

Work with provinces and territories to publish the Annual Synthesis Report on progress made toward PCF implementation.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

ECCC will continue its partnerships with Indigenous peoples, who are vital to successful implementation of the PCF. ECCC will continue to collaborate through distinction-based tables with First Nations, Inuit, and the Métis Nation, in partnership with each of the Assembly of First Nations, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, and the Métis National Council. These tables support the implementation of the PCF on an ongoing basis, and help to inform the design of clean growth and climate change policy and programs to support Indigenous peoples’ leadership on climate action.

ECCC will also continue to work with other federal government departments, provinces and territories, and other partners and stakeholders to implement and report on progress in implementing the PCF. Federal, provincial and territorial (FPT) governments publish an annual synthesis report to fulfill the commitment in the PCF for governments to report regularly to Canadians and First Ministers on their progress in its implementation. The report provides factual information on climate-related actions undertaken by governments during the past year, and is published on the canada.ca website.

ECCC is also active in the Canadian Council of the Ministers of the Environment (CCME) and is co-chair of its Climate Change Committee. This FPT committee enables the exchange of ideas and information related to climate change priorities and programming. The committee also executes project activities that are of mutual interest and benefit to its members. Areas of interest include climate change risk assessment, natural infrastructure and improved adaptation and mitigation metrics. These collaborations foster the exchange of ideas and knowledge that can be leveraged to advance adaptation action, as well as find ways to increase the use of clean technologies, which will contribute to reducing GHG emissions. Also, better data will inform GHG-related decisions thus resulting in more effective actions to reduce GHG emissions.

Through its funding programs (including the Low Carbon Economy Fund and Climate Action Incentive Fund), ECCC will support a diverse range and size of projects, including those from ECCC’s partners, to bring effective and innovative approaches to reduce emissions and to further provincial, territorial and local priorities to bring effective and innovative approaches to reduce GHG emissions.

Furthermore, through the Climate Action Fund, ECCC provides support for projects that raise awareness of climate change and build capacity in order to increase climate actions that contribute to Canada’s clean growth and climate change plan.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure (Target 9.4)

Starting point: Work is ongoing in order to develop the indicators.

Performance Indicator:

Co-development of indicators with Indigenous Peoples to ensure they are engaged in the implementation of the PCF, through three distinct senior-level joint tables with First Nations, Inuit, and the Métis Nation.

Target: Indicators will be co-developed with Indigenous peoples by March 2021.

Note: While ECCC works with 13 other federal organizations and partners on the implementation of the PCF, the department does not have a comprehensive performance indicator to measure this work. Rather, it assesses whether indicators have been co-developed with Indigenous peoples as a measure of success of the contributing action, to work with partners on climate change, towards the achievement of the FSDS Target “reduce Canada’s total GHG emissions.” This measure respects the rights of Indigenous peoples to be engaged in the implementation of the PCF through participation in robust, meaningful engagement and reiterates the federal government’s commitment to renewed nation-to-nation, Inuit-to-Crown, and government-to-government relationships with First Nations, Inuit, and the Métis Nation.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Clean Growth and Climate Change Mitigation
Support students, youth, and Indigenous peoples to increase climate change awareness through the Climate Action Fund.

Starting point: Baseline at zero.

Performance Indicator: Percentage of participants/users of the Climate Action Fund (CAF) indicating increased awareness of climate change

Target: An increase beyond the baseline of zero.

Note: This indicator is aligned to the FSDS Goal 1 “Effective Action on Climate Change.” The indicator will help to quantify the increase in climate awareness or capacity for climate action perceived by funding recipients.

Provide climate change policy coordination, including engagement with provinces and territories, Indigenous peoples and federal partners on climate change issues and support for PCF interdepartmental governance. This includes work with provinces and territories that have adopted the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change to help them deliver on leadership commitments to reduce GHG emissions, including those outlined in the framework, through the Low Carbon Economy Leadership Fund.

Implement the Low Carbon Economy Fund (LCEF) to support projects to mitigate climate change and support Canada’s transition to a low carbon economy, including both the:

  • LCEF Leadership Fund (up to $1.4B): bilateral funding agreements with provinces and territories to help them deliver on their commitments to reduce GHG emissions; and the
  • LCEF Challenge Fund (approximately $500M) (Champions stream—for provinces and territories, municipalities, Indigenous communities and organizations, businesses and not-for-profit organizations, and Partnerships stream for Indigenous communities and their organizations, small and medium-sized businesses, not-for-profit organizations and small municipalities.

Starting point: Zero emissions prior to implementation of the LCEF.

Performance indicator: Contribution of the LCEF towards the reduction of GHG emissions from Canadian sources

Target: 7 Mt (annual non-cumulative target).

Note: This indicator demonstrates the direct impact of actions taken with partners through LCEF projects to reduce GHG emission and mitigate climate change.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Clean Growth and Climate Change Mitigation
Take a leading role in international agreements and initiatives on climate change.

Continue to demonstrate a strong commitment to international leadership on clean growth and climate change, including by:

  • leading Canada’s participation in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) with the aim of strengthening global efforts to implement the Paris Agreement;
  • continuing to engage internationally to advance ambitious and inclusive climate action, including through ensuring Indigenous peoples are engaged in developing international climate policy, and by promoting gender equality and the role of women in climate action around the world, as well as continuing efforts to ensure that international market mechanisms are guided by a robust set of rules and operate with environmental integrity;
  • leading Canada’s participation in the Montreal Protocol, while promoting ratification and global implementation of the Kigali Amendment on the phase-down of hydrofluorocarbons;
  • promoting Canadian climate and environmental objectives in regional trade agreements and international fora such as the G7, G20, OECD, Francophonie, Commonwealth, the World Meteorological Organization and in other Ministerial meetings; and
  • leading Canada’s participation as a convening country of the Global Commission on Adaptation (GCA) which runs from 2018 to 2021 and providing leadership of the nature-based climate solutions action track during the GCA’s Year of Action (2019 to 2021).

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By taking a leadership role and contributing expertise to key international climate and economic fora, ECCC will strengthen Canada’s capacity to contribute to a worldwide reduction of GHGs to meet global targets.

Working with international partners will contribute to international goals under the PCF, such as the implementation of the Paris Agreement and the delivery of Canada’s $2.65B to support developing countries in tackling climate change.

Completing the peer review will help Canada move forward with its international commitments on inefficient fossil fuel subsidies under the G20.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

SDG 13: Climate Action (Target 13.A)

Starting point: Baseline to be established in March 2022.

Performance Indicator: Percentage of decisions or outcomes at multilateral decision-making body meetings (such as the UNFCCC, G7, G20, and UNEP, etc.) that reflect Canadian objectives

Target: 70% by March 31, 2022.

Note: This indicator is aligned to the FSDS Goal 1 “Effective Action on Climate Change.” Playing an active role in multilateral fora, such as the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), G7, G20 and UNEP, is an important part of Canada’s global leadership on climate change. This indicator can provide Canadians with a better understanding of governmental engagement in multilateral decision-making body meetings.

Departmental Results Framework Program: International Climate Change Action

Deliver on the 2015 pledge to provide $2.65 billion in climate finance between 2016 and 2021 to help developing countries transition to a low-carbon, climate-resilient economy, including by:

  • continuing collaboration with Global Affairs Canada, including through multilateral financial mechanisms: Green Climate Fund and Global Environment Facility;
  • funding sectors such as clean technology and renewable energy, climate-smart agriculture and forest management, and risk insurance and capacity building, with special consideration for the poorest and most vulnerable developing countries. Canada’s climate finance is consistent with its feminist international assistance policy to promote gender equality and help empower all women and girls; and
  • supporting Nature-based Solutions to achieve multiple environmental benefits by addressing climate change and biodiversity loss together.

Starting point: The measures begin at zero (2017–2018).

Performance Indicator: GHG reductions resulting from international initiatives funded by Canada

Target: Higher cumulative reductions from year to year, from the baseline, reaching minimum reduction of 200 Mt of GHGs.

Starting point: CAD$367.88M (FY 2017-18).

Performance Indicator: Total value of Canada’s contributions.

Target: $2.65B disbursed cumulatively by March 2021 (information on 2020/2021 disbursements will only be available in March 2022).

Starting Point: 0 in 2016-17.

Performance Indicator: Cumulative number of people in developing countries who benefitted from Canada's adaptation funding

Target: At least 10,000,000 direct beneficiaries by Dec 2030.

Note: These measures assess, in part, Canada’s leadership, through international agreements, to support mitigation action internationally, supporting initiatives that will lead to measurable GHG emission reductions, thus contributing to reducing GHGs globally.

A reduction of GHG emissions in developing countries allows for measurement of progress towards mitigation of climate change from Canada’s support to help developing countries transition to a low-carbon economy.

Measuring the cumulative number of people in developing countries who benefited from Canada’s adaptation funding provides information related to the extent to which Canada supports adaptation action in developing countries via international leadership, ultimately contributing to the transition to a climate-resilient development pathway.Footnote 3

Continue to push forward the global momentum to identify and reduce inefficient fossil fuel subsidies through the G20 process, including by working with Finance Canada to support Canada’s peer review in partnership with Argentina.

Starting Point: In June 2018, Canada and Argentina announced they would be partnering to perform peer review.

Performance Indicator: Input provided to Finance Canada to inform Canada’s peer review

Target: ECCC Input provided to Finance Canada.

Note: In June 2018, Canada and Argentina announced they would be partnering to perform peer reviews to ensure both countries are on track to phase out inefficient fossil fuel subsidies. The peer review process is a good opportunity to seek feedback from international peers on our approach.

Advance priorities and climate change-related commitments with the U.S. and contributing expertise and advancing Canada’s environmental priorities through bilateral partnerships with Mexico, Chile, China and the European Union.

Starting point: A starting point will be identified once the baseline is established.

Performance Indicator: Number of bilateral and/or regional meetings held between partners (indicator under review).

Target: Maintain the average number of meetings per year (11-12) per year.

Note: Meetings with key partners in the implementation on climate, clean energy and environmental initiatives can be used to enable initiatives that lead to environmental and economic opportunities. As such, this represents a good measure of Canada’s leadership in international agreements and initiatives on climate change.

Seek to include provisions in Canada’s free trade agreements that support Canada’s leadership role on climate change.

Starting point: This indicator is under development. Baseline will be established approximately 1 year after the finalization of the methodology.

Performance Indicator: Integration of robust environment and climate change provisions in FTAs and other environmental cooperation instruments (indicator under review)

Target: Increased evidence of environment and climate change provisions in FTAs.

Note: This is a good measure of Canada’s leadership in international agreements and initiatives on climate change because the integration of robust environment and climate change provisions in FTAs and other cooperation instruments is a demonstration of Canada’s progress in leading these initiatives towards positive climate outcomes.

Promote the global reduction of GHG emissions through the Powering Past Coal Alliance (PPCA), co-founded by Canada and the United Kingdom.

Note: This departmental action also contributes to FSDS Goal 5: Clean Energy, by demonstrating Canada’s leadership in an initiative dedicated to advancing the transition from coal to cleaner sources of energy.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

ECCC will continue to advance Canada’s leadership role in the Powering Past Coal Alliance, which calls on governments and organizations to phase out traditional coal power in a timeframe compatible with the temperature goal of the Paris Agreement (i.e., keeping a global temperature rise this century well below 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase even further to 1.5 degrees Celsius). Transitioning to a low-carbon economy will require cleaner sources of energy, and coal phase-out is a key part of Canada’s plan to reduce its GHG emissions.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goals:

SDG 7: Affordable and Clean Energy (Target 7.2, Target 7.A)

SDG 13: Climate Action (Target 13.2)

Starting point: Engagement with international governments, businesses, civil society, PTs.

Performance Indicator: Collaborative processes conducted with stakeholders in support of the PPCA.

Target: Listing type/category of stakeholders met each year. A number has no value.

Note: This indicator relates directly to FSDS Goal 1 “Effective Action on Climate Change”, as stakeholder engagement will build growing support for the transition to a low-carbon energy sector and economy in Canada and abroad. The FSDS Target “reduce Canada’s total GHG emissions” also indicates that phasing out traditional coal-fired electricity is a key element of Canada’s plan to reduce GHG emissions, which will come from an increased PPCA membership. And, since Canada is a Co-Chair of the PPCA, this indicator also demonstrates the impact of Canada’s international climate leadership, which aligns with the contributing action.

Departmental Results Framework Program: International Climate Change Action

Implement recommendations of the Arctic Council’s Expert Group on Black Carbon and Methane to contribute to the achievement of the collective goal on black carbon, including by:

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By taking a leadership role and contributing expertise to key international climate and economic fora, ECCC will strengthen Canada’s capacity to contribute to a worldwide reduction of GHGs and SLCPs to meet global targets. A reduction in black carbon emissions will directly contribute to attaining Canada’s goal to reduce black carbon emissions by 25% below 2013 levels, which will in turn help limit the global average temperature rise.

Working with international partners will contribute to international goals under the PCF, such as the implementation of the Paris Agreement and the delivery of Canada’s $2.65B to support developing countries in tackling climate change.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

SDG 13: Climate Action (Target 13.A)

Starting point: 2013 national emission levels (specific amount subject to change due to changes in methodology).

Performance Indicator: Black carbon emissions, as reported in Canada’s Black Carbon Emissions Inventory

Target: 25% decrease from an annually calculated 2013 baseline of national emissions by December 2025

Note: This indicator is aligned to the FSDS Goal 1 “Effective Action on Climate Change.” This measure assesses the implementation of recommendations of the Arctic Council’s Expert Group on Black Carbon and Methane that contribute to the achievement of the collective goal on black carbon.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Clean Growth and Climate Change Mitigation; International Climate Change Action
Develop a solid base of scientific research and analysis on climate change

Continue to track Canada’s GHG emissions, collect emissions data, support academic research, provide information to support policy development and help Canadians make climate-related decisions, including by:

  • ensuring public access to information and research findings pertaining to sustainable development and environmental governance; and
  • providing key economic analysis to assess incremental impacts of regulatory proposals that combat climate change and reduce GHG emissions and meet national emissions-reductions targets.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By conducting scientific and economic research and analysis, ECCC will support evidence-based climate-related decisions, including to reduce GHG emissions. For example, 100% of upstream GHG assessments are reviewed as per the Environmental Assessment process and timelines. This ensures the quality of the assessments which lead to better decisions and more effective action to reduce emissions.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 12: Responsible consumption and production (Target 12.8)

Starting point: 225,068 visits in 2018.

Performance Indicator: Number of visits to the CESI web site

Target: 230,000 by March 2022.

Starting point: 27,039 visits in 2017.

Performance Indicator: Number of visits to the FSDS web site

Target: 30,000 by March 2022.

Note: These indicators measure the degree to which these objectives have been realized and purposes fulfilled which makes environmental decision-making more transparent and accountable to Parliament and engages Canadians in sustainable development. For these reasons, these indicators measure the aspect of “ensuring public access to information and research findings pertaining to sustainable development and environmental governance.”

Departmental Results Framework Program: Climate Change Adaptation

 

Support and continue to implement the Canadian Centre for Climate Services (CCCS), an important part of the Pan-Canadian Framework and the official source for reliable climate data, information, tools, training and user support to help increase climate resilience across Canada.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By establishing the CCCS as an authoritative access point for climate information, tools and support, ECCC supports informed decision-making contributing to climate resilience in communities, economies and ecosystems.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 13: Climate Action (Targets 13.1 and 13.3)

Starting point: In 2019-2020, 179 750 visits were registered on the climate information portals supported by the CCCS, where stakeholders accessed climate and adaptation information.

Performance Indicator:

Number of stakeholders accessing climate and adaptation information through the CCCS portal.

Target: Annual increase.

Note: An increasing number of stakeholders accessing climate and adaptation information is an indication of greater awareness that the climate is changing and may change in the future. This information is important in the decision-making and planning process to enhance resilience and better prepare for climate-related risks and impacts.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Climate Change Adaptation

Conduct targeted scientific and engineering studies to quantify GHG emissions and associated costs by technology, equipment type, fuel, and operating conditions, including by:

  • maintaining comprehensive GHG emission and air pollutant inventories that are up-to-date, informative, and relevant to all Canadian jurisdictions; and
  • conducting climate research and analysis to develop climate data and scenarios, which will inform mitigation actions and effective adaptation planning and support active participation in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By conducting scientific research and maintaining inventories, ECCC will contribute to current knowledge and data that support improved global and domestic air quality, reduction of GHG emissions, and adaptation planning.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 13: Climate Action (Targets 13.1 and 13.3)

Starting point: Based on a 3 year rolling average that started in 2014.

Performance indicator: Annual number of downloads of climate datasets (based on a 3 year rolling average)

Target: 222,000

Note: This indicator is aligned to the FSDS Target “reduce Canada’s total GHG emissions.” Historical and predicted climate data is used as a basis for climate impacts, adaptation and mitigation studies and planning. The Department provides this foundational data via the web. Multiple climate data sets are available to download for historical climate datasets, climate model datasets, and ensemble climate scenario datasets (for multiple climate parameters such as temperature and precipitation). The indicator represents user demand for this information, which underpins adaptation and mitigation analyses to inform decision-making that supports efforts to limit the increase of GHG emissions.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Climate Change Adaptation

Conduct GHG science, modelling and long-term monitoring of atmospheric GHGs to understand sources and sinks in support of domestic legislation and international commitments.

Prepare Canada’s annual National Inventory Report on Greenhouse Gas Sources and Sinks in Canada and submitting it to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

Undertaking research, modelling, and long-term atmospheric GHG monitoring increases ECCC’s understanding of the implications of climate change on human health. This informs risk assessments, communication and adaptation actions that support domestic legislation and international commitments that contribute to reaching the goal of the FSDS.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goals:

UN SDG 13: Climate Action (Targets 13.1 and 13.3)

Starting point: Annual percentage starting from 2018.

Performance indicator: % of requested products delivered to senior management and decision makers.

Target: 100%

Note: This indicator is aligned to the FSDS Target “reduce Canada’s total GHG emissions” by continuing to track Canada’s GHG emissions, collecting emissions data, providing information to support policy development and helping Canadians make climate-related decisions. This indicator represents the percentage of requested products delivered to senior management related to information and analysis on atmospheric monitoring and modelling, and emissions. These products support evidence-based decision-making related to climate change mitigation.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Clean Growth and Climate Change Mitigation
Support businesses and Canadians in taking action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions

Deliver the Champions (approximately $450 million) and Partnerships (up to $50 million) streams of the Low Carbon Economy Challenge to support businesses in reducing GHG emissions and driving clean economic growth.

Note: Please also refer to the departmental action that speaks to the implementation of the Low Carbon Economy Fund (Goal 1).

Deliver the Climate Action Incentive Fund to support projects and measures to reduce energy usage, save money and reduce carbon pollution. For example, the Small and Medium Enterprise Project stream and the Municipalities, Universities, Schools and Hospitals (MUSH) Retrofit stream support eligible applicants in undertaking energy efficiency retrofit projects.

Note: Please also refer to the departmental action that speaks to the implementation of projects through the Low Carbon Economy Fund (Goal 1).

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

The Low Carbon Economy Fund and the Climate Action Incentive Fund provide funding for eligible partners (such as private enterprises, not for profit organizations, indigenous organizations and communities, municipalities and others) to undertake projects that decrease energy usage, reduce GHG emissions and support clean growth.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goals:

UN SDG 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure (Target 9.4)

Starting point: Baseline at zero.

Performance indicator: Annual GHG emission reductions in 2030.

Target: 7 Mt (annual non-cumulative target).

Note: This indicator measure the effects of direct action with partners, including business, in mitigating climate change.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Clean Growth and Climate Change Mitigation
Zero-emission vehicles will represent 10% of new light-duty vehicle sales by 2025, 30% by 2030 and 100% by 2040. Work with partners on climate change Continue laying the groundwork towards Canada’s zero-emission vehicle targets of 10% light-duty vehicle sales by 2025, 30% by 2030 and 100% by 2040, in collaboration with Innovation, Science and Industry Canada, Natural Resources Canada and Transport Canada.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

ECCC will continue to work with federal partners to accelerate the uptake of zero-emission vehicles to contribute to the FSDS goal of GHG emission reductions by 2030.

In January 2019, the Government of Canada announced the following federal ZEV sales targets:

  • 10% of new light-duty vehicles sales by 2025, 30% by 2030, and 100% by 2040

Budget 2019 allocated $700M in new measures to support increased uptake of ZEVs, including:

  • $300M for purchase incentives for eligible ZEVs;
  • $265M for full tax write-off for eligible ZEVs acquired by businesses; and,
  • $135M to support charging stations in more localized environment.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goals:

UN SDG Goal 3: Climate Action (Target 13.2)

Starting point: 2011 (331 g/Mile—passenger vehicle and light truck combined standard).

Performance Indicator: GHG emissions from light-duty vehicles.

Target: 27% improvement in performance vs 2011 standard (measured by CO2e g/mile) for manufacturer model year 2019 reporting by December 2020.

Note: This indicator is aligned to the FSDS target “reduce Canada’s total GHG emissions.” This measure assesses the effectiveness of regulations in reducing emissions from light-duty vehicles.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Clean Growth and Climate Change Mitigation

Actions Supporting the Goal: Effective Action on Climate Change.

This section is for actions that support the Effective Action on Climate Change goal but do not directly support a FSDS target.

Provide support and funding for climate resilience

Support a coordinated and strategic government-wide approach to adaptation and climate resilience.

Note: The Canadian Centre for Climate Services will provide technical support for climate resilience, please also refer to the contributing action “Develop a solid base of scientific research and analysis on climate change” above.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

Contributes to the FSDS Goal of taking effective action on climate change, as it supports a coordinated and strategic approach to adaptation and climate resilience.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 13: Climate Action (Target 13.1)

Starting point: Work is ongoing in order to develop metrics.

Performance Indicator:

Development of metrics to improve our understanding of Canada's resilience to climate change.

Target: The target date to develop metrics is TBD.

Note: Climate change adaptation is multifaceted, and efforts span across all jurisdictions and sectors. Common quantifiable metrics used for other fields are not adequate to capture the complexities of adaptation. ECCC is currently working, through the CCME and other mechanisms, to develop metrics that can be used across jurisdictions to improve our understanding of Canada's resilience to climate change. This will build on the work of the Expert Panel of Climate Change Resilience and Adaptation Results, and will help us to better measure progress on adaptation.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Climate Change Adaptation
Other contributions For more information on actions that contribute to Goal 1 of the FSDS, please consult ECCC’s 2021-22 Departmental Plan.
Goal 2 large icon

FSDS Goal 2, Greening government: The Government of Canada will transition to low-carbon, climate-resilient, and green operations

Responsible Minister: All Ministers

Greening government

FSDS target(s)

FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target

Starting point(s)

Performance indicator(s)

Target(s)

Program(s) in which the departmental actions will occur
Reduce greenhouse gas emissions from federal government facilities and fleets by 40% by 2030 (with an aspiration to achieve this target by 2025) and 80% below 2005 levels by 2050 (with an aspiration to be carbon neutral) Real Property Determine the most cost-effective pathway to achieve low-carbon operations, as well as opportunities for portfolio rationalization and space optimization, by undertaking a strategic evaluation of the Department’s real property portfolio. The Department will ensure that these findings are then taken into consideration in investment planning associated with GHG emission reductions projects in the Department’s real property portfolio and that all new buildings and major building retrofits prioritize low-carbon investments based on integrated design principles, and lifecycle and total-cost-of-ownership assessments, which incorporate shadow carbon pricing.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

ECCC will contribute to further reduce GHG emissions from its facilities by:

  • ensuring that the most cost-effective pathway to achieve low-carbon operations is pursued
  • taking into consideration opportunities for portfolio rationalization and space optimization in investment planning associated with GHG emission reductions projects in its real property portfolio
  • ensuring that all new buildings and major building retrofits prioritize low-carbon investments.

The reduction of GHG emissions from ECCC’s facilities directly contributes to advancing towards the FSDS Greening Government goal.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 13: Climate Action (Target 13.2)

Starting point: Energy-related GHG emissions from facilities in fiscal year 2018-19 were 11.9 ktCO2e, representing a cumulative reduction of 29.8% relative to the baseline year 2005 to 2006.

Performance indicator:

Percentage change in energy-related GHG emissions from facilities relative to baseline year 2005 to 2006

Target: 40% reduction in energy-related GHG emissions from facilities relative to fiscal year 2005–06 by 2031 (with an aspiration to achieve this target by 2025).

Departmental Results Framework Program:

Internal Services

Mobility and fleet

Support the reduction of energy use in ECCC’s fleet and the adoption of low-carbon mobility solutions, including by deploying zero-emission vehicle (ZEV) charging stations within its facilities, where operationally feasible.

Note: The procurement and installation of Charging Stations are part of the departmental Real Property Function. It is listed here because it is related to the Mobility and Fleet function.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By reducing the energy use in its fleet and deploying ZEV charging stations, and by developing a strategic approach to decarbonizing its fleet and optimizing its fleet management, ECCC will further reduce GHG emissions from its fleet. This enables ECCC to contribute directly to meeting the FSDS Greening Government Goal and the FSDS Target, as well as increased the deployment of ZEV charging stations.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities (Target 11.6)

UN SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production (Target 12.7)

UN SDG 13: Climate Action (Target 13.2)

Starting point:

Energy-related GHG emissions from fleet in fiscal year 2018-19 were 3.0 ktCO2e, representing a cumulative reduction of 35.5% relative to the baseline year emissions of 4.6 ktCO2e in 2005–06.

Performance indicators:

Percentage change in energy-related GHG emissions from fleet relative to baseline year 2005–06.

Target:

40% reduction in energy-related GHG emissions from fleet relative to fiscal year 2005–06 by 2030 (with an aspiration to achieve this target by 2025).

Departmental Results Framework Program:

Internal Services

Develop a strategic approach to decarbonize ECCC’s fleet, including approaches such as purchasing ZEVs or hybrids (for new executive vehicles and unmodified administrative fleet vehicles) and facilitating the sharing of fleet vehicles across the department. The Department will also optimize fleet management by expanding the use of telematics to collect and analyze vehicle usage data on vehicles scheduled to be replaced, provided that essential operational needs and departmental targets are met.

Starting point: As of March 31, 2020, 100% of the Department’s executive fleet and 16% of its administrative fleet was comprised of ZEVs.

Performance indicator:

  • Percentage of executive fleet comprised of zero-emission vehicles.
  • Percentage of administrative fleet comprised of ZEVs.

Target:

  • At least 80% of executive fleet comprised of ZEVs by 2030.
  • At least 80% of administrative fleet comprised of zero-emission vehicles by 2030.

Departmental Results Framework Program:

Internal Services

Procurement Undertake clean technology demonstration projects and adopt clean technology through procurement of innovative solutions that displace and/or offset the GHG emissions associated with electricity used in departmental operations.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By adopting innovative solutions that displace and/or offset the GHG emissions associated with electricity used in its operations, ECCC will contribute to meeting FSDS Target “Use 100% clean electricity by 2025.” Moreover, by undertaking clean technology demonstration projects and adopting innovative services and goods, the Department will demonstrate federal leadership in the use of clean technologies as a strategy to meet the FSDS goal of transitioning to low-carbon, climate-resilient and green government operations.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 7: Affordable and Clean Energy (Target 7.2)

UN SDG 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure (Target 9.4)

UN SDG 13: Climate Action (Target 13.2)

Starting point: In 2018-19, 90% of electricity used in ECCC’s building operations was from clean generation sources.

Performance indicator:

Percentage use of electricity from clean generation sources in its building operations, including procurement of renewable energy credits

TargetFootnote 4 : By 2025, 100% of electricity used in ECCC’s building operations is from clean generation sources, including procurement of renewable energy credits.

Note: The Department will assess opportunities to deploy clean electricity projects in its buildings and work with Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC) to prioritize clean electricity contracts and/or procurement of renewable energy credits to offset GHG emissions from the conventional grid-tied electricity used by the Department.

Departmental Results Framework Programs:

Internal Services

Divert at least 75% (by weight) of non-hazardous operational waste from landfills by 2030. Real Property Implement procedures to manage building operations and take advantage of programs to reduce the environmental impact of Departmental building operations and materials, including waste reduction and diversion work plans.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By implementing procedures to manage building operations and taking advantage of programs, such as waste reduction and diversion work plans, ECCC will increase waste diversion rates in its buildings and thereby contribute directly to meeting the FSDS target.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goals:

UN SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities (Target 11.6)

UN SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production (Target 12.5)

UN SDG 13: Climate Action (Target 13.2)

Starting point: In February 2020, initial waste audits started to be performed at priority sites, which will provide preliminary information on Departmental waste diversion performance and actions needed to achieve a 75% waste diversion rate by 2030.

Performance indicators:

Percentage (by weight) of non-hazardous operational waste diverted from landfill

Targets: At least 75% (by weight) of non-hazardous operational waste diverted from landfill by 2030.

Note: This indicator shows how the Department is progressing towards meeting the FSDS short-term milestone of waste diversion rates tracking and disclosure by 2022.

Departmental Results Framework Program:

Internal Services

Divert at least 75% (by weight) of plastic waste from landfills by 2030 Real Property Implement procedures to manage building operations and take advantage of programs to reduce the environmental impact of Departmental building operations and materials, including tracking systems for waste diversion rates, as well as potable water usage in high-occupancy buildings.Footnote 5

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By implementing procedures to manage building operations, such as tracking systems for waste diversion rates, and potable water usage, ECCC will contribute directly to meeting FSDS short-term milestones of waste diversion rates and potable water consumption tracking and disclosure by 2022.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goals:

UN SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities (Target 11.6)

UN SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production (Target 12.5)

UN SDG 13: Climate Action (Target 13.2)

Starting point: In February 2020, initial waste audits started to be performed at priority sites, which will provide preliminary information on Departmental waste diversion performance and actions needed to achieve a 75% waste diversion rate by 2030.

Performance indicators:

  1. Percentage completion of Departmental waste diversion rates tracking system.
  2. Percentage completion of Departmental potable water consumption tracking system.

Targets:

  1. Completion of Departmental waste diversion rates tracking system by 2022.
  2. Completion of Departmental potable water consumption tracking system by 2022.

Note: This indicator shows how the Department is progressing towards meeting the FSDS short-term milestone of waste diversion and potable water consumption tracking and disclosure by 2022.

Departmental Results Framework Program:

Internal Services

Procurement

Develop a Departmental Green Procurement Action Plan that will include:

  • promoting use of sustainable plastic in goods that contain plastic and the reduction of associated plastic packaging waste; and
  • eliminating unnecessary use of single-use plastics in government operations, events and meetings.Footnote 6 

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By adopting green procurement practices, including the use of environmental criteria to reduce the environmental impact and ensure best value in procurement decisions, the Department will contribute to meeting the FSDS goal of transitioning to green government operations.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production (Target 12.7)

UN SDG 13: Climate Action (Target 13.2)

Starting Point:

In 2020, the Department started to work with the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat to identify high impact categories of goods and services purchased.

Performance Indicator:

The Departmental Green Procurement Action Plan is finalized.

Additional performance indicators will be identified once the Departmental Green Procurement Action Plan is finalized in FY 2021-22.

Target:

The Departmental Green Procurement Action Plan is finalized in FY 2021-22.

The target date for additional indicators will be established once the Departmental Green Procurement Action Plan is finalized in FY 2021-22.

Note: A Departmental Green Procurement Working Group will be established to develop an action plan, which will include metrics (i.e. performance indicators) to indicate how the Department is progressing towards achieving all short-term procurement milestones prescribed in the FSDS.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Internal Services
Divert at least 90% (by weight) of all construction and demolition waste from landfills (striving to achieve 100% by 2030). Real Property

Implement procedures to manage building operations and take advantage of programs to reduce the environmental impact of Departmental building operations and materials, including:

  • waste reduction and diversion work plans; and
  • life-cycle assessment techniques to minimize embodied carbon and the use of harmful materials in construction and renovation.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By implementing procedures to manage building operations and taking advantage of programs, such as waste reduction and diversion work plans, ECCC will increase waste diversion rates in its buildings and thereby contribute directly to meeting the FSDS target.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goals:

UN SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities (Target 11.6)

UN SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production (Target 12.5)

UN SDG 13: Climate Action (Target 13.2)

Starting point: In February 2020, initial waste audits started to be performed at priority sites, which will provide preliminary information on Departmental waste diversion performance and actions needed to achieve a 75% waste diversion rate by 2030.

Performance indicators:

Percentage (by weight) of construction, renovation and demolition waste diverted from landfills.

Target:

At least 90% (by weight) of all construction and demolition waste diverted from landfills by 2030 (strive to achieve 100%).

Departmental Results Framework Program:

Internal Services

Our administrative fleet will be comprised of at least 80% zero-emission vehicles by 2030. Mobility and fleet

Support the reduction of energy use in ECCC’s fleet and the adoption of low-carbon mobility solutions, including by deploying zero-emission vehicle (ZEV) charging stations within its facilities, where operationally feasible.

Note: The procurement and installation of Charging Stations are part of the departmental Real Property Function. It is listed here because it is related to the Mobility and Fleet function.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By reducing the energy use in its fleet and deploying ZEV charging stations and by developing a strategic approach to decarbonizing its fleet and optimizing its fleet management, ECCC will further reduce GHG emissions from its fleet. This enables ECCC to contribute directly to meeting the FSDS Greening Government goal and develop a strategic approach that incorporates specific procurement targets for ZEVs contribute directly to meeting the FSDS target.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities (Target 11.6)

UN SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production (Target 12.7)

UN SDG 13: Climate Action (Target 13.2)

Starting point: Energy-related GHG emissions from fleet in fiscal year 2018-19 were 3.0 ktCO2e, representing a cumulative reduction of 35.5% relative to the baseline year emissions of 4.6 ktCO2e in 2005–06.

Performance indicator:

Percentage change in energy-related GHG emissions from fleet relative to baseline year 2005–06

Target: 40% reduction in energy-related GHG emissions from fleet relative to fiscal year 2005–06 by 2030 (with an aspiration to achieve this target by 2025).

Departmental Results Framework Program:

Internal Services

Develop a strategic approach to decarbonize ECCC’s fleet, including approaches such as purchasing ZEVs or hybrids (for new executive vehicles and unmodified administrative fleet vehicles) and facilitating the sharing of fleet vehicles across the department. The Department will also optimize fleet management, by expanding the use of telematics to collect and analyze vehicle usage data on vehicles scheduled to be replaced, provided that essential operational needs and departmental targets are met.

Starting point: As of March 31, 2020, 100% of the Department’s executive fleet and 16% of its administrative fleet was comprised of ZEVs.

Performance indicator:

  • Percentage of executive fleet comprised of zero-emission vehicles.
  • Percentage of administrative fleet comprised of ZEVs.

Target:

  • At least 80% of executive fleet comprised of ZEVs by 2030.
  • At least 80% of administrative fleet comprised of zero-emission vehicles by 2030.

Departmental Results Framework Program:

Internal Services

By 2022, departments have developed measures to reduce climate change risks to assets, services and operations. Adaptation to climate change

Take action to understand the wide range of climate change impacts that could potentially affect ECCC assets, services and operations.

Develop measures to reduce climate change risks to ECCC assets, services and operations.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

Actions and measures are part of a Departmental adaptation plan that will improve ECCC’s understanding of the impacts of climate change and support the transition to more climate-resilient departmental operations.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 13: Climate Action (Target 13.1)

Starting Point: In 2018-19, ECCC undertook a comprehensive Climate Change Risk Assessment. 2020-21 will be the first reporting year for this DSDS target so baseline not yet established.

Performance Indicators:

  • Climate change risk assessment completed (yes/no).
  • Departmental adaptation plan that identifies actions to address climate change risks developed (yes/no).

Target: ECCC will assess climate-related risks to its assets, services and operations by 2021 and develop measures to address these risks by 2022.

Note: This indicator measures the completion of a Climate Change Risk Assessment which aligns with FSDS Greening Government goal and performance indicator (i.e., % of departments that have developed measures to reduce climate change risks to assets, services and operations identified through departmental climate change risk assessment processes).

Departmental Results Framework: Internal Services
Use 100% clean electricity by 2025. Procurement Undertake clean technology demonstration projects and adopt clean technology through procurement of innovative solutions that displace and/or offset the GHG emissions associated with electricity used in departmental operations.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By adopting innovative solutions that displace and/or offset the GHG emissions associated with electricity used in its operations, ECCC will contribute to meeting the FSDS target. Moreover, by undertaking clean technology demonstration projects and adopting innovative services and goods, the Department will demonstrate federal leadership in the use of clean technologies as a strategy to meet the FSDS goal of transitioning to low-carbon, climate-resilient and green government operations.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 7: Affordable and Clean Energy (Target 7.2)

UN SDG 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure (Target 9.4)

UN SDG 13: Climate Action (Target 13.2)

Starting point: In FY 2018-19, 90% of electricity used in ECCC’s building operations was from clean generation sources.

Performance indicator: Percentage use of electricity from clean generation sources in its building operations, including procurement of renewable energy credits

TargetFootnote 7 : By 2025, 100% of electricity used in ECCC’s building operations is from clean generation sources, including procurement of renewable energy credits.

Note: The Department will assess opportunities to deploy clean electricity projects in its buildings and work with Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC) to prioritize clean electricity contracts and/or procurement of renewable energy credits to offset GHG emissions from the conventional grid-tied electricity used by the Department.

Departmental Results Framework Programs:

Internal Services

Actions supporting the Goal:

Greening Government

Procurement

Develop a Departmental Green Procurement Action Plan that will include:

  • identifying high impact categories of goods and services purchased (i.e. with significant influence in achieving low-carbon and green operations); and
  • establishing metrics to measure progress over time.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By adopting green procurement practices, including the use of environmental criteria to reduce the environmental impact of, and ensure best value in, procurement decisions, the Department will contribute to meeting the FSDS goal of transitioning to green government operations.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production (Target 12.7)

UN SDG 13: Climate Action (Target 13.2)

Starting Point: In 2020, the Department started to work with the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat to identify high impact categories of goods and services purchased.

Performance Indicator:

The Departmental Green Procurement Action Plan is finalized.

Additional performance indicators will be identified once the Departmental Green Procurement Action Plan is finalized in FY 2021-22.

Target: The Departmental Green Procurement Action Plan is finalized in FY 2021-22.

The target date for additional indicators will be established once the Departmental Green Procurement Action Plan is finalized in FY 2021-22.

Note: A Departmental Green Procurement Working Group will be established to develop an action plan, which will include metrics (i.e. performance indicators) to indicate how the Department is progressing towards achieving all short-term procurement milestones prescribed in the FSDS.

Departmental Results Framework Program:

Internal Services

Strengthen support for green procurement and contracting responsibilities, including by:

  • developing guidelines and resources to help Government Acquisition Card holders and specialists in procurement buy green goods and services;
  • developing and providing training for employees with procurement and contracting responsibilities; and
  • ensuring that procurement and contracting employees continue to adhere to the requirements and the spirit of the PSPC Policy on Green Procurement and related, relevant legislation.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By developing guidelines, resources and training needed to ensure procurement decision-makers are able to buy green goods and services, ECCC will facilitate, provide and promote mechanisms for green procurement, which is a key step in elevating the rate with which green procurement practices are pursued in the department.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production (Target 12.7)

Starting Point: An Advanced Green Procurement training course will be available to employees in FY 2021-22.

Performance indicator:

Percentage of employees with procurement and contracting responsibilities that have completed the Advanced Green Procurement training course.

Target: 100% employees with procurement and contracting responsibilities have completed the Advanced Green Procurement training course by March 31, 2023.

Note: Overall, this indicator shows the Department’s progress toward the development of guidelines, resources and training needed to ensure procurement decision-makers are able to buy green goods and services.

Departmental Results Framework Program:

Internal Services

Continue to track GHG emissions from work-related air travel by employees to raise awareness.

Promote lower-carbon alternatives to work-related air travel through implementation of the Departmental Sustainable Business Travel Awareness Campaign.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

Actions to promote less GHG-intensive modes of work-related air travel will have an impact on the selection of lower-carbon alternative mode of transportation by business travelers. The behavioral change will contribute to meeting the FSDS goal of transitioning to low-carbon and green government operations.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production (Target 12.7)

Starting Point: In December 2019, a Departmental Sustainable Business Travel Awareness Campaign was completed.

Performance Indicator:

Completion of the communications activities listed in the Departmental Sustainable Business Travel Awareness Campaign.

Target: Completion of the communications activities listed in the Departmental Sustainable Business Travel Awareness Campaign by March 31, 2023.

Note: Overall, this indicator will show how the Department is progressing toward building readiness to achieve the FSDS short-term procurement milestone of including criteria that address carbon reduction into procurement for services that have a high environmental impact. In 2019, the Department put in place a system to track GHG emissions from employee business travel and developed a communication plan to educate employees on sustainable business travel practises. The Department is developing a sustainable travel guide to promote lower-carbon alternatives to work-related air travel.

Departmental Results Framework Program:

Internal services

Other contributions For more information on actions that contribute to Goal 2 of the FSDS, please consult ECCC’s 2021-22 Departmental Plan.
Goal 3 large icon

FSDS Goal 3, Clean Growth: A growing clean technology industry in Canada contributes to clean growth and the transition to a low-carbon economy

Responsible Minister: Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development and Minister of Natural Resources

Clean Growth

FSDS target(s)

FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Contribution of each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target

Starting point(s)

Performance indicator(s)

Target(s)

Program(s) in which the departmental actions will occur
Increase the value of Canada’s clean technology exports to $15.6 billion by 2025. Invest in clean technologies. Deliver the Low Carbon Economy Fund and the Climate Action Incentive Fund, which provide funding to projects that deploy and adopt clean technologies to reduce energy use, reduce GHG emissions and generate clean growth.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

These programs provide funding for projects that decrease energy usage, reduce GHG emissions and support clean growth.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 9: Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation

(Target 9.4, Target 9.5)

Starting point: Baseline at zero.

Performance indicator:  Annual GHG emission reductions in 2030 (Mt).

Target: 7 Mt (annual non-cumulative target).

Note: This indicator demonstrates the direct impact of actions taken with partners through LCEF projects to reduce GHG emission and mitigate climate change, including through clean technology.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Clean Growth and Climate Change Mitigation
Collaborate with stakeholders and partners to support the growth of clean technology in Canada. Deliver a series of Canadian Plastics Innovation Challenges to support the growth of clean technologies that reduce plastic waste.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

ECCC efforts to support the development, demonstration, commercialization, deployment, adoption, and export of plastics clean technologies that reduce environmental impacts, including through the Plastics Innovation Challenges, contribute to meeting the goal of clean growth, faster clean technology innovation, and support the transition to a low-carbon economy.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 17: Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development  (Target 17.16)

Starting point: In 2018–2019, awarded 6 companies $150K each to develop a proof of concept ($900K total for Phase I funding) solution to reduce waste in the construction waste, recycling and food packaging sectors. During Spring 2020, 3 of these companies will be awarded $1 million each to develop a prototype.

In 2020, a second Plastics Innovation Challenge was launched. ECCC will award four companies $150K each to develop a proof of concept ($600K total for Phase I funding) to reduce plastic waste in the packaging and textiles and microfibers sectors. In the fall of 2020, two of these companies will be awarded $1M each to develop a prototype. 

Performance indicator: Number of additional proofs of concept developed by Canadian innovators; Number of additional prototypes developed by Canadian innovators

Targets:

  • 4 proofs of concept, by March 31, 2022.
  • 2 prototypes, by March 31, 2022.

Note: This indicator will show the extent of ECCC’s Plastics Innovation Challenges funding to facilitate the early development, testing of prototypes, demonstration, and the commercialization of clean technologies to support sustainable plastics products and clean technologies.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Substance and Waste Management
Other contributions For more information on actions that contribute to Goal 3 of the FSDS, please consult ECCC’s 2021-22 Departmental Plan.
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FSDS Goal 5, Clean Energy: All Canadians have access to affordable, reliable and sustainable energy

Responsible Minister: Minister of Natural Resources

Clean Energy

FSDS target(s)

FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target

Starting point(s)

Performance indicator(s)

Target(s)

Program(s) in which the departmental actions will occur
By 2030, 600 petajoules of total annual energy savings will be achieved as a result of adoption of energy efficiency codes, standards and practices from a baseline savings of 27.4 petajoules in 2017 to 2018. Reduce energy costs and work with partners to increase energy efficiency. Investments delivered through the Federation of Canadian Municipalities’ Green Municipal Fund to increase energy efficiency in residential, commercial and multi-unit buildings.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

Support the development, verification and demonstration of technologies that reduce greenhouse gas emissions by providing funding, strategic direction, governance, and partnerships for clean technology investment initiatives such as Sustainable Development Technology Canada and the Green Municipal Fund.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 7: Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all

(Target 7.1, Target 7.2 and Target 7.3)

Starting point: A starting point will be identified once the baseline is established.

Performance indicator: Percentage of GHG emissions and other climate warming substances (e.g., black carbon) generated from energy, building, transportation, and waste sectors

Target: Reduce GHG emissions by 30% below 2005 levels by 2030 (national target).

Starting point: 2013 national emission levels (specific amount subject to change due to changes in methodology).

Performance indicator: Black carbon emissions, as reported in Canada’s Black Carbon Emissions Inventory

Target: 25% decrease from an annually calculated 2013 baseline of national emissions by December 2025.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Clean Growth and Climate Change Mitigation
Deliver the Climate Action Incentive Fund and the Low Carbon Economy Fund (LCEF), which provide funding for projects and initiatives that decrease energy usage, save money and reduce carbon pollution. These programs support projects undertaken by a range of partners such as private enterprises, municipalities, universities, schools, hospitals and not for profit organizations.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

The projects and measures supported by the Climate Action Incentive Fund and the Low Carbon Economy Fund will support Canadians in reducing their energy usage.

ECCC will support a diverse range and size of projects, including those of ECCC’s partners, to bring effective and innovative approaches to reduce emissions and energy usage.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 7: Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all

(Target 7.1, Target 7.2 and Target 7.3)

Starting point: Baseline of zero (March 2020).

Performance indicator: Cumulative energy savings by 2030 (petajoules)

Target:

  • LCEF: 250–500 petajoules of energy savings by 2030.

Note: This indicator measures progress on the contributing action and the FSDS Target on reducing energy costs and working with partners to increase energy efficiency, by measuring the energy savings as a result of direct actions with partners to reduce energy usage.

Program: Clean Growth and Climate Change Mitigation
Other contributions For more information on actions that contribute to Goal 5 of the FSDS, please consult ECCC’s 2021-22 Departmental Plan.
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FSDS Goal 6, Healthy Coasts and Oceans: Coasts and Oceans support health, resilient and productive ecosystems

Responsible Minister: Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard

Healthy Coasts and Oceans

FSDS target(s)

FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target

Starting point(s)

Performance indicator(s)

Target(s)

Program(s) in which the departmental actions will occur
By 2020, 10% of coastal and marine areas are conserved through networks of protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures.Footnote 8 Protect and manage marine and coastal areas. Continue to establish and manage marine National Wildlife Areas as well as the marine portion of other National Wildlife Areas and migratory bird sanctuaries, and track national progress toward national targets.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

Well-managed conserved areas help preserve species and their habitats for present and future generations by reducing direct human development stresses. As a party to the UN Convention on Biological Diversity, Canada reports on progress toward its area-based conservation targets once every four years, with frequent releases of national data in the interceding period. Frequent reporting provides a transparent way for Canadians to track progress toward our area-based conservation targets and can serve to motivate all Canadian jurisdictions to further advance their efforts related to protected and conserved area establishment and reporting.Footnote 9

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 14: Life Below Water

(Target 14.1, Target 14.2, Target 14.5)

Starting point: 7.75%

Performance indicator: Percentage of total coastal and marine areas that are conserved through networks of protected areas, Other Effective Conservation Measures (OECMs) and Indigenous Protected and Conserved Areas (IPCAs)

Target: 10% of total coastal and marine areas are conserved by 2020.Footnote 10

Note: The percentage of Canada’s marine territory that is conserved is a direct measurement of the FSDS contributing action and progress towards Canada’s target. These are national starting points and targets – i.e., they also include Department of Fisheries and Oceans and Parks Canada Agency.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Habitat Conservation and Protection
By 2020, all fish and invertebrate stocks and aquatic plants are managed and harvested at levels considered to be sustainable, from a baseline of 96% harvested within established ecosystem limits in 2016. Build our knowledge of coastal ecosystems, marine protected areas and fisheries. Improve knowledge of fisheries resources, their productivity and factors affecting them to support sustainable fisheries management.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

The Metal and Diamond Mines Effluent Regulations (MDMER) to protect fish, fish habitat and use of fish in marine and freshwater ecosystems by putting in place limits on the levels of pollution in effluents released from mines into waterbodies. Program studies indirectly support sustainable fisheries by consider effects on fish from Metal and Diamond Mines.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goals:

UN SDG 14: Life Below Water

(Target 14.2, Target 14.4)

Starting point: 71% in 2002–2017. It requires 2 studies (6 years) before a mine can confirm the effect on fish size, habitat and tissue.

Performance indicator: Percentage of regulated mines facilities reporting confirmed effects above the critical effect size for fish, fish habitat or fish tissue

Target: Reduction over time. Specific target will be established once there is sufficient environmental effects monitoring data to analyse.

Note: The MDMER is a regulatory program that sets limits on pollution in effluent from mines entering marine and fresh waterbodies. It contributes to protecting the health of coastal and marine ecosystems and the sustainability of the fisheries. The monitoring results used for the indicator provide increased knowledge about the impact of mine effluent on the fisheries resource.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Substances and Waste Management

Support and conduct science on sources, fate, distribution and impacts of marine litter, including plastic litter and microplastics.

Participate in and contribute to international discussions, negotiations and reviews on plastic waste and marine litter.

Amend the Convention to control plastic waste, updating guidelines related to managing plastic waste, and launching a partnership composed of governments, industry, and NGOs, with the goal to improve and promote the environmentally sound management of plastic waste and reduce plastic waste generation.

Conduct targeted education, outreach, and engagement with key sectors and stakeholders.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

The Basel Convention aims to protect human health and the environment by controlling the movement of hazardous waste and other waste. In 2019 a number of actions were launched domestically and internationally to ensure plastic waste is managed appropriately, with an aim to reduce marine litter. The involvement and leadership of Canada contributes to the FSDS Target.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 14: Life Below Water

(Target 14.2, Target 14.4)

Starting point: Work is ongoing in order to develop a National Roadmap.Footnote 11

Performance indicator: Published National Roadmap.Footnote 12

Target: One national roadmap for remanufacturing and refurbishing published by March 2022.Footnote 13

Note: Ratifying the amendments on plastic waste on the Basel Convention is a measure of Canada’s participating in and contribution to international discussions, negotiations, and reviews on plastic waste and marine litter. The ratification of the amendments is the point at which Canada is bound to the new controls. The development of the guidelines is an international process and its completion date is currently unknown.Footnote 14

Departmental Results Framework Program: Substances and Waste Management
Use legislation and regulations to protect coasts and oceans.

Lower risks posed by aquatic invasive species to Canada’s coastal ecosystems through updates to Canada’s Ballast Water Regulations, giving effect to the International Ballast Water Convention in Canada.

Assess and deliver permits for disposal at sea and Antarctic expeditions in accordance with the Canadian Environmental Protection Act and the Antarctic Environmental Protection Act and their regulations, based on the latest scientific and technical information and public and indigenous consultations, as appropriate.

Meet Canada’s international obligations under the London Convention and Protocol and Antarctic Treaty to prevent marine pollution and protect coastlines and Oceans.Footnote 15

Administer, promote compliance and implement a risk-based approach to enforcing federal environmental laws.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

The implementation of the London protocol and Antarctic Treaty contributes to supporting the FSDS Goal, as it aims to protect and preserve the marine environment from all sources of pollution and take effective measures, according to scientific, technical and economic capabilities to prevent, reduce and, where practicable, eliminate pollution caused by dumping. Canada implements these treaties through permit processes, which assess applicants for suitability. Approved permits place specific controls in place to protect the marine environment or other users of the sea. For disposal at sea, specific disposal sites are monitored to verify effectiveness of measures.Footnote 16

By enforcing sections of Division 3 of Part 7 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, which is consistent with the London Convention and its Protocol, using the risk-based enforcement approach will ultimately aid in the Government’s ability to achieve the contributing goal.Footnote 17

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 14: Life Below Water

(Target 14.2, Target 14.4)

Starting point: 100% in 2014-15.

Performance indicator: Percentage of monitored ocean disposal sites with no evidence of marine pollution from disposal activities.

Target: 100% annually in March.

Note: If permitting of the disposal or tourist activity is done in accordance with the relevant acts and regulations, the activities can be done without causing marine pollution. Where monitoring data produces no evidence of marine pollution it corroborates that the legislative and regulatory controls on disposal at sea were correct and sufficient to protect the marine environment, which makes this indicator a good measure of the contributing action “use legislation and regulations to protect coasts and oceans.” These controls implement the international obligations under the treaties to prevent marine pollution via a legal permit, assessment and monitoring system.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Substances and Waste Management
Actions supporting the Goal: Healthy Coasts and Oceans. Healthy Coasts and Oceans.

Continue to implement ECCC’s initiatives contributing to Canada’s Oceans Protection Plan, such as enhanced 24/7 response capacity, integrated risk-based response planning, enhanced marine weather forecasting and alternative response measures, to strengthen 24/7 emergency response capacity to ensure the environment is protected in the event of an oil spill.

Improve guidance for permit applicants for the Disposal at Sea program and the Antarctic program, including the development of a revised set of internal monitoring guidance, strategies, policies and site management plans.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

The Ocean Protection Plan enhances the capacity of the Government of Canada and of communities to prevent and mitigate the impacts of accidental marine oil spills, and reduce their environmental impact on the marine environment.

The Disposal at Sea and Antarctic permitting systems enable certain activities while simultaneously putting in place measures which will prevent marine pollution. Program decisions will indirectly support the FSDS Healthy Coasts and Oceans goal and targets by conserving and protecting coastal and marine area function, or by contributing to the science and understanding of these systems.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 14: Life Below Water

(Target 14.2, Target 14.4)

Starting point: 100% in 2014-15.

Performance indicator: Percentage of monitored ocean disposal sites with no evidence of marine pollution from disposal activities.

Target: 100% annually in March.

Note: This is a regulatory program that prohibits all disposal at sea except for a small list of low-risk wastes that may be assessed and disposed of in a controlled fashion, supporting the FSDS Goal. The monitoring results confirm that the program is sustainable and disposal when allowed under a CEPA DAS permit will not cause marine pollution.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Substances and Waste Management
Other contributions For more information on actions that contribute to Goal 6 of the FSDS, please consult ECCC’s 2021-22 Departmental Plan.
Goal 7 large icon

FSDS Goal 7, Pristine Lakes and Rivers: Clean and healthy lakes and rivers support economic prosperity and the well-being of Canadians

Responsible Minister: Minister of Environment and Climate Change

Pristine Lakes and Rivers

FSDS target(s)

FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target

Starting point(s)

Performance indicator(s)

Target(s)

Program(s) in which the departmental actions will occur
Achieve and maintain a 40% reduction in annual phosphorus loading into Lake Erie from a 2008 baseline to meet the binational (Canada-US) phosphorus targets. Work with partners on water quality and ecosystem health.

Work to protect Canada’s freshwater and priority ecosystems such as the Great Lakes through sound science and regulatory tools and in collaboration with Indigenous and other partners across Canada.

Collaborate with other governments, Indigenous peoples and regional stakeholders, in an integrated watershed management approach, to improve water quality and restore key aquatic ecosystems, including through:

  • the Canada-US Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement;
  • the Canada-Ontario Agreement on Great Lakes Water Quality and Ecosystem Health; and
  • the Canada-Ontario Lake Erie Action Plan.

Finalize a new Canada-Ontario Agreement on Great Lakes Water Quality and Ecosystem Health (2020) that will align with Canada’s commitments under the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement to address key challenges in the Lakes (such as algae in Lake Erie).

Provide application-based funding to support partner-led projects to advance efforts to address priority areas under the Great Lakes Protection Initiative.

Continue to collaborate with the United States to restore and protect the Great Lakes and their environmental and economic benefits to both countries, under the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement.

Continue to work with partners to complete the implementation of Remedial Action Plans to clean up and restore beneficial uses in Great Lakes Areas of Concern.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By sharing science and expertise, financially supporting stakeholder-driven nutrient reduction demonstration projects, and developing and enforcing regulations in collaboration with Canadian partners, ECCC supports partners to take action to improve water quality and ecosystem health, including by reducing phosphorus loading in key ecosystems. For example, through the Great Lakes Protection Initiative, ECCC works with partners and stakeholders to restore and protect Great Lakes water quality and ecosystem health. A key priority under the initiative is preventing toxic and nuisance algae in Lake Erie, which directly contributes to the achievement of phosphorus load reductions to Lake Erie from Canadian sources.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 6: Clean Water and Sanitation

(Target 6.3, Target 6.6)

Starting point: 22% in 2016-17.

Indicator will be reported on triennially.

Performance indicator: Percentage of Great Lakes indicators that have been assessed as "good" through the State of the Great Lakes assessment (9 indicators in total).           

Target: 100%

Note: This indicator is a good measure of the FSDS Goal 7 and the contributing action to “work with partners on water quality and ecosystem health” because the State of the Great Lakes report illustrates the environmental results of our collaborative efforts to restores and protect Great Lakes water quality and ecosystem health. The Report is collaboratively prepared and is intended to assess the overall state of the Great Lakes ecosystem. Contributors to the State of the Great Lakes report provide a narrative assessment of the temporal and spatial variation in the Great Lakes’ physical, chemical, and biological characteristics.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Water Quality and Ecosystems Partnerships

Provide information, data and expertise for domestic and international water boards to support efforts to regulate lakes and river basins through:

  • collaboration with the provinces, by way of agreements;
  • collaboration with the U.S. through the international Joint Commission;
  • participation in targeted studies focus on improving inter-jurisdictional water management;
  • partner with Indigenous peoples to increase collaboration in major basins.

Contribute to the effective management of other boundary and transboundary waters.

Starting point: 35 in July 2018.

Performance indicator: Number of Indigenous organizations/communities participating in Great Lakes decision-making processes and projects that restore and protect Great Lakes water quality

Target: 35 by 2022.

Note: This indicator is a good measure of the FSDS goal, target and contributing action because it demonstrates how Canada is working with Indigenous communities and organizations to address Great Lakes issues, and ensuring Indigenous partners have a role in Great Lakes governance and decision-making.

Starting point: 95% 2019-2020.

Performance Indicator: Percentage of water board members rating their satisfaction with Environment and Climate Change Canada's involvement on water boards and committees as 8 out of 10 or higher.

Target: 80% year-to-year.

Note: Water Boards that manage water resources in several inter-jurisdictional basins across Canada are a major client of the data and information collected and disseminated by the National Hydrometric Program (NHP). The federal component of the NHP, the Water Survey of Canada, solicits feedback from these water board clients through an annual survey, developed with input from the International Joint Commission, which is responsible for many but not all international boards between Canada and the USA.

Provide in-kind support and funding for projects.

Support projects to improve water quality and help restore ecosystems in the Great Lakes including action to:

  • reduce nutrient pollution;
  • restore water quality and ecosystem health of Great Lakes Areas of Concern;
  • reduce releases of harmful chemicals;
  • increase public engagement through citizen science;
  • engage Indigenous peoples;
  • enhance research and monitoring capacity essential to the restoration of the watersheds; and
  • enhance collaboration to protect freshwater quality throughout the watersheds.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By supporting local ecosystem improvement projects, ECCC will engage Canadians in long-term sustainability of healthy and productive ecosystems.

Canadians engaged in funded projects will take action to help protect the quality of freshwater resources across Canada, including diverting and reducing harmful substances, improving freshwater management, and increasing climate resilience through action involving the development and/or restoration of natural infrastructure.

ECCC provides funding to partner-led projects (through the Great Lakes Protection Initiative) and other regional initiatives that restore and protect water quality and ecosystem health. Project funding is leveraged by encouraging proponents to secure other sources of financial and in-kind support to maximize the impact of their project(s).

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 6: Clean Water and Sanitation (Target 6.3,  Target 6.B)

Starting point: The starting point for these three programs is $0.00 as they have not previously collectively measured this metric.

Performance indicator: Value of resources contributed by partners per dollar contributed by ECCC through the Great Lakes Protection Initiative and other regional initiatives

Target: $2 by March 31, 2022 (The target is $2 of non-federal funding for every $1 of federal funding for a federal target of 1/3 funding per project).

Note: This indicator is a good measure of the FSDS Goal 7 as it demonstrates the Government of Canada’s commitment to provide funding and support for projects while encouraging proponents to secure other sources of financial and in-kind support to maximize the impact of their project.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Water Quality and Ecosystems Partnerships and Community Eco-Action
Better understand lake and river ecosystems.

Conduct targeted research studies and national water quality monitoring programs for chemicals to inform decision-making for the preservation and protection of Canadian freshwater quality, including through the release of reports on:

  • groundwater science;
  • the fate and effect of metals associated with regulated mining discharge into lakes and rivers;
  • the state of the Great Lakes.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By contributing expertise and conducting and sharing research and monitoring data to decision makers, ECCC enables sound decisions and appropriate actions to protect and preserve the quality and quantity of Canada’s freshwater.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 6: Clean Water and Sanitation (Target 6.3,  Target 6.5)

Starting point: 22% in March of 2020

Performance indicators:

Percentage of Great Lakes indicators that have been assessed as “good” through the State of the Great Lakes assessment (9 indicators in total).

Target: 100% by March 2020 (aspirational target – 22% likely to be reported in 2020)

Note: ECCC conducts science in collaboration with its partners which serves to inform ecosystem management decisions, and restore and conserve priority ecosystems. Making data publicly available ensures that decision makers have the necessary knowledge and information to inform decisions.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Water Quality and Ecosystems Partnerships and Hydrological Services
By 2022, reduce nutrient loadings in the Lake Winnipeg Basin by an estimated 44 700 kilograms per year in support of Manitoba’s plan to reduce phosphorus in Lake Winnipeg by 50% to pre-1990 levels. Work with partners on water quality and ecosystem health.

Work to protect Canada’s freshwater and priority ecosystems, such as the Lake Winnipeg Basin through sound science and regulatory tools and in collaboration with Indigenous and other partners across Canada.

Collaborate with other governments, Indigenous peoples and regional stakeholders, in an integrated watershed management approach, to improve water quality and restore key aquatic ecosystems, including through the Canada-Manitoba Memorandum of Understanding Respecting Lake Winnipeg and the Lake Winnipeg Basin.

Continue to support nutrient-reduction efforts in Lake Winnipeg through the Lake Winnipeg Basin Program, through basin-wide collaboration and engagement of Indigenous peoples on freshwater issues, and through the renewal of the Canada-Manitoba Memorandum of Understanding Respecting Lake Winnipeg and the Lake Winnipeg Basin.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By sharing science and expertise, financially supporting stakeholder-driven nutrient reduction demonstration projects, and developing and enforcing regulations in collaboration with Canadian partners, ECCC supports partners to take action to improve water quality and ecosystem health, including by reducing phosphorus loading in key ecosystems. Similarly, ECCC works with partners and stakeholders in the Lake Winnipeg Basin to reduce nutrient loading and support collaborative approaches and engagement of Indigenous peoples on efforts that improve water quality and the ecosystem health of the Lake Winnipeg.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 6: Clean Water and Sanitation

(Target 6.3, Target 6.6)

Starting point: Baseline will be established in 2022.

Performance indicator: Overall status of ecosystem health of Lake Winnipeg is stable or improving as presented in the State of Lake Winnipeg Report.

Target: Improving by March 31, 2024.

Note: This indicator is a good measure of the FSDS Goal 7 and the contributing action to “work with partners on water quality and ecosystem health” as the State of Lake Winnipeg report is collaboratively prepared by Canada and Manitoba and is intended to assess the overall state of the Lake Winnipeg ecosystem. Contributors to the State of Lake Winnipeg report provide a narrative assessment of the temporal and spatial variation in Lake Winnipeg’s physical, chemical, and biological characteristics.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Water Quality and Ecosystems Partnerships

Provide information, data and expertise for domestic and international water boards to support efforts to regulate lakes and river basins through:

  • collaboration with the provinces, by way of agreements;
  • collaboration with the U.S. through the international Joint Commission
  • participation in targeted studies focus on improving inter-jurisdictional water management; and
  • partner with Indigenous peoples to increase collaboration in major basins.

Contribute to the effective management of other boundary and transboundary waters.

Starting point: 0 partnership with Indigenous governments, organizations, or communities.

Performance indicator: Number of Indigenous governments, organizations and communities engaged in efforts that restore and protect Lake Winnipeg water quality

Target: 10 by 2022.

Note: Healthy waterbodies and watersheds are required to sustain the traditional cultural, spiritual, and economic activities of Indigenous people and their communities. Indigenous governments, organizations, and communities have historically been underrepresented in efforts to improve water quality in Lake Winnipeg and its basin.

Provide in-kind support and funding for projects.

Support projects to improve water quality and help restore ecosystems in the Lake Winnipeg Basin, including action to:

  • reduce nutrient pollution;
  • reduce releases of harmful chemicals;
  • increase public engagement through citizen science;
  • engage Indigenous peoples;
  • enhance research and monitoring capacity essential to the restoration of the watersheds; and
  • enhance collaboration to protect freshwater quality throughout the watersheds.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By supporting local ecosystem improvement projects, ECCC will engage Canadians in long-term sustainability of healthy and productive ecosystems.

Canadians engaged in funded projects will take action to help protect the quality of freshwater resources across Canada, including diverting and reducing harmful substances, improving freshwater management, and increasing climate resilience through action involving the development and/or restoration of natural infrastructure.

ECCC provides funding to partner-led projects through the Lake Winnipeg Basin Program. Project funding is leveraged by encouraging proponents to secure other sources of financial and in-kind support to maximize the impact of their project(s).

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 6: Clean Water and Sanitation (Target 6.3,  Target 6.B)

Starting point: The starting point for these three programs is $0.00 as they have not previously collectively measured this metric.

Performance indicator: Value of resources contributed by partners per dollar contributed by ECCC through the Lake Winnipeg Basin Program and other regional initiatives

Target: $2 by March 31, 2022 (The target is $2 of non-federal funding for every $1 of federal funding for a federal target of 1/3 funding per project).

Note: This indicator is a good measure of the FSDS Goal 7 as it demonstrates the Government of Canada’s commitment to provide funding and support for projects while encouraging proponents to secure other sources of financial and in-kind support to maximize the impact of their project.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Water Quality and Ecosystems Partnerships
Better understand lake and river ecosystems.

Conduct targeted research studies and national water quality monitoring programs for chemicals to inform decision-making for the preservation and protection of Canadian freshwater quality including through release of reports on:

  • groundwater science;
  • the fate and effect of metals associated with regulated mining discharge into lakes and rivers; and
  • the state of Lake Winnipeg.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By contributing expertise and conducting and sharing research and monitoring data to decision makers, ECCC enables sound decisions and appropriate actions to protect and preserve the quality and quantity of Canada’s freshwater.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 6: Clean Water and Sanitation (Target 6.3,  Target 6.5)

Starting point: 100% in March of 2019.

Performance indicators: Percentage of scientific information (information, research findings, factsheets, webinars, reports, journal articles, etc.), made available publicly per year.

Targets: 100% by March 2022.

Note: ECCC conducts science in collaboration with its partners, which serves to inform ecosystem management decisions, and restore and conserve priority ecosystems. Making data publicly available ensures that decision makers have the necessary knowledge and information to inform decisions.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Water Quality and Ecosystems Partnerships and Hydrological Services

Actions supporting the Goal: Pristine Lakes and Rivers.

Note: In cases where departmental actions do not include specific site information, they can to some extent also contribute to the targets.

Work with partners on water quality and ecosystem health.

Work to protect Canada’s freshwater and priority ecosystems such as the St. Lawrence River and other major river basins in Atlantic, Western, and Northern ecosystems, through sound science and regulatory tools and in collaboration with Indigenous and other partners across Canada.

Collaborate with other governments, Indigenous peoples and regional stakeholders, in an integrated watershed management approach, to improve water quality and restore key aquatic ecosystems, including through:

  • the Canada-Quebec Agreement 2011–2026 and the St. Lawrence Action Plan (including to publish 21 water quality indicators in 2020-21);
  • the Atlantic Ecosystems Initiatives; and
  • the Saint John River/Wəlastəkw initiative (Freshwater Action Plan, Other Major Basins).

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

Establish partnerships to implement the St. Lawrence Action Plan activities and projects to pool expertise and resources toward the common objective of protecting the St. Lawrence River ecosystem, including to address problems related to phosphorus and nitrogen levels, thus contributing to meeting FSDS Goal 7.

Support coordination and oversight to ecosystem management, develops and shares science, and funds proposals that leverage contributions from other sources.

Engage and support coordinated effort among diverse stakeholders, including other levels of government and watershed governance bodies in Canada and the U.S., Indigenous organizations, non-government organizations and industry, as well as post-secondary institutions.

By supporting and advancing governance in specific basins, ECCC enables the sharing of information, enhancing capacity via funded projects, increased coordination of effort, and engagement among stakeholders from various sectors.

Atlantic Ecosystems Initiative (AEI) supports projects that improve the health, productivity and long-term sustainability of ecosystems in Atlantic Canada. AEI projects leverage funds, build extensive partnerships, and facilitate collaborative action, resulting in projects that contribute to FSDS Goal 7 by reducing nutrients, plastics, and bacteria in priority Atlantic Canadian watersheds.Footnote 18

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 6: Clean Water and Sanitation

(Target 6.3, Target 6.6)

Starting point: The baseline for the 21 indicators is different. The data collected is based on sufficient temporal and spatial coverage and defined for five years. The frequency of collection for each indicator varies from a 15 minute, hourly, monthly, or annual data gathering.

Performance indicator: Percentage of indicators (21)Footnote 19  in the “State of the St. Lawrence River” report which show a trend of being stable or improving

Target: 85% of the indicators in the State of the St. Lawrence River report show the achievement of an intermediate or improved result on the state of the river, including water quality, preservation of biodiversity, and sustainable use.

Note: This indicator is a good measure of the effectiveness of programs dedicated to improving the environment.

Starting point: 8 non-federal partnerships.

Performance indicator: Average number of non-federal partnerships established during the implementation of the St. Lawrence Action Plan (SLAP) activities and projects.

Target: The target date is to be determined.

Note: The State of the St. Lawrence Monitoring Program (SSLMP) launched in 2003, allows federal and provincial partners to pool their expertise in regular reports on the state and evolution of the St. Lawrence River.

The resulting environmental data and information are based on the follow-up of the 21 indicators and used to facilitate decision making and determine appropriate measures for promoting St. Lawrence conservation.

The main objective of this monitoring program is to report on the state and evolution of the St. Lawrence using scientific information by:

a) coordinating the environmental monitoring activities carried out on the St. Lawrence by the participants, selected on the basis of their relevance for the entire St. Lawrence and its riparian strip;

b) optimizing the participants’ acquisition of environmental data on the St. Lawrence to avoid duplication of efforts; and

c) maximizing the environmental information that is obtained by interpreting it in light of the data collected through other SSLMP monitoring activities.

Note 2: The Community Interaction Program under the St. Lawrence Action Plan provides funding for projects led by Indigenous communities, not-for-profit organizations, and other partners, to conserve biodiversity, improve water quality, and ensure the sustainable use of the St. Lawrence. This program works to ensure the improvement of ecological health of the St Lawrence Partnerships through partnerships, thus directly contributing to the FSDS contributing action.Footnote 20

Departmental Results Framework Program: Water Quality and Ecosystems Partnerships

Provide information, data and expertise for domestic and international water boards to support efforts to regulate lakes and river basins such as the Mackenzie River Basin and the Pacific Drainage Basin through:

  • collaboration with the provinces, by way of agreements;
  • collaboration with the U.S. through the international Joint Commission
  • participation in targeted studies focus on improving inter-jurisdictional water management; and
  • partnership with Indigenous peoples to increase collaboration in major basins.

Contribute to the effective management of other boundary and transboundary waters.

Starting point: 95% 2019-2020

Performance Indicator: Percentage of water board members rating their satisfaction with Environment Canada's involvement on water boards and committees as 8 out of 10 or higher

Target: 80% year-to-year.

Note: Water Boards that manage water resources in several inter-jurisdictional basins across Canada are a major client of the data and information collected and disseminated by the National Hydrometric Program (NHP). The federal component of the NHP, the Water Survey of Canada, solicits feedback from these water board clients through an annual survey, developed with input from the International Joint Commission, who are responsible for many but not all international boards between Canada and the USA.

Provide support and funding for projects.

Support projects to improve water quality and help restore ecosystems in the St. Lawrence River, including action to:

  • reduce nutrient pollution;
  • reduce releases of harmful chemicals;
  • increase public engagement through citizen science; and
  • engage Indigenous peoples
  • enhance research and monitoring capacity essential to the restoration of the watersheds;
  • enhance collaboration to protect freshwater quality throughout the watersheds.

Fund projects through the Atlantic Ecosystems Initiatives to improve water quality, to conserve biodiversity, and to improve capacity to adapt to climate change.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By supporting local ecosystem improvement projects, ECCC will engage Canadians in long-term sustainability of healthy and productive ecosystems.

Canadians engaged in funded projects will take action to help protect the quality of freshwater resources across Canada, including diverting and reducing harmful substances, improving freshwater management, and increasing climate resilience through action involving the development and/or restoration of natural infrastructure.

ECCC provides funding to partner-led projects (through the St. Lawrence Action Plan) and other regional initiatives that restore and protect water quality and ecosystem health. Project funding is leveraged by encouraging proponents to secure other sources of financial and in-kind support to maximize the impact of their project(s).

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 6: Clean Water and Sanitation (Target 6.3,  Target 6.B)

Starting point: The starting point for these three programs is $0.00 as they have not previously collectively measured this metric.

Performance indicator: Value of resources contributed by partners per dollar contributed by ECCC through the St. Lawrence Action Plan, and other regional initiatives.

Target: $2 by March 31, 2022 (The target is $2 of non-federal funding for every $1 of federal funding for a federal target of 1/3 funding per project).

Note: This indicator is a good measure of the FSDS Goal 7 as it demonstrates the Government of Canada’s commitment to provide funding and support for projects while encouraging proponents to secure other sources of financial and in-kind support to maximize the impact of their project.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Water Quality and Ecosystems Partnerships and Community Eco-Action
Implement the Eco-Action Community Funding Program which provides up to 50% in matching funding to not-for-profit and non-government organizations to undertake local projects that will help protect freshwater quality.

Starting point: 61,266 in 2015/16.

Performance indicator: Number of Canadians engaged in individual and collective actions funded by the Eco-Action Program

Target: 110,000 by 2022.

Note: This indicator is a good measure of the FSDS Goal 7 as it demonstrates the Government of Canada’s commitment to clean and healthy lakes and rivers by providing funding support to community groups for action-based projects that provide opportunities for community engagement to deliver projects that produce measurable, positive impacts on the environment, as well as build capacity in the communities.

Provide support and funding for projects. Apply payments received by the Environmental Damages Fund to projects that restore damaged natural environments and improve the environmental quality of natural environments.

Starting point: Measurement (in hectares) of the total area of natural environments of comparable geographic location, quality, or value to those affected that has been restored, as well as the area in which the environmental quality of natural environments of different geographic location, quality, or value to those affected has been improved or enhanced.

Baseline is 500 hectares; result is calculated annually using project results from previous fiscal year to ensure indicator data is collected from closed projects only.

Performance indicator: Area (in hectares) where natural environments are restored and/or enhanced; publicly reported.

Target: 1,000 hectares by 2022

Note: The primary goal of the Environmental Damages Fund is to restore natural environments that have been negatively affected by an environmental incident. The Fund prioritizes restoration and environmental quality improvement projects in order to achieve positive and measurable benefits to the natural environment and Canadians.

Better understand lake and river ecosystems.

Conduct targeted research studies and national water quality monitoring programs for chemicals to inform decision-making for the preservation and protection of Canadian freshwater quality including through release of reports on:

  • groundwater science;
  • the fate and effect of metals associated with regulated mining discharge into lakes and rivers; and
  • the state of the St. Lawrence River.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By contributing expertise and conducting and sharing research and monitoring data to decision makers, ECCC enables sound decisions and appropriate actions to protect and preserve the quality and quantity of Canada’s freshwater.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 6: Clean Water and Sanitation (Target 6.3,  Target 6.5)

Starting point: 81% in March of 2019.

Performance indicators:

Percentage of scientific information (information sheets, journal articles, open data etc.), made available publicly per year.

Targets: Between 75% and 100% by March 2021.

Note: ECCC conducts science in collaboration with its partners, which serves to inform ecosystem management decisions, and restore and conserve priority ecosystems. Making data publicly available ensures that decision makers have the necessary knowledge and information to inform decisions.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Water Quality and Ecosystems Partnerships and Hydrological Services

Focus scientific efforts to proactively understand, track and provide water quality and quantity information relating to Canada’s freshwater resources.

Provide analysis, guidance and economic advice and develop and provide economic models to enable environmental effects to be factored into decisions.

Starting point: 83% in the 2015 to 2017 period.

Performance indicator: Freshwater Indicator—percentage of sites where water quality is assessed as Fair-Good-Excellent vs. Poor-Marginal

Target: 90% percentage of sites where water quality is assessed as Fair-Good-Excellent with a Target Date of March 31, 2022.

Note: The indicator is a measure of the state of surface water quality in mostly non-remote areas of Canada. Clean freshwater is an essential resource. It protects aquatic plant and animal biodiversity. It is used for drinking, manufacturing, energy production, irrigation, swimming, boating and fishing.

Degraded water quality damages the health of all freshwater ecosystems, including rivers, lakes, reservoirs and wetlands. It can also disrupt fisheries, tourism and agriculture. The results of this indicator help the Government of Canada to better understand lake and river ecosystems.

Provide quality assured water quantity information (river flow and level) to various stakeholders to assist them in water management, planning and related decision-making.

Starting point: Baseline - 81% from the initial October 2013 survey.

Performance indicator: Percentage of program partners rating their satisfaction with Environment and Climate Change Canada's hydrological services as 8 out of 10 or higher

Target: At least 80% by March 2021-22.

Note: This measure is suitable for the contributing action “better understanding lake and river ecosystems” because water quantity information is primarily used by Provinces and Territories, other government organizations and targeted stakeholders to support water management and decision-making.

Use legislation and regulations to protect lake and river ecosystems.

Administer, promote compliance with and enforce and implement a risk-based approach to enforcing federal environmental laws, including:

  • the Fisheries Act pollution prevention provisions and associated regulations, including the Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations (WSER), the Pulp and Paper Effluent Regulations (PPER), and the Metal and Diamond Mining Effluent Regulations (MDMER);
  • the Environment Effects Monitoring (EEM) requirements under the PPER and MDMER; and
  • the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) Regulations.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By administering and enforcing legislation and regulations, ECCC will contribute to better water quality in Canada’s key freshwater ecosystems by deterring actions and behaviours that contribute to the deterioration of water quality.

Ensuring high compliance rates with Fisheries Act regulations helps improve water quality in lakes and rivers, thus contributes to the FSDS goal.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 6: Clean Water and Sanitation (Target 6.3)

Starting point: Baseline - 77% in 2015.

Performance indicator: Percentage of wastewater systems where effluent quality standards are achieved

Target: Percentage increase in order to reach 100% by 2040, compared to the baseline.

Note: In Canada, municipal wastewater is the largest point source of pollution entering lakes and rivers. Ensuring municipal wastewater treatment plant effluents comply with Wastewater System Effluent Regulations reduces the risk of contaminants in the effluent harming aquatic plants and animals.

Other contributions For more information on actions that contribute to Goal 7 of the FSDS, please consult ECCC’s 2021-22 Departmental Plan.
Goal 8 large icon

FSDS Goal 8, Sustainably Managed Lands and Forests: Lands and forests support biodiversity and provide a variety of ecosystem services for generations to come

Responsible Minister: Minister of the Environment and Climate Change

Sustainably Managed Lands and Forests

FSDS target(s)

FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target

Starting point(s)

Performance indicator(s)

Target(s)

Program(s) in which the departmental actions will occur
By 2020, at least 17% of terrestrial areas and inland waters are conserved through networks of protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures.Footnote 21 Better understand lands and forests.

Continue to establish and manage National Wildlife and manage existing Migratory Bird Sanctuaries, and track national progress toward national targets.

Work in partnership, through a variety of collaborative forums, with Provinces. Territories, municipalities, Indigenous people, and the private and non-profit sectors to encourage the recognition and establishment of more protected and conserved areas. Provide financial incentives under the Canada Nature Fund for the establishment of more protected and conserved areas, including Indigenous protected and conserved areas.Footnote 22

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

Well-managed conserved areas help preserve species and their habitats for present and future generations by reducing direct human development stresses.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 15: Life on Land (Target 15.1, Target 15.2)

Starting point: 104,604 km2 of terrestrial areas and inland waters (of a total 124, 490 km2 when including marine habitat) were conserved as National Wildlife Areas and Migratory Bird Sanctuaries in 2014-15.

Performance indicator: Total area of habitat protected as ECCC National Wildlife Areas (NWAs), Migratory Bird Sanctuaries (MBSs), and Conservation Areas.

Target: 136,848 km2 of terrestrial areas and inland waters by March 31, 2022 are conserved as National Wildlife Areas and Migratory Bird Sanctuaries.

Note: The percentage of Canada’s territory that is conserved is a direct measurement of the FSDS contributing action and progress towards Canada’s target. These are national starting points and targets – i.e., they also include federal, provincial, territorial, and Indigenous protected and conserved areas as well as other conservation measures.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Habitat Conservation and Protection
Increase understanding of the effects of land cover and use on wildlife and ecosystems by incorporating Indigenous knowledge into management decisions.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

Scientific research and Indigenous knowledge are required to manage lands and forests to support biodiversity targets and provide ecosystem services for generations to come.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 15: Life on Land

(Target 15.1, Target 15.2)

Starting point: 61% in 2018-19.

Performance indicator: Percentage of Indigenous peoples engaged with ECCC who indicate that the engagement was meaningful.

Target: 61% in March 2022.

Note: This indicator is a good measure of the contributing action “Better understand lands and forests” by better incorporating Indigenous knowledge because it provides an understanding of whether Indigenous peoples deem engagement with the department to be meaningful. This measure indicates whether survey respondents believe that their views were taken into consideration in the decisions/actions about which their input was sought. Moving forward, the department aims to ensure that management decisions are informed by science and Indigenous knowledge.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Biodiversity Policy and Partnerships
Conserve natural spaces

Secure private land, expand National Wildlife Areas and Migratory Bird Sanctuaries, increase our capacity to manage protected areas, and establish a coordinated network of conservation areas, through:

  • implementation of the Nature Legacy Initiative;
  • management and expansion of ECCC’s protected areas network
  • supporting on-the-ground wetland restoration and enhancement projects in Canada; and
  • conservation planning and actions related to Protected Areas including the development of national policies, identification of Candidate Sites, and implementing sites’ user services and site management.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By implementing the Nature Legacy Initiative, establishing protected areas and supporting wetland restoration, ECCC directly contributes to achieving Canada’s land and inland water conservation target of 17% with the use of both conventional (direct land securement) and innovative (incentivizing private and public stewardship and conservation through the designation of lands and other effective conservation measures (OECMs)). By conserving natural spaces of ecological and cultural importance, Canada’s lands and forests are being sustainably managed for future generations.

Securing ecologically sensitive land contributes directly to Canada’s network of protected and conserved areas, and supports the goal of sustaining Canada’s biodiversity and ecosystem services for the long-term in Canada’s lands and forests.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 15: Life on Land

(Target 15.1, Target 15.5)

Starting point: Baseline of 130,871 km2 in 2014-15.

Performance indicator: Total area of habitat secured directly by ECCC and through partnerships

Target: 177,235 km2 by March 31, 2022

Note: This indicator is a direct measure of the growth of protected areas (NWAs and MBSs) together with the establishment of Indigenous Protected and Conserved Areas and other effective areas-based conservation measures (OECMs) directly supports progress towards the FSDS goal that lands and forests support biodiversity and provide a variety of ecosystem services for generations to come by protecting and conserving important habitat. This network of protected areas also contributes directly to Canada’s total protected and conserved area and is accounted for in assessing progress towards the 17% target.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Habitat Conservation and Protection
Develop and advance the Ecological Gifts Program to increase the amount of ecologically sensitive land or rights in land donated by Canadians.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By enabling donations of ecologically sensitive lands, establishing protected areas and supporting wetland restoration, ECCC directly contributes to achieving Canada’s land and inland water conservation target of 17% with the use of both conventional (direct land securement) and innovative (incentivizing private stewardship) conservation mechanisms. By conserving natural spaces of ecological and cultural importance, Canada’s lands and forests are being sustainably managed for future generations.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 15: Life on Land

(Target 15.1, Target 15.5)

Starting point: 1,648 km2 in 2013-14.

Performance indicator: Total area of ecologically sensitive land secured through the ecological gifts program

Target: 2,161 km2 by March 31, 2022.

Note: This indicator is a direct measure of the amount of ecologically sensitive land secured through the Ecological Gift Program contributes directly to Canada’s network of protected and conserved areas, and supports the goal of sustaining Canada’s biodiversity and ecosystem services for the long-term in Canada’s lands and forests.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Habitat Conservation and Protection
Work with Indigenous peoples.

Work with Indigenous peoples to protect and conserve lands and waters by:

  • supporting the establishment of Indigenous Protected and Conserved Areas (IPCAs);
  • developing management plans for ECCC National Wildlife Areas and Migratory Bird Sanctuaries in Nunavut as part of the Inuit Impact and Benefit Agreement (IIBA);
  • consulting with Indigenous peoples and the Government of the Northwest Territories with respect to the long-term conservation of additional sites;
  • progressing on officially replacing existing names of northern protected areas with Indigenous names; and
  • implementing the terms of the renewed IIBA for ECCC’s conservation areas in the Nunavut Settlement Area with Inuit parties to the agreement.
  • providing ongoing support for Indigenous Guardians initiatives.Footnote 23

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

Indigenous peoples have long been stewards of the environment and have deep connections to nature. ECCC consults and collaborates with Indigenous peoples and invests through the Canada Nature Fund in initiatives that protect and restore biodiversity, and strengthen and renew nation-to-nation, government-to-government, and Inuit-Crown relationships. Such collaboration has resulted in, for example, the 14,200 km2 Edéhzhíe Protected Area in the Northwest Territories, established as the first new Indigenous Protected Area under the Nature Legacy Initiative. Edéhzhíe Protected Area contributes directly to the target of conserving 17% of terrestrial and in-land waters in Canada and marks an important step in reconciliation with Indigenous peoples and sustaining Canada’s lands and forests for future generations. Also, by collaborating with Indigenous peoples in the North to create management plans for existing sites, and conservation plans for the future, ECCC will contribute to achieving land and inland water conservation targets and enabling long-term, sustainable management approaches.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 15: Life on Land

(Target 15.1, Target 15.2)

Starting point: 2 National Indigenous Representative Organizations (NIROs) & 3 Communities as of March 31, 2020.

Performance Indicator: Number of Indigenous governments, organizations and communities engaged in ECCC supported habitat conservation and protection initiatives.

Target: 3 NIROs, 1 Indigenous-Led Foundation & 100 Communities by March 31, 2022.

Note: Increased and meaningful engagement with Indigenous peoples contributes to building the capacity and support of Indigenous communities to further conserve and grow Canada’s terrestrial and freshwater network of protected and conserved areas.

Starting point: 61% in 2018-19.

Performance indicator:

Percentage of Indigenous peoples engaged with ECCC who indicate that the engagement was meaningful.

Target: 61% in April 2022.

Note: This indicator is an appropriate measure as it reflects the perspective of Indigenous peoples in how meaningfully ECCC works with Indigenous partners to protect and conserve lands and waters. ECCC recognizes that improved decision-making and conservation outcomes result from inclusive processes and meaningful engagement with the Department’s partners, including Indigenous peoples.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Habitat Conservation and Protection, Biodiversity Policy and Partnerships
Other contributions For more information on actions that contribute to Goal 8 of the FSDS, please consult ECCC’s 2021-22 Departmental Plan.
Goal 9 large icon

FSDS Goal 9, Healthy Wildlife Populations: All species have healthy and viable populations

Responsible Minister: Minister of the Environment and Climate Change

Healthy Wildlife Populations

FSDS target(s)

FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target

Starting point(s)

Performance indicator(s)

Target(s)

Program(s) in which the departmental actions will occur
By 2020, species that are secure remain secure and populations of species at risk listed under federal law exhibit trends that are consistent with recovery strategies and management plans. Work with partners to implement the Pan-Canadian Approach to Transforming Species at Risk Conservation in Canada

Implement the Pan-Canadian Approach to Transforming Species at Risk Conservation in Canada with the collaboration of provinces and territories, Indigenous peoples, and stakeholders, and through the following actions, enabled by investments under the Canada Nature Fund:

  • partner and stakeholder engagement, cooperative conservation action planning, and the implementation of on-the-ground actions for species at risk for 11 Federal-Provincial-Territorial priority places;
  • funding for 15 Community-Nominated Priority Places where multiple partners will take action together to protect and recover species at risk;
  • participation in collaborative conservation action planning initiatives for the six priority species identified by federal, provincial and territorial governments; and
  • co-creation of conservation action plans with the agriculture, forest, and urban development sectors.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target or goal:

The new Pan-Canadian Approach to transforming Species at Risk Conservation in Canada reflects a shift to more multi-species and ecosystem-based conservation, and more targeted and collaborative FPT efforts focused on conservation planning and action on shared priority places, species, and sectors. Provinces and territories continue to lead efforts to recover species at risk and other priority species on lands under their jurisdiction, with support and partnership from ECCC.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 15: Life on Land

(Target 15.1, Target 15.5)

Starting Point: 9% (21 out of 230) in 2018–2019.

Performance indicator:

% of 230 SAR for which protection or recovery actions are being implemented through action for priority places, species and sectors/threats.

Target: 100% by 2023.

Note: This indicator is a good measure of FSDS Target because ECCC’s work with partners to implement a Pan-Canadian Approach to Wildlife Health, it is representative of the Government of Canada’s progress with implementing the Approach.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Species at Risk
Work with partners to implement A Pan-Canadian Approach to Wildlife Health Develop management and policy recommendations to implement a Pan-Canadian Approach to Wildlife Health through ECCC’s participation in the Wildlife Health Advisory Committee.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target or goal:

The Wildlife Health Advisory Committee will help focus efforts and resources on shared priorities and address discrepancies in capacity across Canada which will contribute to the development of more efficient actions on the ground and should then in turn influence positively the population sizes of migratory bird species.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 15: Life on Land

(Target 15.1, Target 15.5)

Implement, innovate and modernize the regulatory and policy framework and tools to protect species at risk and migratory birds

Implement legislation, regulations and tools that support a priority-based approach to protecting species at risk and migratory birds through:

  • protection of critical habitat of species as identified in recovery strategies and action plans under the Species at Risk Act (SARA);
  • development of policies, standard operating procedures and/or guidance in accordance with the strategic SARA policy framework and plan;
  • engagement with provinces, territories, Indigenous communities, scientists, industry and other stakeholders to evaluate the effectiveness of the existing Species at Risk Act and assess the need for modernizing the Act;
  • maintain partnerships with Indigenous peoples to protect, conserve and recover species at risk;
  • development of tools to assess and protect habitat for species at risk, such as woodland caribou (boreal and southern mountain populations) and polar bear;
  • provision of expert advice related to wildlife during assessments of human activities under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act and the Impacts Assessment Act and the undertaking of a Strategic Assessment of Biodiversity;
  • implementation of the Pan-Canadian Approach and a prioritized approach for action on species at risk, and seek ways to further advance innovative approaches; and
  • implementation of an improved risk-based approach to enforcing federal wildlife laws that protect species at risk, protected areas, migratory birds and wild plants and animals in international and interprovincial trade.Footnote 24

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

Managing wildlife and ecosystems in Canada is shared across all levels of government. Ongoing domestic and international collaboration with partners and stakeholders is key to ensure continuous progress in securing species at risk and migratory birds populations. Appropriately, the Government of Canada has been working closely with provinces and territories, Indigenous peoples, and other partners on species at risk conservation to transform its approach to terrestrial species at risk conservation through advancing the implementation of the Pan-Canadian Approach and related policy and program improvements.Footnote 25  Using a range of tools—both regulatory and non-regulatory—helps maximize conservation outcomes and supports healthy and viable populations for all species.

These tools include being able to prepare for and react strategically to unplanned occurrences which may impede our ability to employ targeted enforcement of wildlife legislation and regulations aimed at protecting plant and animal species and their habitats.Footnote 26

The Government of Canada has also began conceptual work on a Strategic Assessment of Biodiversity, which will help enable the continued provision of expert advice during federal project reviews and the development of policies, guidelines and tools that help address cumulative effects to biodiversity and support a balanced approach to the conservation of nature and development of the economy.Footnote 27

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 15: Life on Land

(Target 15.1, Target 15.5)

Starting point: 43% in 2017.

Performance indicator:

Percentage of species at risk (SAR) for which changes in populations are consistent with recovery and management objectives

Target: 60% by May 2025.

Note: Through the implementation of regulatory and policy work it can be expected that, increasingly, recovery actions will be implemented for an increasing percentage of SAR. This indicator is a measure of the progress that the Government of Canada has made. This indicator is a direct measure of the Target and Goal 9 of the FSDS.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Species at Risk and Compliance Promotion and Enforcement—Wildlife

Starting Point: 95% in 2015–2016.

Performance Indicator:

Percentage of prosecutions that result in convictions

Target: 95% April 2022.

Note: This measure will inform the programs whether the enforcement related to the regulatory activity is effective. Successful enforcement will support the maintenance of species at risk populations, as per the FSDS Target.

Work with partners to enhance foundational knowledge of species, habitats and ecosystems.

Advance protection and recovery action for priority species at risk and migratory birds by conducting research, including co-application of western science and Indigenous knowledge by:

  • collaborating with stakeholders and Indigenous partners via Species at Risk Act-mandated and enabled advisory bodies (including the Species at Risk Advisory Committee, the National Aboriginal Council on Species at Risk and the First Nation Advisory Committee on Species at Risk, and others);
  • collaborating with provinces, territories and other partners on national studies and analyses related to priority invasive species pathways;
  • developing inventories and characterizations of lands to improve knowledge of ecosystems;
  • participating in the National Aquatic Invasive Species Committee;
  • informing recovery planning and action for listed species at risk and priority species, including caribou, polar bear and listed migratory birds;Footnote 28 
  • conducting collaborative research with stakeholders and partners; and
  • ensuring SAR information is available to partners and the public through publication of recovery documents on the public SAR Registry.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

Responsibility for managing wildlife and ecosystems in Canada is shared across all levels of government.

By collaborating with Canadian and international partners to protect animal and bird species and their habitats, ECCC will contribute to achieving Canada’s population goals for species at risk and their habitats.

Collaborative initiatives between partners increase the audience of conservation actions, and influence the public and interested local stakeholders to engage and participate in species and habitat protection.

Collaboration with partners, in Canada and globally, allows for sharing of expertise and advice which may promote more effective species protection.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 15: Life on Land

(Target 15.1, Target 15.5)

Starting point: 93% (306 of 330) by March 31, 2019, had documents posted.

Performance indicator: Percent of legally listed species at risk with a recovery strategy, or management plan available on the Species at Risk public registry where a recovery document is due.

Target: 95% by March 2023.

Note: Working with partners to enhance foundational knowledge of species, habitats and ecosystems contributes to achieving FSDS Goal 9. Measuring the percent of recovery strategies or management plans where a recovery document is due increases the government’s understanding of the extent to which protection and recovery is occurring and where more collaboration initiatives may be beneficial to achieving the Goal.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Species at Risk, and Biodiversity Policy and Partnerships and Migratory Birds and other Wildlife

Work in partnership with Indigenous peoples to protect, conserve and recover species at risk by:

  • working to renew nation-to-nation relationships with Indigenous peoples as part of the implementation of the Pan-Canadian Approach to Transforming Species at Risk Conservation in Canada and the Species at Risk Act;
  • establishing mechanisms, including the Boreal Caribou Knowledge Consortium and others, to support co-application of Indigenous knowledge and western science;
  • partnering with First Nations, Inuit, and Métis under the Canada Nature Fund, recognizing and enabling Indigenous leadership, knowledge, and interests in land and resource management;
  • engaging Indigenous peoples for species and priority places, including in species assessment, recovery planning, recovery implementation (protection measures, stewardship and other actions); and
  • negotiating of modern treaties and reconciliation agreements, including implementation of obligations, engagement with Indigenous peoples, and application of Indigenous knowledge.Footnote 29

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

Indigenous engagement is an important principle guiding collaborative work to support healthy wildlife populations under the Pan-Canadian Approach to Transforming Species at Risk Conservation. Canada will work closely with Indigenous peoples to help shape and test tools to implement the Species at Risk Act (SARA), and to identify new priorities for future action.

By collaborating with international and Canadian partners, including Indigenous peoples, to protect animal and bird species and their habitats, ECCC will contribute to achieving Canada’s population goals for species at risk and their habitats.

Collaborative initiatives between partners, including Indigenous peoples, increase the audience of conservation actions, and influence the public and interested local stakeholders and rights-holders to engage and participate in species and habitat protection.

Collaboration with partners, in Canada and globally, allows for sharing of expertise and advice which may promote more effective species protection.

Modern treaties and reconciliation agreements with Indigenous peoples represent an opportunity for Canada and rights-holders to more formally collaborate in protecting species and their habitat.Footnote 30

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 15: Life on Land

(Target 15.1, Target 15.5)

Starting point: 61% in 2018-19.

Performance indicator: Percentage of Indigenous peoples engaged with ECCC who indicate that the engagement was meaningful

Target: 61% in March 2022.

Note: This indicator is an appropriate measure for the FSDS Target because ECCC’s work in partnership with Indigenous peoples to protect, conserve, and recover species at risk reflects the perspective of Indigenous peoples. ECCC recognizes that improved decision-making and conservation outcomes result from inclusive processes and meaningful engagement with the Department’s partners, including Indigenous peoples.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Species at Risk, and Biodiversity Policy and Partnerships and Migratory Birds and other Wildlife
Build capacity and promote education

Build capacity to protect, conserve, and restore species and their habitat through:

  • support projects under the Habitat Stewardship Program for Species at Risk and the Community-Nominated Priority Places for Species at Risk that engage Canadians in conservation actions to benefit wildlife;
  • support projects under the Aboriginal Fund for Species at Risk that engage Indigenous recipients in conservation;
  • the development of research capacity in Indigenous and Northern communities to support community-based monitoring and education; and
  • the investment of $2.25 million over 3 years in programs for Engaging Canadian Kids in Wildlife Conservation.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By providing expertise and funding to Indigenous peoples and other local stakeholders, ECCC will contribute to Canadians’ capacity to protect and conserve species. Supporting capacity building and education of local actors will achieve better outcomes for more species at risk, improve return on investment, and increase co-benefits for biodiversity and ecosystems.

Engagement of Canadians in conservation efforts and species protection activities supports recovery objectives for species at risk, and the population targets for migratory birds indirectly, by fostering enthusiasm for stewardship, public awareness and education, and a sense of ownership over conservation efforts. This may further result in increased participation in species and habitat protection beyond the initial activities.

Funding enables partnerships for the protection and recovery of species at risk with First Nations, Inuit, and Métis in a manner that recognizes and enables Indigenous leadership and engagement in land and resource management.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 15: Life on Land

(Target 15.1, Target 15.5)

Starting point: 25,000,000 in 2013-14.

Performance indicator: Amount of leveraged contributions (cash + in-kind)

Target: To be established once the 2020-21 budgets are finalized.

Note: The indicator measures the level of capacity that exists within the Canadian public, which is in line with the contributing action. The indicator measures the amount of non-federal funding leveraged by federal investment.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Biodiversity Policy and Partnerships and Species at Risk
Uphold international commitments related to wildlife.

Work with international partners to protect and conserve species at risk and fulfill Canada’s obligations under international agreements by:

  • fulfilling Canada’s obligations under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES);
  • implementing the Wild Animal and Plant Protection Regulation of International and Interprovincial Trade Act;
  • working with international partners to implement a Circumpolar Action Plan for Polar Bears in accordance with the 1973 Agreement on the Conservation of Polar Bears;
  • fulfilling Canada’s obligations under the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD);
  • tracking and coordinating actions in support of the Canadian Biodiversity Strategy and initiatives to advance the 2020 Biodiversity Goals and Targets for Canada, including by participating in and leading Canadian delegations at international meetings in support of biodiversity;
  • coordinating Canada’s participation with the U.S. and Mexico in the Trilateral Committee for Wildlife and Ecosystem Conservation and Management, and supporting the trilateral working group to conserve the Monarch butterfly migration, as per the 2016 North American Leaders Summit commitment;
  • implementing the Ramsar Convention in Canada to promote the wise use of wetlands and support partners in the nomination of any new proposed Ramsar Sites;
  • implementing an improved risk-based approach to enforcing federal wildlife laws that protect species at risk, protected areas, migratory birds, and wild plants and animals in international and interprovincial trade;
  • working closely with foreign law enforcement agencies and intergovernmental organizations to protect domestic species and exotic species in Canadian commerce;
  • participating in the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES); and
  • seeking to include provisions in Canada’s free trade agreements that support Canada’s leadership role in combatting illegal wildlife trade and protecting species at risk.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By collaborating with international partners, ECCC will support Canada in meeting its international wildlife commitments.

Decisions and actions taken outside of Canada can have an impact on wildlife in Canada, particularly migratory species.

By supporting actions to conserve species, through its international commitment, Canada makes important contributions to regional and global biodiversity conservation.

By ensuring the conservation, restoration and sustainable use of terrestrial and inland freshwater ecosystems (in particular forests, wetlands, mountains and drylands), securing their services, while being in line with obligations under international agreements contributes to reaching the FSDS target.

Enforcement activities contributes to the protection of wildlife and will ultimately contribute towards the Government’s ability to achieve the contributing action and upholding its international commitments related to wildlife.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 15: Life on Land

(Target 15.1, Target 15.5)

Starting point:

10.5% in 2015 (Terrestrial lands & inland waters).

Performance indicator:

Percentage of Canadian areas conserved as protected areas and other effective areas-based conservation measures.

Target:

17% by December 2022.

Note: The 17% target is both a domestic target and a global target. This indicator tracks our progress towards Canada’s international commitments and domestic goals, and is therefore a measure of FSDS Goal 9.

Starting Point: 95% of targeted regulates in 2015-16.

Performance Indicator:

Percentage of prosecutions that result in convictions

Target: 95% by April 2022.

Note: Measuring prosecutions that result in convictions will provide information to help better identify the most effective measures to find non-compliance, to adjust investigation, and to take appropriate enforcement measures which will contribute to upholding international commitments related to wildlife.

Starting Point:

Baseline CITES:
71% in 2018-19.

Baseline CBD:
83 in 2018-19.

Performance indicator:

Number of expert groups formed to address international CITES or CBD conservation issues in which Canada participated.

Target:

CITES: 80% by 2021, and maintain going forward

CBD: 90% by 2021, and maintain going forward.

Note: This indicator provides information about the extent to which Canada’s positions and priorities are conveyed and reflected in key international biodiversity fora. Progress in promoting Canada’s positions and priorities demonstrated by ECCC within the international communities through these partnerships and the impacts they have on domestic and exotic species in Canadian commerce contributes to the FSDS target.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Habitat Conservation and Protection, Biodiversity Policy and Partnerships and Compliance Promotion and Enforcement—Wildlife
By 2025, increase the percentage of migratory bird species whose populations sizes fall within an acceptable range—neither too low nor too high—from a baseline of 57% in 2013. Other Advance the Migratory Birds Strategy, by providing a risk-based approach to enforcement of and compliance promotion with federal legislation such as the Migratory Bird Convention Act, 1994 (MBCA, 1994) and the Species et Risk Act (SARA) to ensure an increase in population growth amongst migratory bird species.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

The Migratory Birds Strategy will focus efforts on implementing the most pressing conservation actions for migratory birds, thereby supporting population goals for migratory birds.

By advancing the Migratory Birds Strategy and enforcing the SARA, ECCC will contribute to maintaining and protecting wildlife populations through risk-based compliance promotion, targeted and strategic enforcement activities and enforcement measures conducted to address potential and real non-compliance to the MBCA, 1994 and SARA.

By enforcing Canadian and international legislation and regulations, ECCC will support Canada’s population goals for species at risk and migratory birds.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 15: Life on Land

(Target 15.1, Target 15.5)

Starting point: Baseline of 57% in 2014-15.

Performance indicator:

Percentage of migratory bird species that are within target population ranges

Target: 60% by December 2021.

Note: This measure will inform the programs whether conservation activities have been successful in maintaining and/or increasing migratory bird populations.

Program: Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – Wildlife and Migratory Birds and Other Wildlife
Implement, innovate and modernize the regulatory and policy framework and tools to protect species at risk and migratory birds.

Promote compliance with the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994 by

  • providing key economic analysis in support of the Migratory Birds Convention Act (MBCA) and regulations; and
  • collaborating with partners at home and internationally, and continue to monitor the status of and conduct research on migratory birds and their habitats.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By enforcing Canadian and international legislation and regulations, ECCC will support Canada’s population goals for species at risk and migratory birds.

By undertaking key economic analysis of legislation and regulation, decision-making for species conservation can be better informed, and policy options and programs can be more effectively implemented. Economic analysis can also help inform decision-making for species conservation, and policy options and programs can be more effectively implemented.

Responsibility for managing wildlife and ecosystems in Canada is shared across all levels of government. Collaborating with partners at home and internationally to ensure continuous progress in securing populations of species at risk and migratory birds listed under federal law is essential to species conservation and recovery. Using a range of tools—both regulatory and non-regulatory—helps maximize conservation outcomes and support healthy and viable populations for all species.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 15: Life on Land

(Target 15.1, Target 15.5)

Starting point: Baseline of 57% in 2014-15.

Performance indicator:

Percentage of migratory bird species that are within target population ranges

Target: 60% by December 2021.

Note: This measure will inform the programs whether the regulations and compliance promotion activities have had the intended impact so that migratory bird populations are conserved.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Migratory Birds and other Wildlife; Compliance Promotion and Enforcement - Wildlife
Work with partners to enhance foundational knowledge of species, habitats and ecosystems.

Continue to monitor the status of and conduct research on migratory birds and their habitats by:

  • conducting research to understand the impacts of environmental change on species protection and conservation, including long-term and targeted research to assess key threats of climate change, habitat loss and anthropogenic activities, and through collaboration with Indigenous communities to design and implement research projects (Ongoing);
  • monitoring and assessing the status and trends of populations and landscapes, modelling the cause mechanisms and effects of population changes, establishing measurable population and habitat goals and conservation priorities, and identifying conservation actions in consultation with stakeholders—in support of developing regulations; and
  • enabling the implementation of Bird Conservation Regions (BCR) Strategies by finding mechanisms and developing partnerships to disseminate information on the Strategies.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

Responsibility for managing wildlife and ecosystems in Canada is shared across all levels of government.

By collaborating with Canadian and international partners to protect bird species and their habitats, ECCC will contribute to achieving Canada’s goal in increasing migratory bird species whose populations sizes fall within an acceptable range.

Collaboration with partners, in Canada and globally, may increase the audience of conservation actions, and influences the public and interested local stakeholders to engage and participate in species and habitat protection supports this goal. It allows for sharing of expertise and advice, knowledge, and information, which may promote more effective species protection through improvements to foundational understanding of species and their habitats.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 15: Life on Land

(Target 15.1, Target 15.5)

Starting point: TBD April 2021.

Performance indicator: Percent of industry organizations assessed that have integrated planning and priority conservation actions for migratory birds into their practices or policies.

Target: 50% by March 2023.

Starting Point: 30% in 2014-15.

Performance Indicator: Proportion of migratory bird species whose population status can be assessed with high reliability.

Target: 50% by March 2025.

Note: These two indicators are a good measure of the contributing action and the FSDS Target because they are an indication of whether partners outside of government are maintaining their end of agreements to plan and prioritize conservation and how well ECCC understands the status of migratory bird populations, respectively.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Species at Risk, and Biodiversity Policy and Partnerships and Migratory Birds and other Wildlife
Uphold international commitments related to wildlife.

Work with international partners to protect and conserve species at risk (including relevant migratory bird species) and fulfill Canada’s obligations under international agreements by:

  • taking actions for migratory bird conservation (under the auspices of the Commission for Environmental Cooperation), and delivering projects for seabird conservation in Chile (under the Canada-Chile Agreement on Environmental Cooperation) and for shorebird monitoring in Panama (under the Canada-Panama Environment Agreement);
  • implementing the Ramsar Convention in Canada to promote the wise use of wetlands and support partners in the nomination of any new proposed Ramsar Sites;
  • collaborating with international partners, including to implement the Migratory Birds Convention Act, and continuing to monitor the status of and conduct research on migratory birds and their habitats; and
  • implementing an improved risk-based approach to enforcing federal wildlife laws that protect species at risk, protected areas, migratory birds, and wild plants and animals in international and interprovincial trade.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By collaborating with international partners, ECCC will support Canada in meeting its international wildlife commitments.

Decisions and actions taken outside of Canada can have an impact on wildlife in Canada, particularly migratory species.

By supporting actions to conserve species through its international commitment, Canada makes important contributions to regional and global biodiversity conservation.

By ensuring the conservation, restoration and sustainable use of terrestrial and inland freshwater ecosystems (in particular forests, wetlands, mountains and drylands), securing their services, while being in line with obligations under international agreements contributes to the FSDS target.

Enforcement activities contributes to the protection of wildlife and will ultimately contribute towards the Government’s ability to achieve the contributing action and upholding its international commitments related to wildlife.

Starting point: 10.5% in 2015 (Terrestrial lands & inland waters).

Performance indicator:

Percentage of Canadian areas conserved as protected areas and other effective areas-based conservation measures.

Target: 17% by December 2022.

Note: The 17% target is both a domestic target and a global target. This indicator tracks our progress towards respecting Canada’s international commitments as well as domestic goals and is therefore a measure of the contributing action and the FSDS Goal 9.

Starting Point: 95% of targeted regulates in 2015-16.

Performance Indicator:

Percentage of prosecutions that result in convictions.

Target: 95% by April 2022.

Note: Measuring prosecutions that result in convictions will provide information to help better identify the most effective measures to find non-compliance, to adjust investigation, and to take appropriate enforcement measures which will contribute to upholding international commitments related to wildlife.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Habitat Conservation and Protection, Biodiversity Policy and Partnerships, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement—Wildlife and Migratory Birds and other Wildlife
Other contributions For more information on actions that contribute to Goal 9 of the FSDS, please consult ECCC’s 2021-22 Departmental Plan.
Goal 12 large icon

FSDS Goal 12, Connecting Canadians with Nature: Canadians are informed about the value of nature, experiencing nature first hand, and actively engaged in its stewardship

Responsible Minister: Minister of the Environment and Climate Change

Connecting Canadians with Nature

FSDS Target(s)

FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target

Starting point(s)

Performance indicator(s)

Target(s)

Program(s) in which the departmental actions will occur
By 2020, maintain or increase the number of Canadians that get out into nature—for example, by visiting parks and green space—and increase participation in biodiversity conservation activities relative to a 2010 baseline. Build capacity for conservation activities. Collaborate with Indigenous peoples on a wide range of Indigenous protected and conserved areas and Indigenous Guardians.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

Providing expertise and funding to Indigenous peoples and other local stakeholders, and collaborating with them will support capacity building and education of local actors, will indirectly provide a sense of ownership over the importance of nature and contribute to connecting Canadians with nature.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 11 Sustainable Cities and Communities (Target 11.4)

UN SDG 15: Life on Land (Target 15.5)

Starting point: 61% in 2018-19.

Performance indicator: Percentage of Indigenous peoples engaged with ECCC who indicate that the engagement was meaningful

Target: 61% in March 2022.

Note: Measuring the degree to which Indigenous peoples feel their engagement with ECCC was meaningful provides an understanding of built relationships and satisfaction with collaborative activities and capacity, both of which contribute to the goal of connecting Canadians with nature.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Habitat Conservation and Protection

Build capacity for conservation activities by:

  • developing strategic partnerships for collaborative activities such as scientific and academic research, conservation efforts, promotional campaigns and outreach activities;
  • working with the Nature Conservancy of Canada to deliver Government priorities, including to accelerate the rate of private land conservation and protect important natural habitat in communities across southern Canada; and
  • funding the Natural Heritage Conservation Program to assist and support securing of ecologically significant areas across Canada, protect habitat for species at risk (both COSEWIC-assessed and SARA-listed) and migratory birds, and enhance connections and corridors between protected areas.

Invest in the North American Waterfowl Management Plan ($10 million over two years, as part of the Government’s sustained commitment to invest up to $20 million over four years) and partner with the Nature Conservancy of Canada, Ducks Unlimited Canada, Island Nature Trust, and the Manitoba Habitat Heritage Corporation and others to implement the Plan.

Engage with external partners to advance the Migratory Birds Strategy and enforce and promote compliance with federal wildlife legislation that protects plant and animal species, including in interprovincial and international trade.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

Managed by the Nature Conservancy of Canada in collaboration with other conservation organizations, the Natural Heritage Conservation Program (NHCP), established through an investment from the Canada Nature Fund, aims to conserve private land in southern Canada, where the most biodiversity-rich areas are found, and where most Canadians live. As such, it contributes to increasing access to natural areas for urban residents. The NHCP also advances partnership through a collaborative governance structure with project partners made up of national and local land trusts.

FundingFootnote 31  to undertake North American Waterfowl Management Plan (NAWMP) projects under the Canada Nature Fund support private land securement of wetland and associated upland habitat, at least 300km2 (30,000 hectares) from 2019/20 - 2022/23, in biodiversity-rich landscapes in southern Canada. These projects contribute to the recovery of wetland-dependent species at risk and the prevention of other priority species, such as migratory birds, from becoming a conservation concern. In addition, these habitats provide numerous ecosystem services, such as carbon storage. The funds also contribute to supporting partners to undertake actions that conserve wildlife and protect and improve their habitat.

The North American Waterfowl Management Plan is an international partnership between Canada, the United States and Mexico with the goal of conserving and protecting wetland and upland habitats and associated waterfowl populations. Canada implements the plan through four regional Habitat Joint Ventures made up of a variety of cooperative public and private partners.

These Habitat Joint Ventures integrate planning, science, governance, partnerships, and management to achieve North American Waterfowl Management Plan goals in Canada. A science-based implementation plan is created to address local, regional and continental goals for each Joint Venture.Footnote 32

As a result of engagement of external partners to advance the Migratory Birds Strategy, Canadians will become increasingly aware of the importance of migratory birds and the threats that they face such that they are more likely to get outdoors and participate in citizen science programs.Footnote 33

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 15: Life on Land

(Target 15.1, Target 15.5)

Starting point: 6,382 km2 on March 31, 2014.

Performance indicator: Total area of habitat secured by partners

Target: 9,200 km2 by March 31, 2022.

Note: This is a summary indicator of all of the land securement efforts supported by a variety of ECCC programs. The results of this measure demonstrate the effectiveness of the ECCC support to build capacity for land securement efforts, which supports the contributing action and ultimately biodiversity conservation, as per the FSDS Target.

Departmental Results Framework Programs: Habitat Conservation and Protection
Promote public participation.

Promote public participation in nature through:

  • continuation of efforts to increase participation in nature-based programs and visits to national wildlife areas;
  • implementation of the “Connecting Canadians to Nature” Initiative in ten National Wildlife Areas by constructing new trails, bridges and exhibits, and promoting a national geocaching program (an outdoor educational game that uses GPS-enabled devices); and
  • facilitation of access to nature in National Wildlife Areas close to urban centres (for example, free access to Cap Tourmente National Wildlife Area in 2017).

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By increasing access to wildlife areas and expanding the range of nature-based experiences available, ECCC will make it easier for the public to get out into nature and encourage greater public participation in biodiversity and conservation activities. Such visits can foster enthusiasm for engagement in stewardship, public awareness and education.

Visits to National Wildlife Areas foster enthusiasm for nature and conservation, which in turn may encourage stewardship, education, and a sense of ownership over conservation efforts. This may further result in increased visits to NWAs and to further Connecting Canadians with Nature.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 11: Sustainable cities and communities (Target 11.7)

UN SDG 12 Responsible Consumption and Production (Target 12.8)

Starting point: 220,050 in 2015.

Performance indicator: Percentage increase in annual visitation to the ten National Wildlife Areas that are part of the Connecting Canadians to Nature Initiative since launch

Target: 25% by March 31, 2022(280,062 visitors from a baseline of 220,050 in 2015).

Note: The initiative encourages people to get outside and to enjoy the benefits of nature. Visitation rates are a direct measure of how many people are responding to the program, and thus engaged, as per the contributing action and the FSDS Target.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Habitat Conservation and Protection
Other contributions For more information on actions that contribute to Goal 12 of the FSDS, please consult ECCC’s 2021-22 Departmental Plan.
Goal 13 large icon

FSDS Goal 13, Safe and Healthy Communities: All Canadians live in clean, sustainable communities that contribute to their health and well-being

Responsible Minister: Minister of the Environment and Climate Change; Minister of Health

Safe and Healthy Communities

FSDS Target(s)

FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target

Starting point(s)

Performance indicator(s)

Target(s)

Program(s) in which the departmental actions will occur
Increase the percentage of Canadians living in areas where air quality standards are achieved from 70% in 2015 to 85% in 2030. Better understand air pollutants and harmful substances Monitor the impact of air pollution on ecosystems.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By monitoring the impacts of air pollution, ECCC will be working to ensure that Canadians’ environment is sustainable.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goals:

UN SDG 3: Good health and well-being (Target 3.9, Target 3.D)

UN SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities (Target 11.6)

Starting point: Baseline three-year average to be established by September 2022.

Performance indicator Area of exceedance of ecosystem critical loads of acidity

Target: Decrease in the area of acidity critical load exceedance from a baseline.

Note: Deposition of acidifying air pollutants to lakes and soils can exceed levels at which damage is expected (critical loads). Critical load exceedances are not compatible with ecosystem health. Healthy ecosystems help ensure sustainable communities. This is therefore a good measure of the FSDS Goal.

Deposition will be estimated based on air quality monitoring and modelling and compared with previously-determined critical load values for soils and lakes to calculate exceedance areas.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Air Quality
Provide information to inform action and decision-making.

Help Canadians understand air quality in their area through the Air Quality Health Index and the State of the Air website.

Implement the Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) to provide Canadians with greater access to local air quality information and forecasts to help make informed decisions about their health.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By collecting and sharing data on air pollutants and harmful substances, ECCC will inform evidence-based decision-making to protect the health of Canadians and the environment from harmful substances and assist Canadians in making informed decisions about their health.

Increasing the number of individuals that have access to the AQHI has helped Canadians to better inform their actions regarding their health and safety.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goals:

UN SDG 3: Good health and well-being
(
Target 3.9, Target 3.D)

UN SDG 13: Climate Action (Target 13.3)

Starting point: Target has been developed based on an initial value estimate of 400,000 at risk Canadians receiving AQHI risk communications (June 2016).

Performance indicator: Number of sensitive individuals reached by Air Quality Health Index (AQHI risk) communications

Target: 4 million by 2026.

Note: The indicator measures how well ECCC is succeeding in providing information to help Canadians reduce their exposure to air pollutants, so directly measures this contributing action, which is to provide information to inform action and decision-making.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Air Quality
Work with partners on outdoor air quality and chemicals management. Work with provinces, territories and other stakeholders to address air pollution through the implementation of the Air Quality Management System.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By collaborating with provinces, territories, stakeholders and international partners to develop and implement standards and approaches to improve air quality, ECCC works to reduce pollutants in outdoor air and increase the percentage of Canadians living in areas that meet ambient air quality standards.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goals:

UN SDG 3: Good health and well-being (Target 3.9)

UN SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities (Target 11.6)

Starting point: From a baseline of 60% in 2005-2007 based on 2020 CAAQS values.

Performance indicator: Percentage of Canadians living in areas where air quality standards are achieved

Target: 85% of Canadians live in areas that meet the Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standards (CAAQS) in 2030.

Note: The indicator tracks how many Canadians are living in areas with good air quality, and is thus a good measure of the FSDS Goal 13 and directly measures the FSDS Target.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Air Quality
Take a leading role in international agreements and collaboration on chemicals management and transboundary air pollution.

Negotiate on behalf of Canada and implement and strengthen agreements to reduce transboundary air pollution through:

  • continuing work with the U.S. to address transboundary air pollution under the Canada-U.S. Air Quality Agreement;
  • implementing the commitments under the Gothenburg Protocol to the UNECE Convention on Long Range Transboundary Air Pollution and continuing to demonstrate; leadership under the Convention; seeking to broaden the geographic scope of cooperation to address transboundary air pollution, including through provisions in Canada’s trade agreements that require cooperation and support Canada’s leadership role on air quality; and
  • engaging in efforts to take action on short-lived climate pollutants (SLCPs) and other contaminants under the Arctic Council.Footnote 34

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target[s] or goal:

By engaging with international partners and by leveraging collective inputs, ECCC is strengthening the impacts of its domestic actions and those of its international partners through ECCC’s regional action and meeting key international obligations, collective efforts to manage air pollutants will result in safer and healthier Canadian communities, therefore contributing to meeting the FSDS Goal 13.

Reductions in these key air pollutants contribute directly to the FSDS Target by contributing to improved air quality, and to increasing the percentage of Canadians living in areas where the air quality standards are achieved.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goals:

UN SDG 3: Good health and well-being (Target 3.9, Target 3.D)

UN SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities
(
Target 11.6)

UN SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production (Target 12.4)

Starting point: Emissions of NOx, SO2, PM2.5 and VOCs in the year 2005 (base year for Gothenburg Protocol commitments).

Performance indicator:

Percentage reduction of national emissions of:

  • nitrogen oxides (NOx)
  • sulphur dioxide (SO2)
  • fine particulate matter (PM2.5)
  • volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

Target: By 2020 (reporting in 2022), reduced and maintain the following from a 2005 baseline:

  • NOx: Reduction of emissions by 35%
  • SO2: Reduction of emissions by 55%
  • PM 2.5: Reduction of emissions by 25% (excluding road dust, construction operations, and crop production)
  • VOCs: Reduction of emissions by 20%.

Note: Decreases in national emissions of the pollutants for which Canada has reduction targets under the Gothenburg Protocol will measure progress towards the FSDS target. This indicator also provides information about the extent to which Canada’s positions and priorities are conveyed and reflected in key international transboundary air pollution fora. Progress demonstrated by ECCC within the international communities through these partnerships, inclusion in free trade agreements and the impacts they have on domestic air quality, therefore contributing to the FSDS target.

Starting point: 2013 national emission levels (specific amount subject to change due to changes in methodology).

Performance indicator: Black carbon emissions, as reported in Canada's Black Carbon Emissions Inventory.Footnote 35

Target: 25% decrease from an annually calculated 2013 baseline of national emissions by December 2025.

Note: Black carbon, an air pollutant with climate-warming effects, is emitted as a component of PM2.5. Reductions in PM2.5 emissions impact ambient PM2.5 and short lived climate pollutant levels. This indicator therefore is a measure of the FSDS Target and FSDS Goals 1 and 13.

Starting point: 45 Mt CO2e in 2012.

Performance indicator: Methane emissions from the oil and gas sectorFootnote 36

Target: 40-45% reduction relative to 2012 levels by December 2025.

Note: Methane is a potent GHG and short lived climate pollutant that is significantly more powerful than carbon dioxide, and contributes to ozone formation. This indicator therefore is a measure of the FSDS Target and FSDS Goals 1 and 13.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Air Quality; Clean Growth and Climate Change Mitigation
Continued decrease in emissions from 1990 of fine particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, sulphur oxides and volatile organic compounds from all sources. Better understand air pollutants and harmful substances. Assess the benefits and co-benefits for the environment and human health of existing, planned and proposed measures to reduce emissions, including by providing air quality monitoring data, expertise, maps and analysis, and modeling to guide implementation of the Air Quality Management System (AQMS) and other measures to reduce air pollutants.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By conducting research, analysis and modeling, and collecting data on sources of air pollution, and impacts of measures to mitigate it, ECCC will be in a position to continue to develop effective regulations and other tools to reduce harmful pollutants and improve air quality for Canadians, contributing to safer, healthier communities.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goals:

UN SDG 3: Good health and well-being (Target 3.9)

UN SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities (Target 11.6)

Starting point: 2006-2008 average.

Performance indicator: Emissions of air pollutants from industrial, transportation and other sources in tonnes for fine particulate matter (PM2.5); sulphur oxides (SOx); nitrogen oxides (NOx); volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

Target: Continued downward trend in current three-year average relative to the 2006-2008 baseline.

Note: This indicator directly tracks progress on the FSDS Target. Decreased emissions result in improved air quality and associated health benefits.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Air Quality
Use legislation and regulations to address outdoor air pollutant emissions and harmful substances.

Develop, administer, implement, and enforce regulations and non-regulatory instruments to limit emissions of air pollutants, including nitrogen oxides, sulphur dioxide, particulate matter and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by:

  • continuing to implement transportation air pollutant regulations and amending, where appropriate, to achieve emissions reductions objectives, including;Footnote 37 
  • implementing amendments to regulation of on-road vehicles for 2017–2025;
  • implementing Tier 3 under the On-Road Vehicle and Engine Emission Regulations;
  • finalizing regulation of petroleum and refinery air pollutant emissions;
  • continuing to administer the Multi-Sector Air Pollutants Regulations (MSAPR) and various non-regulatory instruments for industrial sectors and equipment;
  • finalizing an on-line reporting system for the MSAPR for stationary spark-ignition engines;
  • continuing to administer various non-regulatory instruments to reduce air pollution from industrial sectors and equipment, such as NOx guidelines for new stationary combustion turbines and Performance Agreements for the aluminum and the iron ore pellets sectors;
  • administering amendments to coal-fired electricity generation regulations;
  • publishing the final Off-Road Compression-Ignition (Mobile and Stationary) and Large Spark-Ignition Engine Emission Regulations;
  • continuing to implement transportation air pollutant regulations and amending, where appropriate, to achieve emissions reductions objectives;
  • implementing amendments to regulation of on-road vehicles for 2017–2025;
  • implementing Tier 3 under the On-Road Vehicle and Engine Emission Regulations;
  • finalizing the Volatile Organic Compound Concentration Limits for Certain Products Regulations;
  • proposing amendments to the Volatile Organic Compounds Concentration Limits for Architectural Coatings Regulations; and
  • starting the consultation on and publishing the renewal of the federal agenda on the reductions of VOC emissions from consumer and commercial products.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By developing and enforcing regulations and applying other measures, ECCC will reduce the release of pollutants emissions and substances that are harmful to human health and the environment, and will decrease the three-year averages of fine particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, sulphur oxides, and volatile organic compounds emissions, thereby contributing to the protection of human health and safe and healthy communities.

These actions contribute to the FSDS Target directly, but also to Goal 13, since emissions reductions improve air quality, resulting in associated health benefits and cleaner, sustainable communities.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goals:

UN SDG 3: Good health and well-being (Target 3.9)

UN SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production (Target 12.4)

Starting Point: 2006–2008 average.

Performance Indicator:

Emissions of air pollutants from industrial, transportation and other sources in tonnes for fine particulate matter (PM2.5); sulphur oxides (SOx); nitrogen oxides (NOx); volatile organic compounds (VOCs)

Target: Continued downward trend in current three year average relative to the 2006-2008 baseline.

Note: Measuring air pollutant emissions reductions is a direct way to measure the impact of regulations and other measures to reduce emissions, including non-regulatory measures, changes to legislation and establishment of air quality standards using legislative authorities. It also directly measures the contribution to the FSDS Target.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Air Quality

 

Continue to reduce short-lived climate pollutants (SLCPs), many of which are also harmful air pollutants, by:

  • continuing to implement ECCC’s Strategy on Short-lived Climate Pollutants;
  • publishing a progress report on commitments under the SLCP Strategy; and
  • continuing to advance domestic and international work to reduce SLCPs.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

Reducing short-lived climate pollutants (black carbon, methane, ozone and HFCs) will improve air quality while contributing to reducing near-term climate change. It contributes to FSDS Goals 1 and 13.Footnote 38

Support to related Sustainable Development Goals:

UN SDG 3: Good health and well-being (Target 3.9, Target 3.D)

UN SDG 13: Climate Action (Target 13.3)

Starting point: 2013 national emission levels (specific amount subject to change due to changes in methodology).

Performance indicator: Black carbon emissions, as reported in Canada's Black Carbon Emissions Inventory.

Target: 25% decrease from an annually calculated 2013 baseline of national emissions by December 2025.

Note: Black carbon, an air pollutant with climate-warming effects, is emitted as a component of PM2.5. This indicator therefore is a measure of the FSDS Target and FSDS Goals 1 and 13.

Starting point: 45 Mt CO2e in 2012.

Performance indicator: Methane emissions from the oil and gas sector

Target: 40-45% reduction relative to 2012 levels by December 2025.

Note: Methane is a potent GHG, significantly more powerful than carbon dioxide, and contributes to the formation of ozone. This indicator therefore is a measure of FSDS Goals 1 and 13.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Clean Growth and Climate Change Mitigation
Assess the potential for the development of federal measures to address black carbon from new wood-burning appliances and continue implementing measures to reduce black carbon emissions from new stationary diesel engines.Footnote 39

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By developing and enforcing regulations and applying other measures, ECCC will reduce the release of pollutants emissions and substances that are harmful to human health and the environment, thereby contributing to the protection of human health and safe and healthy communities.

Starting point: 2013 national emission levels (specific amount subject to change due to changes in methodology).

Performance indicator: Black carbon emissions, as reported in Canada’s Black Carbon Emissions Inventory

Target: 25% decrease from an annually calculated 2013 baseline of national emissions by December 2025.

Note: Black carbon, an air pollutant with climate-warming effects, is emitted as a component of PM2.5, specifically referenced in this FSDS Target. Decreasing black carbon emissions will have health benefits associated with it, thereby contributing directly to FSDS Goals 1 and 13.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Clean Growth and Climate Change Mitigation
Work with partners on outdoor air quality and chemicals management. Complete the review of the Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standards for fine particulate matter (PM 2.5), and recommend new CAAQs for PM2.5 to be met in 2025.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By collaborating with provinces, territories, stakeholders and international partners to develop and implement standards and approaches to improve air quality, ECCC will work to reduce pollutants in outdoor air. Through collaboration, ECCC engages partners to work on common objectives, increase capacity, improve efficacy of efforts through information sharing and other means.

Air quality standards drive local air quality improvements. Working towards the 2030 goal of 85% of the Canadian population living in areas where air quality standards are achieved means more Canadians live in safe and healthy communities.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goals:

UN SDG 3: Good health and well-being (Target 3.9)

UN SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities (Target 11.6)

Starting Point: Baseline of 60% in 2005–2007.

Performance Indicator:

Percentage of Canadians living in areas where air quality standards are achieved

Target: 85% of Canadians live in areas that meet the Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standards (CAAQS) in 2030.

Note: The indicator tracks how many Canadians are living in areas with good air quality, and can be used, with other indicators, to assess progress toward the reduction of outdoor air pollutant emissions and harmful substances.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Air Quality
Other Prepare and publish a national report on black carbon and methane every two years in line with an Arctic Council commitment.Footnote 40

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

Through Canada’s leadership role and by collecting and sharing data on black carbon and methane, ECCC will inform evidence-based decision-making to protect the health of Canadians and the environment from air pollutants and harmful substances and fulfill Canada’s Arctic Council commitment.Footnote 41

Support to related Sustainable Development Goals:

UN SDG 3: Good health and well-being (Target 3.9, Target 3.D)

UN SDG 13: Climate Action (Target 13.3)

Starting point: 2013 national emission levels (specific amount subject to change due to changes in methodology).

Performance indicator: Black carbon emissions, as reported in Canada's Black Carbon Emissions Inventory

Target: 25% decrease from an annually calculated 2013 baseline of national emissions by December 2025.

Note: Black carbon, an air pollutant with climate-warming effects, is emitted as a component of PM2.5. This indicator therefore is a measure of the FSDS Target and FSDS Goals 1 and 13.

Starting point: 45 Mt CO2e in 2012.

Performance indicator: Methane emissions from the oil and gas sector

Target: 40-45% reduction relative to 2012 levels by December 2025.

Note: Methane is a potent GHG, significantly more powerful than carbon dioxide, and contributes to ozone formation. This indicator is therefore a measure of the FSDS target and Goals 1 and 13.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Clean Growth and Climate Change Mitigation
By 2022, take risk management actions in a timely manner for 100% of substances found to be a risk to the environment or human health. Better understand air pollutants and harmful substances

Develop a better understanding and capacity to manage the health and environmental risks of pollutants to Canadians by:

  • continuing to deliver Canada’s Chemicals Management Plan with Health Canada, including addressing the remaining 472 priority chemicals by the end of FY 2020–21, continuing to set new directions and objectives for managing chemicals beyond 2020, and supporting greater transparency and public participation in the notification and risk assessments of new substances and organisms through the New Substances Voluntary Public Engagement Transparency Initiative; and
  • collaborating with Health Canada to strengthen the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA).

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

Assessing and managing priority chemicals that pose a risk will help reduce the exposure of the environment and of Canadians to potentially harmful substances from hazardous chemicals, or air, water, and soil contamination.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goals:

UN SDG 3: Good health and well-being (Target 3.9)

Starting point: Not applicable.

Performance indicator: Publication of Risk Assessments.Footnote 42

Target: Publish 24 draft screening assessment reports (DSARs) representing 101 substances and 21 final screening assessment reports (FSARs) representing 167 substances by March 2021.

Note: The indicator directly reflects the identification of substances that are considered to be a health or environmental risk, and will inform their subsequent risk management.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Substances and Waste Management
Better understand harmful substances by conducting scientific assessment to determine the risks to the environment from substances that are already in commerce (existing substances) and substances proposed for use in Canada.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By conducting scientific assessment on harmful substances, ECCC will inform evidence-based decision-making to protect the health of Canadians and the environment from harmful substances and assist Canadians in making informed decisions about their health.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 3: Good health and well-being (Target 3.9)

UN SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities (Target 11.6)

Starting point: Not applicable.

Performance indicator: Publication of Risk Assessments.Footnote 43

Target: Publish 24 draft screening assessment reports (DSARs) representing 101 substances and 21 final screening assessment reports (FSARs) representing 167 substances by March 2021.

Note: The indicator directly reflects the identification of substances that are considered to be a health or environmental risk, and will inform their subsequent risk management.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Substances and Waste Management
Deliver funding for community-led and citizen science initiatives (HMF, Federal Leadership towards Zero Plastic Waste Initiative).

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

Plastic pollution will be diverted from the environment (captured and removed), contributing to clean communities.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goals:

UN SDG 3: Good health and well-being (Target 3.9)

UN SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities (Target 11.6)

UN SDG 14: Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources (Target 14.1)

Starting point: No previous funding.

Performance indicator:

  1. # of kilograms of plastic litter diverted (captured or collected) from water bodies
  2. # of citizen science sharing platform mechanism identified
  3. # of modules, science reviews to identify plastic sources and distribution
  4. # of best practices or guidance reports/tools developed.Footnote 44

Target:

  1. TBD kg of plastic litter based on region and amount of pollution by March 2022;
  2. One citizen science protocol published by March 2021;
  3. At least 2 by March 2022;
  4. At least 2 by March 2022.

Note: These indicators are a measure of progress towards developing community-led, science backed, and effective plastic pollution capture and collection solutions for diverting plastic waste from the environment. This ultimately leads to a better understanding of the impact of substances that are harmful to the environment or human health.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Substances and Waste Management
Provide information to inform action and decision-making. Inform Canadians about releases and disposals of pollutants in their communities through the National Pollutant Release Inventory.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By collecting and sharing data on air pollutants and harmful substances from more than 7,500 facilities across Canada through the National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI), ECCC will inform evidence-based decision-making to protect the health of Canadians and the environment from harmful substances and assist Canadians in making informed decisions about their health.Footnote 45

Support to related Sustainable Development Goals:

UN SDG 3: Good health and well-being

(Target 3.9, Target 3.D)

UN SDG 13: Climate Action (Target 13.3)

Starting point: Data available each year in first half of December.

Performance indicator: NPRI data is made publicly available each year

Target: NPRI 2019 reviewed data is published before the end of each calendar year (December).

Note: This indicator measures the publication of data on pollutants which helps Canadians access key information to help them make better decision for their health.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Substances and Waste Management
Support decision-making by federal custodians of contaminated sites by providing enhanced oversight, administration and coordination to program partners.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By remediating ECCC contaminated sites and providing expertise to remediation work of other federal departments, ECCC will reduce ecological risks related to harmful substances on these lands.

Assessment of sites reduces uncertainty related to ecological and human health risks and allows remediation to progress.

Risk reduction activities contribute to a safe and healthy environment for Canadians by minimizing impacts to human health and the environment.

The implementation of action items and decisions from senior governance meetings helps to improve program delivery, thereby providing Canadians with safe and healthy communities to enjoy.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 3: Good health and well-being (Target 3.9)

UN SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production (Target 12.4)

Starting point: The starting point will be established once the performance indicator is identified.

Performance indicator: The performance indicator is under development.

Target: The target date is to be determined.

Note: An explanation will be provided once the performance indicator is identified.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Substances and Waste Management
Assist Federal departments and programs, provinces and territories by developing the Environment Quality Guidelines, national benchmarks or indicators of environmental quality intended to protect, sustain and enhance Canada’s environment.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

Environmental Quality Guidelines establish targets for sound decision-making for the risk management of chemicals in aquatic and terrestrial environments. They are also used to set priorities for action and serve as performance indicators of success.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goals:

UN SDG 11 Sustainable Cities and Communities (Target 11.6)

UN SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production (Target 12.4)

Starting point: Not available. This is a new indicator.

Performance indicator: The number of substances for which Environmental Quality Guidelines are developed.

Target: Environmental Quality Guidelines will be developed for 8 substances by December 2022.

Note: Environmental Quality Guidelines provide benchmarks of toxicity for substances that allows governments to make quick and informed risk management decisions, thereby contributing to meeting the target “By 2022, take risk management actions in a timely manner for 100% of substances found to be a risk to the environment or human health.”

Departmental Results Framework Program: Substances and Waste Management

Manage harmful substances that pose risks, and ensure risk management measures are in place for substances identified as harmful, including through:

  • modelling, analysis and research, and by developing regulatory impact analysis statements to support informed federal decision-making on policy approaches to reduce air and water pollution, including assessments of regulations such as the off-road small spark ignition engines. The analysis will also support the development of air quality standards;
  • development, implementation and administration of regulatory and non-regulatory instruments to manage risks from harmful substances; and
  • administering and promoting compliance and implementing a risk-based approach to enforcing regulations related to chemicals and toxic substances.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

Through this Departmental Action, ECCC will contribute to the FSDS Goal 13 - Safe and Healthy Communities. The implementation of risk management actions aims to reduce the potential environmental risks of harmful substances. This departmental action directly contributes to the FSDS target which is about taking risk management actions for substances found to be a risk to the environment or human health. Managing chemical substances protects the environment and human health.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goals:

UN SDG 11 Sustainable Cities and Communities (Target 11.6)

UN SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production (Target 12.4)

Starting point: Baseline of 100% for fiscal year 2019-20.

Performance indicator: Percentage of substances that are added to Schedule 1 of CEPA (Toxic substances list) because they pose a risk to the environment that have controls in place within legislated timelines.

Target: 95%-100% by March 31, 2022.

Note: This indicator measures the extent to which risk management actions are taken in a timely manner, so as to reduce the potential environmental risks of harmful substances. As such, this indicator is well-aligned with the departmental action concerning the development, implementation and administration of risk management instruments for harmful substances.

This indicator is a meaningful interim measure for the FSDS Target which is “By 2022, take risk management actions in a timely manner for 100% of substances found to be a risk to the environment or human health”.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Substances and Waste Management
Take a leading role in international agreements and collaboration on chemicals management and transboundary air pollution

Negotiate on behalf of Canada and implement international agreements related to chemicals management, including through:

  • continuing to advance the implementation of the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, including its Kigali Amendment on HFCs, including by supporting bilateral projects in developing countries; and
  • continuing to advance the sound management of chemicals and waste through active participation in committees and subsidiary bodies to the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions, supported by domestic action under the Chemicals Management Plan.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target(s) or goal:

By engaging with international partners and by leveraging collective inputs, ECCC is strengthening the impacts of its domestic actions and those of its international partners. Through ECCC’s regional action and meeting key international obligations, collective efforts to manage harmful chemicals, hazardous and other waste, and air pollutants will result in safer and healthier Canadian communities, therefore contributing to meeting the FSDS goal.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goals:

UN SDG 3: Good health and well-being (Target 3.9, Target 3.D)

UN SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production (Target 12.4)

Starting point: The starting point will be established once the performance indicator is identified.

Performance indicator: The performance indicator is under development.

Target: The target date is to be determined.

Note: An explanation will be provided once the performance indicator is identified.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Substances and Waste Management
Demonstrate leadership on assessing and remediating contaminates sites Assess and remediate federal contaminates sites through the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan at sites for which ECCC is responsible.

Contribution to meeting the FSDS target[s] or goal:

By remediating contaminated sites, including those sites for which ECCC is responsible, ECCC will reduce ecological risks related to harmful substances on these lands.

The assessment reduces uncertainty related to ecological and human health risks and allows remediation to progress.

Risk reduction activities contribute to a safe and healthy environment for Canadians by minimizing impacts to human health and the environment.

Support to related Sustainable Development Goal:

UN SDG 3: Good health and well-being (Target 3.9)

UN SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production (Target 12.4)

Starting point: The starting point will be established once the performance indicator is identified.

Performance indicator: The performance indicator is under development.

Target: The target date is to be determined.

Note: An explanation will be provided once the performance indicator is identified.

Departmental Results Framework Program: Substance and Waste Management
Other contributions For more information on actions that contribute to Goal 13 of the FSDS, please consult ECCC’s 2021-22 Departmental Plan.

Section 4: Report on Integrating Sustainable Development

Strategic environmental assessment (SEA) is the systematic and comprehensive process of evaluating the environmental effects of a policy, plan, or program and its alternatives. The emphasis is on examining environmental effects, but most SEAs also consider economic and social effects. SEAs promote environmental sustainability in decision- making and help ensure that the environment and other factors are considered when developing policy, plan and program proposals.

SEA is comprehensively applied at ECCC to support environmentally sustainable decision-making. ECCC’s SEA policy, building on the foundation of the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals, recognizes that every proposal has important environmental effects. As such, ECCC does not conduct preliminary scans to make that determination, but instead conducts a SEA for all proposals.

ECCC will continue to ensure that its decision-making process, through the application of SEAs, includes consideration of FSDS goals and targets. Every SEA undertaken of a policy, plan or program proposal at ECCC includes an analysis of the impacts of the given proposal on the environment, including links to the relevant FSDS goals and targets, as well as the environmentally-focused Sustainable Development Goals [SDGs] of the United Nations 2030 Agenda.

Public statements on the results of ECCC’s assessments are released on ECCC’s registry of public statements on strategic environmental assessments when an initiative that has undergone a detailed SEA is made public. The purpose of the public statement is to demonstrate that the environmental effects, including impacts on the relevant FSDS goals and targets of the approved policy, plan or program, have been considered during proposal development and decision-making.

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