Goal 7: Increase Canadians' access to clean energy

Why this goal is important

This Goal's focus on increasing Canadian's access to clean energy supports SDG Global Indicator Framework targets.

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This Goal's focus on increasing Canadian's access to clean energy supports SDG Global Indicator Framework targets:

  • 7.1: By 2030, ensure universal access to affordable, reliable and modern energy services
  • 7.2: By 2030, increase substantially the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix
  • 7.3: By 2030, double the global rate of improvement in energy efficiency

Access to affordable and reliable energy is essential to eradicating poverty and enabling economic growth and improved living standards. At the same time, energy production and use is currently the dominant contributor to climate change, accounting for around 78% of total global greenhouse gas emissions. In Canada, as in the rest of the world, greenhouse gas emissions primarily come from activities such as non-renewable electricity production, oil and gas production, transportation, and heating and cooling of buildings using fossil fuels.

Clean and affordable energy is essential to Canada's and the world's aspirations to decarbonize the economy and achieve net-zero greenhouse gas emissions. There are 3 key pathways to decarbonize how Canadians use energy: electrification, efficiency, and clean fuels.

Canada reduced its energy consumption per dollar of economic activity by approximately 17% from 2000 to 2018 but remains one of the world's largest per-capita consumers of energy and approximately 81% of its greenhouse gas emissions come from energy production, including for export, and domestic use. Canadians use more energy per capita due to the country's extreme temperatures, vast landscape and dispersed population. Energy efficiency has an important role in meeting Canada's emissions reduction targets, while also helping individual Canadians and businesses save money on energy costs, improving competitiveness, and creating jobs.

Canadians have access to some of the world's cleanest electricity. Between 2016 and 2020, the electricity generated in Canada that came from non-greenhouse-gas-emitting sources increased about 2% to reach 83% of the total electricity produced in Canada, including 68% from renewables and 15% from nuclear. However, remote and northern communities are not afforded equal access to reliable sources of clean energy and typically rely on diesel fuel for electricity and heat. Increasing access to reliable and affordable clean energy is vital for enhancing the economic development and well-being of remote and northern communities, and for meeting the Government of Canada's climate change targets.

Electrification provides a foundation for decarbonization strategies such as electrifying transportation, heating and cooling of buildings, and certain industrial applications. It also underpins digitization, smart technology, and the internet of things, all of which play a critical role in managing energy and increasing demand.

Energy efficiency standards and labelling programs are among the most cost-effective greenhouse gas emission reduction policies and are the cornerstone of energy efficiency and climate change programs in more than 80 countries. According to the International Energy Agency, improvements to the energy efficiency of products are some of the lowest-cost options available today for reducing energy consumption and associated emissions (with benefit-cost ratios of 4:1 for Canadian society), while providing net financial benefits to individuals and the community.

Clean fuels produce fewer greenhouse gas emissions than traditional fuels. Growing Canada's clean fuels market will help reduce its carbon footprint by cutting emissions from hard-to-abate sectors. Canada is rich in a variety of feedstocks that can be used to make clean fuels like hydrogen, cellulosic ethanol, renewable natural gas, and renewable diesel. Even our abundant fossil fuel resources can be converted to clean hydrogen when coupled with carbon capture and storage technologies. These fuels can be used to power our transportation and industrial sectors, supporting Canada's energy sector transition to a net-zero economy.

Nuclear energy, and small modular reactors (SMRs) in particular, will be part of the “all-options” approach to achieve the Government of Canada's ambitious commitments to achieve net-zero emissions by 2050, and by 2035 in the electricity sector. This technology can position Canada as a clean energy leader; support the decarbonization of provincial electricity grids; facilitate the transition away from diesel power in remote communities; and help decarbonize heavy emitting industries. As a baseload, dispatchable and non-emitting source of energy, SMRs could also play a vital role in enabling deeper integration of variable renewables (for example, wind and solar) into Canada's energy mix, especially in regions without significant hydro resources.

How the Government of Canada contributes

In March 2022, the Government of Canada tabled its first 2030 Emissions Reduction Plan (ERP) under the Canadian Net-Zero Emissions Accountability Act.

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The ERP continues to build on the climate actions outlined in Canada's previous climate plans, the strengthened climate plan - A Healthy Environment and a Healthy Economy, and the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change, released respectively in 2020 and 2016. The 2030 Emissions Reduction Plan is the next major step in taking action to address climate change and create good, sustainable jobs. This $9.1 billion plan outlines a sector-by-sector roadmap for Canada to reach its emissions reduction target of 40% below 2005 levels by 2030 and net-zero emissions by 2050.

Through this plan, Canada is working towards net-zero electricity by 2035 and will expand non-emitting energy across Canada, connect regions to clean power, and foster more clean, reliable, and affordable electricity supply. In addition, Budget 2022 provided $250 millions to support pre-development activities of clean electricity projects of national significance, such as inter-provincial electricity transmission projects and small modular reactors. The 2030 Emissions Reduction Plan will also help reduce emissions from industry, buildings, and transportation. With these climate plans, the Government of Canada, in collaboration with provincial and territorial governments, will continue to improve the energy efficiency of Canadian homes and buildings; incent the uptake of technologies that reduce the carbon intensity of liquid fuels and invest in clean fuels production capacity; and support the transition of Indigenous and northern communities to clean, renewable and reliable energy.

To speed up the transition to clean fuels, technologies and processes across Canada, the Government of Canada is supporting the development of a clean fuels sector in Canada through a series of investments and initiatives that complement the Clean Fuel Regulations. The Government of Canada collaborated with stakeholders including industry, other levels of government, Indigenous organizations, non-government organizations and academia to develop the Hydrogen Strategy for Canada. The Clean Fuels Fund, a $1.5 billion investment in the clean fuels sector, is one of many federal initiatives supporting this strategy.

The Regional Energy and Resource Tables have been launched, a collaborative initiative with the provinces and territories designed to identify, prioritize and accelerate opportunities for sustainable job creation and economic growth for a low-carbon future in the energy, electricity, mining, forestry and clean technology sectors across all of Canada's regions.

Canada is also working to enhance energy security and efficiency and to accelerate the pace of the clean and inclusive energy transition around the world. As a founding member of the International Energy Agency (IEA), Canada actively supports developing net-zero roadmaps—tracking progress, enhancing its assistance to priority countries, leveraging its expertise through data, supporting modelling and analysis, and providing policy advice to IEA member governments and key emitters. Recognizing the importance of an inclusive and equitable clean transition, Canada is an active member of the IEA's Global Commission on People-Centred Clean Energy Transitions.

Canada is a member of the Clean Energy Ministerial, which brings together 28 countries and the European Commission to accelerate progress on energy efficiency, clean energy supply and clean energy access. Canada also advances its clean energy agenda through the Group of Seven (G7) and Group of Twenty (G20).

The Powering Past Coal Alliance, co-founded and co-chaired by Canada and the UK, is the world's leading initiative seeking to accelerate clean growth and climate protection through the rapid phase-out of unabated coal power. As of July 2022, the alliance has more than 165 members. It is committed to just transition and an economically-inclusive phase-out of coal through its Just Transition Taskforce. Domestically, Canada has committed to phasing out traditional coal-fired electricity by 2030 and with new regulations in place, will end exports of thermal coal by 2030.

Canada continues to play a leadership role in Mission Innovation, an initiative among 23 governments launched in 2015 to enhance collaboration and catalyze action and investment in research, development and demonstration to make clean energy affordable, attractive and accessible for all. Mission Innovation 2.0 was launched in June 2021 and Canada is co-leading the Carbon Dioxide Removal Mission, and participating in the Green Power and Clean Hydrogen Missions.

The Energy Efficiency Act provides the authority to regulate energy efficiency standards and labelling for energy using products. The Government of Canada is reviewing this Act to maximize its legislative authority to better support innovation in energy efficiency products and services, promote effective decision-making, minimise burden, manage market challenges, and facilitate voluntary approaches. It also recognizes the importance of aligning regulatory policies with provinces and territories, who share authority in this area.

In December 2020, the Government of Canada released the SMR Action Plan to enable the development, demonstration, and deployment of Small Modular Reactors or SMRs to reduce emissions, decarbonize heavy industry, and spur economic development. The plan now includes 119 participating organizations and over 500 actions. The government is supporting the plan through demonstration and deployment projects, as well as developing policy, legislation and regulation, such as inaugurating the SMR Leadership Table, engagement and capacity building and working to develop international partnerships.

Finally, Canada is a member of the International Renewable Energy Agency, an intergovernmental organization dedicated to producing energy from clean, sustainable energy sources. Canada recently contributed to the launch of a Multi-stakeholder Platform for Transitioning Remote Communities to Renewable Energy.

Access to energy in Indigenous and northern communities

About 200 communities across Canada rely completely on diesel fuel for heat and power. The vast majority are Indigenous or have significant Indigenous populations. Remote communities consume more than 680 million litres of diesel per year and close to two thirds of this areused for heat, as many remote communities are located in harsh environments. The Government of Canada is investing in several clean energy projects in Indigenous communities that are seeking to transition from diesel to clean energy. For example, the Fort Chipewyan Solar Project has received $4.5 million toward building a 2.2-megawatt solar energy and energy storage project in northern Alberta. The project, Canada's largest off-grid solar project, is owned by 3 neighbouring Indigenous groups in Fort Chipewyan. It will produce 20% of the community's electricity, displacing 650,000 litres of diesel fuel per year and reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 1,743 tonnes annually. In 2021, the federal government announced an additional investment of $300 million, starting in 2022, to continue to support community-driven solutions to reducing diesel reliance in remote communities.

Partner perspective: Energy democracy in Indigenous communities

Some Indigenous communities are generating wealth from a range of renewable energy assets and have full employment of their membership as a result. These trends provide a stepping stone towards energy democracy in Indigenous communities. “Energy democracy” refers to systems where both the sources (for example, solar panels) and ownership of energy generation are distributed widely, where the energy system is governed by democratic principles that allow ordinary citizens to have a say, and access to governance of the energy system is equitable regardless of socioeconomic status or other factors.

As of 2017, as many as 152 clean-energy projects featured Indigenous community involvement or were Indigenous-owned, with an estimated production capacity of 19,516 megawatts and an estimated $2.5 billion in profits for involved Indigenous communities over 15 years. The economic benefits of Indigenous-owned clean-energy generation are also estimated to be three times greater than absentee-owned systems. Greater institutional completeness (or the ability to meet human needs for survival and cultural expression) through energy security in Indigenous communities is also sparking the resurrection and reinforcement of internal moral authorities such as clan mothers, Elders' councils, and Indigenous governance structures. The map below visualizes Indigenous Clean Energy projects that were active or which had undergone feasibility studies as of 2016. For more information on Energy Democracy in Indigenous communities, see Scott (2020).

Source: Perspective provided by a member of the Sustainable Development Advisory Council

Partner perspective: Student residence deep energy retrofit in Iqaluit, Nunavut

Nunavut's infrastructure is aging, as most of its buildings were constructed in the 1970s. The old building designs, coupled with the cold environment, means that building retrofits could have a high impact on energy savings. Qikiqtaaluk Properties Inc. is renovating a building constructed in 2006 that functions as a student residence for Nunavut Arctic College. It is a demonstration project to support national and territorial building energy codes and will verify the feasibility of Arctic deep energy retrofits.

This retrofit project features significant improvements to the building envelope (including triple pane windows), upgrades to LED lighting, low flow fixtures, heat recovery systems, and a 100kW rooftop solar installation. Energy modelling projects that the retrofits will reduce energy consumption by an estimated 62 percent. This is estimated to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 352 tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent annually, equal to taking 65 cars off the road annually. The project also creates training and career opportunities for highly qualified clean energy personnel, and includes an occupant education project to educate the students on how to improve their energy use-behaviours.

Source: Perspective provided by a member of the Sustainable Development Advisory Council

Additional context and updates regarding this goal

Targets, indicators, milestones and contextual indicators

Targets, indicators, milestones and contextual indicators

Theme:  Renewable and non-emitting sources of electricity

Target: Clean power generation (1)

By 2030, 90%, and in the long term 100% of Canada's electricity is generated from renewable and non-emitting sources (Minister of Natural Resources)

Indicator (i)

Proportion of electricity generated from renewable and non-greenhouse gas-emitting sources

This indicator tracks electricity generation from renewable sources, such as solar, tidal, biomass, wind, and hydroelectricity, as well as from non-emitting sources such as nuclear energy. Between 2016 and 2020, the share of electricity produced from renewable and non-emitting sources increased about 2% to reach 83% of the total electricity produced in Canada. This share combines 68% from renewable and 15% from nuclear sources.

Short-term milestone: Demonstrate and deploy the next generation of smart grids (1)

By the end of 2023, complete 22 projects that demonstrate the next generation of smart grid technologies and/or deploy smart grid integrated systems.

Update

The Smart Grid Program has supported successful completion of 18 projects as of December 2023, with the remaining four projects expected to be completed by March 2024.

Status: In Progress

Source: Natural Resources Canada, 2023

Short-term milestone: Develop the Clean Electricity Regulations (1)

By the end of 2023, develop, in collaboration with provinces, territories, environmental non-governmental organizations, industry, academics, and Indigenous partners, the Clean Electricity Regulations in support of a net-zero electricity grid by 2035 while continuing to deliver clean, reliable and affordable electricity to Canadians.

Short-term milestone: Install renewable energy in Indigenous and northern communities (1)

By the end of 2026, install up to 40 megawatts of renewable energy in rural and remote communities and off-grid industrial sites.

(Supports the goal and the Clean Power Generation Target)

Natural Resources Canada

Short-term milestone: Support smart renewables (1)

By the end of 2026, support 1,000 megawatts of new renewable energy projects, capable of providing essential grid services.

Short-term milestone: Provide access to efficient sources of electricity (1)

By March 31, 2026, at least 11 communities have access to more efficient sources of electricity as a result of infrastructure investments under Infrastructure Canada's Arctic Energy Fund.

Theme: Energy efficiency

Target: Energy efficiency (2)

By 2030, 600 petajoules of total annual energy savings will be achieved as a result of adoption of energy efficiency codes, standards and practices from a baseline savings of 20.0 petajoules in 2017 to 2018 (Minister of Natural Resources)

Indicator (i)

Total annual energy savings resulting from adoption of energy efficiency codes, standards and practices

This indicator tracks annual energy savings resulting from adopting energy efficiency codes, standards and practices. By the end of fiscal year 2021-2022, by adopting energy efficiency codes, standards, and practices, Canada had achieved total annual energy savings of 80.0 petajoules.

Short-term milestone: Support greener homes (2)

• By March 2023, expand the eligibility of the Canada Greener Homes Grant to include more climate resilience measures

• By March 2024, homeowners complete 450,000 pre-retrofit EnerGuide evaluations under the Canada Greener Homes Grant initiative

Update

In 2023 as part of the Canada Greener Homes Grant Annual Review, stakeholder engagement sessions were held to seek input on proposed new resiliency measures and other program changes. Internal analysis of input received and stakeholder recommendations regarding resiliency measures and other proposed program changes is ongoing as of December 2023.

Status: In Progress

Source: Natural Resources Canada, 2023

Short-term milestone: Develop the Canada Green Buildings Strategy (2)

By the end of 2023, develop the Canada Green Buildings Strategy that will include initiatives that lay the foundation for achieving a net zero buildings sector by 2050, including initiatives related to promoting ambitious building codes and regulations; fostering the use of lower carbon construction materials; and increasing the climate resilience of existing buildings.

Update

Through 2022 and 2023, NRCan has been working closely with key stakeholders and federal partners to develop the Canada Green Buildings Strategy, with a view to achieving net zero and enhancing climate resiliency. The Strategy will take into account new actions being developed at the federal level and by provincial and territorial partners, industry and the private sector. 

In the summer of 2022, NRCan released the Canada Green Buildings Strategy Discussion Paper and launched a public engagement process which concluded in early 2023. 

In summer 2023, NRCan published key learnings from this engagement with a What We Heard report and a Summary of Engagement with Indigenous Partners.

Status: In Progress

Source: Natural Resources Canada, 2023

Short-term milestone: Demonstrate energy-efficient and net-zero energy building technologies (2)

By the end of 2026, support at least 12 projects demonstrating energy-efficient and net-zero energy building technologies.

Short-term milestone: Promote ENERGY STAR® Portfolio Manager® (2)

By the end of 2026, ENERGY STAR® performance scores are available for 21 building types and 480 million square metres of commercial and institutional building floor space are captured in the ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager® benchmarking tool.

Theme: Clean fuels

Target: Clean fuels (3)

By March 2030, increase Canada's capacity to produce clean fuels by 10% over 2021 levels (Minister of Natural Resources)

Indicator (i)

Percentage increase in clean fuels production capacity

This indicator will track the percentage increase in clean fuels production capacity in Canada.

Short-term milestone: Support the development of clean fuel production facilities (3)

By the end of 2026, at least 10 hydrogen facilities (expansion or conversions), and up to eight other clean fuel facilities, are commissioned across the country.

Short-term milestone: Support biomass supply chains (3)

By the end of 2026, Canada has at least 7 sustainable biomass supply chains across the country, complementing growth in new clean fuel production.

Short-term milestone: Develop codes, standards and regulations (3)

By 2026, develop at least 24 new or revised codes and standards in collaboration with industry, provinces and territories, as well as international entities, ensuring alignment and harmonization where possible.

Contextual indicator: Number of projects funded to support First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities' clean energy capacity and readiness (i)

This indicator is to capture new programming under the Strategic Partnerships Initiative from 2021 to 2024. It will help to build capacity for local, economically sustainable clean energy projects in First Nations, Inuit, and Métis communities and support economic development opportunities. As this is a new indicator, no current data is available.

Implementation strategies and departmental actions

Implementation strategies and departmental actions

Theme: Renewable and non-emitting sources of electricity

Implementation strategy: Implement and enforce regulations and legislation (1)

Develop, implement, harmonize and enforce regulatory measures that keep energy moving safely and efficiently to protect people, the environment, energy markets and the economy. This includes developing environmental protection and safety regulations for offshore renewable energy projects with the Offshore Renewable Energy Regulations initiative.

Implementation strategy: Invest in research, development and demonstration of clean energy technologies (1)

Invest in research, development and demonstration of clean technologies for energy generation, storage and distribution.

Implementation strategy: Play a leading role to promote clean and renewable energy (1)

Continue to play a leadership role in international agreements on clean and renewable energy policies, innovation and program design, and in international organizations focused on clean and renewable energy.

Implementation strategy: Support renewable energy deployment (1)

Invest in renewable energy (for example, hydro, solar, tidal, wind and geothermal), grid modernization, and regional transmission projects to replace greenhouse-gas-emitting energy sources and support grid decarbonization.

Implementation strategy: Support voluntary action to adopt clean energy technologies (1)

Encourage businesses to adopt clean energy technologies to reduce greenhouse gas and air pollutant emissions through the accelerated capital cost allowance for clean energy and energy conservation equipment.

Implementation strategy: Work with partners on clean and renewable energy (1)

Work with other governments, the private sector and Indigenous Peoples to advance the development and deployment of clean and renewable energy.

Implementation strategy: Streamline federal investments to advance clean, reliable energy in rural, remote, and Indigenous communities (1)

Work with partners to advance the Indigenous Climate Leadership Agenda to support the clean energy transition for diesel-reliant remote and Indigenous communities, support capacity and development of economically sustainable clean energy projects.

Theme: Energy efficiency

Implementation strategy: Develop and implement energy efficiency codes and regulations (2)

Work with provinces and territories to develop and adopt more ambitious model building codes, and develop, implement, and enforce energy efficiency regulations in Canada to incrementally improve energy efficiency and standardization across industries, homes, businesses and products in Canada.

Implementation strategy: Invest in research, development and demonstration of energy efficiency technologies (2)

Invest in research, development and demonstration of energy efficiency technologies to overcome barriers to large-scale adoption and unlock solutions to complex and persistent problems.

Implementation strategy: Support use of energy efficiency technologies and practices (2)

Invest in large-scale deployment of energy-efficient technologies and practices—for example, through deep building retrofits.

Implementation strategy: Support voluntary action to adopt energy efficiency technologies and practices (2)

Encourage businesses and organizations to adopt energy efficiency technologies and practices.

Implementation strategy: Work with domestic and international partners on energy efficiency (2)

Work with provinces, territories, municipalities, Indigenous Peoples, utilities, industry, and non-profit organizations to increase energy efficiency in Canada, and continue to play a leadership role in international agreements and initiatives involving energy efficiency.

Theme: Clean fuels (3)

Implementation strategy: Deliver the Clean Fuels Fund (3)

Invest $1.5 billion to de-risk the capital investment required to build new or expand existing clean fuel production facilities, establish sustainable biomass supply chains, and address gaps and misalignment in codes, standards and regulations related to the production, distribution and use of clean fuels.

Implementation strategy: Develop and update codes and standards (3)

Work with domestic and international partners to ensure needed codes and standards are in place to support the safe and efficient use of clean fuels.

Implementation strategy: Invest in research, development and demonstration of clean fuels (3)

Invest in research, development and demonstration of cleaner fuels pathways to decarbonize the sectors and sources of emissions that are more challenging and less cost-effective to electrify.

Implementation strategy: Work with stakeholders to advance the Hydrogen Strategy for Canada (3)

Work with stakeholders to position Canada as a supplier of choice to the world for clean hydrogen and the technologies that use it by advancing the Hydrogen Strategy for Canada, including implementing measures that align with it.

Responsibilities and contributions of federal organizations

Responsibilities and contributions of federal organizations

1Target theme: Renewable and non-emitting sources of electricity
FSDS component Title Supports Goal and/or Target Responsible organization(s)
Target By 2030, 90%, and in the long term 100% of Canada's electricity is generated from renewable and non-emitting sources Supports the goal Minister of Natural Resources
Milestone Demonstrate and deploy the next generation of smart grids Supports the goal and the Clean Power Generation Target Natural Resources Canada
Milestone Develop the Clean Electricity Regulations Supports the goal and the Clean Power Generation Target Environment and Climate Change Canada
Milestone Install renewable energy in Indigenous and northern communities Supports the goal and the Clean Power Generation Target Natural Resources Canada
Milestone Support smart renewables Supports the goal and the Clean Power Generation Target Natural Resources Canada
Milestone Provide access to more efficient sources of electricity Supports the goal Infrastructure Canada
Implementation Strategy Implement and enforce regulations and legislation Supports the goal and the Clean Power Generation Target

Canada Energy Regulator

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission

Implementation Strategy Invest in research, development, and demonstration of clean energy technologies Supports the goal and the Clean Power Generation Target

National Research Council of Canada

Natural Resources Canada

Implementation Strategy Play a leading role to promote clean and renewable energy Supports the goal and the Clean Power Generation Target

Environment and Climate Change Canada

Indigenous Services Canada

Natural Resources Canada

Implementation Strategy Support renewable energy deployment Supports the goal and the Clean Power Generation Target

Indigenous Services Canada

Natural Resources Canada

Implementation Strategy Support voluntary action to adopt clean energy technologies Supports the goal and the Clean Power Generation Target

Department of Finance Canada

Natural Resources Canada

Implementation Strategy Work with partners on clean and renewable energy Supports the goal and the Clean Power Generation Target

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

Indigenous Services Canada

Natural Resources Canada

Implementation Strategy Streamline federal investments to advance clean, reliable energy in rural, remote, and Indigenous communities Supports the goal Indigenous Services Canada
2Target theme: Energy efficiency
FSDS component Title Supports Goal and/or Target Responsible organization(s)
Target By 2030, 600 petajoules of total annual energy savings will be achieved as a result of adoption of energy efficiency codes, standards and practices from a baseline savings of 20.0 petajoules in 2017 to 2018 Supports the goal Minister of Natural Resources
Milestone Support greener homes Supports the goal and the Energy Efficiency Target Natural Resources Canada
Milestone Develop the Canada Green Buildings Strategy Supports the goal and the Energy Efficiency Target Natural Resources Canada
Milestone Demonstrate energy-efficient and net-zero energy building technologies Supports the goal and the Energy Efficiency Target Natural Resources Canada
Milestone Promote ENERGY STAR® Portfolio Manager® Supports the goal and the Energy Efficiency Target Natural Resources Canada
Implementation Strategy Develop and implement energy efficiency codes and regulations Supports the goal and the Energy Efficiency Target

National Research Council of Canada

Natural Resources Canada

Implementation Strategy Invest in research, development, and demonstration of energy efficiency technologies Supports the goal and the Energy Efficiency Target Natural Resources Canada
Implementation Strategy Support use of energy efficiency technologies and practices Supports the goal and the Energy Efficiency Target Natural Resources Canada
Implementation Strategy Support voluntary action to adopt energy efficiency technologies and practices Supports the goal and the Energy Efficiency Target Natural Resources Canada
Implementation Strategy Work with domestic and international partners on energy efficiency Supports the goal and the Energy Efficiency Target

Canada Energy Regulator

Environment and Climate Change Canada

Natural Resources Canada

3Target theme: Clean fuels
FSDS component Title Supports Goal and/or Target Responsible organization(s)
Target By 2030, increase Canada’s capacity to produce clean fuels by 10% over 2021 levels Supports the goal Minister of Natural Resources
Milestone Support the development of clean fuel production facilities Supports the goal and the Clean Fuels Target Natural Resources Canada
Milestone Support biomass supply chains Supports the goal and the Clean Fuels Target Natural Resources Canada
Milestone Develop codes, standards and regulations Supports the goal

Environment and Climate Change Canada

Natural Resources Canada

Implementation Strategy Deliver the Clean Fuels Fund Supports the goal and the Clean Fuels Target Natural Resources Canada
Implementation Strategy Develop and update codes and standards Supports the goal and the Clean Fuels Target

Canada Energy Regulator

Environment and Climate Change Canada

Natural Resources Canada

Implementation Strategy Invest in research, development and demonstration of clean fuels Supports the goal Natural Resources Canada
Implementation Strategy Work with stakeholders to advance the Hydrogen Strategy for Canada Supports the goal Natural Resources Canada

Performance measurement

iIndicators supporting the goal and contextual indicators
Indicator type Target Indicator Source Update cycle
Target By 2030, 90%, and in the long term 100% of Canada's electricity is generated from renewable and non-emitting sources Proportion of electricity generated from renewable and non-greenhouse gas-emitting sources * Natural Resources Canada Annual
Target By 2030, 600 petajoules of total annual energy savings will be achieved as a result of adoption of energy efficiency codes, standards and practices from a baseline savings of 20.0 petajoules in 2017 to 2018 Total annual energy savings resulting from adoption of energy efficiency codes, standards and practices * Natural Resources Canada Annual
Target By March 2030, increase Canada’s capacity to produce clean fuels by 10% over 2021 levels Percentage increase in clean fuels production Natural Resources Canada Indicator under development
Contextual Number of projects funded to support First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities’ clean energy capacity and readiness Indigenous Services Canada Indicator under development

*Indicators that have also been included in the Canadian Indicator Framework.

For more detailed information see Strengthening transparency and accountability.

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