Supplementary Information Tables 2017-2018 : Health Canada

Territorial Health Investment Fund (Voted)

General Information

Start date

April 1, 2014

End date

March 31, 2021

Type of transfer payment

Contribution from 2014-15 through 2017-18; grant from 2017-18 through 2020-21.

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017-18

Strategic outcome

A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians.

Link to department’s Program Alignment Architecture

  • Program 1.1: Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1: Health System Priorities

Description

The Territorial Health Investment Fund (THIF) was initiated in 2014 as a $70M contribution, over three years (subsequently extended to 2017-18 with no additional funds) to support the transformation of territorial health systems with a view to improving access to health services — particularly in the areas of mental health, chronic disease and children's oral health — and to reduce reliance on medical travel. 

THIF was renewed in 2017 with an investment of $108M over four years (2017-18 to 2020-21). To minimize the administrative burden on territories related to financial reporting, and thereby increase their ability to reduce overhead costs, the program was changed from a contribution to a grant. A total of up to $54M will be available to Nunavut, $28.4M to the Northwest Territories, and $25.6M to Yukon. Investment through THIF will help territorial governments offset the cost of medical travel and introduce innovations that will strengthen health systems and improve health outcomes for Northerners.

Results achieved

The initial THIF investment (2014-15 to 2017-18) has contributed to health system improvements, notably in the areas of chronic disease and mental health, and helped territorial governments improve access to needed health services by offsetting the medical transportation costs for out-of-territory health care. For instance, initial THIF investment supported:

  • The amalgamation of health and social services into one single territorial Health and Social Services Authority in the Northwest Territories; this authority now provides seamless access to health services across the Northwest Territories.
  • The development of mental health services capacity in Nunavut, including: training for mental health service providers; the development and implementation of mental health screening and assessment tools and clinical standards of practice; and projects to provide school-based mental health and addictions services and supports.
  • Enhanced service delivery/service integration in mental wellness care and chronic disease management in Yukon, including skills training for health providers and home health monitoring for patients with chronic diseases.

Renewed THIF funding (starting in 2017-18) continued to offset the medical transportation costs experienced by territorial governments and has supported foundational planning for the adoption of innovations to strengthen territorial health systems. For instance, renewed THIF funding will help:

  • The Northwest Territories build a culturally respectful health and social services system and improve child and youth oral health.
  • Yukon undertake enhancements to client information systems, electronic health records, data collection and performance reporting; it will also increase its capacity to provide telehealth, including tele-mental health, and remote patient care delivery.
  • Nunavut increase staffing and program funding to improve prevention, detection and treatment of tuberculosis, build health human resources capacity, and e-health programs.

Audits completed or planned

Office of Audit and Evaluation – Audit of the Management of Grants and Contributions – Phase 2 is ongoing and is expected to be completed by February 2019.

Evaluations completed or planned

An evaluation of the Territorial Health Investment Fund focusing on THIF’s key activities from 2014-15 to 2016-17, was started in 2017-18 and will be publicly available in the Fall.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

In 2017-18, Territorial governments were invited to submit a four-year work plan that included clear project objectives; detailed project descriptions; and associated performance indicators; and a breakdown of project costs in order to access grant funding under the renewed THIF program.  

This process was initiated by Health Canada’s First Nations and Inuit Health Branch and subsequently transitioned to Health Canada’s Strategic Policy Branch after the creation of the Department of Indigenous Services Canada.

A federal/territorial Assistant Deputy Ministers (ADMs) Working Group, composed of ADMs from all three territories and Health Canada, will continue to provide a forum for ongoing monitoring and progress, including: ensuring individual territorial work plans meet the objectives and intent of the initiative; sharing best practices and collaborating on policy and management approaches; and developing a Progress Report in 2020-21. Staff in Health Canada’s Strategic Policy Branch will work with territorial government officials to support implementation of funding.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2015–16 Actual
spending
2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Planned
spending
2017–18 Total
authorities available for use
2017–18 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 27,000,000 27,000,000 27,000,000
Total contributions 22,990,300 20,000,000 - 0 0 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 22,990,300 20,000,000 0 27,000,000 27,000,000 27,000,000
Comments on variances The variance between actual and planned spending is due to additional in-year funding received.

Canada Brain Research Fund Program (Voted)

General Information

Start date

April 1, 2011

End date

March 31, 2020

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2016-17

Strategic outcome

A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians.

Link to department’s Program Alignment Architecture

  • Program 1.1: Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1 Health System Priorities

Description

In Budget 2011, the Government committed up to $100M over eight years until 2019-20 to the Brain Canada Foundation (Brain Canada), in dollar-for-dollar matched funding with non-federal government donors, to establish the Canada Brain Research Fund (CBRF). The purpose of the CBRF is to serve as a focal point for private investment in brain research by attracting private and charitable donations to match federal funding, and to support research that advances knowledge of the brain. Budget 2016 committed an additional $20M starting from 2016-17 until 2019-20, bringing the total fund to $240M.

Results achieved

Through a competitive process, CBRF grants are awarded to brain research projects across Canada. This funding is distributed across various brain research themes with approximately 31% directed to neurodegenerative diseases, 21% for multiple disorders, 24% split equally for neurodevelopmental disorders and for brain and spinal cord injury, 11% for brain cancer, 10% for mental illness, and 3% for other brain research themes. Examples of projects funded under these themes include: imaging technology to map brain development and wiring, development of a novel intervention to prevent the onset of Alzheimer’s disease, and use of bioengineering to restore vision among others.

During 2017-18, initiatives supported through the CBRF produced various knowledge products (e.g., journal articles, reviews, etc.), learning events, partnerships, and grants. To date, CBRF investments under the Program have supported the training of more than 300 highly qualified personnel who have contributed to the publication of 740 research articles. CBRF investments have also generated over 100 partnerships that support 228 projects across Canada involving more than 960 researchers at 115 institutions, connecting more than 75 disciplines.

In 2017-18, through partnerships with various institutions, health charities and donors, research networks, provincial agencies and corporations, Brain Canada raised $17.1M in funds and disbursed $43.6M supporting 214 research grants. For example, in September 2017, Brain Canada and Parkinson Canada launched the Brain Canada – Parkinson Canada Platform Grant. This grant is intended to support the development and maintenance of a large-scale Canadian Parkinson Network that is built on the foundation of the established and successful Fonds de recherche du Québec – Santé (FRQS), Quebec Parkinson Network, involving multiple provinces, in the field of Parkinson’s disease and related disorders, as well as its operating costs, for a period of three years.

Funding research is long-term and typically, CBRF research grants range between three to five years. This means that the vast majority of research projects are mid-way, but results are starting to be achieved. Funded projects are equipping Canadian researchers to undertake collaborative brain research in order to advance brain knowledge and to inform future brain research. To illustrate this, as of April 2018, more than 9,900 citations of CBRF-funded publications were made by other authors in Canada and internationally, demonstrating the use of knowledge by other stakeholders to inform solutions to brain diseases and disorders.

As per Brain Canada’s 2016 Annual Report, Brain Canada is creating a space that enables collaboration involving a constellation of partners across sectors; and collaboration involving researchers from different disciplines. The result is a brain community that is better coordinated to achieve common goals more rapidly. An example of collaborative and multidisciplinary reach refers to a non-invasive treatment technique of pediatric disorders that would use Magnetic Resonance-guided Focused Ultrasound (MRgFUS). Neuroscientists and engineers at the University of Toronto, the Hospital for Sick Children, the University Health Network and the Thunder Bay Regional Research Institute have joined together to develop a technique for two common and disabling pediatric neurological conditions: stroke and drug resistant epilepsy. The results could lead to a revolutionary, novel non-invasive platform for treatment of pediatric neurological disorders.

Audits completed or planned

Office of Audit and Evaluation – Audit of the Management of Grants and Contributions – Phase 2 is ongoing and is expected to be completed by February 2019.

Evaluations completed or planned

Brain Canada is currently not on Health Canada’s five year evaluation plan. However, a Program evaluation was completed in February 2017. A second evaluation is not scheduled as the current funding agreement ends March 2020 before the end of the five-year evaluation cycle for this Program. If the Program does not continue, the Recipient will be required to complete a Recipient-led evaluation and submit a final evaluation report by March 31, 2020.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Brain Canada is the sole recipient of the contribution. Health Canada monitors the recipient's compliance with the contribution agreement through the analysis of corporate documents and has regular correspondence with senior management of the organization.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2015–16 Actual
spending
2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Planned
spending
2017–18 Total
authorities available for use
2017–18 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total grants 0 0
Total contributions 6,180,793 24,992,085 27,000,000 27,000,000 20,000,000 7,000,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0
Total program 6,180,793 24,992,085 27,000,000 27,000,000 20,000,000 7,000,000
Comments on variances The variance between actual and planned spending is due to the reprofile of $7M to future years.

Contribution to the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (Voted)

General Information

Start date

April 1, 2008

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017-18

trategic outcome

A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians.

Link to department’s Program Alignment Architecture

  • Program 1.1: Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1: Health System Priorities

Description

Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH) is an independent, not-for-profit agency funded by Canadian federal, provincial, and territorial governments to provide credible, impartial and evidence-based information about the clinical/cost-effectiveness and optimal use of drugs and other health technologies to Canadian health care decision makers.

Results achieved

The purpose of the contribution agreement is to provide financial assistance to support CADTH's core business activities, namely, the Common Drug Review, Health Technology Assessments and Optimal Use Projects. Results include the creation and dissemination of evidence-based information that supports informed decisions on the adoption and appropriate utilization of drugs and non-drug technologies, in terms of both effectiveness and cost. Additional funding announced in Budget 2017 is supporting CADTH’s transition to a Health Technology Management organization in order to deliver results that better meet the needs of the healthcare system by employing a lifecycle approach to technology that involves reassessment and disinvestment.

Audits completed or planned

Office of Audit and Evaluation – Audit of the Management of Grants and Contributions - Phase 2 is ongoing and is expected to be completed by February 2019. The objective of the audit is to ensure adequate controls are in place for transfer payment management. While CADTH is not directly implicated, findings will inform the management of CADTH’s contribution agreement.

Evaluations completed or planned

As per the terms of its contribution agreement, an independent evaluation of CADTH’s activities was conducted for the period between April 1, 2012 and March 31, 2016. The final results of this recipient-led evaluation were made available in December 2016. A departmental evaluation of CADTH activities between 2012-13 and 2015-16 was conducted and approved by Health Canada in March 2017 and is available online.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

CADTH has produced numerous products and services including health technology reports, optimal use projects, environmental scans, therapeutic reviews and formulary listing recommendations. These deliverables provide guidance and evidence-based information to health care decision-makers regarding the cost-effectiveness and optimal use of health technologies. In particular, the formulary listing recommendations increases transparency across jurisdictions and provides consistency to pharmaceutical reimbursement decisions made by the participating public drug plans. CADTH also convenes, connects and collaborates with patients, clinicians and other health care decision-makers to help support the adoption and use of its products.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2015–16 Actual
spending
2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Planned
spending
2017–18 Total
authorities available for use
2017–18 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total grants 0 0
Total contributions 16,058,769 16,058,769 16,058,769 18,058,769 18,058,769 2,000,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0  0
Total program 16,058,769 16,058,769 16,058,769 18,058,769 18,058,769 2,000,000
Comments on variances The variance between actual and planned spending is due to additional in-year funding received.

Contribution to the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (Voted)

General information

Start date

December 10, 2015

End date

March 31, 2019

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017-18

Strategic Outcome

A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians.

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

  • Program 1.1: Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1: Health System Priorities

Description

The contribution to the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI) supports the federal government's interest (in a federal, provincial and territorial partnership context) in achieving an accessible, high quality, sustainable and accountable health system adaptable to the needs of Canadians. It is designed to support CFHI's work to identify savings and efficiencies in the health system by: building leadership and skill capacity; enabling patient, family and community engagement; applying improvement methodology to drive measurable results; and creating collaboratives to spread evidence-informed improvements. Contribution funding was made available to CFHI in Budgets 2015, 2016 and 2017. A contribution agreement is currently in effect that covers the period from 2015-16 to 2018-19.

Results achieved

In 2017-18, CFHI continued to support innovations designed to accelerate improvements in health care delivery by working with health care leaders, governments, policy-makers and other leaders. Examples of results achieved by CFHI in 2017-18, include:

  • Support for numerous large-scale health care improvement initiatives, for example:
    • CFHI scaled up its INSPIRED hospital-to-home initiative to six teams across Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island to help equip patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) to manage their chronic condition at home and in the community rather than in hospital. The latest results have shown that providing patients with the right supports close to home has improved the quality of life for patients, while also reducing hospital readmissions by 64% and emergency department visits by 52%.
    • Scaled up across the province of New Brunswick the Appropriate Use of Antipsychotics Collaborative to reduce the inappropriate use of antipsychotics and improve the quality of life for long-term care residents. A total of 43 nursing home organizations across New Brunswick joined the second phase of this collaborative effort – the first phase saw 43% of participating patients’ antipsychotics safely reduced or discontinued, which helped contribute to a 6% decrease in falls; improved patients’ social engagement, wakefulness and ability to self-manage care without an increase in aggressive behaviours or the need to use of other psychotropic medications.
    • CFHI also began the spread of the Appropriate Use of Antipsychotics approach to long term care homes in Newfoundland and Labrador, Prince Edward Island and Quebec.
    • As part of its Connected Medicine quality improvement collaborative, CFHI worked with partners to spread two leading Canadian innovations that have demonstrably improved primary healthcare access to specialist consultation services.
  • Support for 35 leaders through nine improvement projects across Canada as part of the Executive Training for Research Application (EXTRA) program. Examples of innovative projects undertaken include:
    • Improving and spreading cancer coaching; enhancing a community oncology network; maximizing care attendants’ skills to optimize long-term care; implement a strategic hub for coordinating public health activities to improve regional consistency; involving patient advisors in serious adverse event reviews; creating an integrated management structure for care of patients who have had a stroke; enhancing the transition between hospital and community care; and, building a home-first culture and approach to improving the quality of care and quality of life for patients and families.

Disseminated results from recent CFHI-led improvement initiatives in support of a broader knowledge translation strategy so that health care institutions and providers who did not participate in the improvement initiatives can be aware of and adopt the initiatives that have been found to be most effective at improving care in their own settings.

Audits completed or planned

Office of Audit and Evaluation – Audit of the Management of Grants and Contributions – Phase 2 is ongoing and is expected to be completed by February 2019.

Evaluations completed or planned

No evaluations were completed or planned.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Health Canada works with CFHI to establish activities to be carried out under the contribution agreement and maintains regular contact with CFHI to monitor progress and compliance under the funding agreement. In addition, Health Canada nominates one representative to CFHI’s Board of Directors, and, in that capacity, participates as a voting member of the corporation.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2015–16 Actual
spending
2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Planned
spending
2017–18 Total
authorities available for use
2017–18 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total grants 0
Total contributions 2,000,000 17,000,000 17,000,000 17,000,000 17,000,000  0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 2,000,000 17,000,000 17,000,000 17,000,000 17,000,000  0
Comments on variances NIL

Note: 2017-18 DRR Supplementary Information Tables for CFHI are reported under Up-Front Multi-Year Funding and Details on Transfer Payment Programs of $5 Million or more.

Contribution to the Canadian Institute for Health Information (Voted)

General Information

Start date

April 1, 1999

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017-18

Strategic outcome

A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians.

Link to department’s Program Alignment Architecture

  • Program 1.1: Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1: Health System Priorities

Description

The Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) is an independent, not-for-profit organization supported by federal, provincial and territorial (FPT) governments that provides essential data and analysis on Canada's health system, and the health of Canadians. CIHI was created in 1994 by the FPT Ministers of Health to address significant gaps in health information. CIHI's data and its analyses respond to questions about Canada's health systems and assist a variety of stakeholders, including funders, policy makers, health system managers, analysts, clinicians and researchers, in making informed decisions.

Since 1999, the federal government has provided funding to CIHI through a series of grants and conditional grants, known as the Roadmap Initiatives. More recently CIHI's funding has been consolidated through the Health Information Initiative (HII), and is currently delivered through a contribution agreement. This combined funding has allowed CIHI to produce quality and timely health information ranging from health care system capacity and wait times data to the development of pan-Canadian health indicators.

The HII extended funding to CIHI for its “2012-17 Strategic Plan: Better data. Better decisions. Healthier Canadians.” The previous contribution agreement began in 2012-13; the amended agreement spanned over fiscal years 2012-13 to 2017-18 and provided $475M to CIHI over six years, with annual funding as follows:

Table 1: Previous amended contribution agreement with Prescription Drug Abuse (PDAFootnote 1) funds detailed (dollars)
Fiscal Year 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 Total
Amended Agreement Totals 81,746,294 79,154,839 77,758,979 78,508,979 78,863,979 78,748,979 474,782,049
PDA Funds (included in totals above) 0 0 100,000 850,000 1,090,000 1,090,000 3,130,000

The HII continues to extend funding to CIHI. The current contribution agreement began in 2017-18 and provides $365M to CIHI over five years, with annual funding as follows in Table 2:

Table 2: Current contribution agreement with PDA funds detailed (dollars)
Fiscal Year 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 Total
Amended Agreement Totals 3,000,000 83,808,979 87,658,979 92,658,979 97,658,979 364,785,916
PDA Funds (included in totals above) 0 1,150,000 0 0 0 1,150,000

Results achieved

In 2017-18, CIHI continued to make progress towards producing more and better data, more relevant and actionable analysis, and improved client understanding and use of CIHI data and information products.

Below are selected highlights from CIHI’s 2017-18 Annual Report.

The results achieved focus on CIHI’s three strategic goals and their key associated priorities:

  • Be a trusted source of standards and quality data:
    • Increase the use of health data standards to achieve quality data;
    • Close the data gaps in priority areas;
    • Make data collection easier and improve timeliness;
    • Make data more accessible;
  • Expand analytical tools to support measurement of health systems:
    • Compare health systems in priority areas;
    • Enrich the information infrastructure, grouping methods and decision-support tools;
    • Expand analytical products using innovative approaches, including data linkage and predictive modeling;
    • Transform its digital presence into a core strategic asset;
  • Produce actionable analysis and accelerate its adoption:
    • Produce analyses that contribute new information and insights;
    • Engage with stakeholders to enable better use of health data and information.

A trusted source of standards and quality data

To increase the use of health data standards in order to achieve quality data, CIHI developed new standards in patient-reported outcomes measures standards for hip and knee arthroplasty. Further, CIHI developed the paper “Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) for Hip and Knee Arthroplasty: A Canadian Perspective” which was presented at the OECD Healthcare Quality Indicators Working Group meeting in Paris in May 2017. CIHI also developed new oncology drug data standards in partnership with the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer. Further, CIHI participated in the development and review of the eleventh international classification of disease (ICD-11) through its membership on World Health Organization (WHO) committees. Finally, CIHI developed equity stratifiers for the advanced measurement and reporting of equity in health care.

To close existing data gaps, CIHI made progress on the collection of pan-Canadian data to enhance coverage in key areas, including: acute care patient experience, patient-level physician billing and financial data.

With new investments from Budget 2017, CIHI began a multi-year initiative to support the performance measurement commitments made by the health ministers in the Common Statement of Principles on Shared Health Priorities. In March, 2018, CIHI released, “Selecting Pan-Canadian Indicators for Access to Mental Health and Addiction Services, and to Home and Community Care: Progress Report”.

To make data collection and to improve timeliness, CIHI completed a feasibility and costing assessment for an integrated hospital system, a business plan to transform its approach to hospital data creation, processes and technology.

To make data more accessible for researchers and other users, CIHI made five linked data files available through Statistics Canada’s Research Data Centres. Linking CIHI’s data to other data sources is a major step toward enabling new health service and policy research in such areas as end of life care, morbidity, and cancer treatment.

Expand analytical tools to support measurement of health systems

To permit comparisons of health systems in priority areas, CIHI launched the Canadian Patient Experiences Reporting System Comparative Results tool, a secure online tool that provides comparative results on patient experience from three provinces. CIHI also delivered a biannual update of its international comparisons eTool; and produced and supported international health system performance comparisons for Canada via the release of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development health data eTool and benchmarking report, and the Commonwealth Fund International Health Policy Survey results.

To enrich the information infrastructure, grouping methods and decision support tools, CIHI developed new indicators and case mix methodologies, including the number of hospital admissions and emergency department visits due to opioid poisoning; the number of people receiving opioids per 1,000 population and the number of defined daily doses of opioids per 1,000 population.

To expand its analytical products and transform its digital presence into a strategic asset, CIHI enhanced web tools and reports, including the development of online reports using its new digital format on topics such as dementia, opioids harm and prescribing, seniors in transition and Canadian patient experiences. CIHI also integrated financial data with clinical data in “Your Health System: Insight,” which permits an enhanced understanding of the value for money of clinical interventions.

Produce actionable analysis and accelerate its adoption

CIHI collaborated with stakeholders to increase their ability to use data and analysis to accelerate improvements in health systems in the health of populations.

To produce analyses that contribute new information and insights, CIHI published reports on priority themes such as seniors in transition, dementia, alcohol harm, asthma hospitalization among children and youth, and unnecessary care in Canada (in collaboration with Choosing Wisely Canada). It also established metrics and reported information publicly on prevalence, consumption and potential harms of opioids.

To engage with stakeholders in order to enable better use of health data and information, CIHI established a partnership with the BC First Nations Health Authority with plans to support enhanced understanding of and access to data and analytical tools and expertise pertaining to the health and health service use of First Nations in BC. Further, CIHI completed an external stakeholder engagement satisfaction survey to understand where to improve its tools and services.

Audits completed or planned

Under the terms of its agreement with Health Canada, CIHI was required to have a performance audit completed and reported on by March 31, 2015. KPMG completed the audit in September 2014.

Evaluations completed or planned

The Office of Evaluation evaluated the relevance and performance of the HII for the period of 2012-15, as required by the contribution agreement. The evaluation was completed in December 2014. The pan-Canadian health organisation synthesis evaluation typically done for each initiative on a 5-year cycle is currently underway and is planned to be completed in fall 2018.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

CIHI is the sole recipient of HII funding as per the terms and conditions of the HII.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2015–16 Actual
spending
2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Planned
spending
2017–18 Total
authorities available for use
2017–18 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total grants 0 0
Total contributions 78,508,979 78,863,979 78,748,979 81,748,979 81,748,979 3,000,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0
Total program 78,508,979 78,863,979 78,748,979 81,748,979 81,748,979 3,000,000
Comments on variances The variance between actual and planned spending is due to additional in-year funding received.

Contribution to the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (Voted)

General Information

Start date

April 1, 2007

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017-18

Strategic outcome

A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians.

Link to department’s Program Alignment Architecture

  • Program 1.1: Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1: Health System Priorities

Description

The Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (CPAC) is responsible for stewarding the Canadian Strategy for Cancer Control with the following objectives: reduce the expected number of new cases of cancer among Canadians; enhance the quality of life of those living with cancer; and lessen the likelihood of Canadians dying from cancer.

The mandate of CPAC is to provide a leadership role with respect to cancer control in Canada, through the management of knowledge and the coordination of efforts among provinces and territories, cancer experts, stakeholder groups and Indigenous organizations to champion change and improve health outcomes related to cancer. CPAC acts as a pan-Canadian resource to provide the most up-to-date knowledge across strategic priority areas including prevention, screening/early detection, patient-centered care, guidelines, standards, as well as supporting key research activities and facilitating the development of a pan-Canadian surveillance system.

Results achieved

Since it began operating in April 2007, CPAC has:

  • Provided cancer patients and physicians across Canada with current evidence-based knowledge about what works best to prevent, diagnose and treat cancer;
  • Improved the quality of our national cancer system by monitoring its performance and identifying gaps;
  • Improved the quality of life for cancer patients by providing information that addressed their social, emotional and financial needs;
  • Implemented a large-scale effort to raise awareness of the common risk factors for cancer and other chronic diseases;
  • Implemented the country's largest population health study of risk factors - the Canadian Partnership for Tomorrow Project - which has enrolled 300,000 Canadians to explore why some people develop cancer and others do not;
  • Launched a First Nations, Inuit and Métis Action Plan on Cancer Control, in collaboration with First Peoples;
  • Expanded cancer screening programs in all provinces and encouraged hard-to-reach populations, to undergo screening - which helps doctors detect cancer earlier; and
  • Developed programs to help survivors through the tremendous uncertainty following treatment.

In 2017-18, CPAC did the following: worked with its screening networks to advance collaboration between screening programs in order to improve quality across the screening pathway; advanced collaboration with the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH) and the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) on improving oncology drug sustainability; engaged partners to scale-up and spread structured and standardized reporting in cancer to drive quality improvements; launched funding activities to develop new and improved responses to cancer control gaps specific to First Nations, Inuit and Métis with provincial, territorial and national partners; convened the fourth Canadian Cancer Research Conference, which included 139 speakers and chairs and 1,084 registered participants; released the 2017 Cancer System Performance Reportand engaged provincial cancer agencies and programs on how best to utilize data to effect change; and, continued its Canadian Partnership for Tomorrow Project – Canada’s largest longitudinal population study that will help researchers understand the causes of cancer and other chronic diseases.

Audits completed or planned

In September 2011, Health Canada released its audit of the funding agreement between Health Canada and CPAC between April and July 2011.

Evaluations completed or planned

Last completed evaluation was in 2015-16. A synthesis evaluation of transfer payments to Pan-Canadian Health Organizations, typically done on a 5-year cycle, is underway and is expected to be completed in Fall 2018.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Health Canada works with CPAC to establish activities to be carried out under the contribution agreement, and maintains regular contact with CPAC to monitor progress and compliance under the contribution agreement.

CPAC works to engage stakeholders through communications activities that include media and on-line vehicles to both the broader public and the cancer and health communities, and targeted outreach and partnership building.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2015–16 Actual
spending
2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Planned
spending
2017–18 Total
authorities available for use
2017–18 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total grants 0 0
Total contributions 47,296,994 47,500,000 47,500,000 47,500,000 39,854,241 7,645,759
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0
Total program 47,296,994 47,500,000 47,500,000 47,500,000 39,954,241 7,645,759
Comments on variances The variance between actual and planned spending is mainly due to the reprofile of $7.6M to future years.

Contribution to the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (Voted)

General Information

Start date

December 10, 2003

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2012-13

Strategic outcome

A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians.

Link to department’s Program Alignment Architecture

  • Program 1.1: Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1: Health System Priorities

Description

The Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) is an independent not-for-profit corporation mandated to provide leadership and coordinate the work necessary to build a culture of patient safety and quality improvement throughout the Canadian health system. CPSI promotes leading ideas and best practices, raises awareness and provides advice on effective strategies to improve patient safety.

CPSI focuses on fulfilling its mandate by: inspiring and sustaining patient safety knowledge within the system and guiding transformational change in areas most likely to drive patient safety improvement; building and influencing patient safety capability at organizational and systems levels; engaging all audiences across the health system in the national patient safety agenda; and providing leadership on the establishment of a National Integrated Patient Safety Action Plan. Funding to CPSI is delivered through a contribution agreement, currently covering April 1, 2013 to March 31, 2019.

Results achieved

In 2017-18, key results achieved by CPSI included:

  • Conclusion of the National Integrated Patient Safety Action Plan that drove coordinated pan-Canadian improvement efforts in the areas of home care safety, surgical safety, medication safety, infection prevention and control, and patient safety education. This work was guided by the National Patient Safety Consortium, a group of more than 50 key organizations in Canadian health care who worked collaboratively to advance the Action Plan.
    • Key deliverables from the National Integrated Patient Safety Action Plan in 2017-18 included: a six-part webinar series on medication safety; identification of a set of eight surgical safety indicators; and the formation of Enhanced Recovery Canada, which finalized a project plan and secured funding for work on improving surgical safety across the country.
  • The release of The Case for Investing in Patient Safety in Canada, a report that found patient safety incidents are the third leading cause of death in Canada, equivalent to one death every 13 minutes and 14 seconds.
  • Held Canadian Patient Safety Week 2017, a national annual campaign to inspire improvement in patient safety and quality by highlighting patient safety issues, sharing information about best practices, and expanding patient safety and quality initiatives. The 2017 theme was medication safety and included the launch of a new podcast series, PATIENT.
  • Training was delivered to increase patient safety capacity in health care organizations, including through the launch of TeamSTEPPS Canada, an evidence-based teamwork system designed to improve patient care through improved teamwork and communication.
  • The Global Patient Safety Alerts system, which provides an ongoing resource of actionable information on specific patient safety incidents, was expanded and independently evaluated.
  • Patients for Patient Safety Canada, a patient-led program of CPSI, continued to strengthen its reach in health care systems, by bringing the patient perspective to collaborations at all levels of care.
  • Designation as a World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Patient Safety and Patient Engagement, through which CPSI is supporting global work on patient safety incident reporting and learning systems, providing coordination support and advice to the global Patients for Patient Safety champion network, supporting global initiatives in achieving safer care, and contributing to planning and implementation of the third Global Patient Safety Challenge on Medication Safety.

Audits completed or planned

Office of Audit and Evaluation – Audit of the Management of Grants and Contributions – Phase 2 is ongoing and is expected to be completed by February 2019.

Evaluations completed or planned

A departmental evaluation was completed in August 2017.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

To ensure the CPSI funding agreement is managed in an appropriate and efficient manner, Health Canada officials regularly engage with CPSI. In addition, the Department nominates one representative to CPSI's Board of Directors, and participates as a voting member of the corporation.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2015–16 Actual
spending
2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Planned
spending
2017–18 Total
authorities available for use
2017–18 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total grants 0 0
Total contributions 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0
Total program 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000 0
Comments on variances NIL

Mental Health Commission of Canada Contribution Program (Voted)

General Information

Start date

April 1, 2008

End date

March 31, 2019

Budget 2015 announced the Government’s intention to renew the Mental Health Commission of Canada's (MHCC) mandate for another 10 years beginning in 2017.

While the grant funding ended on March 31, 2017, the Government renewed the MHCC’s funding for 2017-18 and 2018-19 under a new contribution program.

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017-18

Strategic outcome

A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians.

Link to department’s Program Alignment Architecture

  • Program 1.1: Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1: Health System Priorities
Description

In Budget 2007, the Government of Canada announced funding for the establishment of the MHCC, an independent, arm's length organization, with a mandate to act as a catalyst for improving the mental health system and changing the attitudes and behaviors of Canadians around mental health issues.

Results achieved

In 2017-18, the MHCC continued to provide valuable mental health expertise and advice to mental health stakeholders. Notable achievements included:

Problematic Substance Abuse

  • Worked with the Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction to develop practical tools for employers to support them in addressing substance use in the workplace.
  • Hosted six focus groups with first responders from across Canada to understand their learning needs regarding opioid use and addiction. This was done as part of Opening Minds – an MHCC initiative focused on reducing the stigma associated with mental illness.
  • Hosted a roundtable of experts from across Canada to identify physicians' training needs related to mental health, substance use and opioids.

Suicide Prevention

  • Completed six in-person consultations with researchers, service providers, people with lived experience and government/policy makers to set priorities for a national suicide prevention research agenda, in collaboration with the Public Health Agency of Canada.
  • Updated and enhanced their online toolkit for Survivors of Suicide Loss and Postvention Professionals; developed a new online toolkit for Survivors of Suicide Attempt.
  • Launched accredited Suicide Prevention Training Modules for family physicians and nurses (that have been completed by more than 1,200 physicians and nurses to date).
  • Partnered with Wisdom2Action (a national knowledge mobilization initiative focused on child and youth mental health) to host a youth suicide prevention event in February 2018 in Vancouver.

Population-Based Initiatives

  • Convened an expert Seniors Advisory Group to develop suggestions for building bridges between the home care and mental health care sectors, as well as a knowledge translation plan for advancing the mental health of seniors.
  • Developed a knowledge translation plan and best/promising practices document to influence policy makers to create a more seamless continuum of mental health care for emerging adults and their families; convened an Emerging Adult Advisory Group to provide feedback and direction on these and other knowledge products.
  • Launched and released a youth and recovery video and discussion guide.
  • Established a community of practice to support the implementation of a toolkit for improving mental health planning for immigrant, refugee, ethno-cultural and racialized populations.
  • Completed a report on recovery and primary care that was used by the College of Family Physicians of Canada to develop a Best Advice Guide to support provision of high-quality mental health services in primary care.
  • Undertook consultations with clinicians, health service planners, funders, researchers, people with lived experience and caregivers to support the development of a pan-Canadian quality framework for collaborative care and associated key indicators.
  • Identified a research and implementation team, recruited pilot sites and developed a project charter for its population-based e-mental health demonstration project. The goal of this project is to support the implementation and/or expansion of e-mental health to improve access to mental health services.
  • Hosted a one-day workshop in March 2018 with family caregiver stakeholders from across Canada to identify opportunities and shared priorities for the uptake of best practices in engaging family caregivers in mental health.

Engagement with Canadians, Provinces and Federal Partners

  • Convened federal/provincial/territorial policy makers, mental health professionals and others to explore policy options to expand access to psychological services. The final summary report and options paper were published in June 2017.
  • Co-hosted, with the University of British Columbia, its E-Mental Health Knowledge Exchange Conference in February 2018 in Vancouver. The conference attracted over 175 registrants including policy/decision makers, researchers, technology developers, people with lived experience, and post-secondary students.
Audits completed or planned

Audit of the Grants to the Mental Health Commission of Canada was completed in December 2011.

Evaluations completed or planned

The MHCC was evaluated as part of a broader evaluation on Health Canada and Public Health Agency of Canada mental health and mental illness activities. The final report was approved in July 2016.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

MHCC is the sole recipient of the contribution. Health Canada monitors the recipient's compliance with the funding agreement through the analysis of corporate documents and has regular correspondence with senior management of the organization.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2015–16 Actual
spending
2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Planned
spending
2017–18 Total
authorities available for use
2017–18 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total grants 14,250,000 14,243,652
Total contributions 0 0 14,250,000 14,250,000 14,250,000 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 14,250,000 14,243,652 14,250,000 14,250,000 14,250,000 0
Comments on variances NIL

Health Care Policy Contribution Program (Voted)

General Information

Start date

September 24, 2002

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017-18

Strategic outcome

A Health System Responsive to the Needs of Canadians.

Link to department’s Program Alignment Architecture

  • Program 1.1: Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1: Health System Priorities

Description

The Health Care Policy Contribution Program (HCPCP) provides up to $26.9M per fiscal year in time-limited contribution funding for projects that address specific health care system priorities, including palliative and end-of-life care, home care, mental health, and optimization of the health work force. Through the implementation of contribution agreements and a variety of stakeholder engagement activities, HCPCP contributes to the development and application of effective approaches to support sustainable improvements to the Canadian health care system.

Results achieved

The Program directed funding toward knowledge development, translation and exchange activities to support innovation and implementation of best practices in key policy areas such as palliative and end-of-life care, medication safety, and the integration of internationally educated health professionals. The Program also supported projects that contributed to improving access to health care services for all Canadians.

Specific examples include:

  • The Choosing Wisely Canada (CWC) project, a campaign that encourages clinicians and patients across Canada to engage in conversations about unnecessary tests, treatments and procedures, launched the national Antimicrobial Wisely Campaign in 2017-18, with the aim of reducing unnecessary antibiotic use. CWC’s work has resulted in more than 180 practice recommendations to empower clinicians and patients to make better choices; avoid unnecessary tests; and cultivate increased stewardship of health care resources among physicians and health care delivery organizations. 
  • Health Canada provided funding to the Heart and Stroke Foundation for the initiative “Advancing Women’s Heart Health”. This initiative supported targeted research on the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of heart disease and stroke in women; promoting collaboration between research institutions across the country; and investing in female and Indigenous researchers to build a pool of high calibre Canadian scientists engaged in research focussed on women’s vascular health.
  • Pallium Canada’s project: “Building and Bridging – Palliative Care is Everyone’s Business” aims to strengthen home and community palliative care capacity. In 2017-18, Pallium Canada expanded the "Learning Essentials Approaches to Palliative Care" (LEAP) program, which develops and provides inter-professional palliative care education across Canada. Additional facilitators were trained at the local level to deliver the LEAP in-person, the on-line program was expanded to reach new audiences, and progress was made to refine the cultural awareness components of the program to respond to the diversity of Canadians.
  • The Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) received funding for the Canadian Medication Incident Reporting and Prevention System. The initiative promoted medication safety improvement through the analysis of medication incidents and the development of takeaway knowledge, tools, and educational initiatives for the medical community and general public. ISMP worked collaboratively with the health care community, regulatory agencies and policy makers, provincial, national and international organizations, the pharmaceutical industry and the public to promote safe medication practises.

Audits completed or planned

Office of Audit and Evaluation – Audit of the Management of Grants and Contributions – Phase 2 is ongoing and is expected to be completed by February 2019.

Evaluations completed or planned

The evaluation of the Health Care Policy Contribution Program for 2013-14 to 2017-18 was undertaken and should be completed by September 2018. The next evaluation is scheduled for 2023-24.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Funding recipients continue to be engaged through site visits, and regular communication regarding the progress of funded projects.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2015–16 Actual
spending
2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Planned
spending
2017–18 Total
authorities available for use
2017–18 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total grants            
Total contributions 17,839,928 9,284,670 26,874,000 11,084,516 8,737,838 18,136,162
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 17,839,928 9,284,670 26,874,000 11,084,516 8,737,838 18,136,162
Comments on variances The variance between actual and planned spending is mainly due to the reallocation of resources within the Department to meet needs and priorities.

Thalidomide Survivors Contribution Program (Voted)

General Information

Start date

June 19, 2015

End date

March 31, 2021

Note: Support payments will continue throughout the entire lifetime of Canadian Thalidomide survivors and the program will be reviewed every five years.

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2015-16

Strategic outcome

A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians.

Link to department’s Program Alignment Architecture

  • Program 1.1: Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1: Health System Priorities

Description

The purpose of the Program is to contribute to meeting the needs of Thalidomide survivors for the remainder of their lives so that they may age with dignity. The objectives in supporting the Thalidomide Survivors Contribution Program (TSCP) are to ensure that eligible Thalidomide survivors: receive ongoing tax-free payments based on their level of disability; and have transparent and timely access to the Extraordinary Medical Assistance Fund (EMAF).

Results achieved

Ongoing tax-free payments were distributed to 99% of known Thalidomide survivors; one file is pending confirmation. 100% of payments were made within the time frame service standard of the third-party administrator.

The independent third-party program administrator processed 28 EMAF applications. The EMAF assists survivors with costs related to extraordinary health support needs such as specialized surgeries and home or vehicle adaptations. No new thalidomide survivors were confirmed in 2017-18. One survivor passed away reducing the total from 122 to 121 Canadian thalidomide survivors.

Outreach data for 2017-18 showed that 81% of Thalidomide survivors who responded said that the Thalidomide Survivors Contribution Program (TSCP) is helping them age with dignity, which aligns with the purpose of the program.

Audits completed or planned

Office of Audit and Evaluation – Audit of the Management of Grants and Contributions - Phase 2 is ongoing and is expected to be completed by February 2019.

Evaluations completed or planned

A departmental evaluation is currently scheduled for completion in 2019-20.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Health Canada engaged the independent third party administrator of the TSCP by responding to inquiries and undertaking regular monitoring activities such as progress and performance measurement reporting, and meetings and ongoing communication to support program implementation.

Health Canada engaged the Thalidomide Victims Association of Canada (TVAC), a key stakeholder, in meetings as needed, regarding program implementation. Health Canada also provided information about the program to individual Thalidomide survivors and to individuals who believe they are survivors of Thalidomide, through direct correspondence and online.

The administrator continued to implement its outreach strategy (direct mail and web-based) to provide the Thalidomide survivor community with updates on program implementation and results.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2015–16 Actual
spending
2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Planned
spending
2017–18 Total
authorities available for use
2017–18 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 8,000,000 11,185,847 8,323,200 9,967,690 9,967,690 1,644,490
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 8,000,000 11,185,847 8,323,200 9,967,690 9,967,690 1,644,490
Comments on variances The variance between actual and planned spending is mainly due to an increased funding obligation, resulting from an increase in the number of survivors in the first year of the program and lower than projected actuarial mortality rates.

Contribution to Canada Health Infoway (Voted)

General Information

Start date

April 1, 2016

End date

March 31, 2022

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017-18

Strategic outcome

A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians.

Link to department’s Program Alignment Architecture

  • Program 1.1: Canadian Health System Policy
    • Sub-Program 1.1.1: Health System Priorities

Description

Infoway is an independent, not-for-profit corporation that is federally funded to work with jurisdictions and other stakeholders to support the development and adoption of digital health technologies across Canada. Between 2001 and 2010, the Government of Canada has invested $2.1B in Infoway, through grants or up-front multi-year funding, to focus on electronic health records, and other priorities in digital health. Budget 2016 allocated $50M over two years to Infoway to support short-term digital health activities in e-prescribing and tele homecare, with the funds to flow as a contribution agreement. Budget 2017 allocated $300M to expand e-prescribing and virtual care initiatives; and improve access to electronic health records for institutions, providers and patients, with the funds also to flow as a contribution agreement.

Results achieved

The Program demonstrated a good level of achievement in 2017-18. With Budget 2016 funds, telehomecare projects across five jurisdictions (British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick) enrolled over 8,700 patients as of February 2018; and nearly 31,500 Canadians have participated in telehomecare programs since 2010. On e-prescribing, by March 31, 2018, a limited production release was being tested in two provinces (Ontario and Alberta) and Memoranda of Understanding to implement the service were in place with six provinces (Ontario, Alberta, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and Labrador, New Brunswick and Manitoba).

Audits completed or planned

Canada Health Infoway must submit annual independently audited financial statements to Health Canada.

Evaluations completed or planned

A synthesis evaluation of transfer payments to Pan-Canadian Health Organizations, typically done every 5-year cycle, is underway and is expected to be completed in fall 2018. This evaluation would also be informed by recent recipient-led evaluations.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Health Canada works with Infoway to establish activities to be carried out under the contribution agreement, and maintains regular contact with Infoway to monitor progress and compliance under the Contribution Agreement.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2015–16 Actual
spending
2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Planned
spending
2017–18 Total
authorities available for use
2017–18 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total grants 0 0
Total contributions 0 21,000,000 29,000,000 47,000,000 47,000,000 18,000,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 0 21,000,000 29,000,000 47,000,000 47,000,000 18,000,000
Comments on variances The variance between actual and planned spending is due to additional in-year funding received.

Note: Infoway is also reported under the Up-Front Multi-Year Funding Supplementary Information Table.

Official Languages Health Contribution Program (Voted)

General Information

Start date

June 18, 2003

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017-18

Strategic outcome

A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians.

Link to department’s Program Alignment Architecture

  • Program 1.3: Official Language Minority Community Development

Description

First established in 2003, the Official Languages Health Contribution Program (OLHCP) was renewed by Treasury Board on November 28, 2013 with total funding of $174.3M over five years (2013-14 to 2017-18 fiscal years) under the Government of Canada's Roadmap for Canada's Official Languages 2013-18: Education, Immigration, and Communities initiative.

The OLHCP has the following objectives:

  • To foster increased access to bilingual health professionals and intake staff in English and French linguistic minority communities in Canada; and
  • To increase the active offer of health services for English and French linguistic minority communities within health institutions and communities.

These objectives are achieved through the following three mutually reinforcing program components:

  • Training and retention of health professionals in official language minority communities (OLMCs).
  • Strengthening and improving local health networking capacity.
  • Encouraging bilingual health professionals to practice in English and French linguistic minority communities, through Health Services Access and Retention Projects.

Results achieved

In 2017-18, Health Canada supported a range of initiatives through the OLHCP. The impacts of these initiatives include an increase in the availability of health service providers to meet the needs of OLMCs, enhanced mechanisms for providing effective health services for these communities, and improved understanding and measurement of health issues and challenges.

Through the OLHCP, Health Canada continued to provide financial support to community organizations and training institutions (e.g., la Société Santé en français [SSF], l'Association des collèges et universités de la francophonie canadienne [ACUFC], le Consortium national de formation en santé [CNFS], McGill University, Community Health and Social Services Network [CHSSN]). These organizations implemented various initiatives to improve access to health services for OLMCs.

Training and retention of health professionals in OLMCs

In 2017-18, the OLHCP supported a range of training and retention initiatives to improve the availability of bilingual health professionals and improve access to services in OLMCs. For example:

  • In Quebec, McGill University recorded 830 registrations as part of its language training program for health professionals and intake staff working in the Quebec health network. A total of 569 health professionals and intake staff completed a language training course during the year, and are now able to serve OLMCs in Quebec. McGill University also coordinated scholarship programs, regional internships, and French-language classes for students to increase the number of health and social services technicians and professionals able to meet the needs of English-speaking people in Quebec’s regions. McGill's internship program helped 70 bilingual students, who benefited from higher placement opportunities in Anglophone minority communities.
  • Outside of Quebec, 787 French-speaking students graduated from health-related programs in 11 postsecondary institutions. The CNFS recorded 1,126 registrations and 787 additional graduates in 100 healthcare training programs. Follow-up survey results with graduates demonstrated an average placement rate of 73% in health care institutions in OLMCs, increasing the pool of health human resources available to meet the needs of OLMCs in Canada. 

Strengthening and improving local health networking capacity in OLMCs

In 2017-18, the OLHCP continued to support initiatives to strengthen and improve networking capacity to improve access to health services for English and French speaking minorities. A total of 36 community-based health networks (covering all provinces and territories) managed by both SSF and CHSSN collaborated with various health sector stakeholders to improve access to health services for OLMCs. These efforts had a direct impact on the accessibility of health services for OLMCs across Canada:

For example, in Quebec, through its activities and partnerships, the CHSSN:

  • Worked with the staff of 19 of the 22 integrated health and social services centres (CIUSSS) and integrated university health and social services centres (CIUSSS) to improve access to English-language health and social services, based on the needs of the English-speaking minority communities.
  • Continued to actively represent the Anglophone community’s needs in a number of local and regional tables on senior services, youth services, and early childhood development.
  • Increased the active offer of health services in OLMCs and health institutions by producing and disseminating a broad range of health information products, as well as coordinating learning and promotional activities.

Outside Quebec, through its activities and partnerships, the SSF:

  • Contributed to enhancing the French-language internship program, which welcomed nine new health trainees in areas such as speech therapy, social work, and occupational therapy (Nunavut).
  • Launched a new online resource: which serves as a platform to recruit and retain bilingual staff (Ontario).
  • Supported the Canadian Volunteers United in Action / Volontaires Unis dans l’action au Canada in the development and implementation of health service navigators (Alberta).
  • Supported two organizations that provide long-term healthcare services to improve the range of healthcare services in French (Prince Edward Island).
  • Supported a feasibility study to consider opening a Francophone health community centre (Yukon).

Projects to improve access to health services for OLMCs outside Quebec

Health Canada also funds the Association des collèges et universités de la francophonie canadienne (ACUFC) to improve the availability of bilingual health professionals and access to services in French in minority regions. In 2017-18, the ACUFC:

  • Rolled out 22 projects as part of continuing education programs for existing health professionals that focused on language training for health professionals, clinical training and the active offer of services in French.
  • Identified and equipped more than 100 Francophone medical students in English-language institutions with the ultimate goal of serving Francophone minority communities more effectively through a collaboration with the Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada.
  • Completed eight research projects that involved at least five universities, on the following themes: home care services; minority inmates; building capacity to improve the quality of life of French-language minority seniors; and the involvement of French-speaking health professionals in training the future generation of workers. 

Audits completed or planned

In 2017-18, Health Canada continued to carry out audits and site visits to ensure that funding for OLMCs is spent effectively and that stakeholder organizations are achieving expected outcomes in compliance with funding agreements and terms and conditions. The following are examples of audit and site visit activities conducted this year:

  • AMI-Quebec and La Cité collègiale audits were conducted in 2017-18. Overall, the audits concluded that these initiatives were being effectively managed.
  • Representatives from the Official Language Community Development Bureau (OLCDB) participated in multiple meetings and site visits in Ottawa (CNFS, SSF) in June 2017 and one in Quebec City (CHSSN) in November 2017.

Evaluations completed or planned

The OLHCP was last evaluation in 2016-17 and will be evaluated again in 2021-22.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Representatives of OLCDB and departmental senior management attended annual general meetings and meetings of Boards of Directors of official language minority community organizations, and were in frequent contact with recipients of the Program.

In November 2017, the OLCDB put in place the Federal Health Portfolio Consultative Committee for Canada’s OLMCs to facilitate the consideration of OLMC health needs in the Portfolio’s various programs and policies. Membership on the Committee includes Health Canada, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Public Health Agency of Canada as well as targeted recipients under the OLHCP, including: SSF, CNFS, CHSSN and McGill University.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2015–16 Actual
spending
2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Planned
spending
2017–18 Total
authorities available for use
2017–18 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 36,399,999 36,400,000 33,800,000 33,800,001 33,800,001 1
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 36,399,999 36,400,000 33,800,000 33,800,001 33,800,001 1
Comments on variances NIL

Canadian Blood Services: Blood Research and Development Program (Voted)

General Information

Start date

April 1, 2000

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2013-14

Strategic outcome

Health risks and benefits associated with food, products, substances, and environmental factors are appropriately managed and communicated to Canadians.

Link to department’s Program Alignment Architecture

  • Program 2.1: Health Products
    • Sub-Program 2.1.2: Biologics and Radiopharmaceuticals

Description

The Canadian Blood Services – Blood Research and Development (CBS Blood R&D) Program helps maintain and increase the safety, supply and efficiency of the Canadian blood system by advancing innovation and maintaining Canadian capacity in transfusion science and medicine. The program pursues these goals by fostering relevant discovery and development research, facilitating dissemination and application of knowledge, educating the next generation of scientific and health care experts, and engaging with an interdisciplinary network of partners in Canada and beyond. In 2016-17, the agreement was amended and a further $3M was allocated over 2016-20 for research related to blood donor criteria about men who have sex with men. This resulted in the launch of the Men who have Sex with Men (MSM) Research Grant Program in 2017, a collaborative effort betweenCBS and Héma-Québec.

Results achieved

The CBS Blood R&D Program has generated numerous outputs related to knowledge products (e.g., journal articles, reviews, etc.) learning events, collaborative arrangements and the development of highly qualified people in the important areas of basic and applied research. According to the 2017 evaluation report, the program has met or exceeded its key outcome targets.

During 2017-18, the program established 43 new partnerships and awarded 152 funding grants in support of R&D and training. In particular, the program has played a key role in building and maintaining research capacity in transfusion science and medicine. For example, seven highly qualified people were formally trained in transfusion science and medicine through graduate fellowship programs, postdoctoral fellowship programs, and provision of training positions in research laboratories. The program’s research network also published 332 peer-reviewed publications and delivered over 309 conference presentations worldwide. The average h-index of CBS research staff (29) is almost three times the average h-index of Canadian academic science authors (10.6) demonstrating the significance of their published work. Since h-Index is a single bibliometric indicator that is a measure of both the productivity and impact of published work, it demonstrates research users being aware of and valuing published research evidence. Seven major education events were held for specialists in transfusion science and medicine, attracting 1,833 professionals. In addition, various stakeholders used knowledge generated by R&D projects to inform changes to practices and standards. As a result, there were seven Health Canada license amendments and one minor change to a license, leading to greater efficiency and safety of the Canadian blood system.

Under the MSM Research Grant Program, eleven research projects were funded in the first round of competitions held in 2017 and are underway as planned. The second and final funding competition was announced in January 2018 and research projects will be finalized in fall 2018. Projects will end between summer 2018 and spring 2020.

Audits completed or planned

Office of Audit and Evaluation – Audit of the Management of Grants and Contributions – Phase 2 is ongoing and is expected to be completed by February 2019.

Evaluations completed or planned

A joint federal evaluation of this program and of the Organ and Tissue Donation and Transplantation Program (administered under a separate agreement) was undertaken in 2017. The evaluation focused on the period from 2013-14 to 2016-17, and the results were posted in the public domain in June 2018.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Health Canada officials undertook numerous exchanges (meetings, phone calls, e-mails) with CBS to discuss program progress. Health Canada continues to monitor the recipient's compliance with the contribution agreement through the analysis of corporate documents and has regular correspondence with senior management of the organization.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2015–16 Actual
spending
2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Planned
spending
2017–18 Total
authorities available for use
2017–18 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total grants 0 0
Total contributions 5,000,000 5,175,000 5,000,000  6,250,000 6,250,000 1,250,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0
Total program 5,000,000 5,175,000 5,000,000 6,250,000 6,250,000 1,250,000
Comments on variances The variance between actual and planned spending is mainly due to additional funding to support the new MSM research initiative.

Substance Use and Addictions Program (Voted)

General Information

Start date

December 4, 2014

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017-18

Strategic outcome

Health risks and benefits associated with food, products, substances, and environmental factors are appropriately managed and communicated to Canadians.

Link to department’s Program Alignment Architecture

  • Program 2.5: Problematic Substance Use (previously Substance Use and Misuse)
    • Sub-Program 2.5.2: Controlled Substances

Description

Aligned with the Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy, the Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP) supports evidence-informed and innovative initiatives across health promotion, prevention, harm reduction, treatment and rehabilitation, targeting a broad range of legal and illegal substances including opioids, alcohol, cannabis and prescription drugs. The overall objective of the SUAP is to support other levels of government, community and non-profit organizations to respond to drug and substance use issues across Canada by: preventing problematic substance use and reducing harms; facilitating treatment and related system enhancements; and, improving awareness, knowledge, skills and competencies of targeted stakeholders and Canadians.

Results achieved

The Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP) managed 14 active community-based and national substance use prevention, harm reduction and treatment initiatives in 2017-18. These initiatives targeted a range of substances and related issues including: new initiatives responding to the opioid crisis such as delivering and evaluating the effectiveness of drug checking services and supporting peers with lived experience who work as first responders; engaging communities and building capacity for a public health approach to cannabis; supporting policies related to lower-risk drinking guidelines; developing national substance use guidelines for older adults; supporting provincial and territorial treatment system planning; community- and school-based drug prevention policy and programming; and promoting trauma- and gender-informed substance use policies and services across Canada. The program also continued to provide core funding to the Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction (CCSA).

The SUAP launched and publically posted a national call for proposals seeking innovative new initiatives related to opioids, cannabis, alcohol and other substances. The solicitation process is ongoing, but by March 31, 2018, the program received and reviewed 204 letters of intent from across Canada, resulting in 63 invitations to submit proposals. By year end, 14 were formally approved.

In 2017-18 there were nine active SUAP funded initiatives across Canada, including the CCSA.

Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction

The CCSA produced 42 significant knowledge products and delivered 75 knowledge exchange mechanisms, including presentations, webinars and workshops. Topics covered multiple substances, with a strong focus on cannabis and the prevention, treatment and harm reduction implications of upcoming legalization. The CCSA also delivered the biennial Issues of Substance conference held in Calgary, Alberta. This is the only national conference that brings together addiction workers, healthcare professionals, researchers, policy makers and knowledge brokers from across the country. Close to 500 individuals participated in the event.

The CCSA reported promising results across many of the program expected results, including significant impact related to collaborative efforts to address the opioid crisis and making evidence-informed information and resources available to stakeholders across Canada on a range of substance use issues and topics.

Other funded initiatives

The remaining funded initiatives produced 44 knowledge products including: approximately 15 new and culturally adapted resources related to understanding and facilitating community consultation and dialogue around cannabis and other substance use related issues in communities across Canada; several products to support needs-based treatment service and system planning in Canada; and a trauma and sex and gender-based policy analysis tool for substance use and mental health service providers. In combination with knowledge exchange mechanisms used to disseminate and promote uptake of these outputs, nearly 2,000 organizations and service providers were reached.

These eight initiatives had a combined total of 65 significant partnerships in 2017-18 supporting planning and delivery as well as knowledge and expertise. Several initiatives worked together and partnered with the CCSA to exchange data, avoid duplication and make resources available nationally to maximize reach.

The majority of the initiatives showed progress in making evidence-informed information and resources available to stakeholders and while additional data on uptake is expected in the coming year, there is evidence of policy, program and practice change. For example, the initiative targeting school-based prevention policy and programming noted that data generated has been used to inform school improvement plans and program improvements in British Columbia, Quebec and Nunavut.

Those initiatives involving community engagement and dialogue were able to show significant impact towards strengthened community, provincial and territorial capacity to address substance use. For example, in the national initiative related to promoting trauma- and gender-informed substance use policies and services across Canada, the majority of workshop participants in Ontario, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia indicated they felt more confident in implementing trauma- and gender-informed principles into their work.

Audits completed or planned

Office of Audit and Evaluation – Audit of the Management of Grants and Contributions – Phase 2 is ongoing and is expected to be completed by February 2019. A component of this audit will include files from the Substance Use and Addictions Program and an audit of the 2017-18 solicitation process.

Evaluations completed or planned

The Substance Use and Addictions Program will be evaluated as part of Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy evaluation that is scheduled to start to April 2021.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Applicants for funding in 2017-18 were engaged through a national call for proposals, with program staff working closely with successful applicant organizations to shape their initiatives. Program staff worked regularly with funding recipients to monitor contribution agreements and obtain required performance measurement and evaluation reports.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2015–16 Actual
spending
2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Planned
spending
2017–18 Total
authorities available for use
2017–18 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 25,467,729 22,793,236 26,350,014  25,839,006 12,969,040  13,380,974
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 25,467,729 22,793,236 26,350,014 25,839,006 12,969,040 13,380,974
Comments on variances The variance between actual and planned spending is mainly due to the re-profile of $12.9M to future years as well as unspent funds by the recipients.

Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care (Voted)

General Information

Start date

April 1, 2011

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2010-11

Strategic outcome

First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals receive health services and benefits that are responsive to their needs so as to improve their health status.

Link to department’s Program Alignment Architecture

  • Program 3.1: First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care
    • Sub-Program 3.1.1: First Nations and Inuit Health Promotion and Disease Prevention
      • Sub-Sub Program 3.1.1.1: Healthy Child Development
      • Sub-Sub Program 3.1.1.2: Mental Wellness
      • Sub-Sub Program 3.1.1.3: Healthy Living
    • Sub-Program 3.1.2: First Nations and Inuit Public Health Protection
      • Sub-Sub Program 3.1.2.1: Communicable Disease Control and Management
      • Sub-Sub Program 3.1.2.2: Environmental Public Health
    • Sub-Program 3.1.3: First Nations and Inuit Primary Care
      • Sub-Sub Program 3.1.3.1: Clinical and Client Care
      • Sub-Sub Program 3.1.3.2: Home and Community Care

Description

The Primary Health Care Authority funds a suite of programs, services and strategies provided primarily to First Nations and Inuit individuals, families, and communities living on-reserve or in Inuit communities. It encompasses health promotion and disease prevention programs to improve health outcomes and reduce health risks; public health protection, including surveillance, to prevent and/or mitigate human health risks associated with communicable diseases and exposure to environmental hazards; and primary care where individuals are provided diagnostic, curative, rehabilitative, supportive, palliative/end-of-life care, and referral services.

Results achieved

Due to the transfer of First Nations and Inuit Health Branch (FNIHB) to Indigenous Services Canada (ISC), effective November 30, 2017, as per the Order in Council P.C. 2017-1465, all results will be reported in the ISC 2017-18 Departmental Results Report.

Audits completed or planned

  • Office of Audit and Evaluation – Audit of First Nations and Inuit Youth Mental Health Programming: Cancelled. Audit transferred to ISC; and,
  • Office of the Auditor General – Oral Health Programs: for First Nations and Inuit – Health Canada: Completed in November 2017.

Evaluations completed or plannedFootnote 2

  • Mental Wellness: Completed in July 2016;
  • Environmental Health: Completed in November 2016;
  • Home and Community Care: Planned for January 2017 – June 2018;
  • Clinical and Client Care: Planned for March 2018;
  • First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan: Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) Led; March 2018 – March 2019;
  • Healthy Child Development: Planned for April 2018 – September 2019; and,
  • Healthy Living: Planned for April 2018 – September 2019.
  • Communicable Disease Control and Management: Planned for July 2018 – December 2019
  • Mental Wellness: Planned for September 2019 – March 2021;

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Health Canada's First Nations and Inuit Health Strategic Plan was developed collaboratively with First Nations and Inuit, provinces and territories, other federal departments and health and social organizations. It informs how Health Canada plans to fulfill its core mandate of providing quality health services while strengthening its focus with key partners to advance mutual priorities for improved health.

Health Canada has also signed an Engagement Protocol with the Assembly of First Nations and an Inuit Health Approach with the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami. These documents guide engagement processes at the national level.

At the regional level, regional partnership tables have been established that provide important vehicles for engagement with partners. Regional partnership tables feed into planning and priority setting processes within the Branch and play a key role in identifying where and how efforts are directed at the regional level.

Federally, Health Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada and INAC continue to streamline and reduce reporting and administrative burdens associated with grants and contributions.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2015–16 Actual
spending
2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Planned
spending
2017–18 Total
authorities available for use
2017–18 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 659,852,641 694,651,345 802,295,540 688,501,903 607,762,078 194,533,462
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 659,852,641 694,651,345 802,295,540 688,501,903 607,762,078 194,533,462
Comments on variances Due to the transfer of First Nations and Inuit Health Branch (FNIHB) to Indigenous Services Canada (ISC), effective November 30, 2017, as per Order in Council P.C. 2017-1465, all FNIHB related components will be reported in ISC 2017-18 Departmental Results Report.

Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Supplementary Health Benefits (Voted)

General Information

Start date

April 1, 2011

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2010-11

Strategic outcome

First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals receive health services and benefits that are responsive to their needs so as to improve their health status.

Link to department’s Program Alignment Architecture

  • Program 3.2: Supplementary Health Benefits for First Nations and Inuit

Description

Health Canada's Non-Insured Health Benefits (NIHB) Program is a national program that provides registered First Nations and recognized Inuit residents in Canada with coverage for a range of medically necessary health-related goods and services which are not otherwise available to them through other private plans or provincial/territorial health or social programs. NIHB Program benefits include prescription and over-the-counter medications, dental and vision care, medical supplies and equipment, mental health counselling, and transportation to access medically required health services that are not available on-reserve or in the community of residence.

Results achieved

Due to the transfer of First Nations and Inuit Health Branch (FNIHB) to Indigenous Services Canada (ISC), effective November 30, 2017, as per the Order in Council P.C. 2017-1465, all results will be reported in the ISC 2017-18 Departmental Results Report.

Audits completed or planned

Office of the Auditor General of Canada Oral Health Programs for First Nations and Inuit – Health Canada: Completed in November 2017.

Evaluations completed or planned

Supplementary Health Benefits for First Nations and Inuit: Completed for September 2017.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Health Canada's First Nations and Inuit Health Strategic Plan was developed collaboratively with First Nations and Inuit, provinces and territories, other federal departments and health and social organizations. It informs how Health Canada plans to fulfill its core mandate of providing quality health services while strengthening its focus with key partners to advance mutual priorities for improved health.

Health Canada has also signed an Engagement Protocol with the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) and an Inuit Health Approach with the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami (ITK). These documents guide engagement processes at the national level.

In 2016-17, Health Canada continued to work collaboratively with the AFN on the NIHB Program Joint Review in order to enhance client access to benefits, identify and address gaps in benefits, streamline service delivery to be more responsive to client needs, and increase program efficiencies. Health Canada also continued to work collaboratively with the ITK Senior Bilateral Committee to identify and respond to Inuit-specific issues related to the NIHB Program.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2015–16 Actual
spending
2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Planned
spending
2017–18 Total
authorities available for use
2017–18 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 200,370,251 210,429,939 220,707,524 150,873,478 142,170,853 78,536,671
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 200,370,251 210,429,939 220,707,524 150,873,478 142,170,853 78,536,671
Comments on variances Due to the transfer of FNIHB to Indigenous Services Canada (ISC), effective November 30, 2017, as per the Order in Council P.C. 2017-1465, all results will be reported in the ISC 2017-18 Departmental Results Report.

Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Infrastructure Support (Voted)

General Information

Start date

April 1, 2011

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2013-14

Strategic outcome

First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals receive health services and benefits that are responsive to their needs so as to improve their health status.

Link to department’s Program Alignment Architecture

  • Program 3.3: Health Infrastructure Support for First Nations and Inuit
    • Sub-Program 3.3.1: First Nations and Inuit Health System Capacity
      • Sub-Sub Program 3.3.1.1: Health Planning and Quality Management
      • Sub-Sub Program 3.3.1.2: Health Human Resources
      • Sub-Sub Program 3.3.1.3: Health Facilities
    • Sub-Program 3.3.2: First Nations and Inuit Health System Transformation
      • Sub-Sub Program 3.3.2.1: Health Systems Integration
      • Sub-Sub Program 3.3.2.2: e-Health Infostructure
    • Sub-Program 3.3.3: Tripartite Health Governance

Description

The Health Infrastructure Support Authority underpins the long-term vision of an integrated health system with greater First Nations and Inuit control by enhancing their capacity to design, manage, deliver and evaluate quality health programs and services. It provides the foundation to support the delivery of programs and services in First Nations communities and for individuals, and to promote innovation and partnerships in health care delivery to better meet the unique health needs of First Nations and Inuit.

The funds are used for: planning and management for the delivery of quality health services; construction and maintenance of health facilities; research activities; encouraging Indigenous people to pursue health careers; investments in technologies to modernize health services; and integrating and realigning the governance of existing health services.

Results achieved

Due to the transfer of the First Nations and Inuit Health Branch (FNIHB) to Indigenous Services Canada (ISC), effective November 30, 2017, as per the Order in Council P.C. 2017-1465, all results will be reported in the ISC 2017-18 Departmental Results Report.

Audits completed or plannedFootnote 3

  • Office of Audit and Evaluation - Audit of First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, Health Facilities Program: Completed in March 2017;
  • Office of Audit and Evaluation - Audit of Health Canada’s Management of the Administration of the BC Framework Agreement: Completed in March 2017; and,
  • Office of Audit and Evaluation – Audit of the Management of Grants and Contributions: Completed in March 2018.

Evaluations completed or plannedFootnote 3

  • Health Planning and Quality Management: Completed November 2016;
  • Health Facilities: Completed March 2017;
  • e-Health Infostructure: Completed March 2017;
  • BC Tripartite Governance: Completed September 2017; and,
  • First Nations and Inuit Health Human Resources: Planned for June 2018.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Health Canada's First Nations and Inuit Health Strategic Plan was developed collaboratively with First Nations and Inuit, provinces and territories, other federal departments and health and social organizations. It informs how Health Canada plans to fulfill its core mandate of providing quality health services while strengthening its focus with key partners to advance mutual priorities for improved health.

Health Canada has also signed an Engagement Protocol with the Assembly of First Nations and an Inuit Health Approach with the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami. These documents guide engagement processes at the national level.

At the regional level, regional partnership tables have been established that provide important vehicles for engagement with partners. Regional partnership tables feed into planning and priority setting processes within the Branch and play a key role in identifying where and how efforts are directed at the regional level.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2015–16 Actual
spending
2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Planned
spending
2017–18 Total
authorities available for use
2017–18 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 637,662,686 782,135,571 752,465,894 572,417,139 571,624,276 180,841,618
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 637,662,686 752,135,571 752,465,894 572,418,139 571,624,276 180,841,618
Comments on variances Due to the transfer of First Nations and Inuit Health Branch (FNIHB) to Indigenous Services Canada (ISC), effective November 30, 2017, as per Order in Council P.C. 2017-1465, all FNIHB related components will be reported in ISC 2017-18 Departmental Results Report.
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