Supplementary Information Tables 2019-20 Departmental Results Report: Health Canada

Table of Contents

Details on Transfer Payment Programs of $5 Million or More

Contribution to the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement

General information

Name of transfer payment program

Contribution to the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (Voted)

Start date

December 10, 2015

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017-18

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Description

The contribution to the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI) supports the federal government's interest in achieving an accessible, high quality, sustainable and accountable health system, adaptable to the needs of Canadians. It is designed to support CFHI's work to identify and accelerate the spread of promising innovations across Canada by supporting health care organizations to adapt, implement and measure improvements in patient care, population health and value for money for health care system investments.

CFHI previously operated as the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation (CHSRF), an arm's-length, non-profit, charitable organization with a mandate to fund health services research and promote the use of research evidence to strengthen the delivery of health services. CHSRF received $151.5 million in federal funding under three separate grants (1996-97 to 2003-04).

Results achieved

In 2019-20, CFHI continued to support innovations designed to accelerate improvements in health care delivery by working with health care leaders, governments, policy-makers and other leaders. Examples of results achieved by CFHI in 2019-20 include:

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20

Completed: Audit of Grants and Contributions Management Phase 2

Summary of Findings:

The audit found effective solicitation of applicants and selection of recipients, and that the funding agreements complied with the Treasury Board Policy. The audit report also found adequate monitoring of recipients with respect to their reporting requirements.

The audit reported that the solicitation process was lengthy which affected the ability to disburse funds in a timely manner and support departmental objectives. There was limited use of service standards to manage the contribution agreement management process and support continuous improvement. The audit found an absence of documentation for Health Canada employees to identify conflicts of interest in the selection of recipients. The audit also found there was limited information to support recipient risk assessments and inform the annual risk-based recipient audit plan. Finally, there was a limited number of employees engaged in SGBA+ training and limited collection of data through recipient performance measurement plans to support diversity elements of SGBA+.

Planned: Not applicable

Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

Completed: No evaluation was completed in 2019-20.

Planned: The next evaluation is scheduled for 2023-24.

Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20

Health Canada maintained regular contact with CFHI through quarterly meetings to receive updates on its programming and finances. Over the course of the year, it also monitored progress and compliance under the funding agreement, including providing feedback on draft deliverables such as the work plan and annual report.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 17,000,000 17,000,000 17,000,000 17,000,000 17,000,000 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 17,000,000 17,000,000 17,000,000 17,000,000 17,000,000 0
Explanation of variances Not applicable
Note: CFHI is also reported under the "Up-Front Multi-Year Funding" section of the Supplementary Information Tables

Health Care Policy Contribution Program

General information

Name of transfer payment program

Health Care Policy Contribution Program (Voted)

Start date

September 24, 2002

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2010-11

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Description

The Health Care Policy Contribution Program (HCPCP) provides up to $26.9 million per fiscal year in time-limited contribution funding for projects that address specific health care systems priorities, including mental health, home and palliative care, health care systems innovation, and optimization of the health workforce. Through the implementation of contribution agreements and a variety of stakeholder engagement activities, Health Canada contributes to the development and application of effective approaches to support sustainable improvements to health care systems.

Results achieved

In 2019-20, the Health Care Policy Contribution Program (HCPCP) directed funding toward disseminating, exchanging and implementing knowledge to support innovation and implementation of best practices in palliative and end-of-life care, home care and medication safety. The Program also supported projects that contributed to improving access to health care services for all Canadians. Specific examples include:

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20

Completed: Audit of Grants and Contributions Management Phase 2

Summary of Findings:

The audit found effective solicitation of applicants and selection of recipients, and that the contribution agreements complied with the Treasury Board Policy. The audit report also found adequate monitoring of recipients with respect to their reporting requirements.

The audit reported that the solicitation process was lengthy which affected the ability to disburse funds in a timely manner and support departmental objectives. There was limited use of service standards to manage the contribution agreement management process and support continuous improvement. The audit found an absence of documentation for Health Canada employees to identify conflicts of interest in the selection of recipients. The audit also found there was limited information to support recipient risk assessments and inform the annual risk-based recipient audit plan. Finally, there was a limited number of employees engaged in SGBA+ training and limited collection of data through recipient performance measurement plans to support diversity elements of SGBA+.

Planned: Not applicable

Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

Completed: No evaluation was completed in 2019-20.

Planned: The next evaluation is scheduled for 2023-24.

Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20

Funding recipients continued to be engaged through site visits and regular communication. For example Health Canada visited the Canadian Hospice and Palliative Care Association and CHCA to discuss progress against objectives, planned impacts and achievements to date. Program officials continue to have discussions with recipients to guide them in the development of performance measurement plans and to provide feedback on annual performance reports.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 8,737,838 9,489,511 27,018,000 21,584,501 18,346,468 8,671,532
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 8,737,838 9,489,511 27,018,000 21,584,501 18,346,468 8,671,532
Explanation of variances The variance between actual and planned spending is mainly due to the allocation of funds to other programs, as some planned activities did not materialize until closer to year-end. The Program has put in place a multi-year planning process to support longer-term and enhanced planning aligned with current and emerging health care policy priorities.

Contribution to the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health

General information

Name of transfer payment program

Contribution to the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 2008

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017-18

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Description

The Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH) is an independent, not-for-profit agency funded by Canadian federal, provincial, and territorial governments to provide credible, impartial and evidence-based information about the clinical/cost-effectiveness and optimal use of drugs and other health technologies to Canadian health care decision makers.

Results achieved

The contribution agreement provided financial support for CADTH's core business activities, namely, the Common Drug Review, pan-Canadian Oncology Drug Review, Health Technology Assessments and Optimal Use Projects. Through these activities, CADTH achieved results through the creation and dissemination of evidence-based information that provide guidance and evidence-based information enabling health system partners to make informed decisions on the adoption and appropriate utilization of drugs and non-drug technologies, in terms of both effectiveness and cost. In particular, CADTH's formulary listing recommendations have been embedded within the decision-processes of public drug plans as a means of increasing transparency across jurisdictions and providing consistency to pharmaceutical reimbursement decisions. Additional funding announced in Budget 2017 supported CADTH's ongoing transition to a health technology management organization in order to deliver results that better meet the needs of the healthcare system.

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20

Completed: No audit was completed in 2019-20.

Planned: Not applicable.

Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

Completed: No evaluation was completed in 2019-20.

Planned: The next evaluation is scheduled for 2023-24.

Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20

Health Canada worked with CADTH to establish activities to be carried out under the contribution agreement, and maintained regular contact with CADTH to monitor progress and ensure compliance with terms of the organization's contribution agreement.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 18,058,769 20,058,769 23,058,769 23,058,769 23,058,769 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 18,058,769 20,058,769 23,058,769 23,058,769 23,058,769 0
Explanation of variances Not applicable

Strengthening Canada's Home and Community Care and Mental Health and Addiction Services Initiative

General information

Name of transfer payment program

Payments to Provinces and Territories for the Purposes of Home Care and Mental Health (Voted)

Start date

November 9, 2017

End date

March 31, 2027

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017-18

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Description

The Government of Canada is investing $11 billion over ten years (2017-2027) to support the provinces and territories (PTs) in improving access to home and community care ($6 billion) and mental health and addictions ($5 billion) services in their jurisdictions as per the Common Statement of Principles for Shared Health Priorities (CSoP). In August 2017, federal, provincial and territorial Ministers of Health agreed to the CSoP which outlines the priority areas of focus for these investments.

On mental health and addictions, PTs have agreed to focus on:

On home and community care, PTs have agreed to focus on:

By endorsing the CSoP, PTs fulfilled the conditions set out in the Budget Implementation Act, 2017 to receive funding for fiscal year 2017-18 through a statutory appropriation ($300 million). The remaining nine years of funding ($10.7 billion) will be provided through bilateral contribution agreements.

Following the 2017 federal, provincial and territorial agreement on the Common Statement of Principles, the federal government negotiated and signed bilateral agreements with each province and territory in which equal jurisdiction outlines how it will invest the funding for the first five years of the ten years of investment, based on the priority areas of action agreed to in August 2017. In 2021-22, these agreements will be renewed for the remaining five years (2022-23 to 2026-27) of the 10- year commitment.

As part of the CSoP, all governments also agreed to develop a focused set of common indicators to measure progress on these priority areas. The Canadian Institute for Health Information led a collaborative process which culminated in May 2018 when federal, provincial and territorial Ministers of Health endorsed a suite of 12 common indicators to be implemented over the coming years.

Results achieved

In keeping with the bilateral agreements, federal funding is being used to improve access to home and community care and mental health and addiction services. Action plans annexed to the bilateral agreements allow Canadians to see how the targeted federal funding will be invested in each province and territory.

In May 2019, CIHI released its inaugural annual report on the first three of these indicators, which provides baseline information to begin to track progress. CIHI will continue to work with governments across Canada to report annually on all 12 indicators.

These investments to strengthen home and community care and access to mental health and addiction services are leading to better health outcomes and a more sustainable health care system, as care is shifted from expensive hospital care to home and community-based service delivery.

Canadians are beginning to see improvements in the availability and quality of services in their communities and at home. New investments:

PTs are also taking steps to improve access to mental health and addiction services. Many are taking an integrated approach to delivery of these services that recognizes the need to provide people-centred care that is coordinated across the health care system. Specifically, investments in these areas:

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20

Completed: No audit was completed in 2019-20.

Planned: Not applicable.

Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

Completed: No evaluation was completed in 2019-20.

Planned: The next evaluation is scheduled for 2022-23.

Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20

With respect to mental health and addictions, the Government of Canada has engaged with PTs, National Indigenous Organizations, mental health stakeholders, provincial and territorial medical associations and treatment centres, and experts.

With respect to the home and community care, the Government of Canada has engaged with a range of home care stakeholders including representatives from national organizations working on home, community and palliative care, provincial home care providers, patient and family advocates, and national health professional associations (e.g., the Canadian Medical Association, Canadian Nurses Association and the College of Family Physicians of Canada), as well as experts.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 849,119,329 1,100,000,000 1,100,000,000 1,099, 745,825 254, 175
Total program 0 849,119,329 1,100,000,000 1,100,000,000 1,099, 745,825 254, 175
Explanation of variances The variance between actual and planned spending is mainly due to the negotiated delay in the flow of funds for the Canada-Nunavut Home and Community Care and Mental Health and Addiction Services Contribution Agreement.

Mental Health Commission of Canada Contribution Program

General information

Name of transfer payment program

Mental Health Commission of Canada Contribution Program (Voted)

Start date

2000 as a Grant, but as of April 1, 2017 it has become a Contribution

End date

March 31, 2021

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2019-20

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Description

The Mental Health Commission of Canada (MHCC), an arm's length, not-for-profit organization, was established in March 2007 with a ten-year mandate to improve health and social outcomes for people and their families living with mental illness. Between 2007 and 2017, the Government of Canada invested $130 million in the MHCC through a grant, to develop a mental health strategy for Canada, conduct an anti-stigma campaign and create a knowledge exchange centre. In 2016, the MHCC's mandate was renewed for a two-year period, from 2017-18 to 2018-19, with a contribution of $14.25 million per year to advance work on mental health priorities, including problematic substance use, suicide prevention, support for at-risk populations and engagement. This contribution has been extended for 2019-20.

Results achieved

In 2019-20, the MHCC continued to provide valuable mental health expertise and advice to mental health stakeholders. Notable achievements:

Substance Use

The MHCC collected significant data on the evaluation of four stigma reduction interventions using the Opening Minds Scale for First Responders and Health Care Providers on Opioid Use Problems. This evaluation included:

  1. the MHCC's Understanding Stigma program,
  2. an opioid-use-specific social contact intervention (using a survey of second year nursing students at St. Lawrence College in Brockville, Ontario),
  3. an iteration of the Community Addictions Peer Support Association and the Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction (CCSA) "Stigma Ends with Me" workshop, and
  4. three iterations of the Fraser Health Authority's Trauma and Resiliency Informed Practice workshop.

The results will be used to support the expansion and scale-up of best practices.

Suicide Prevention

Roots of Hope

The Roots of Hope project has generated a great deal of attention, and new communities continued to express interest. The MHCC's Prevention and Promotion team formalized support of Iqaluit, Nunavut, one of eight communities participating in the five-year research demonstration project: Roots of Hope: A Community Suicide Prevention Project.

Key elements of the Iqaluit suicide prevention action plan are: community engagement, social determinants of health, Inuit-specific approaches to wellness, and land-based programming. The meeting helped to build momentum around specific programs with infrastructure and administrative leadership that will be provided through the project.

Suicide Prevention Conference

The MHCC's Prevention and Promotion team supported the 30th annual Canadian Association for Suicide Prevention national conference in Edmonton (October 2019). The conference focused on reconciliation and the need to heal relationships to drive connectedness, a key element underpinning suicide prevention.

Engagement

Mental Health Needs of Incarcerated or Detained Individuals within the Criminal Justice System

People living with mental illness are over-represented in the criminal justice system, and the justice system is not well equipped to meet their needs. The MHCC worked to mobilize key stakeholders in the health and justice systems to spread best practices, promote evidence-based research, and improve collaboration in the delivery of mental health services for those involved with the law.

To date, key partners and stakeholders have been identified and an advisory committee established. An evidence summary based on three sources from the listening phase (17 key-informant interviews, a national survey with 584 responses, and a scoping review of 391 documents from academic and grey literature) was combined into final key themes. Thirty four participants from various sectors related to mental health and the criminal justice system subsequently met at a national forum. Participants developed specific action items to improve mental health services and supports for people involved in the criminal justice system. Action steps were also identified, and a final report is being developed.

Population-Based Initiatives

National Standard for Psychological Health and Safety of Post-Secondary Students

The MHCC and CSA Group (formerly called the Canadian Standards Association) continue to lead the development of the Standard on Psychological Health and Safety for Post-Secondary Students (PSS Standard) – voluntary guidelines that post-secondary organizations can use to promote mental health and prevent psychological harm among their students.

The MHCC has been leading extensive stakeholder engagement efforts to inform the PSS Standard. The public was invited to review the first draft and share feedback and the MHCC hosted 14 focus groups for select strategic audiences across the country. Participants included students; Francophones; First Nations, Inuit, and Métis; senior leadership; service providers; and the project's executive advisory committee (a total of 230 people). The CSA Group received more than 1,700 comments on the draft, which were shared with the CSA Technical Committee.

The MHCC subsequently hosted a session with representatives from the CSA Technical Committee, CSA Group, and project partners (including Universities Canada, Colleges and Institutes Canada, and their members) to discuss the PSS Standard content and implementation strategies at post-secondary institutions across Canada.

E-Mental Health National Conference

In March 2020, the MHCC, together with the University of British Columbia, the University Health Network, and Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH), co-hosted the 9th Annual E-Mental Health Conference in Toronto. This year's theme, Caring in a Digital World: Introducing Disruptive Change to Mental Health Care, set out to underline the importance of e-mental health.

Over 250 people (from Canada and international locations) were in attendance, including health-care providers, administrators, system leaders, and people with lived experience.

Pan-Canadian Network for the Implementation of Increased Access to Psychotherapies

Access to psychological services is a significant barrier for many people in need of mental health services, something public funding could reduce. To align key stakeholders, support knowledge sharing, build consensus, and develop recommendations with the goal of increasing access to services, the MHCC created the Psychotherapy Policy Implementation Network, a pan-Canadian group of policy makers, researchers, clinicians, people with lived experience, and other experts. At the group's inaugural meeting (February 21 in Ottawa), 23 members with diverse perspectives (including persons with lived and living experience) discussed ways of increasing access to psychotherapies, building on the thought leaders' meeting of November 29.

Research Demonstration Project for Culturally Adapted Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CaCBT)

People of South Asian origin living in Canada are the largest visible minority group in the country and are disproportionately impacted by unemployment; low income, education, and literacy; language barriers; and migration stress. To improve mental health outcomes for this population, the MHCC, in collaboration with CAMH, launched a CaCBT project in Toronto on December 10. This project will develop a specialized form of psychotherapy for people in this group who are experiencing anxiety and depression.

The CaCBT launch brought together 83 participants, including policy makers, researchers and research sites, people with lived and living experience, and other stakeholders. The purpose was to communicate the project's goals and approach, build interest, and start recruitment for the first stage. The event included a panel discussion with local media and a research-team meeting. 150 people of South Asian origin from across Canada have expressed interest in participating in the project.

Mental Health Needs of Canadians Living with Chronic Disease

The MHCC held an inaugural call of its Mental Health and Chronic Disease Network on February 25. This knowledge exchange network includes 27 members representing various physical chronic disease groups and organizations in mental health, primary care, and research.

Child and Youth Mental Health

The child and youth mental health incubation project is helping service sectors work together to:

In this reporting period, a listening phase summary report was completed based on three sources of evidence (20 key-informant interviews, a national survey with over 1,800 responses, and a scoping review of the literature), which were combined into final key themes.

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20

Completed: No audit was completed in 2019-20.

Planned: Not applicable.

Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

Completed: No evaluation was completed in 2019-20.

Planned: The next evaluation is scheduled for 2023-24.

Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20

Regular meetings with the recipient; analysis and follow-up of progress and financial reporting; and monitoring of performance and results.

MHCC is the sole recipient of the contribution. Health Canada monitors the recipient's compliance with the contribution agreement through the analysis of corporate documents by reviewing their progress/performance reports twice a year (mid-year and year-end) and has regular meetings with senior management of the organization.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 14,250,000 14,250,000 14,250,000 14,250,000 14,250,000 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 14,250,000 14,250,000 14,250,000 14,250,000 14,250,000 0
Explanation of variances Not applicable

Substance Use and Addictions Program

General information

Name of transfer payment program

Substance Use and Addictions Program (Voted)

Start date

December 4, 2014

End date

March 31, 2022 (Grant)

Ongoing (Contribution)

Type of transfer payment

Grant and Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2018-19

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Description

The Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP) provides funding for a wide range of evidence-informed and innovative problematic substance use prevention, harm reduction and treatment initiatives across Canada at the community, regional and national levels. Initiatives target a range of psychoactive substances, including opioids, cannabis, alcohol and tobacco.

Results achieved

In 2019-20, SUAP provided funding to 105 multi-year community-based and national substance use awareness, prevention, harm reduction and treatment initiatives. Of note, of the 12 existing initiatives ended.

In summer 2019, a call for proposals was launched seeking proposals that enhance the response to the opioid crisis and other emerging issues, such as methamphetamine use. Selected proposals were approved for funding in the fourth quarter of 2020. Initiatives funded in 2019-20 focused on a wide range of issues including:

Controlled Drugs and Substances

67 initiatives address a variety of needs around controlled drugs and substances, including reducing stigma and engaging people with lived and living experience, identifying best practices for medication-assisted treatments, improving access to different types of treatment, and identifying innovative models for opioid replacement therapy.

Cannabis

31 initiatives focus on preventing and reducing harm caused by cannabis misuse, including the development of guidance and tools for health professionals, the development and dissemination of culturally appropriate resources within Indigenous communities, and the development of resources targeting audiences with greater risks and/or harms associated with cannabis use.

Tobacco Use and Vaping

7 initiatives focus on informing Canadians about the harms of tobacco use and vaping, including designing cessation interventions for people who smoke/vape, the development of low-risk nicotine use guidelines, and addressing knowledge gaps.

Together these initiatives produced over 1,700 knowledge products (guidelines, toolkits, reports) and delivered over 2,300 learning opportunities (workshops, presentations, webinars). Over 80% of targeted stakeholders and Canadians indicated that they gained knowledge and skills relevant to reducing the harms of substance use in Canada. In addition, over 65% are using their new knowledge and skills to make positive changes to behaviour, as well as improvements to substance use policies, programs and clinical practices.

Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction

The SUAP continued to provide core funding to CCSA, as well as funding for research on the impact of cannabis legalization. The CCSA works with a wide range of national and international partners to mobilize efforts, foster knowledge exchange, and develop evidence-informed actions responding to problematic substance use.

Initiatives delivered this fiscal year targeted priorities ranging from educating the public about cannabis following legalization, decreasing substance use stigma to affect changes in the health system, to reducing the harms of problematic alcohol consumption. CCSA's objectives in knowledge sharing and serving as a national convener in the field of problematic substance use were advanced through organizing the national Issues of Substance Conference, and by responding to the urgent knowledge needs in relation to COVID-19 and the impact on substance use and addictions.

CCSA's work informs policy changes, practices and raises awareness. In 2019-20, over 125 knowledge and communication products were created, 56 events were delivered, 95 presentations were given, and close to 4,400 knowledge activities were disseminated through social media. This generated increased national and international interests compared to previous years. In total, CCSA website had over 1,399,205 visits with Canada Low Risk, Drinking Guidelines, National Awareness Week and Cannabis being the most searched. Their social media knowledge dissemination activities had over 11.2 million impressions (an increase of 485%) and 303,000 engagements, which was almost 8 times higher than the previous year. The topics that generated the highest response and impact included Stigma Ends with Me Campaigns, National Awareness Week and Issues of Substance Conference 2019. CCSA's workshops and webinars resulted in increased capacity among participants - surveys suggested an average of 91% satisfaction rate among respondent, 90% increased awareness, 81% in knowledge and 79% in increased skills. Interest in CCSA products also resulted in garnering increased product use requests and citations of their work. In 2019-20, CCSA worked with over 2,000 partners and stakeholders as well as the Mental Health Commission of Canada to affect changes in the health system to address problematic substance use.

Mental Health Commission of Canada

Budget 2018 included a commitment to provide $10 million over five years for the Mental Health Commission of Canada (MHCC) to help assess the impact of cannabis use on the mental health of Canadians.

In 2019-20, the MHCC continued to work toward the objectives of informing and advancing research, building the evidence base, and mobilizing knowledge on the impacts of cannabis use on mental health. Five knowledge products were developed, including an environmental scan and a scoping review to assess the state of the research on cannabis and mental health outcomes and to identify research gaps. In addition, the MHCC held a number of in-person events, with the goal of exchanging knowledge and identifying research gaps and priorities. Events took place in Ottawa, Ontario, and Goose Bay, Labrador, in partnership with such organizations such as Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, the CCSA and the Nunatsiavut Department of Health and Social Development.

The MHCC, with the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), funded two one-year catalyst grant research projects to explore the potential therapeutic benefit of cannabis and cannabidiol on mental health outcomes. In addition, the MHCC launched a call for 11 additional one-year catalyst research grants to generate new evidence around cannabis and mental health. In partnership with CCSA and CIHR, MHCC also launched a call for proposals for three five-year team grants that will investigate the potential harms and benefits of cannabis, the impact of social determinants of health, as well as the needs of diverse populations experiencing cannabis use disorder and/or mental illness. Lastly, the MHCC launched four multi-year team-based research projects in alignment with the CIHR's Integrated Cannabis Research Strategy. These research projects will address key research gaps regarding cannabis use and mental health.

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20

Completed: Audit of Grants & Contributions Management Phase 2

The audit found effective solicitation of applicants and selection of recipients, and indicated that the funding agreements complied with the Treasury Board Policy. The audit report also found adequate monitoring of recipients with respect to their reporting requirements. The audit reported that the solicitation process was lengthy which affected the ability to disburse funds in a timely manner and support departmental objectives. There was limited use of service standards to manage the contribution agreement management process. The audit found an absence of documentation for Health Canada employees to identify conflicts of interest in the selection of recipients. The audit also found there was limited information to support recipient risk assessments and inform the annual risk-based recipient audit plan. Finally, there was a limited number of employees engaged in SGBA+ training and limited collection of data through recipient performance measurement plans to support diversity elements of SGBA+. The program has taken steps to address the deficiencies indicated by the audit.

Planned: Not applicable

Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

Completed: No evaluation was completed in 2019-20.

Planned: The next evaluation is scheduled for 2022-23.

Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20

Applicants for funding in 2019-20 were engaged through a national call for proposals, with program staff working closely with successful applicant organizations to shape their initiatives, monitor contribution agreements and obtain required performance measurement and evaluation reports. The program also supported knowledge translation and exchange opportunities between projects, and between Health Canada and other partners and stakeholders through its involvement in various conferences, workshops, and committees. Of note, the program is exploring the development of theme-based Communities of Practices with partners within and external to the federal government.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 0 0 200,000 200,000 175,000 25,000
Total contributions 12,969,040 26,938,461 52,398,985 52,842,492 51,481,773 917,212
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 12,969,040 26,938,461 52,598,985 53,042,492 51,656,773 942,212
Explanation of variances The variance between actual and planned spending is mainly due to projects that were not undertaken in 2019-20 as well as a transfer of funds to Indigenous Services Canada. The variance in grant funding is due to not generating as many proposals as expected prior to the deadline for call for proposals.

Contribution to Canada Health Infoway

General information

Name of transfer payment program

Contribution to Canada Health Infoway (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 2016

End date

March 31, 2022

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017-18

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Description

Infoway is an independent, not-for-profit corporation that is federally funded to work with jurisdictions and other stakeholders to support the development and adoption of digital health technologies across Canada. Between 2001 and 2010, the Government of Canada has invested $2.1 billion in Infoway, through grants or up-front multi-year funding, to focus on electronic health records, and other priorities in digital health. Budget 2016 allocated $50 million over two years to Infoway to support short-term digital health activities in e-prescribing and telehomecare, with the funds flowing as a Contribution Agreement. Budget 2017 allocated $300 million over five years to Infoway to expand e-prescribing and virtual care initiatives, support the continued adoption and use of electronic medical records, help patients to access their own health records electronically, and better link electronic health record systems to improve access by all providers and institutions. These funds flow as a Contribution agreement.

Results achieved

The PrescribeIT program continued to grow in fiscal year 2019-20. Memorandums of Understanding to implement the program are signed with 10 jurisdictions (Yukon, Manitoba, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and Labrador, Prince Edward Island, Saskatchewan, Northwest Territories, Ontario, Alberta and New Brunswick), and an eleventh is in the process of being signed with Nunavut. In 2019-20, PrescribeIT continued to equip Canadian providers with digital health technologies that aid them in delivering more efficient and high quality health care. The program was operational in five jurisdictions (Alberta, Saskatchewan, Ontario, New Brunswick, and Newfoundland and Labrador), and as a result, enrollment increased with 2,442 enrolled prescribers (up from 897 last year) and 3,312 enrolled pharmacies (up from 877 last year).

The ACCESS Health program is continuing to develop. In 2019-20, Infoway began building the ACCESS Gateway platform, an identity, access, and consent management service that will eventually allow patients and providers to access electronic health records and multiple digital health tools through a single set of login credentials. Infoway is piloting and developing its ACCESS Gateway services as part of ACCESS Atlantic, a collaborative initiative with four Atlantic provinces that aims to make it quicker and easier to access health services in Atlantic Canada. In support of its ACCESS Health program, Infoway continues to use its ACCESS 2022 awareness campaign in an effort to inspire action towards a vision that includes patients, families and clinicians having access to the information and digital services they need to manage their health. Through its ACCESS Health program, Infoway continued to fund the nationwide "Crisis Text Line" powered by Kids Help Phone. Available 24/7 in both English and French, this free service provides youth with support for mental health and other issues through text messaging. In 2019-20, the text line had nearly 134,000 texting conversations, saving an estimated five young lives per day. In addition, Infoway expanded its First Nations-developed community health record and personal health record platform, the Mustimuhw Community Electronic Medical Record (cEMR), to benefit 285 First Nations communities across 7 provinces. Infoway also announced an agreement to integrate PrescribeIT into the cEMR.

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20

Completed: No audit was completed in 2019-20.

Planned: Not applicable.

Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

Completed: No evaluation was completed in 2019-20.

Planned: The next evaluation is scheduled for 2023-24.

Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20

Health Canada worked with Infoway to establish the activities that it carried out under the contribution agreement, and maintained regular contact with Infoway to monitor progress and compliance under the contribution agreement. Health Canada has a representative on Infoway's Board of Directors, which met 4 times in 2019-20.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 47,000,000 49,844,676 75,000,000 75,000,000 74,440,696 (559,304)
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 47,000,000 49,844,676 75,000,000 75,000,000 74,440,696 (559,304)
Explanation of variances The variance between actual and planned spending is mainly due to interest earned by Canada Health Infoway and reimbursed to Health Canada in 2019-20.
Note: Infoway is also reported under the "Up-Front Multi-Year Funding" section of the Supplementary Information Tables.

Contribution to the Canadian Institute for Health Information

General information

Name of transfer payment program

Contribution to the Canadian Institute for Health Information (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 1999

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017-18

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Description

The Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) is an independent, not-for-profit organization supported by federal, provincial and territorial governments (F/P/T) that provides essential data and analysis on Canada's health system and the health of Canadians. CIHI was created in 1994 by the F/P/T Ministers of Health to address significant gaps in health information.

Between 1994 and 2018, the Government of Canada allocated approximately $1,232 million in total to CIHI through a series of contribution agreements. Under the current agreement signed in early 2018, close to $365 million will be delivered to CIHI over 5 years (2017-18 to 2021-22). Presently, Health Canada funds 77% of CIHI's total budget, while the P/T governments contribute 17%. The remaining funds are generated largely through product sales.

In early 2018, the current contribution agreement was signed, providing close to $365 million over five years (2017-18 to 2021-22). A first amendment was signed in February 2019 to provide an additional $140,000 to CIHI to undertake an environmental scan of data gaps for addiction treatment services. A second amendment was signed in December 2019 to provide $500,000 for initiating a collaborative pan-Canadian project to enhance organ donation and transplantation data and reporting across the country.

Results achieved

In 2019 -20, CIHI continued to make progress towards producing more and better data, more relevant and actionable analysis, and improved client understanding and use of CIHI data and information products.

Selected highlights from the past year:

In 2018, Health Canada initiated the objective of the Collaborative is to inform thinking and encourage action on ways of facilitating and supporting collaboration among and between governments, Canadian Blood Services (CBS) and other stakeholders to improve Canada's organ donation and transplantation (ODT) system performance.

Budget 2019 allocated $36.5M over five years to support the development of a comprehensive data and performance system to improve the approach to organ donation and transplantation across Canada. CIHI, working in partnership with Canada Health Infoway, was identified as the lead organization to implement this initiative. CIHI has initiated this work with the ODT Collaborative (the Collaborative), which includes provinces and territories (PTs), organ donation organizations, transplant programs, research bodies, regulators, ethicists, and patient/advocacy bodies. In particular, CIHI worked with PTs, CBS, Transplant Quebec and clinicians to develop a detailed implementation plan to move forward on this initiative.

In 2019-20 CIHI also facilitated the development and led the selection and reporting of pan-Canadian common indicators focusing on shared health priorities to measure access to home care and mental health services. Over four years, CIHI will publicly report on 12 indicators endorsed by federal, provincial and territorial Health Ministers in June 2018. Each year, CIHI reports the results for three new indicators. The first release, in May 2019, included the following three indicators:

CIHI will continue working with federal, provincial and territorial governments across Canada to report annually on these indicators and to build on data sources to enable more comprehensive reporting.

To close existing data gaps, CIHI made progress on the collection of pan-Canadian data to enhance coverage in key areas, including: primary health care, home care, community mental health, addictions, palliative care, pharmaceuticals, patient-reported outcomes and the health of Indigenous populations. CIHI's goals through its Corporate Data Advancement Strategy are to close gaps and expand data collection in each province and territory, to make the data submission process more user-friendly, to broaden adoption of CIHI data standards, and to have more timely and linked data for stakeholders.

CIHI has also undertaken a number of new work streams to support the federal, provincial and territorial response to the pandemic. CIHI will maintain and further enhance their current data supply chains to contribute to understanding of COVID-19 impacts in the near and longer term through supporting coding of COVID-19 cases in hospital and non-acute care, investigating strategies to acquire real-time hospital data and developing guidelines on regular data submission to reduce interruptions in regular data flow. CIHI is also creating, curating and delivering priority COVID-19 data and information for use by governments, health systems managers and the media though their website and social media channels. CIHI is also undertaking an exercise to identify data priorities to better respond to health system needs for subsequent pandemic waves.

CIHI has been monitoring the emergence of new virtual care codes during the COVID-19 pandemic. This work includes monitoring changes in policy directions by provincial and territorial governments in the use of any diagnosis and fee codes when submitting claims to medical care plans during the pandemic. This type of surveillance is routinely undertaken by CIHI to anticipate changes in future billing submissions from P/T governments, and it has taken on added importance during the current crisis.

Since signing the Joint Statement of Action to Address the Opioid Crisis in Canada in 2016, CIHI has supported efforts across the country to reduce opioid harms, including working with governments and other partners to improve data collection and produce timely, relevant information that can help inform harm reduction efforts. Opioid harms and prescribing data assists policy-makers to track progress and see the impact their strategies have on the communities affected by this crisis. This data reveals which geographic areas have the highest rates of hospitalizations and emergency department visits due to harms caused by opioids. CIHI also released a report examining opioid harms and opioid prescribing trends across the country.

Along with the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), CIHI has been co-leading an international working group on patient-reported indicators for hip and knee replacement surgery since December 2017. This work is part of a broader OECD initiative that aims to advance the collection and reporting of comparable patient-reported measures to better monitor health system performance and drive continuous improvement among member countries.

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20

Completed: No audit was completed in 2019-20.

Planned: Not applicable.

Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

Completed: No evaluation was completed in 2019-20.

Planned: The next evaluation is scheduled for 2023-24.

Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20

Health Canada previously worked with CIHI to establish activities to be carried out under the contribution agreement, and maintained regular contact with CIHI to monitor progress and compliance under the contribution agreement.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 81,748,979 83,948,979 87,658,979 88,158,979 88,158,979 500,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 81,748,979 83,948,979 87,658,979 88,158,979 88,158,979 500,000
Explanation of variances The variance between actual and planned spending is mainly due to an internal reallocation of funds to the new Organ Donation and Transplantation Data and Performance Reporting System.

Contribution to the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer

General information

Name of transfer payment program

Contribution to the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 2007

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017-18

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Description

The Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (CPAC) is an independent, not-for-profit corporation established to implement the Canadian Strategy for Cancer Control (CSCC). The CSCC was developed in consultation with Canadians, including cancer experts and stakeholders, with the following objectives:

Health Canada is responsible for managing the funding to the corporation. CPAC was eligible to receive $250 million from the federal government for its first five-year term (2007 to 2012) and $241 million for its second five-year term (2012 to 2017). Budget 2016 confirmed ongoing funding for CPAC, which is governed by a five-year agreement (2017 to 2022) for $237.5 million.

Results achieved

In 2019-20, CPAC continued its work in cancer control by accelerating the uptake of new knowledge and coordinating approaches to advance cancer control in Canada. Notable achievements:

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20

Completed: No audit was completed in 2019-20.

Planned: Not applicable.

Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

Completed: No evaluation was completed in 2019-20.

Planned: The next evaluation is scheduled for 2023-24.

Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20

Health Canada worked with CPAC to establish activities to be carried out under the contribution agreement, and maintains regular contact with CPAC to monitor progress and compliance under the contribution agreement through bi-monthly calls between Health Canada representatives and the CPAC leadership team. Health Canada has an official observer on CPAC's Board of Directors, which met 4 times in 2019-20.

CPAC engaged stakeholders, as planned, through communication activities that included media and on-line vehicles to reach the broader public and the cancer and health communities. In 2019-20 CPAC officials met with partners and stakeholders across Canada, including provincial and territorial governments, regional health authorities, Indigenous organizations, provincial cancer agencies, cancer charities and the federal government to identify Strategy priorities that could be supported, leveraged, shared, or enhanced through collaborative action.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 39,854,241 42,971,939 51,000,000 51,000,000 50,846,986 153,014
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 39,854,241 42,971,939 51,000,000 51,000,000 50,846,986 153,014
Explanation of variances Health Canada disbursed $51 million to the Canadian Partnership Against Partnership (CPAC) in 2019-20.
The variance between actual and planned spending is mainly due to interest earned by CPAC and reimbursed to Health Canada.

Contribution to the Canadian Patient Safety Institute

General information

Name of transfer payment program

Contribution to the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 2013

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2012-13

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Description

The Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) supports the federal government's interest in achieving an accessible, high quality, sustainable and accountable health system adaptable to the needs of Canadians. It is designed to improve the quality of health care services by providing a leadership role in building a culture of patient safety and quality improvement in the Canadian health care system through coordination across sectors, promotion of best practices, and advice on effective strategies to improve patient safety. CPSI received grant year funding via five year grant agreements from 2003-2013. The five-year contribution agreement began on April 1, 2013 has been extended to March 31, 2020.

Results achieved

In 2019-20, key results achieved by CPSI included:

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20

Completed: No audit was completed in 2019-20.

Planned: Not applicable.

Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

Completed: No evaluation was completed in 2019-20.

Planned: The next evaluation is scheduled for 2023-24.

Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20

Health Canada officials continued regular engagement with CPSI senior staff and program officers to ensure the CPSI contribution agreement is managed in an appropriate and efficient manner. In addition, the Department nominates one representative to CPSI's Board of Directors, and participates as a voting member of the corporation.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000 0
Explanation of variances Not applicable

Canadian Blood Services: Blood Research and Development Program

General information

Name of transfer payment program

Canadian Blood Services: Blood Research and Development Program (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 2000

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2019-20

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Description

The Canadian Blood Services: Blood Research and Development (CBS - Blood R&D) Program helps maintain and increase the safety, supply and efficiency of the Canadian blood system by advancing innovation and maintaining Canadian capacity in transfusion science and medicine. The program pursues these goals by fostering relevant discovery and development research, facilitating dissemination and application of knowledge, educating the next generation of scientific and health care experts, and engaging with an interdisciplinary network of partners in Canada and beyond.

Results achieved

Blood research and development

In this context, "blood" includes whole blood and blood products, plasma and plasma products and their respective artificial and substitute products.

Under its blood research and development component, the CBS - Blood R&D Program has generated numerous outputs related to knowledge products (e.g., journal articles, reviews, etc.), learning events, collaborative arrangements and the development of highly qualified people in the important areas of basic and applied research.

The Program's research network published 122 peer-reviewed and 67 non peer-reviewed publications and delivered over 385 conference presentations worldwide. The average h-index, a measure demonstrating the significance and impact of published work, was 33 for CBS research staff, an increase over the prior year and over three times the average h-index (10.6) for Canadian academic science authors. Canadian Blood Services (CBS) held eight major education events for specialists in transfusion science and medicine and attracted 2,869 professionals. Various stakeholders used the knowledge generated by R&D projects to inform changes to practices and standards in blood. Under the Men who have Sex with Men (MSM) Research Grant Program, 19 research projects, including 4 projects funded for MSM Plasma, were funded that will end by spring 2020.

With blood research investments, one of the 19 funded projects contributed to the blood operators' submissions to Health Canada to reduce the deferral period, from one year to three months, for blood donation from MSM. The change was authorized by Health Canada on April 20, 2019, and implemented on June 3, 2019. This MSM deferral period aligns with the three-month deferral period for MSM in England, Scotland, Wales, the United States and Australia.

A Knowledge Synthesis Forum was held in November 2019 to discuss preliminary findings of the blood research, which targets MSM attitudes toward donation, the impact of question sequence, and remaining research gaps.

In 2019-2020, CBS started to work with Héma-Québec (H-Q) to align business development frameworks that will define all elements of the MSM-Plasma stream and guide its development. Outcomes for the blood and plasma R&D investments include advancing knowledge on the feasibility of MSM plasma donation in Canada; applying knowledge to inform changes in CBS and H-Q plasma donor policies; and, more broadly, reducing barriers to MSM plasma donation if feasible, while maintaining the safety of blood and manufactured plasma products for Canadians.

Organ and Tissue Donation and Transplantation

With the support of the CBS - Blood R&D Program, the contribution of CBS to the organ and tissue donation and transplantation (OTDT) system involves working with partners and stakeholders to influence and improve system performance through development and implementation of leading practices, professional and public education, engagement and awareness, data and analytics services and system performance reporting.

Under the OTDT component of the Program, CBS hosted in collaboration with Trillium Gift of Life Network and Canadian Donation and Transplantation Research Program, a Deceased Organ Donation Symposium at the 2019 Canadian Critical Care Forum. Highlights of this year's symposium include sessions on the complexities of organ donation after circulatory death and medical assistance in dying. The symposium had over 200 attendees. In advance of the Forum and in partnership with Trillium Gift of Life, a donation physician masterclass was delivered to over 60 attendees, focusing on the complexities of donation after circulatory death and the standardized withdrawal of life sustaining measures.

Two additional leading practice initiatives included hosting a national forum on Advancing Living Donation, to understand how the clinical community can do a better job of helping transplant candidates initiate a search and identify a living donor as early as possible in their disease progression, and a national consensus forum with the aim of improving access to cornea donation and transplantation for patients in Canada.

In partnership with all organ donation organizations in Canada and organ donation and transplantation stakeholders, CBS leads a multi-year collaborative process to develop a national, peer-reviewed curriculum that includes multiple education modules informed by leading practices, along with an e-learning and evaluation platform for training health professionals. Currently 2 modules are distributed. To date, more than 315 practitioners working in the field have enrolled in these courses.

In 2019-20, public awareness activities included national campaign planning and the development of easy to use awareness toolkits for National Organ and Tissue Donation Awareness Week (NOTDAW) and Green Shirt day and two social media awareness campaigns focused on living donation. In support of these initiatives a number of tactical information pieces were developed including:

CBS also hosted over 22 screenings of "Her Last Project", the story of Dr. Shelly Sarwal, a physician from Halifax who was diagnosed with an incurable disease. Shelly chose Medical Assistance in Dying and wished to become an organ donor. The screenings reached over 1,200 donation and critical care professionals. "Her Last Project" is a powerful tool for professional awareness and catalyst for the implementation of the Organ Donation and the Conscious Competent Patient guidance policy. Four screenings of "Her Last Project" were open to the public. They were attended by approximately 500 people.

CBS works with their partners and stakeholders to develop, operate, and evolve the national programs to facilitate the sharing of organs across provincial boundaries using the Canadian Transplant Registry. Using this registry, CBS is leading the implementation of a project to develop and implement national policies and processes to efficiently share hearts for hard to match patients inter-provincially. This will improve equity of access for hard to match patients. In October 2019, the project met its first major milestone, implementing functionality that quickly identifies potential matches. This project remains on track for full implementation in 2021.

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20

Completed: No audit was completed in 2019-20.

Planned: Not applicable.

Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

Completed: No evaluation was completed in 2019-20.

Planned: The next evaluation is scheduled for 2022-23.

Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20

Health Canada officials undertook numerous exchanges (meetings, phone calls, e-mails and knowledge transfer activities) with CBS program staff and senior management to discuss program progress. In addition, Health Canada continues to monitor the recipient's compliance with the contribution agreement, performance and results through the analysis and follow-up of progress, performance and financial reporting. CBS staff are also members of the Organ Donation and Transplantation Collaborative. A workshop of the Collaborative was held in collaboration between Health Canada and CBS in December 2019.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 9,830,000 10,816,500 8,580,000 11,698,500 11,698,500 3,118,500
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 9,830,000 10,816,500 8,580,000 11,698,500 11,698,500 3,118,500
Explanation of variances The variance between actual and planned spending is mainly due to a reallocation of funds to address program priorities such as the Minister's mandate for MSM, as well as additional funding received in-year.

Official Languages Health Program

General information

Name of transfer payment program

Official Languages Health Program (Voted)

Start date

June 18, 2003

End date

March 31, 2022 (Grant)

Ongoing (Contribution)

Type of transfer payment

Grant and Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2018-19

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Description

The Official Languages Health Program (OLHP) has a total budget of $191.2 million over five years (2018-2023), and $38.46 million per year ongoing after 2023. The Program supports the federal government's commitment to maintain a strong and effective publicly funded health care system by ensuring that official language minority communities (OLMCs) have access to bilingual health services in their communities. Through the implementation of contribution agreements and micro-grants, Health Canada supports investments that improve access to health care services for OLMCs, in the language of their choice through training and retention of bilingual health care providers, networking activities and innovative projects in priority areas, such as home care, mental health, palliative and end-of-life care.

Results achieved

In 2019-20, Health Canada supported a range of initiatives through the OLHP. The impacts of these initiatives included: increased in the availability of health service providers to meet the needs of OLMCs, enhanced mechanisms for providing effective health services for these communities, and improved understanding and measurement of health issues and challenges.

Through the OLHP, Health Canada continued to provide financial support to community organizations and training institutions (e.g., la Société Santé en français (SSF), l'Association des collèges et universités de la francophonie canadienne (ACUFC)-Consortium national de formation en santé (CNFS), McGill University, Community Health and Social Services Network (CHSSN)). These organizations implemented various initiatives to improve access to health services for OLMCs.

Training and retention of health professionals in OLMCs

In 2019-20, the OLHP supported various training and retention initiatives to increase the availability of bilingual health professionals and improve access to services in OLMCs. For example:

Overall, these initiatives resulted in an increased number of health service providers who can offer appropriate services to Anglophones and Francophones minority communities in their language of choice.

Strengthening and improving local health networking capacity in OLMCs

In 2019-20, the OLHP continued to support initiatives to strengthen and increase networking activities to improve access to health services for English and French speaking minorities. A total of 39 community-based health networks (covering all provinces and territories) managed by both the SSF and CHSSN collaborated with various health sector stakeholders to improve access to health services for OLMCs.

These efforts had a direct impact on the accessibility of health services for OLMCs across Canada. For example:

Projects to improve access to health services for OLMCs

In 2019-20, Health Canada funded innovative projects to improve the availability of bilingual health professionals to address the needs of OLMCs. For example:

It is expected that these initiatives will further improve access to health care services that take into account the specific needs and priorities of patients (targeted areas) living in OLMCs in Canada.

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20

In 2019-20, Deloitte LLP was retained to conduct the audit of fiscal year 2017-18 of the ACUFC and McGill University, two recipients of the OLHP.

The audits assessed the overall management of each recipient's Contribution Agreement. For the ACUFC, the audit indicated the need to recover an amount of $985 and the OLHP will follow-up with the ACUFC to recover the amount. No recovery is needed for McGill.

Opportunities for improvement identified by the auditor for the ACUFC were the need to put in place systems to formalise the approval of salary increases; better monitoring of the allocation of working hours by staff; ensuring taxes on inputs purchased outside of Ontario reflect the correct tax rate; providing different accounting credentials to people responsible of the accounting system; and, ensuring all numbers in the general ledger match financial reports. For McGill University, the auditor indicated the need to ensure that financial reports are provided on time and that unspent funds be signalled to Health Canada in advance of the end of the fiscal year to provide enough time to reallocate them. In both cases, the OLHP will ensure that robust processes are implemented to ensure proper monitoring of expenses on a timely basis as per the recommendations of the audit.

In 2019-20, the OLHP also continued to carry out site visits to ensure that funding is spent effectively and that stakeholder organizations are achieving expected outcomes in compliance with contribution agreements and terms and conditions.

Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

Completed: No evaluation was completed in 2019-20.

Planned: The next evaluation of the 2018-2023 Canada's Official Languages Action Plan: Investing in our future, including the OLHP, is scheduled for 2021-22.

Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20

In 2019-20, representatives of Official Languages Community Development Bureau and departmental senior management attended annual general meetings and meetings of Boards of Directors of OLMC organizations, and were in frequent contact with recipients of the Program.

Also, further engagement was facilitated through the Federal Health Portfolio Consultative Committee for OLMCs, created in 2017, to inform the Health Portfolio's various programs and policies on the specific needs of OLMCs. In 2019-20, the committee met in May to discuss priority issues in the Health Portfolio, such as OLMCs data collection and analysis to overcome current limitations. Committee members include Health Canada, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Public Health Agency of Canada as well as targeted recipients under the OLHP, including the SSF, CNFS, CHSSN and McGill University.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 0 0 50,000 50,000 10,000 40,000
Total contributions 33,800,001 36,100,000 37,330,000 39,369,999 39,369,999 2,039,999
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 33,800,001 36,100,000 37,380,000 39,419,999 39,379,999 1,999,999
Explanation of variances The variance between actual and planned spending is mainly due to the 2019-2020 Open Call for Micro-grants not generating as many proposals as expected. An internal reallocation of funds including the remaining Micro-grant funding was transferred to the contribution program.

Canada Brain Research Fund Program

General information

Name of transfer payment program

Canada Brain Research Fund Program (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 2011

End date

March 31, 2020

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2016-17

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Description

In Budgets 2011 and 2016, the Government of Canada committed up to $120 million in matched funding with non-federal government donors, to establish the Canada Brain Research Fund Program "to support the very best Canadian neuroscience, and accelerate discoveries to improve the health and quality of life for Canadians who suffer from brain disorders." The Government of Canada's objective in funding the Canada Brain Research Fund was: 1) to serve as a focal point for private investment in brain research by attracting private and charitable donations to match federal funding; and 2) to support research that advances knowledge of the brain through grants to researchers. Notably, the program was renewed through Budget 2019 following the period covered by this report with the commitment of an additional $40M over 2 years beginning in 2020-21.

Results achieved

The Canada Brain Research Fund (CBRF) supported research leading to scientific discoveries that are essential to advancing therapies and approaches to improve the health and quality of life of Canadians at risk of or affected by brain health conditions. To this end, the Recipient, in partnership with a range of donors from across the private and charitable sectors, provided competitively-awarded funding for research across Canada. In 2019-20, Brain Canada partnered with various institutions, health charities and donors, research networks, provincial agencies and corporations, to raise $13.6 million in funds to match the federal contribution and also to disburse over $28 million to 119 research grants and awards.

To capture the breadth of possibilities that can spur innovation, the CBRF supported projects ranging from basic and fundamental research to clinical trials, interventions, and implementation research. Grants in all project categories are intended to accelerate transformative research toward improved understanding of nervous system function and dysfunction and their impact on health. In 2019-20, 8% of funding disbursed was invested in basic research, resulting in the completion of 21 projects that lay the foundations for longer-term health care improvements. In one prominent example, researchers explored a potential new avenue for treating Parkinson's disease by boosting the energy-efficiency of implicated cells, which may be vulnerable to stress and damage because they often function at a burn-out level. In addition to basic research, 75% of funding disbursed in 2019-20 supported 32 translational and clinical research projects that set the stage for more tangible advancements such as new treatments, devices, and early detection/diagnosis practices. One example resulted in the development of a new retinal scan that could allow for earlier detection and diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. The remaining 17% of funding in 2019-20 supported projects related to knowledge translation to shape future research priorities and advance the implementation of ideas.

Perspectives and experiences of members of diverse populations, such as individuals with lived experience of neurological and mental health conditions, are being increasingly considered in Brain Canada's work. For example, in March 2020, Brain Canada held a Youth Mental Health workshop attended by 40 participants including youth, practitioners and care providers, researchers, non-profit and charitable organizations, and private sector representatives. The participants formulated funding priorities in the area of youth mental health to inform Brain Canada's upcoming research competitions.

Since the inception of the program, Brain Canada has demonstrated its continued commitment to developing the next generation of Canadian researchers and supporting trainees and early-career researchers. Since 2011, the program has supported more than 500 PhD students and postdoctoral fellows. To meet its goals over the past year, the CBRF disbursed over $6 million in capacity-building grants. Further, in November 2019 Brain Canada launched the 2019 Future Leaders in Canadian Brain Research Program, which was open to all researchers within five years of their first independent academic appointment conducting research in the field of neuroscience.

Brain Canada plays a convening role within the research community, bringing research stakeholders together to discuss and advance key priorities. Projects undertaken through the CBRF since its inception, including over the past year, connected over 75 disciplines involving more than 1,000 researchers at 115 institutions across Canada. Brain Canada builds cohesion through the alignment of over 100 funding and research partners and engagement with an array of stakeholders. Brain Canada's collaborative work has successfully informed and influenced the research agenda, as demonstrated through more than 35,000 citations of CBRF-funded publications in Canada and internationally.

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20

Completed: No audit was completed in 2019-20.

Planned: Not applicable.

Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

Completed: No evaluation was completed in 2019-20.

Planned: The next evaluation is scheduled for 2021-22.

Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20

Brain Canada participated in engagement opportunities with other recipient organizations to advance and share knowledge on the implementation of best practices in performance measurement, knowledge translation, and sex, gender and diversity analysis.

Brain Canada is the sole recipient of the contribution. Health Canada monitors the recipient's compliance with the contribution agreement through the analysis of corporate documents and had regular correspondence with senior management of the organization.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 20,000,000 23,500,000 13,174,646 13,174,646 8,497,963 4,676,683
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 20,000,000 23,500,000 13,174,646 13,174,646 8,497,963 4,676,683
Explanation of variances The variance between actual and planned spending is due to the approved reprofile from 2019-20 to 2020-21.

Canadian Thalidomide Survivors Support Program

General information

Name of transfer payment program

Canadian Thalidomide Survivors Support Program (Voted)

Start date

March 22, 2019 (replaced the Thalidomide Survivors Contribution Program, which started in 2015)

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2018-19

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Description

The program objectives are to ensure that, for the remainder of their lives, eligible thalidomide survivors:

  1. receive ongoing tax-free payments based on their level of disability; and
  2. have transparent and timely access to the Extraordinary Medical Assistance Fund.

Results achieved

The Canadian Thalidomide Survivors Support Program (CTSSP) supported 120 confirmed survivors as of March 31, 2020.

Ongoing tax-free payments were distributed to 100% of known thalidomide survivors. 100% of payments were made before the end of April 2019, as per the time frame service standard of the independent third-party administrator.

The independent third-party program administrator processed 24 Extraordinary Medical Assistance Fund (EMAF) applications. The EMAF assists survivors with costs related to extraordinary health support needs such as specialized surgeries and home or vehicle adaptations.

The application period for the CTSSP launched June 3, 2019 and will remain open for five years, closing June 3, 2024. While no new survivors were confirmed in 2019-20, 132 applications were submitted to the program and are being assessed.

Outreach data for 2019-20 showed that 88% of thalidomide survivors who responded to the survey said that the CTSSP is helping them age with dignity, which aligns with the purpose of the program.

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20

Not Applicable

Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

Completed: Evaluation of the Thalidomide Survivors Contribution Program 2015 to 2019Footnote 1

Summary of Findings:

Overall, the evaluation found that the program made a notable contribution to help thalidomide survivors age with dignity and access care, treatment, and support. More than half of the thalidomide survivors surveyed reported having peace of mind, as the program's benefits have provided them with improved financial stability. Respondents whose needs were not met by the program reported that the financial assistance provided could not fund the full costs of massage or physiotherapy treatments, nor could it fund the full costs of the health care supports they require. The evaluation also found that the program was delivered efficiently in a relatively short timeframe, with low administrative costs. Continued monitoring of variance between budgeted and actual expenses for the new program was identified as an area for consideration moving forward, as was maintaining the annual survey of thalidomide survivors conducted by a third-party administrator to monitor trends on the challenges faced by thalidomide survivors.

Planned: The next evaluation is scheduled for 2024-25.

Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20

Health Canada engaged the independent third-party administrator of the CTSSP by responding to inquiries and undertaking regular monitoring activities such as financial, progress and performance measurement reporting, meetings and ongoing communication to support program implementation.

The Thalidomide Victims Association of Canada, a key stakeholder, participated in meetings with the independent third-party administrator and Health Canada as needed, regarding program implementation. Health Canada also provided information about the program to individual Thalidomide survivors, the general public, and to individuals who believe they are survivors of Thalidomide, through direct correspondence and online.

The administrator continued to implement its outreach strategy (direct mail, e-mail and web-based) to provide the Thalidomide survivor community with updates on program implementation and results.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0      
Total contributions 9,967,690 9,500,408 13,418,765 13,418,765 13,418,765 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0      
Total program 9,967,690 9,500,408 13,418,765 13,418,765 13,418,765 0
Explanation of variances Not applicable

Territorial Health Investment Fund

General information

Name of transfer payment program

Territorial Health Investment Fund (Voted)

Start date

April 1, 2014

End date

March 31, 2021

Type of transfer payment

Grant

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017-18

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Description

Building on an initial investment of $70 million (2014-15 to 2017-18), which flowed as contribution funding, the Territorial Health Investment Fund (THIF) was renewed as a grant program in 2017-18 with an additional $108 million over four years (2017-18 to 2020-21). Of this funding, $54 million was allocated to Nunavut, $28.4 million to Northwest Territories and $25.6 million to Yukon. This funding has enabled each territory to continue pursuing innovative activities in support of strong, sustainable health systems and to offset costs associated with medical travel to support Northerners' access to the health care they need.

The use of grant agreements rather than contribution agreements for the new investment minimizes the administrative burden on territories associated with participating in the program.

Results achieved

Funding provided through THIF in 2019-20 continued to offset the medical transportation costs experienced by territorial governments and supported the development and implementation of innovative activities intended to transform territorial health systems. For instance, in 2019-20:

Findings of audits completed in 2019–20

Completed: No audit was completed in 2019-20.

Planned: Not applicable.

Findings of evaluations completed in 2019–20

Completed: No evaluation was completed in 2019-20.

Planned: Not applicable.

Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2019–20

A federal/territorial Assistant Deputy Ministers (ADMs) Working Group, composed of ADMs from all three territories and Health Canada, continued to provide a forum for ongoing monitoring and progress, including: ensuring individual territorial work plans continued to meet the objectives and intent of the initiative; sharing best practices and collaborating on policy and management approaches. They will work to develop a Progress Report in 2020-21.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Actual spending 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
Total grants 27,000,000 27,000,000 27,000,000 27,000,000 27,000,000 0
Total contributions 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 27,000,000 27,000,000 27,000,000 27,000,000 27,000,000 0
Explanation of variances Not applicable

Horizontal Initiatives

Addressing the Opioid Crisis

Name of horizontal initiative

Lead department

Health Canada

Federal partner organization(s)

Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)
Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)
Public Safety Canada (PS)
Statistics Canada (StatCan)

Note: Other government departments (e.g., Correctional Service Canada) are supporting the federal response to the opioid crisis. However, they are not captured in this Horizontal Initiative table, as they have not received funding through the Treasury Board Submission "Addressing the Opioid Crisis."

Start date of the horizontal initiative

April 1, 2018

End date of the horizontal initiative

March 31, 2023 and ongoing

Description of the horizontal initiative

Illegal drugs and problematic substance use have always presented health and safety challenges in Canada and around the world. In recent years, however, Canada has experienced an unprecedented increase in opioid-related overdose deaths largely due to the adulteration of illegal street drugs with lethally potent opioids like fentanyl. According to data collected by the Public Health Agency of CanadaFootnote 1, in 2018 and 2019 respectively, there were 4,372 and 3,799 apparent opioid-related deaths in Canada..

The federal government is taking actions in areas of federal jurisdiction to address the crisis. Since 2016, the government has invested significant funding to improve access to treatment and harm reduction services; increase education and awareness among Canadians, including the public and health care providers; and build research and surveillance capacity to strengthen the evidence base for further action. However, despite these significant efforts, the opioid crisis in Canada continues. According to data from the Public Health Agency of Canada, 16,364 people lost their lives in Canada between January 2016 and March 2020 related to opioids. Additionally, since the onset of the COVID-19 outbreak in Canada, there are indications from several jurisdictions across Canada that they are seeing the highest numbers of opioid-related harms, including deaths, since they began monitoring the crisis.

While the Government of Canada is taking a number of actions to respond to the opioid crisis, this horizontal initiative is specific to measures announced in Budget 2018 to:

  • support additional prevention and treatment interventions through an expansion of the Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP);
  • address the stigma surrounding people who use drugs, which creates barriers for those seeking treatment, through the launch of a public education campaign and training for law enforcement;
  • enhance capacity to identify and intercept illegal substances at the border by equipping border agents with additional tools at ports of entry; and,
  • improve the availability of and access to public health data by expanding public health surveillance, conducting special studies, and redesigning the Canadian Coroner and Medical Examiner Database (CCMED).

Ultimately, these complementary activities are intended to contribute to a reduction in opioid-related harms and deaths in Canada.

Governance structures

The Government of Canada has put in place a robust governance structure to facilitate whole-of-government coordination in implementing a comprehensive federal response to the opioid crisis. Each department/agency is responsible for leading its respective initiatives and providing updates to the interdepartmental Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM) level Working Group on Opioids chaired by the Associate-ADM of Health Canada's Controlled Substances and Cannabis Branch. This working group is used as a forum for information and consultation on next steps toward a comprehensive, collaborative federal response to the opioid crisis. Updates and decisions from this working group feed into the federal, interdepartmental Deputy Ministers Task Force on the Opioid Crisis as required. This Task Force, chaired by the Deputy Minister of Health Canada, serves as a time-limited forum to provide leadership and oversight of federal initiatives to respond to the opioid crisis. The Task Force will remain an established committee until such time that the public environment no longer requires it.

The Government is committed to ongoing collaboration and consultation with provincial and territorial partners. Departments and agencies provide updates to, and consult with, provincial and territorial colleagues as required through the federal/provincial/territorial (FPT) ADM-level Problematic Substance Use and Harms Committee (PSUH), co-chaired by Health Canada and British Columbia and comprised of ADMs responsible for drug policy in their jurisdiction. They also provide updates to and consult with PT colleagues as required through the FPT Special Advisory Committee on the Epidemic of Opioid Overdoses (SAC), co-chaired by the Chief Public Health Officer of Canada and Saskatchewan's Chief Medical Officer of Health and comprising Chief Medical Officers of Health from each jurisdiction. While the PSUH is an established committee intended as a long-term forum for drug policy discussions, the SAC is a time-limited mechanism for public health collaboration and information sharing between jurisdictions related to the opioid crisis in Canada. Upon sun setting, activities under SAC will be transferred to established committees and organizations as needed.

Total federal funding allocated from start to end date (dollars)

$108,794,405 and $17,409,691 Ongoing (includes existing funding)

Total federal planned spending to date (dollars)

$47,957,952

Total federal actual spending to date (dollars)

$41,247,844

Date of last renewal of the horizontal initiative

Not applicable

Total federal funding allocated at the last renewal and source of funding (dollars)

Not applicable

Additional federal funding received after the last renewal (dollars)

Not applicable

Total planned spending since the last renewal

Not applicable

Total actual spending since the last renewal

Not applicable

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2022-23

Performance highlights

All federal partners worked collaboratively to address the opioid overdose crisis in a comprehensive, robust, and effective manner. This includes initiatives that span the continuum from gathering data and evidence to better understand the opioid crisis, to conducting public education and awareness activities, to supporting prevention and treatment projects, and enhancing enforcement capabilities.

Key achievements in 2019-20 include:

  • provided ongoing funding and support to 16 opioids-related projects under the Substance Use and Addictions Program to improve prevention and treatment efforts;
  • conducted phase three of a national public education campaign to address stigma surrounding people who use drugs and inform Canadians about harm reduction measures, including Twitter and YouTube campaigns (20 million impressions and 5.3 million impressions, respectively, reaching Canadians at rates above Government of Canada benchmarks) and an experiential marketing campaign that engaged more than 144,000 youth and young adults;
  • developed a training to deliver to police service members so that they have the right tools and awareness to help those with problematic opioid use access treatment and harm reduction supports;
  • implemented 41 Designated Safe Examination Areas and effectively integrated detector dog teams in postal operations;
  • continued to support the provinces and territories in enhancing the national opioids and substance-related harms surveillance system through Public Health Officers placed in the regions; and,
  • continued collaboration with provinces and territories, as well as key federal partners, on a variety of activities surrounding the Canadian Coroners and Medical Examiners Database, aimed at strengthening and co-ordinating new and more timely data analysis and insights as well as enhancing monitoring/surveillance activities associated with overdose death data.

Health Canada

Ongoing monitoring and support of 16 opioid-related projects under the SUAP for years 2018-19 to 2023-24 targeting prevention and treatment issues. Funded projects located across the country including such activities as: developing curricula, tools and supports related to safe prescribing as well as resources and networks that support health and social service professionals to offer addictions services; increasing access to Opioids Agonist Treatment (OAT) across the country, including training and performance measurement activities; and research activities including the development of best practices in OAT.

Launched phase three of a national public education campaign to address the stigma surrounding people who use drugs, and inform Canadians about harm reduction measures. This phase, which occurred from April to June 2019, included content on opioid awareness, stigma, and the Good Samaritan Drug Overdose Act. It was built on the opioid awareness phase of the campaign from fall 2018 and stigma phase from winter 2019, and, like all phases, was assessed through a post-campaign evaluation.

Public Safety Canada

As planned, the Department developed Drug Stigma Awareness Training for law enforcement agencies across Canada; however, its release was deferred until September 2020 due to COVID-19 pressures on first responders. The online module will reinforce information that substance use disorder is a mental health condition and it will provide law enforcement personnel with additional tools and resources they can refer to when interacting with individuals who use drugs. The training will be hosted on the Canadian Police Knowledge Network website and will be made readily available and free of charge to all law enforcement personnel across Canada.

Public Safety hosted the third Law Enforcement Roundtable on Illicit Drugs in Winnipeg in October 2019. Building on past roundtables, the event focused on further advancing information-sharing within the law enforcement community around best practices and effective law enforcement responses to the current opioids crisis and other emerging drug threats. There were 25 subject matter experts who presented their perspectives on and experiences with efforts to curtail the production and trafficking of illicit drugs. The event saw more than 70 participants representing municipal, provincial and federal police agencies across Canada and the United States as well as representatives from academia.

The Department continues to work with portfolio partners to advance its illicit drug supply reduction efforts. This includes working with partners to bolster efforts to detect and seize mail and parcels containing illegal substances, and curtailing the availability of surface websites and social media platforms that promote the sale of illicit substances as well as equipment used in the manufacture of illicit substances.

Also in support of the whole-of-government approach to addressing substance use, Public Safety Canada independently funded an Opioids Communication Initiative with the First Nations Chiefs of Police Association. The program aims to develop and distribute communications material on the dangers of opioid use in First Nations communities. The communications material is planned to be disseminated in late 2020.

Canada Border Services Agency

Exceeded its target of 25 Designated Safe Examination Areas by implementing 41. As well, 100% of the Officers required to work in these areas were trained and are operational. CBSA also made progress on developing and implementing its Regional Screening facilities. Two of the locations were 90% complete by year-end and are now operational.

The staffing of chemists to operate the facilities has progressed with three hired and currently completing training. All detection equipment was purchased on time and under budget. Networking the detection tools at Screening Facilities received approval to move to the planning phase and continues to progress through the CBSA IT governance process.

The detector dog teams have integrated as well in the postal operation and have demonstrated great success.

Public Health Agency of Canada

All of the ten funded Public Health Officer (PHO) positions are staffed. As well, given the importance and priority of the work, PHAC has endeavored to provide additional PHOs in four Provinces when additional support was requested. PHAC has also continued to advance the national epidemiological study on drug- and alcohol-related acute toxicity deaths, and published a report of its phase 1 findings.

A total of nineteen (19) evidence products were released. These included the aforementioned Phase 1 report on the epidemiological study, twelve (12) national surveillance reports on apparent opioid-related deaths and harms, five (5) updates of a joint brief with Health Canada on federal actions on opioids, and a report that integrated harms data on Emergency Medical Services, hospitalization and death.

Statistics Canada

Statistics Canada continued its work in modernizing and enhancing the Canadian Coroners and Medical Examiners Database (CCMED). As it relates to the database itself, Statistics Canada entered into a data-sharing agreement with Newfoundland and Labrador, successfully re-integrating Alberta into the database and renewed data-sharing agreements with Ontario, Yukon and Northwest Territories. As well, new data sources were developed along with new contacts being made with key data users in injury prevention, leading to new fact sheets and data tables being released.

Two additional key developments of the CCMED surround timeliness and comprehensiveness. Statistics Canada will now be releasing data from the CCMED twice per year and will be linking these data to the central data repository to allow for data integration to other datasets such as census, tax, hospital data and additional social domain data. These integrated datasets will allow for a more complete picture of the decedent, providing further insights to the circumstances surrounding deaths, including overdose deaths. Statistics Canada has also partnered with Ryerson University is using machine learning to analyse the narrative portion of the CCMED with the goal of highlighting topics that emerge from the data. The algorithms are being evaluated for their potential in earlier identification of new drug types reported in overdose deaths.

Contact information

Health Canada
Jennifer Novak
Executive Director Opioid Response Team
Controlled Substances and Cannabis Branch
Jennifer.Novak@canada.ca
613-816-6478

Horizontal initiative framework: departmental spending by theme (dollars)

Horizontal initiative: Addressing the Opioid Crisis

Shared outcomes: Reducing harms and deaths related to opioid use

Name of theme Theme Area 1: Supporting Additional Prevention and Treatment Interventions Theme Area 2: Addressing Stigma Theme Area 3: Taking Action at Canada's Borders Theme Area 4: Enhancing the Evidence Base Internal Services
Theme outcome(s) Targeted stakeholdersFootnote 2 use evidence-informed informationFootnote 3 on opioid use to change policies, programs, and practice Increased perception among Canadians of drug use as a public health issue Enhanced capability to interdict illegal cross-border movement of drugs, such as opioids, at ports of entry Enhanced quality surveillance data2 is available Not applicable
Health Canada $13,169,264
(Top up)
$1,166,430
(Existing)
$12,456,900
(Top up)
$22,067,727
(Existing)
Not applicable Not applicable $599,273
(Top up)
$873,836 (Existing
Canada Border Services Agency Not applicable Not applicable $30,254,740 Not applicable $3,125,260
Public Health Agency of Canada Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Enhancing surveillance (top-up)
$14,928,466
(Top up)
$1,408,473
(Existing)
$971,534
(Top up)
$11,383
(Existing)
Public Safety Canada Not applicable $3,396,428
(Top up)
$1,299,754
(Existing)
$346,828 Not applicable $723,217
Statistics Canada Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $1,905,286 $89,606

Performance information

Horizontal initiative overview

Name of horizontal initiative

Total federal funding allocated since the last renewal*
(dollars)

2019 - 20 Planned spending
(dollars)

2019 - 20 Actual spending
(dollars)

Horizontal initiative shared outcome(s) Performance indicator(s) Target(s) Date to achieve target Actual results
Addressing the Opioid Crisis

HC:
$26,500,000
(Top up)
$23,833,430
(Existing)

CBSA:
$33,380,000

PHAC:
$15,900,000
(Top up)
$1,419,856
(Existing)

PS:
$4,466,473
(Top up)
$1,299,754
(Existing)

StatCan:
$1,994,892

HC:
$8,300,000
(Top up)
$3,909,000
(Existing)

CBSA:
$8,063,000

PHAC:
$4,057,058
(Top up)
$345,977
(Existing)

PS:
$1,335,784
(Top up)
$0
(Existing)

StatCan:
$480,000

HC: $16,189,660

CBSA: $5,417,092

PHAC: $4,001,313

PS: $1,295,598

StatCan: $488,736

Reduced harms and deaths related to opioid use.

Number of hospital admissions due to opioid poisoning (including overdoses) per 100,000 population (by gender, age, region)

Number of apparent opioid-related deaths per 100,000 population (by gender, age, region)

% reductionFootnote 4 March 31, 2021

At a national level, the crude rate of opioid-related poisoning hospitalizations per 100,000 population decreased 15.7% from 18.4 in 2017 to 15.5 in 2019

At a national level, the crude rate of apparent opioid-related deaths per 100,000 population decreased 11.4% from 11.4 in 2017 to 10.1 in 2019Footnote 5.

See tables below for detailsFootnote 6

Table 1a. Number and rate of total opioid-related poisoning hospitalizations by province or territory, 2017 to 2019
Province or territory 2017 2018 2019
Number Crude rate per 100,000 population Number Crude rate per 100,000 population Number Crude rate per 100,000 population
British Columbia 1,407 28.6 1,418 28.4 1,196 23.6
Alberta 947 22.3 922 21.4 709 16.2
Saskatchewan 244 21.2 229 19.7 264 22.5
Manitoba 161 12.1 108 8.0 84 6.1
Ontario 2,124 15.1 2,095 14.6 1,981 13.6
Quebec n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a
New Brunswick 101 13.2 87 11.3 104 13.4
Nova Scotia 83 8.7 80 8.3 79 8.1
Prince Edward Island 16 10.6 20 13.0 24 15.3
Newfoundland and Labrador 90 17.0 67 12.7 52 10.0
Territories 30 24.6 26 21.0 21 16.9
Canada 5,203 18.4 5,052 17.6 4,514 15.5
Table 1b. Summary of total opioid-related poisoning hospitalizations in Canada by age and sex, 2017 to 2019
    2017 2018 2019
Percent by sex Male 55% 55% 54%
Female 45% 45% 46%
Percent by age group 19 years or less 6% 7% 6%
20 - 29 years 18% 18% 17%
30 - 39 years 19% 19% 20%
40 - 49 years 14% 16% 14%
50 - 59 years 19% 18% 18%
60 years or more 25% 23% 25%
Table 2a. Number and rate of total apparent opioid-related deaths by province or territory, 2017 to 2019
  2017 2018 2019
Province or territory Number Crude rate
per 100,000 population
Number Crude rate
per 100,000 population
Number Crude rate
per 100,000 population
British Columbia 1,524 30.9 1,565 31.3 1,002 19.8
Alberta 744 17.5 806 18.7 626 14.3
Saskatchewan 85 7.4 125 10.7 108 9.2
Manitoba 106 7.9 93 6.9 26 1.9
Ontario 1,265 9.0 1,474 10.3 1,509 10.4
Quebec 279 3.4 199 2.4 414 4.9
New Brunswick 37 4.8 30 3.9 29 3.7
Nova Scotia 64 6.7 54 5.6 57 5.9
Prince Edward Island 5 3.3 7 4.6 5 3.2
Newfoundland and Labrador 33 6.2 12 2.3 18 3.5
Yukon 7 17.6 5 12.3 4 9.8
Northwest Territories 1 2.2 2 4.4 1 2.2
Nunavut Suppr. Suppr. Suppr. Suppr. Suppr. Suppr.
Canada 4,150 11.4 4,372 11.8 3,799 10.1
Table 2b. Summary of total apparent opioid-related deaths in Canada by age and sex, 2017 to 2019
2017 2018 2019
Percent by sex Male 74% 73% 73%
Female 26% 27% 27%
Percent by age group 19 years or less 2% 2% 2%
20 - 29 years 19% 20% 18%
30 - 39 years 27% 27% 27%
40 - 49 years 21% 21% 21%
50 - 59 years 21% 22% 22%
60 years or more 10% 9% 10%
Theme 1 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated since the last renewal*
(dollars)
2019-20 Federal theme planned spending
(dollars)
2019-20 Federal theme actual spending
(dollars)
Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target Theme actual results
Theme Area 1: Supporting Additional Prevention and Treatment Interventions

HC:
$13,169,264
(Top up)
$1,166,430
(Existing)

HC: $3,237,826 $6,705,958 Targeted stakeholdersFootnote 7 use evidence-informed informationFootnote 8 on opioid use to change policies, programs, and practice Percentage of targeted stakeholders reporting that they made evidence informed improvements to opioid use policies, programs and practice (by type of improvementFootnote 9) 65% March 31, 2024 N/A
Theme 1 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to the department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since the last renewal*
(dollars)
2019-20 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2019-20 Actual spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2019-20 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2019-20 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2019 - 20 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target 2019-20 Horizontal initiative activity actual result(s)
Health Canada Substance Use and Addictions Expanded contribution funding

$13,169,264
(Top up)
$1,166,430
(Existing)

$3,237,826 $6,705,958 ER 1.1.1 PI 1.1.1 T 1.1.1 March 31, 2024 AR 1.1.1
ER 1.1.2 PI 1.1.2 T 1.1.2 AR 1.1.2
Theme 2 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated since the last renewal*
(dollars)
2019-20 Federal theme planned spending
(dollars)
2019-20 Federal theme actual spending
(dollars)
Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target Theme actual results
Theme Area 2: Addressing Stigma

HC:
$12,456,900
(Top up)
$22,067,727
(Existing)

PS:
$3,396,428
$1,299,754
(Existing)

HC:
$4,843,006
(Top up)
$3,790,152
(Existing)

PS:
$369,246Footnote 10

HC:
$9,145,686

PS:
$312,076

Increased perception among Canadians of drug use as a public health issue Percentage of Canadians who believe that the opioid crisis in Canada is a public health issue Increase by 5%Footnote 11 March 31, 2021 76%Footnote 12
Theme 2 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to the department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since the last renewal*
(dollars)
2019-20 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2019-20 Actual spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2019-20 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2019-20 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2019 - 20 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target 2019-20 Horizontal initiative activity actual result(s)
Health Canada Controlled Substances Public education campaign $12,456,900 (Top-up) 22,067,727
(Existing)
$4,843,006
(Top up) $3,790,152
(Existing)
$9,145,686 ER 2.1.1 PI 2.1.1 T 2.1.1 March 31, 2020 AR 2.1.1
ER 2.1.2 PI 2.1.2 T 2.1.2 March 31, 2020 AR 2.1.2
Public Safety Countering Crime De-stigmatization awareness training for law enforcement $3,396,428
(Top up)
$1,299,754
(Existing)
$369,246 $312,076 ER 2.2 PI 2.2 T 2.2 March 31, 2023Table footnote 1 AR 2.2

Table footnotes

Table footnote 1

The date to achieve the target has been revised to March 31, 2023, to account for the time required to develop course content that was reflective of stakeholder input and convert it into an interactive online module, and for impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on police training activities.

Return to Table footnote 1 referrer

Theme 3 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated since the last renewal*
(dollars)
2019-20 Federal theme planned spending
(dollars)
2019-20 Federal theme actual spending
(dollars)
Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target Theme actual results
Theme Area 3: Taking Action at Canada's Borders

PS:
$346,828

CBSA:
$30,254,740

PS:
$847,14410

CBSA:
$7,361,066

PS:
$864,128

CBSA:
$4,715,158

Enhanced capability to interdict illegal cross-border movement of drugs, such as opioids, at ports of entry Percentage of interdictions of drugs, including opioids, using detector dogs (compared to random resultant rate)

Baseline: 2.66%

Target:
2019-20: 2.85%
2020-21: 3.00%
2021-22: 3.20%
2022-23: 3.50%

March 31, 2023 2019-20: 5.14%
Percentage of interdictions of drugs, including opioids, resulting from targeted examinations (compared to random resultant rate) TBD - Establish baseline and target March 31, 2023 2019-20: 5.14%
Theme 3 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to the department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since the last renewal*
(dollars)
2019-20 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2019-20 Actual spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2019-20 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2019-20 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2019 - 20 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target 2019-20 Horizontal initiative activity actual result(s)
Public Safety Countering Crime Information sharing with law enforcement and international partners $346,828 $847,144 $864,128 ER 3.1 PI 3.1 T 3.1 March 31, 2020 AR 3.1
Canada Border Security Agency Commercial-Trade
Facilitation and Compliance
Equipping safe examination areas and regional screening facilities $1,638,673 $581,253 $468,426 ER 3.2.1 PI 3.2.1.1 T 3.2.1.1 March 31, 2020 AR 3.2.1.1
Force Generation $2,153,613 $374,523 $374,523
Building and Equipment $11,353,992 $3,354,521 $1,579,746
Field Technology Support $7,951,329 $1,677,411 $1,527,946 PI 3.2.1.2 T 3.2.1.2 March 31, 2023 AR 3.2.1.2
PI 3.2.1.3 T 3.2.1.3 March 31, 2020 AR 3.2.1.3
Targeting Augmenting intelligence and risk assessment capacity $2,041,704 $399,340 $160,118 ER 3.2.2 PI 3.2.2 T 3.2.2 March 31, 2023 AR 3.2.2
Intelligence Collection and Analysis $3,284,279 $625,689 $418,033 ER 3.2.3 PI 3.2.3 T 3.2.3 March 21, 2023 AR 3.2.3
Commercial-Trade Facilitation and Compliance Enhancement of Detector Dog Program $1,831,150 $348,329 $186,366 ER 3.2.4 PI 3.2.4.1 T 3.2.4.1 March 31, 2023 AR 3.2.4.1
PI 3.2.4.2 T 3.2.4.1 March 31, 2023 AR 3.2.4.2
Theme 4 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated since the last renewal*
(dollars)
2019-20 Federal theme planned spending
(dollars)
2019-20 Federal theme actual spending
(dollars)
Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target Theme actual results
Theme Area 4: Enhancing the Evidence Base

PHAC:
$14,928,466
(Top up)
$1,408,473
(Existing)

StatCan:
$1,905,286

PHAC:
$3,815,738
(Top up)
$344,344
(Existing)

StatCan:
$462,579

PHAC:
$3,758,360

StatCan:
$471,315

Enhanced quality surveillanceFootnote 13 data is available Number of opioid-related evidence productsFootnote 14 disseminated publicly 11 March 31, 2020 Total of 19 publications by PHAC
Percentage of data files published on time 100% March 31, 2020 100%
Released data for 2006 to 2018 on December 10, 2019.
Theme 4 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to the department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since the last renewal*
(dollars)
2019-20 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2019-20 Actual spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2019-20 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2019-20 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2019 - 20 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target 2019-20 Horizontal initiative activity actual result(s)
Public Health Agency of Canada Evidence for Health Promotion, and Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention Expansion of public health surveillance

$14,928,466
(Top up)
$1,408,473
(Existing)

$3,815,738
(Top up)
$344,344
(Existing)

$3,758,360 ER 4.1 PI 4.1 T 4.1 March 31, 2020 AR 4.1
Statistics Canada Socio-economic Statistics Re-design and operation of the Canadian Coroner and Medical Examiner Database (CCMED) $1,905,286 $462,579 $471,315 ER 4.2 PI 4.2 T 4.2 83% by March 31, 2021 AR 4.2
Total spending, all themes*
  Total federal funding allocated since the last renewal*
(dollars)
2019-20 Total federal planned spending
(dollars)
2019-20 Total federal actual spending
(dollars)
Theme 1 $14,335,694 $3,237,826 $6,705,958
Theme 2 $39,220,809 $9,002,404 $9,457,762
Theme 3 $30,601,568 $8,208,210 $5,579,286
Theme 4 $18,242,225 $4,622,661 $4,229,675
Total, all themes 102,400,296 25,071,101 $25,972,681

Theme 1: Supporting Additional Prevention and Treatment Interventions

Expected results

Health Canada

  • ER 1.1.1 Targeted stakeholders and Canadians are equipped with the capacity (knowledge, skills and supports) to inform their decisions and actions related to opioid use
  • ER 1.1.2 Targeted stakeholders use evidence-informed information on opioid use to change policies, programs, and practice

Performance indicators

Health Canada

  • PI 1.1.1 Percentage of targeted stakeholders and Canadians reporting that they have the social and physical supports they need related to opioid use
  • PI 1.1.2 Percentage of targeted stakeholders reporting that they made evidence informed improvements to opioid use policies, programs and practice

Targets

Health Canada

  • T 1.1.1 70%
  • T 1.1.2 65%

Actual Results

Health Canada

  • AR 1.1.1 N/A
  • AR 1.1.2 N/A

Theme 2: Addressing Stigma

Expected results

Health Canada

  • ER 2.1.1 Increased sympathy among Canadians for people using opioids
  • ER 2.1.2 Increased perception among Canadians of drug use as a public health issue

Public Safety Canada

  • ER 2.2 Increased awareness and support amongst law enforcement community about the impacts of stigma on people who use drugs

Performance indicators

Health Canada

  • PI 2.1.1 Percentage of Canadians who have sympathy for people using opioids
  • PI 2.1.2 Percentage of Canadians who believe that opioid-related substance use disorder is a disease

Public Safety Canada

  • PI 2.2 Percentage of police service members who completed the online course

Targets

Health Canada

Public Safety Canada

  • T 2.2 25% of eligible police service members

Actual Results

Health Canada

  • AR 2.1.1 As of July 2019, 25% of Canadians surveyed have sympathy for people using opioids, a 4% increase from the 2017 baseline
  • AR 2.1.2 As of July 2019, 63% of Canadians surveyed agreed that opioid-related substance use disorder is a disease, a 2% increase from the 2017 baseline

Public Safety Canada

  • AR 2.2 Completed the development of its stigma awareness training materials for law enforcement; however, its launch is deferred to Fall 2020 due to unforeseen COVID-19 pressures on first responders

Theme 3: Taking Action at Canada's Borders

Expected results

Public Safety Canada

  • ER 3.1 Increased knowledge generation and sharing of information on targeted issues related to reducing the illegal supply of opioids in Canada

Canada Border Services Agency

  • ER 3.2.1 Increased capacity to identify high-risk goods at ports of entry
  • ER 3.2.2 Increased ability to risk assess and identify high risk shipments
  • ER 3.2.3 Increased communications related to threat assessment information and intelligence provided to personnel and partnering agencies
  • ER 3.2.4 Enhanced capabilityFootnote 17 to interdict illegal cross-border movement of drugs, such as opioids, at postal locations

Performance indicators

Public Safety Canada

  • PI 3.1 Percentage of completed planned engagement activities with law enforcement community, stakeholders and partners to address policy issues related with the illegal supply of opioids

Canada Border Services Agency

  • PI 3.2.1.1 Number of designated safe examination areas, allowing ports of entry to be equipped to identify, detect, and interdict opioids
  • PI 3.2.1.2 Percentage of CBSA officers at ports of entry identified for safe examinations training that have completed the required training
  • PI 3.2.1.3 Number of items per year of suspected opioid-containing packages sampled and identified at safe sampling areas (outside of the laboratory)
  • PI 3.2.2 Number of streams/risk rules supporting advanced risk assessment
  • PI 3.2.3 Number of intelligence products produced by the CBSA
  • PI 3.2.4.1 Percentage of interdictions of drugs, including opioids, using detector dogs (compared to random resultant rate)
  • PI 3.2.4.2 Percentage of interdictions of drugs, including opioids, resulting from targeted examinations (compared to random resultant rate)

Targets

Public Safety Canada

  • T 3.1 100%

Canada Border Services Agency

  • T 3.2.1.1 25
  • T 3.2.1.2 100%Footnote 18
  • T 3.2.1.3 1,000Footnote 19
  • T 3.2.2 Automate 1 multi-mode pre-arrival stream with 5 active risk rules
  • T 3.2.3 Increase by 10%
  • T 3.2.4.1 2.85%
  • T 3.2.4.2 TBD - Establish baseline and target

Actual Results

Public Safety Canada

  • AR 3.1 Public Safety hosted the third Law Enforcement Roundtable on Illicit Drugs in Winnipeg in October 2019. The event focused on further advancing information-sharing amongst the law enforcement community around best practices and effective law enforcement responses to the current opioids crisis and other emerging drug threats. There were 25 subject matter experts who presented their perspectives on and experiences with efforts to curtail the production and trafficking of illicit drugs. The event saw more than 70 participants representing municipal, provincial and federal police agencies across Canada and the United States as well as representatives from academia.

Canada Border Services Agency

  • AR 3.2.1.1 41 Designated Safe Examination Areas were developed and implemented
  • AR 3.2.1.2 100% of officers identified to work within a DSEA have been trained
  • AR 3.2.1.3 No results can be reported as the Regional Screening Facilities have yet to be operationalized. Three chemists have been hired and in process of receiving training to staff the Regional Screening Facilities. Two of the facilities are close to being completed; however, construction of the facilities was halted due to COVID-19.
  • AR 3.2.2 Target date for the initial iteration of the stream is Q4 2020-21. As new postal and resultant data becomes available, the stream will be improved, the risk indicators will be refined and new iterations will be implemented through Q1 2021-11 to Q4 2022-23
  • AR 3.2.3 6 intelligence reports developed, which represents an increase of 100%.
  • AR 3.2.4.1 5.14%
  • AR 3.2.4.2 No results to report as baseline % of interdictions resulting from targeted examination is still to be determined

Theme 4: Enhancing the Evidence Base

Expected results

Public Health Agency of Canada

  • ER 4.1 Enhanced quality surveillance data is available

Statistics Canada

  • ER 4.2 Increased use and relevance of CCMED among stakeholders

Performance indicators

Public Health Agency of Canada

  • PI 4.1 Number of opioid-related evidence productsFootnote 20 disseminated publicly

Statistics Canada

  • PI 4.2 Percentage of clients satisfied with statistical information from CCMED

Targets

Public Health Agency of Canada

  • T 4.1 11

Statistics Canada

  • T 4.2 83% by March 31, 2021

Actual Results

Public Health Agency of Canada

  • AR 4.1 Total of 19 publications by PHAC:

National Reports (12):

  • Apparent Opioid-related Deaths - April 2019, June 2019, September 2019, December 2019, March 2020
  • Suspected Opioid-related Overdoses: Emergency Medical Services - April 2019, June 2019, September 2019, December 2019, March 2020
  • Suspected Opioid-related Overdoses: Hospitalizations - December 2019, March 2020
    (Source: https://health-infobase.canada.ca/substance-related-harms/opioids/)

Other Reports (6):

  • Joint Brief with Health Canada: Federal Actions on Opioids to Date (5 updates) - April, 2019, June 2019, September 2019, December 2019, March 2020
    (Source: https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/substance use/problematic-prescription-drug-use/opioids/federal-actions/overview.html)
  • Opioid-related Harms in Canada: Integrating Emergency Medical Service, Hospitalization, and Death Data - March 2020
    (Source: https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/substance-use/problematic-prescription-drug-use/opioids/data-surveillance-research/integrating-emergency-medical-hospitalization-death-data.html)

Relevant Studies (1):

  • Highlights from phase one of the national study on opioid and other drug-related overdose deaths: insights from coroners and medical examiners - March 2020
    (Source: https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/publications/healthy-living/highlights-phase-one-national-study-opioid-illegal-substance-related-overdose-deaths.html)Articles and Journal Publications: (N/A)

Statistics Canada

  • AR 4.2 85% in 2019-20

Footnote

Footnote 1

PHAC's standard reporting on opioid-related deaths and harms: https://health-infobase.canada.ca/substance-related-harms/opioids/graphs?index=551

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

Targeted stakeholders will differ by individual project funded by the SUAP but may include: other levels of government, pan-Canadian health organizations, non-profit organizations, communities or others at the organizational or system level. This target population category relates to initiatives targeting organization, system or policy and practice change.

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Footnote 3

Public health surveillance is the continuous, systematic collection, analysis and interpretation of health-related data needed for the planning, implementation, and evaluation of public health practice. In the context of opioid-related harms, this involves collecting data on health outcomes/events, including suspected overdoses and deaths, socio-demographic variables and risk factors.

Return to footnote 3 referrer

Footnote 4

Decrease in baseline year over year to 2021. Baseline for hospital admissions: 18.4 per 100,000 population in 2017. Baseline for apparent opioid-related deaths: 11.4 per 100,000 population in 2017.

Return to footnote 4 referrer

Footnote 5

Special Advisory Committee on the Epidemic of Opioid Overdoses. Opioid-related Harms in Canada. Ottawa: Public Health Agency of Canada; September 2020. https://health-infobase.canada.ca/substance-related-harms/opioids

Return to footnote 5 referrer

Footnote 6

Notes: Suppressed (suppr.) - Data may be suppressed in provinces or territories with low numbers of cases.

Not available (n/a) - Data were not available at the time of this publication.

Data on hospitalizations from Quebec are not included in the dataset used for this analysis

Data on opioid related deaths from British Columbia and 2019 data from Quebec includes deaths related to all illicit drugs including, but not limited to, opioids

2019 data from Manitoba are based on January to September.

Return to footnote 6 referrer

Footnote 7

Targeted stakeholders will differ by individual projects funded by the SUAP but may include: other levels of government, pan-Canadian health organizations, non-profit organizations, communities or others at the organizational or system level. This target population category relates to initiatives targeting organization, system or policy and practice change.

Return to footnote 7 referrer

Footnote 8

Evidence-informed information is evidence from research, practice and experience used to inform and improve opioid related policy, programs, practice and behaviour (e.g., curriculum, reports, guidelines, literature, and program materials).

Return to footnote 8 referrer

Footnote 9

Types of improvement is a reference to data that will be submitted to Health Canada by funded SUAP projects broken down by policy, program or practice change. Examples could include adopting policies to ensure the meaningful involvement of people with lived experience; changes to programs to make them more culturally relevant or trauma-informed; and practice changes that improve treatment service such as adopting current national opioid treatment guidelines.

Return to footnote 9 referrer

Footnote 10

Note: Total planned spending for both Themes 2 and 3 remains the same; however, its allocation was amended to further support activities under Theme 3.

Return to footnote 10 referrer

Footnote 11

Baseline: 74% in 2017

Return to footnote 11 referrer

Footnote 12

As of July 2019, 76% of Canadians surveyed believe that the opioid crisis in Canada is a public health issue. This is a 2% increase from the 2017 baseline.

Return to footnote 12 referrer

Footnote 13

Public health surveillance is the continuous, systematic collection, analysis and interpretation of health-related data needed for the planning, implementation, and evaluation of public health practice. In the context of opioid-related harms, this involves collecting data on health outcomes/events, including suspected overdoses and deaths, socio-demographic variables and risk factors.

Return to footnote 13 referrer

Footnote 14

Includes national reports, peer-reviewed (scientific) journal articles, infographics, factsheets, and related analytical products.

Return to footnote 14 referrer

Footnote 15

Baseline: 21% in 2017

Return to footnote 15 referrer

Footnote 16

Baseline: 61% in 2017

Return to footnote 16 referrer

Footnote 17

Enhanced capability is reference to six additional dog teams and the introduction of the fentanyl scent (through training) to existing teams

Return to footnote 17 referrer

Footnote 18

Baseline is 0 as these are new facilities not yet established and no officers have been trained.

Return to footnote 18 referrer

Footnote 19

Target may be adjusted in future years once DSEAs are fully operational.

Return to footnote 19 referrer

Footnote 20

Includes national reports, peer-reviewed (scientific) journal articles, infographics, factsheets, and related analytical products.

Return to footnote 20 referrer

Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy

General information

Name of horizontal initiative

Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy

Lead department

Health Canada

Federal partner organization(s)

  • Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)
  • Canada Revenue Agency (CRA)
  • Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)
  • Correctional Service Canada (CSC)
  • Department of Justice Canada (DOJ)
  • Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC)
  • Global Affairs Canada (GAC)
  • Indigenous Services Canada (ISC)
  • Parole Board of Canada (PB)
  • Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)
  • Public Prosecution Service of Canada (PPSC)
  • Public Safety Canada (PS)
  • Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC)
  • Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

Start date of the horizontal initiative

April 1, 2017

End date of the horizontal initiative

March 31, 2022 and ongoing

Description of the horizontal initiative

The Government of Canada is committed to a comprehensive, collaborative, compassionate and evidence-based approach to drug policy, which uses a public health lens when considering and addressing problematic substance use. The Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy (CDSS) is led by the Minister of Health, supported by Health Canada and 14 other federal departments and agencies. The CDSS covers a broad range of legal and illegal substances, including cannabis,Footnote 1 including alcohol, opioidsFootnote 2 and other kinds of substances that can be used problematically. The goal of the strategy is to protect the health and safety of all Canadians by minimizing harms from substance use for individuals, families and communities.

The CDSS formally restores harm reduction as a pillar of federal drug and substance use policy, alongside the existing prevention, treatment and enforcement pillars, supported by a strong, modern evidence base across all pillars. The public health focus on the CDSS, along with the inclusion of harm reduction as a core pillar of the strategy, will better enable the Government to address the current opioid crisis, and to work toward preventing the emergence of new challenges in substance use.

The CDSS recognizes that the national approach to substance use requires coordinated efforts from all levels of government working in their respective areas of jurisdiction. It also recognizes the importance of incorporating stakeholder views on an ongoing basis, including people with lived and living experience with substance use. Reducing the stigma experienced by people who use drugs is also integral to the CDSS and a priority for the Government of Canada.

Governance structures

The CDSS is led by the Minister of Health. The Strategy is coordinated through a Director-General (DG) level steering committee that reports to Assistant Deputy Ministers (ADMs).

The DG Steering Committee is designed to reflect and support the CDSS's comprehensive approach to drug and substance use issues. The committee is composed of DGs from federal departments/agencies whose mandates are relevant to drug and substance use (including departments that formally receive CDSS funding and those that do not). The committee, which meets at least twice a year and also on an ad hoc basis, is supported by three working groups: the Demand and Harm Reduction Working Group; the Supply Reduction Working Group; and the Evaluation and Reporting Working Group.

Current federal/provincial/territorial (F/P/T) engagement is achieved through a number of F/P/T mechanisms, including the F/P/T Committee on Problematic Substance Use and Harms that is co-chaired by HC and the Province of British Columbia. Secretariat support for the CDSS is provided by the Controlled Substances Directorate (CSD) within HC.

Total federal funding allocated from 2017-18 to 2021-22

$641,968,972Footnote 3

Total federal planned spending to date (dollars)

$388,219,158

Total federal actual spending to date (dollars)

$460,295,090

Date of last renewal of the horizontal initiative

Not applicable

Total federal funding allocated at the last renewal and source of funding (dollars)

Not applicable

Additional federal funding received after the last renewal (dollars)

Not applicable

Total planned spending since the last renewal

Not applicable

Total actual spending since the last renewal

Not applicable

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2022-2023

Performance highlights

In 2019-20, CDSS partners continued to work to address problematic substance use in Canada, including the opioid crisis, across the four pillars of the strategy. Key activities included efforts to inform Canadians about the health risks of problematic substance use and the negative impacts of stigma and discrimination, providing emergency treatment funding to provinces and territories and removing federal regulatory barriers to evidence-based treatment options; advancing harm reduction efforts, expanding the regular service offerings for supervised consumption sites; analyzing the public input into CDSS consultation and releasing the " What We Heard: Strengthening Canada's Approach to Substance Use Issues" report; selecting three finalists for the Drug Checking Technology Challenge - Stage 2; developing an anti-stigma training program for law enforcement personnel; ensuring compliance with federal controlled substances regulations; taking measures to address organized drug crime, including drug trafficking with a focus on toxic substances like fentanyl and developing strategies to effectively prosecute persons and organizations responsible for the distribution throughout Canada of dangerous and life-threatening substances like fentanyl. Specifically, CBSA made 29,429 drug seizures, valued at $364 million. Of those seizures, $128 million worth was seized as a result of intelligence; the CBSA Laboratory issued a (semi-annual) CBSA Drug Trends report to stakeholders (i.e. HC, RCMP, US DEA and US Customs).

Other activities include ongoing research and evidence collection, such as the launch of the ongoing Online New Psychoactive Substances (NPS) survey; completed data collection for the Alcohol and Drugs Survey (CADS); and advanced public health focused issues including promoting the use of non-stigmatizing approaches at the UN Commission on Narcotic Drugs; and implemented the risk-based approach to compliance for Licensed Dealers that introduced the allocation of risk ratings to observations and the assignment of an overall inspection compliance rating. In November 2019, an Evidence and Data Day Retreat was held where knowledge was shared and data and evidence were discussed to support reporting on Drug Policy in Canada.

Contact information

Health Canada

Michelle Boudreau
Director General
Controlled Substances Directorate
Michelle.Boudreau@canada.ca
613-960-2496

Horizontal initiative framework: departmental spending by theme (dollars)

Horizontal initiative: Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy

Shared outcomes:

  • Problematic substance use is addressed as a health and social issue by governments, communities, stakeholders and Canadian society.
  • Rates of problematic substance use in Canada are minimized, especially for youth and those most at risk of harm, including preventing, reducing and/or delaying the use of drugs and other substances.
  • Canadians and their communities are supported with evidence-based tools, programs and services to be safer, healthier and more resilient.
Name of theme Theme Area 1:
Prevention
Theme Area 2:
Treatment
Theme Area 3:
Harm Reduction
Theme Area 4:
Enforcement
Theme Area 5:
Evidence Base
Internal Services
Theme outcome(s) Preventing problematic substance use - note Health Canada is continuing to work with the other federal CDSS partners to review and update the prevention theme outcomes Supporting access to treatment services - note Health Canada is continuing to work with the other federal CDSS partners to review and update the treatment theme outcomes Reduction in risk-taking behaviour among people with problematic drug or substance use Law enforcement and drug regulation activities - note Health Canada is continuing to work with the other federal CDSS partners to review and update the enforcement theme outcomes Data and research evidence on drugs, and emerging drug trends, are used by members of the federal Health Portfolio and their partners Not applicable
Health CanadaFootnote 4 $130,490,598Footnote 5Footnote 6 Not applicable $18,415,181Footnote 7 $94,799,995 $8,520,776 $5,117,712Footnote 8
Canada Border Services Agency Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $11,500,000 Not applicable $6,500,000
Canada Revenue Agency Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $4,209,225 Not applicable $790,775
Canadian Institutes of Health Research Not applicable $6,874,990 Not applicable Not applicable $10,000,000 Not applicable
Correctional Services Canada Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $9,258,480 Not applicable Not applicable
Department of Justice Canada Not applicable $26,593,901 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $42,375
Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $0 Not applicable $0
Global Affairs Canada Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $4,500,000 Not applicable Not applicable
Indigenous Services Canada $14,376,000 $60,357,585 $15,000,000 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
Parole Board of Canada Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $7,695,000 Not applicable $1,710,000
Public Health Agency of Canada Not applicable Not applicable $30,000,000 Not applicable $281,720Footnote 9 $45,647Footnote 10
Public Prosecution Service of Canada Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $53,196,935 Not applicable $7,803,065
Public Safety Canada Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $2,942,660 Not applicable $75,710
Public Services and Procurement Canada Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $3,000,000 Not applicable Not applicable
Royal Canadian Mounted Police $11,107,975 Not applicable Not applicable $82,644,400 Not applicable $14,118,267

Performance information

Horizontal initiative overview

Name of horizontal initiative Total federal funding allocated from 2017-18 to 2021-22
(dollars)
2019 - 20 Planned spending
(dollars)
2019 - 20 Actual spending
(dollars)
Horizontal initiative shared outcome(s) Performance indicator(s) Target(s) Date to achieve target Actual results
Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy (CDSS)Footnote 1 $641,968,972Footnote 2 $127,459,494Footnote 3 $154,712,770 Health Canada is continuing to work with the other federal CDSS partners to update the shared outcomes Health Canada is continuing to work with the other federal CDSS partners to review and update the shared performance indicator(s) TBDFootnote 11 TBD Not applicable
Footnote 1

Funding includes internal services and lead role.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

The Total federal funding allocated has been decreased to $641,968,972 as $19,497,063 has been reallocated through the 2018-19 Addressing the Opioid Crisis submission.

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Footnote 3

The 2019-20 Planned spending has been decreased to $127,459,494 as a result of reallocating $4,004,354 through the 2018-19Addressing the Opioid Crisis and in inclusion of $1,700,000 carried over from 2018-19

Return to footnote 3 referrer

Theme 1 details

Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated from 2017-18 to 2021-22
(dollars)
2019-20 Federal theme planned spending
(dollars)
2019-20 Federal theme actual spending
(dollars)
Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target Theme actual results

Theme Area 1:

Prevention

$155,974,573Footnote 1 $29,851,231 $26,058,764 Health Canada is continuing to work with the other federal CDSS partners to review and update the theme outcome(s) Health Canada is continuing to work with the other federal CDSS partners to review and update the performance indicator(s) for this theme TBDFootnote 12 TBD Not applicable
Footnote 1

The Total federal Theme 1: Prevention funding allocated has been decreased to $155,974,573 as $1,166,430 has been reallocated through the 2018-19 Addressing the Opioid Crisis submission.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Theme 1 horizontal initiative activities

Departments Link to the department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity from 2017-18 to 2021-22
(dollars)
2019-20 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2019-20 Actual spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2019-20 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2019-20 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2019 - 20 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target 2019-20 Horizontal initiative activity actual result(s)

Health Canada

Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP) Grants and Contributions Funding $113,937,570Footnote 13 $22,787,514Footnote 14 $19,623,849

ER 1.1.1

ER 1.1.2

PI 1.1.1

PI 1.1.2

T 1.1.1

T 1.1.2

March 31, 2020

AR 1.1.1

AR 1.1.2

Controlled Substances Problematic prescription drug use (PPDU) $16,553,028Footnote 15 $1,976,940 $1,771,414 ER 1.1.3 PI 1.1.3 T 1.1.3 March 31, 2020 AR 1.1.3
Indigenous Services Canada Mental Wellness Problematic prescription drug use (PPDU) $14,376,000 $2,900,000 $2,476,724

Not applicable

Royal Canadian Mounted Police Federal Policing (FP) Federal Policing Public Engagement (FPPE) $11,107,975 $2,186,777 $2,186,777 ER 1.2

PI 1.2.1

PI 1.2.2

PI 1.2.3

PI 1.2.4

PI 1.2.5

T 1.2.1

T 1.2.2

T 1.2.3

T 1.2.4

T 1.2.5

March 31, 2020

AR 1.2.1

AR 1.2.2

AR 1.2.3

AR 1.2.4

AR 1.2.5

Theme 2 details

Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated from 2017-18 to 2021-22
(dollars)
2019-20 Federal theme planned spending
(dollars)
2019-20 Federal theme actual spending
(dollars)
Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target Theme actual results

Theme Area 2:

Treatment

$93,826,476 $18,405,040 $16,400,255 Health Canada is continuing to work with the other federal CDSS partners to review and update the theme outcome(s) Health Canada is continuing to work with the other federal CDSS partners to review and update the performance indicator(s) for this theme TBDFootnote 16 TBD Not applicable

Theme 2 horizontal initiative activities

Departments Link to the department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity from 2017-18 to 2021-22
(dollars)
2019-20 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2019-20 Actual spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2019-20 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2019-20 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2019 - 20 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target 2019-20 Horizontal initiative activity actual result(s)
Canadian Institutes of Health Research Research in Priority Areas Research on Drug Treatment Model $6,874,990 $974,998 $937,082 ER 2.1 PI 2.1 T 2.1 March 31, 2020 AR 2.1

Department of Justice Canada

Drug Treatment Court Funding Program Drug Treatment Court Funding Program $18,636,276 $3,767,000 $3,692,000 ER 2.2.1 PI 2.2.1 T 2.2.1 March 31, 2020 AR 2.2.1
Youth Justice Youth Justice Fund $7,957,625 $1,591,525 $911,633 ER 2.2.2 PI 2.2.2 T 2.2.2 March 31, 2020 AR 2.2.2
Indigenous Services Canada Mental Wellness Grants and Contributions - Mental Wellness Program $60,357,585 $12,071,517 $10,859,540

Not applicable

Theme 3 details

Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated from 2017-18 to 2021-22
(dollars)
2019-20 Federal theme planned spending
(dollars)
2019-20 Federal theme actual spending
(dollars)
Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target Theme actual results

Theme Area 3:

Harm reduction

$63,415,181Footnote 1

$14,893,952Footnote 2

$15,330,501

Reduction in risk-taking behaviour among drug or substances users

Percentage of targeted Canadians reporting they used knowledge and skills 60% March 31, 2021 Not applicableFootnote 17
Average percentage First Nations people and Inuit per community who received problematic substance use community-based supportsFootnote 18 14.04% March 31, 2021 Not applicableFootnote 19
Percentage decrease of sharing drug use equipment among people who use drugsFootnote 20 10% decrease March 31, 2021 Not applicableFootnote 21
Footnote 1

The Total federal Theme 3: Harm Reduction funding allocated has been decreased to $63,415,181 as $17,276,836 has been reallocated through the 2018-19 Addressing the Opioid Crisis submission.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

The 2019-20 Federal theme 3 planned spending has been decreased to $14,893,952 as a result of reallocating $3,790,152 through the 2018-19 Addressing the Opioid Crisis submission and an inclusion of $1,700,000 carried over from 2018-19.

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Theme 3 horizontal initiative activities

Departments Link to the department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity from 2017-18 to 2021-22
(dollars)
2019-20 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2019-20 Actual spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2019-20 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2019-20 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2019 - 20 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target 2019-20 Horizontal initiative activity actual result(s)

Health Canada

Controlled Substances Strengthening the Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy $18,415,181Footnote 22 $4,893,952Footnote 23 $5,709,198 ER 3.1.1 PI 3.1.1 T 3.1.1 March 31, 2020 AR 3.1.1
Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP) Grants and Contributions - Funding $0Footnote 24 $0Footnote 25 $0 ER 3.1.2 PI 3.1.2 T 3.1.2 March 31, 2021 AR 3.1.2
Indigenous Services Canada Mental Wellness Grants and Contributions -First Nations and Inuit health programming $15,000,000 $3,000,000 $2,900,000 ER 3.2 PI 3.2 T 3.2 March 31, 2020 AR 3.2
Public Health Agency of Canada Communicable Diseases and Infections Control Grants and contributions- Transmission of Sexually Transmitted and Blood Borne Infections $30,000,000 $7,000,000 $6,721,303 ER 3.3 PI 3.3 T 3.3 March 31, 2020 AR 3.3

Theme 4 details

Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated from 2017-18 to 2021-22
(dollars)
2019-20 Federal theme planned spending
(dollars)
2019-20 Federal theme actual spending
(dollars)
Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target Theme actual results

Theme Area 4:

Enforcement

$273,746,695 $53,272,814 $83,798,027 Health Canada is continuing to work with the other federal CDSS partners to review and update the theme outcome(s) Health Canada is continuing to work with the other federal CDSS partners to review and update the performance indicator(s) for this theme TBDFootnote 26 TBD Not applicable

Theme 4 horizontal initiative activities

Departments Link to the department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity from 2017-18 to 2021-22
(dollars)
2019-20 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2019-20 Actual spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2019-20 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2019-20 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2019 - 20 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target 2019-20 Horizontal initiative activity actual result(s)

Health Canada

Controlled Substances

Office of Controlled Substances $31,221,420 $6,244,284 $14,615,741 ER 4.1.1 PI 4.1.1 T 4.1.1 March 31, 2020 AR 4.1.1
Regulatory Operations and Enforcement Branch for Compliance and Enforcement Activities $9,753,510 $1,950,702 $2,192,725 ER 4.1.2 PI 4.1.2 T 4.1.2 March 31, 2020 AR 4.1.2
Drug Analysis Services $53,825,065 $10,765,013 $13,409,416

ER 4.1.3

ER 4.1.4

PI 4.1.3

PI 4.1.4

T 4.1.3

T 4.1.4

March 31, 2020

AR 4.1.3

AR 4.1.4

Canada Border Services Agency

Risk Assessment

Targeting Intelligence Security Screening

$10,500,000 $2,100,000 $2,100,000

ER 4.2.1

ER 4.2.2

ER 4.2.3

PI 4.2

T 4.2

March 31, 2020

AR 4.2

Criminal Investigations $1,000,000 $200,000 $200,000
Canada Revenue Agency Domestic Compliance Small and Medium Enterprises Directorate $4,209,225 $866,369 $1,437,182 ER 4.3 PI 4.3 T 4.3 March 31, 2020 AR 4.3

Correctional Service Canada

Correctional Interventions Case Preparation and Supervision of Provincial Offenders $3,027,280 $773,046 $734,118

ER 4.4

PI 4.4.1

PI 4.4.2

T 4.4.1

T 4.4.2

March 31, 2020

AR 4.4.1

AR 4.4.2

Community Supervision Case Preparation and Supervision of Provincial Offenders $6,231,200 $1,078,651 $1,112,543 PI 4.4.3 T 4.4.3 AR 4.4.3
Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada Financial Intelligence Program Financial Intelligence Program $0 $0 $1,794,985 ER 4.5 PI 4.5 T 4.5 Not applicable AR 4.5
Global Affairs Canada Diplomacy, Advocacy and International Agreements Annual Voluntary Contributions to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and the Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (CICAD) of the American States (OAS) $4,500,000 $900,000 $900,000 ER 4.6

PI 4.6.1

PI 4.6.2

T 4.6.1

T 4.6.2

March 31, 2020

AR 4.6.1

AR 4.6.2

Parole Board of Canada

Conditional Release Decisions Conditional Release Decisions - (Provincial reviews) $5,557,500 $200,000 $166,000 ER 4.7.1 PI 4.7.1 T 4.7.1 March 31, 2020 AR 4.7.1
Conditional Release Decisions Openness and Accountability Conditional Release Decisions Openness and Accountability (Provincial reviews) $2,137,500 $97,000 $79,000 ER 4.7.2 PI 4.7.2 T 4.7.2 March 31, 2020 AR 4.7.2

Public Prosecution Service of Canada

Drug, National Security and Northern Prosecutions Program

Prosecution of serious drug offences under the CDSA to which mandatory minimum penalties are applicable $36,219,785 $7,243,957 $1,451,194 ER 4.8.1

PI 4.8.1.1

PI 4.8.1.2

T 4.8

Not applicable

AR 4.8.1.1

AR 4.8.1.2

Prosecution and Prosecution-related Services $16,977,150 $3,395,430 $26,408,433 ER 4.8.2

PI 4.8.2.1

PI 4.8.2.2

AR 4.8.2.1

AR 4.8.2.2

Public Safety Canada Law Enforcement National Coordination of Efforts to Improve Intelligence, Knowledge, Management, Research, Evaluation $2,942,660 $588,532 $326,860 ER 4.9 PI 4.9 T 4.9 March 31, 2020 AR 4.9
Public Services and Procurement Canada Specialized Programs and Services Financial Intelligence Program $3,000,000 $600,000 $600,000 ER 4.10

PI 4.10.1

PI 4.10.2

T 4.10 March 31, 2020

AR 4.10.1

AR 4.10.2

Royal Canadian Mounted Police Federal Policing (FP) Investigations Federal Policing Project-Based Investigations $82,644,400 $16,269,830 $16,269,830 ER 4.11

PI 4.11.1

PI 4.11.2

PI 4.11.3

T 4.11 Not applicable

AR 4.11.1

AR 4.11.2

AR 4.11.3

Theme 5 details

Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated from 2017-18 to 2021-22)
(dollars)
2019-20 Federal theme planned spending
(dollars)
2019-20 Federal theme actual spending
(dollars)
Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target Theme actual results

Theme Area 5:

Evidence base

$18,802,496Footnote 1

$4,247,867Footnote 2

$4,198,380

Data and research evidence on drugs, and emerging drug trends, are used by members of the federal Health Portfolio and their partners

Percentage of targeted stakeholders reporting that they made evidence informed improvements to substance use policies, programs and practice4 TBDFootnote 27 TBD Not applicable
Percentage of federal health publications in areas related to problematic substance use (from Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada) citing CIHR-funded research 18% March 31, 2022 24%
Footnote 1

The Total federal Theme 5: Evidence Base funding allocated has been decreased to $18,802,496 as $562,883 has been reallocated through the 2018-19 Addressing the Opioid Crisis submission.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

The 2019-20 Federal theme 5 planned spending has been decreased to $4,247,496 as $93,721 has been reallocated through the 2018-19 Addressing the Opioid Crisis submission.

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Theme 5 horizontal initiative activities

Departments Link to the department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity from 2017-18 to 2021-22
(dollars)
2019-20 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2019-20 Actual spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2019-20 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2019-20 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2019 - 20 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target 2019-20 Horizontal initiative activity actual result(s)
Health Canada Controlled Substances Drug Use Surveillance and Monitoring $8,520,776 $2,247,867 $2,541,842 ER 5.1 PI 5.1 T 5.1 March 31, 2022 AR 5.1
Canadian Institutes of Health Research Horizontal Health Research Initiative Canadian Research Initiative in Substance Misuse (CRISM) $10,000,000 $2,000,000 $1,656,538 ER 5.2

PI 5.2.1

PI 5.2.2

T 5.2.1

T 5.2.2

March 31, 2022

AR 5.2.1

AR 5.2.2

Public Health Agency of Canada Emergency Preparedness and Response Chronic Disease and Injury Surveillance $281,720Footnote 28 $0 Not applicable ER 5.3 PI 5.3 T 5.3 March 31, 2020 AR 5.3

Total spending, all themes*

  Total federal funding allocated from 2017-18 to 2021-22
(dollars)
2019-20 Total federal planned spending
(dollars)
2019-20 Total federal actual spending
(dollars)
Theme 1: PreventionFootnote 1 $155,974,573 $29,851,231 $26,058,764
Theme 2: Treatment $93,826,746 $18,405,040 $16,400,255
Theme 3: Harm ReductionFootnote 1 $63,415,181 $14,893,952 $15,330,501
Theme 4: Enforcement $273,746,695 $53,272,814 $83,798,027
Theme 5: Evidence BaseFootnote 1 $18,802,496 $4,247,867 $4,198,380
Total, all themesFootnote * $605,765,421Footnote 2 $120,670,904Footnote 3 $145,785,927
Footnote 1

For more information on the changes to Prevention, Harm Reduction and Evidence Base funding allocation and 2019-20 planned refer to the above Theme Details tables.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

Total federal funding allocated (all themes) has been decreased to $605,765,421 as $19,006,149 has been reallocated through the 2018-19 Addressing the Opioid Crisis submission.

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Footnote 3

The 2019-20 Planned spending (all themes) has been decreased to $120,670,904 as a result of reallocating $3,883,873 through the 2018-19 Addressing the Opioid Crisis submission and an inclusion of $1,700,000 carried over from 2018-19.

Return to footnote 3 referrer

Footnote *

Funding does not include internal services and lead role.

Return to footnote * referrer

Comments on variances

Health Canada

The variance between actual and planned spending is mainly due to reallocations to meet program needs and priorities.

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

The variance between the planned and actual spending is due to funding fewer applications than planned for the Methamphetamine and Related Psychostimulants funding opportunity.

Canada Revenue Agency

Although fewer audits were completed (22 versus 30) than planned in 2019-20; these audits were higher risk and more complex than anticipated, earning four times ($8.2M vs $2M) the planned Taxes Earned by Audit (TEBA) and resulting in a higher rate of Appeals and Department of Justice Costs.

Department of Justice

The federal election period delayed approvals of Youth Justice Fund projects and the program experienced additional delays due to the COVID-19 pandemic. These delays resulted in lower than expected expenditures in 2019-20.

Indigenous Services Canada

The variance between actual and planned spending are a result of adjustments to regional implementation efforts brought about by our commitment to implements solutions in partnership and the need to ensure that unique community needs/priorities are addressed.

Financial Transaction and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC)

FINTRAC is an unfunded partner within CDSS. FINTRAC continues to work with law enforcement and intelligence agencies to ensure they receive financial intelligence related to drug production and distribution that is useful for further actions.

Public Prosecution Service of Canada

The variance between actual and planned spending is mainly due to internal allocations to support this initiative.

Theme 1: Prevention

Expected results

Health Canada

  • ER 1.1.1 Targeted stakeholders and Canadians are equipped with the capacity (knowledge, skills and supports) to inform their decisions and actions related to substance use.
  • ER 1.1.2 Targeted stakeholders use evidence-informed information on substance use to change policies, programs, and practice.
  • ER 1.1.3 Increased compliance and reduced risk of diversion of controlled substances, prescription drugs and precursor chemicals.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

  • ER 1.2 The RCMP will increase awareness of drugs and illegal substances among stakeholders by developing education products, supporting outreach and engagement efforts, and building new partnerships.

Performance indicators

Health Canada

  • PI 1.1.1 Percentage of stakeholders and Canadians reporting that they gained knowledge
  • PI 1.1.2 Percentage of targeted stakeholders reporting that they made evidence informed improvements to substance use policies, programs and practice.
  • PI 1.1.3 Percentage of pharmacies inspected that are deemed to be compliant with the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (CDSA) and its regulations.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

  • PI 1.2.1 Number and nature of awareness products.Footnote 29
  • PI 1.2.2 Number and category (targeted audiences) of stakeholders reached.Footnote 30
  • PI 1.2.3 Percentage of partners and stakeholders who demonstrate an increase in awareness of illegal drugs.
  • PI 1.2.4 Number and nature of partnerships and collaborations.Footnote 31
  • PI 1.2.5 Number of new engagement opportunities identified.

Targets

Health Canada

  • T 1.1.1 75%
  • T 1.1.2 70%
  • T 1.1.3 80%

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

  • T 1.2.1 5 drug related awareness products.
  • T 1.2.2 Approximately 500 stakeholders will be reached (stakeholders include Police, Public/Youth, and Industry/Other stakeholders).
  • T 1.2.3 50% of partners and stakeholders agree that Federal Policing contributed to an increased awareness/understanding of illegal drugs.
  • T 1.2.4 At least 5 partnerships/collaborations.
  • T 1.2.5 5

Actual Results

Health Canada

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

  • AR 1.2.1 Five drug related awareness products were developed and/or updated on the topics of illegal synthetic cannabinoids, suspicious chemical precursor transactions, methamphetamine, and fentanyl.
  • AR 1.2.2 More than 4,770, with an audience of domestic and international police, indigenous communities, Health Canada, industry, educators, and other stakeholdersFootnote 33
  • AR 1.2.3 51%
  • AR 1.2.4 Ten partnerships and/or collaborations were undertaken with domestic and international police services, leaders in Canada's chemical industry, and Canadian realtors.
  • AR 1.2.5 The RCMP coordinated a learning exchange and engaged with and provided awareness to First Nations police officers, school liaison officer, youth program leaders, educators, and various media outlets.

Theme 2: Treatment

Expected results

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

  • ER 2.1 CIHR, through the Canadian Research Initiative in Substance Misuse (CRISM), will continue to fund research to enhance prevention, harm reduction and/or treatment for people living with problematic substance use; increase research capacity in the field of problematic drug and substance use disorder; build and strengthen relationships with health care practitioners, policy makers and people with lived experience; and complete a pan-Canadian clinical trial, OPTIMA, that compares two models of care for the treatment of opioid use.

Department of Justice Canada

  • ER 2.2.1 The criminal justice system supports alternative ways of responding to the causes and consequences of offending.
  • ER 2.2.2 Increased availability of, and access to, drug treatment services and programs for youth involved in the justice system.

Performance indicators

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

  • PI 2.1 Proportion of funded research projects with a nature and scope that support CDSS' goals.Footnote 34

Department of Justice Canada

  • PI 2.2.1 Percentage of Drug Treatment Court participants retained for 6 months or longer in the court-monitored treatment program.
  • PI 2.2.2 Number of active projects funded under Youth Justice Fund's Drug Treatment component per fiscal year.

Targets

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

  • T 2.1 100%

Department of Justice Canada

  • T 2.2.1 50% of participants are retained for six months in federally funded drug Treatment Court programs.
  • T 2.2.2 The budget allocation is fully committed to support drug treatment programming for youth involved in the justice system.Footnote 35

Actual Results

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

  • AR 2.1 100%

Department of Justice Canada

Theme 3: Harm reduction

Expected results

Health Canada

  • ER 3.1.1 Increased availability of harm reduction services.
  • ER 3.1.2 Increased availability of harm reduction services.

Indigenous Services Canada

  • ER 3.2 Reduction in risk-taking behaviour among drug or substances users.

Public Health Agency of Canada

  • ER 3.3 Reduction in risk-taking behaviour among drug or substances users.

Performance indicators

Health Canada

  • PI 3.1.1 Percentage of applications for an exemption to operate a Supervised Consumption Site that received a decision within the service standard from the time the review is complete.
  • PI 3.1.2 Percentage of targeted Canadians reporting they used knowledge and skills.Footnote 37

Indigenous Services Canada

  • PI 3.2 Number of First Nations and Inuit communities that deliver harm reduction programming.Footnote 38

Public Health Agency of Canada

  • PI 3.3 Percentage decrease of sharing drug use equipment among people who use drugs.

Targets

Health Canada

  • T 3.1.1 90%
  • T 3.1.2 60%

Indigenous Services Canada

  • T 3.2 11

Public Health Agency of Canada

  • T 3.3 10% decrease

Actual Results

Health Canada

  • AR 3.1.1 91%
  • AR 3.1.2 Not applicable

Indigenous Services Canada

  • AR 3.2 not applicable

Public Health Agency of Canada

  • AR 3.3 Not applicable

Theme 4: Enforcement

Expected results

Health Canada

  • ER 4.1.1 Authorizations to perform legitimate activities with controlled substances and precursor chemicals are processed in a timely manner.
  • ER 4.1.2 Increased compliance and reduced risk of diversion of controlled substances, prescription drugs and precursor chemicals.
  • ER 4.1.3 Increased effectiveness in drug analysis.
  • ER 4.1.4 Data and research evidence on drugs and emerging drug trends are used by members of the federal Health Portfolio and their partners.

Canada Border Services Agency

  • ER 4.2.1 Continue to increase awareness and capacity to gather information and intelligence of illegal drug issues relative to the border.
  • ER 4.2.2 Continue to increase intelligence and analytical support to regional enforcement activities to interdict goods entering and leaving Canada under the CDSS.
  • ER 4.2.3 Continue to improve relationships and communication with partner agencies under the CDSS to identify opportunities and improve intelligence activities such as targeting, information sharing and laboratory analysis related to illegal drugs and other goods (such as precursor chemicals) identified under the CDSS as they relate to the border.

Canada Revenue Agency

  • ER 4.3 30 audits of taxpayers involved in the production and distribution of illegal drugs resulting in (re) assessments of $2.0 million of federal taxes.

Correctional Services Canada

  • ER 4.4 Timely case preparation and supervision of provincial offenders with a drug offence (CDSA Schedule II).

Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada.

  • ER 4.5 Given the importance of the CDSS initiative, FINTRAC will continue to work with law enforcement and intelligence agencies to ensure they receive financial intelligence related to drug production and distribution that is useful for further actions.

Global Affairs Canada

  • ER 4.6 To assist the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and the Organization of American States-Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (OAS-CICAD) to fulfill their respective mandates in the fight against drugs and transnational crime, including efforts to reduce the supply and availability of illegal drugs. In 2019-2020, GAC will increase capacity of port officials in selected countries in the Americas to intercept and seize illegal drug smuggled via legal maritime containerized cargo.

Parole Board of Canada

  • ER 4.7.1 Conditional release decisions contribute to keeping communities safe.
  • ER 4.7.2 The timely exchange of relevant information with victims, offenders, observers, other components of the criminal justice system, and the general public.

Public Prosecution Service of Canada

  • ER 4.8.1 Provision of pre-charge legal advice and litigation support, as well as the prosecution of drug offences under the CDSA in all provinces and territories regardless of which police agency investigates the alleged offences, except Quebec and New Brunswick. In these two provinces, the PPSC prosecutes only drug offences investigated by the RCMP.
  • ER 4.8.2 Provision of pre-charge legal advice and litigation support, as well as the prosecution of serious drug offences under the CDSA to which mandatory minimum penalties are applicable.

Public Safety Canada

  • ER 4.9 Coordinated enforcement action to address illegal drugs and substances.

Public Services and Procurement Canada

  • ER 4.10 Assist law enforcement agencies and prosecutors by providing forensic accounting services and expertise. These services assist in determining whether the assets identified were derived from criminal activities, thereby allowing the Crown to seize the assets and remove the financial incentives from the crime.
  • ER 4.11 The RCMP will focus its efforts to undertake investigations and initiatives focussing on the highest threats related to organized crime networks including those involved in the importation and trafficking of illegal drugs, including illegal opioids.

Performance indicators

Health Canada

  • PI 4.1.1 Overall percentage of High-Volume Regulatory Authorizations for controlled substances processed within service standards.
  • PI 4.1.2 Percentage of licensed dealers inspected that are deemed to be compliant with the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (CDSA) and its regulations.
  • PI 4.1.3 Percentage of samples analyzed within service standards (60 days or negotiated date).
  • PI 4.1.4 Number of alerts issued to clients and to provincial and territorial health authorities on newly identified potent illegal drugs in communities.

Canada Border Services Agency

  • PI 4.2 Average dollar value of goods, shipments and conveyances seized attributed to Intelligence.

Canada Revenue Agency

  • PI 4.3 80% or more of audits resulting in (re) assessments

Correctional Services Canada

  • PI 4.4.1 Total number of provincial offenders convicted of a drug offence (CDSA Schedule II) supervised by CSC.
  • PI 4.4.2 Total number of provincial offenders convicted of a drug offence (CDSA Schedule II) with a residency requirement.
  • PI 4.4.3 Total number of case preparation reports (pre- and post-release) completed for all provincial offenders.

Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada

  • PI 4.5 Total number of FINTRAC disclosures of actionable financial intelligence made to regime partners, and the number of unique disclosures of actionable financial intelligence that relate to at least one drug-related offence.

Global Affairs Canada

  • PI 4.6.1 Number of illegal drug seizures made by GAC-financed/UNODC trained Port Control Units in beneficiary countries.
  • PI 4.6.2 Volume of illegal drug seized by GAC-financed/UNODC trained Port Control Units in beneficiary countries.

Parole Board of Canada

  • PI 4.7.1 Number and proportion of provincial offenders convicted of drug offences who successfully complete parole.
  • PI 4.7.2 Percentage of individuals (i.e., general public and victims) who are satisfied with the quality of the service.

Public Prosecution Service of Canada

  • PI 4.8.1.1 Number of litigation files related to the prosecution of drug offences under the CDSA referred to the PPSC during the fiscal year.
  • PI 4.8.1.2 Number of files for which legal advice was provided by PPSC counsel.
  • PI 4.8.2.1 Number of litigation files related to the prosecution of serious drug offences under the CDSA referred to the PPSC during the fiscal year to which mandatory minimum penalties are applicable.
  • PI 4.8.2.2 Number of files for which legal advice was provided by PPSC counsel where mandatory minimum penalties are applicable.

Public Safety Canada

  • PI 4.9 Timely sharing of evidence-based knowledge and intelligence to support law enforcement actions against illegal drugs and substances.

Public Services and Procurement Canada

  • PI 4.10.1 Number of active CDSS files (projects) related to determining whether the assets of a suspect were derived from criminal activities. This is further measured by classifying the stage or status of each investigation (for example; still in legal process, proceed to trial, settled before trial or closed by client).
  • PI 4.10.2 Number of Forensic Accounting Reports produced during the fiscal year.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

  • PI 4.11.1 Number and percentage of RCMP drug production, import/export, and trafficking occurrences with a transnational nexus.Footnote 39
  • PI 4.11.2 Number and type of drug-related charges laid.Footnote 40
  • PI 4.11.3 Number and type of drug seizures, including amount of drugsFootnote 41 seized.

Targets

Health Canada

  • T 4.1.1 90%
  • T 4.1.2 TBDFootnote 42
  • T 4.1.3 95% of certificates of analysis issued within service standards or negotiated date.
  • T 4.1.4 Demand driven

Canada Border Services Agency

  • T 4.2 9:1 ratio

Canada Revenue Agency

  • T 4.3 30 audits

Correctional Services Canada

  • T 4.4.1 45 (approximately)
  • T 4.4.2 15 (approximately)
  • T 4.4.3 808

Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada

  • T 4.5 FINTRAC seeks to closely align its financial intelligence products with the needs and priorities of its investigative partners. As such, the Centre does not set specific targets for the number or types of drug-related case disclosures it produces in any fiscal year.

Global Affairs Canada

  • T 4.6.1 Illegal drug seizures are made in all beneficiary countries benefiting from GAC-financed/UNODC trained port control units.
  • T 4.6.2 At least 20 tons

Parole Board of Canada

  • T 4.7.1 100% of provincial offenders serving sentences for drug offences who are on parole are not convicted of a violent offence during their supervision period.
  • T 4.7.2 92% of individuals (i.e. general public and victims) who are satisfied with the quality of the service.

Public Prosecution Service of Canada

  • T 4.8 Targets are not applicable owing to the nature of the PPSC's workload and mandate.

Public Safety Canada

  • T 4.9 100% completion of planned coordination activities based on an integrated law enforcement work plan.

Public Services and Procurement Canada

  • T 4.10 The targets are dependent on the projects they assign to FAMG and are based on the resource capacity of the three senior forensic accounts dedicated to work with law enforcement agencies and prosecution services on CDSS files.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

  • T 4.11 Targets are not applicable as these will vary by province/territory and is based on need.

Actual Results

Health Canada

  • AR 4.1.1 95.6%
  • AR 4.1.2 77%Footnote 43
  • AR 4.1.3 99.5%
  • AR 4.1.4 106 drug alerts

Canada Border Services Agency

  • AR 4.2 26:1

Canada Revenue Agency

  • AR 4.3 22 cases resulting in $8.165M in Taxes Earned by Audit (TEBA)

Correctional Services Canada

Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada

  • AR 4.5 2,057, including 653 unique disclosures.Footnote 46

Global Affairs Canada

  • AR 4.6.1 All beneficiary countries have had successful drug seizures in 2019-20.Footnote 47
  • AR 4.6.2 At least 20 tons of illegal drugs have been seized in 2019-20.Footnote 48

Parole Board of Canada

Public Prosecution Service of CanadaFootnote 51

  • AR 4.8.1.1 7,442 litigation files related to the prosecution of drug offences under the CDSA has been referred to the PPSC.
  • AR 4.8.1.2 PPSC counsel provided legal advice on 977 files.
  • AR 4.8.2.1 190 litigation files related to the prosecution of serious drug offences under the CDSA to which mandatory minimum penalties are applicable had been referred to the PPSC.
  • AR 4.8.2.2 Legal advice was provided by PPSC counsel on 21 litigation files where mandatory minimum penalties are applicable.

Public Safety Canada

  • AR 4.9 75% Public Safety Canada participated in a range of national and international forums to share knowledge and advance best practices to reduce the illegal drug supply.Footnote 52

Public Services and Procurement Canada

  • AR 4.10.1 56 open and active CDSS investigations at the beginning of 2019-20; added 16 new investigations; 2 were closed,Footnote 53 leaving 70 open and active investigations at the end of the year
  • AR 4.10.2 Regarding the 2 closed investigations: 1 investigation went to trial where a decision was rendered, and 1 investigation was closed by the client.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

  • AR 4.11.1 8,232 RCMP drug production, import/export, and trafficking related occurrences, representing 38% of all total related occurrences.Footnote 54
  • AR 4.11.2 14,917 drug related charges laid by RCMP units; by type, this represents (excluding cannabis): 7,371 possession charges; 3,873 trafficking charges; 220 production charges; 210 import/export charges; and 3,243 cannabis related charges.
  • AR 4.11.3 27,785 drug seizure-related occurrences, with a value of $150,608,542.01.Footnote 55

Theme 5: Evidence base

Expected results

Health Canada

  • ER 5.1 Increased availability of data and research evidence on drugs and substances.

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

  • ER 5.2 Increased availability of data and research evidence on drugs and substances.

Public Health Agency of Canada

  • ER 5.3 Increase availability of national data and research evidence related to drugs and substances to support decision making.

Performance indicators

Health Canada

  • PI 5.1 Percentage of United Nations Annual Report Questionnaire completed with Canadian data.

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

  • PI 5.2.1 Percentage of grant recipients producing policy-relevant knowledge products, such as research publications, policy briefs, guidelines for policies or practice, presentations to policy audiences, and media mentions.
  • PI 5.2.2 Number of health research publications related to problematic substance use.Footnote 56

Public Health Agency of Canada

  • PI 5.3 Percentage of provinces and territories reporting.

Targets

Health Canada

  • T 5.1 90%

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

  • T 5.2.1 75%
  • T 5.2.2 100%

Public Health Agency of Canada

  • T 5.3 100%

Actual Results

Health Canada

  • AR 5.1 70%

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

  • AR 5.2.1 67%
  • AR 5.2.2 100%

Public Health Agency of Canada

Footnote 1

While cannabis is encompassed by the CDSS, federal activities, performance measures and funding amounts are reported on through a separate horizontal initiative (Implementing a Framework for the Legalization and Strict Regulation of Cannabis).

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Footnote 2

Additional federal activities to address the opioid crisis are reported through a separate horizontal initiative ( Addressing the Opioid Crisis).

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Footnote 3

The Total federal funding allocated has been decreased to $641,968,972 as $19,497,063 has been reallocated through the 2018-19 Addressing the Opioid Crisis submission.

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Footnote 4

Health Canada Internal Services include $2,436,740 for the Lead Role.

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Footnote 5

The Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP) consolidated funding is reported under the Prevention theme and continues to contribute to both the Prevention and Treatment themes.

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Footnote 6

The Total Allocation Funding for Theme1: Prevention activities has been decreased to $130,490,598 as $1,166,430 has been reallocated through the 2018-19 Addressing the Opioid Crisis submission. The Expected Results, Performance Indicators and Targets have been removed.

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Footnote 7

The Total Allocation Funding for Theme 3: Harm reduction has decreased to $18,415,181 as $17,276,836 has been reallocated through the 2018-19 Addressing the Opioid Crisis submission.

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Footnote 8

The Total Allocation Funding for Internal Services has decreased to $5,117,712 as $481,164 has been reallocated through the 2018-19 Addressing the Opioid Crisis submission.

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Footnote 9

The Total Allocation Funding for the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) for Evidence Base activities have been decreased to $281,720 as $562,883 has been reallocated through the 2018-19 Addressing the Opioid Crisis submission. The Expected Results, Performance Indicators and Targets will be removed in the 2021-22 Departmental Plan CDSS Horizontal Initiative.

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Footnote 10

The Total Allocation Funding for Internal Services has decreased to $45,647 as $9,750 has been reallocated through the 2018-19 Addressing the Opioid Crisis submission.

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Footnote 11

Health Canada will review and update the Horizontal Initiatives for shared outcomes performance indicator(s), target(s) and date(s) to achieve target during Fall/Winter 2020-21.

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Footnote 12

Health Canada will review and update the Theme 1 performance indicator(s), target(s) and date(s) to achieve target during Fall/Winter 2020-21.

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Footnote 13

This amount represents the global SUAP CDSS budget. The SUAP does not allocate or track funding by CDSS pillar/theme. SUAP funding will be allocated across the prevention and treatment theme areas.

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Footnote 14

This amount represents the global SUAP CDSS budget for 2019-20. As above, there are no specific prevention and treatment budget allocations in the SUAP. Funding will be allocated to both prevention and treatment themes based on the results of the current 2018-19 call for proposals.

Return to footnote 14 referrer

Footnote 15

The Total Allocation Funding for Problematic Prescription Drug Use (PPDU) has decreased to $16,553,028 as $1,166,430 has been reallocated through the 2018-19 Addressing the Opioid Crisis submission.

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Footnote 16

Health Canada will review and update the Theme 2 performance indicator(s), target(s) and date(s) to achieve target during Fall/Winter 2020-21.

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Footnote 17

Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP) performance indicator, target, date to achieve target will be reviewed with other CDSS partners in Fall/Winter 2020-21.

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Footnote 18

This indicator has been retired. Indigenous Services Canada Work is continuing to work with other CDSS partners to review and update the shared performance indicator(s).

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Footnote 19

This indicator has been retired. Work is currently underway with other CDSS partners to review and update the shared performance indicator(s).

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Footnote 20

Due to limited data availability as a result of COVID-19, the [percentage %] decrease of sharing drug use equipment amongst people who use drugs is not able to be measured at this time. This performance indicator has been replaced by "Percentage decrease in the number of people who use drugs who report sharing drug use equipment" in the 2020-21 Departmental Plan CDSS Horizontal Initiative. Results for 2019-20 and 2020-21 will be reported in the 2020-21 Departmental Results Report.

Return to footnote 20 referrer

Footnote 21

Project-level performance data were to be reported to the Public Health Agency of Canada at the end of fiscal year 2019-20 once the two-year projects had been completed. The COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on funding recipients who work with vulnerable populations. Given the pandemic hit as organizations were entering their fiscal year end and beginning to conduct their data roll up activities, their ability to report on their results was compromised. As a result, funding recipients were not able to report on their 2019-2020 results in time to be captured in this report.

Return to footnote 21 referrer

Footnote 22

The Total Allocation Funding for Strengthening the Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy has decreased to $18,415,181 as $7,276,836 has been reallocated through the 2018-19 Addressing the Opioid Crisis submission.

Return to footnote 22 referrer

Footnote 23

The 2019-20 Planned Spending for Strengthening the Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy has decreased to $4,893,952 as a result of reallocating $1,790,152 through the 2018-19 Addressing the Opioid Crisis submission and an inclusion of $1,700,000 carried over from 2018-19.

Return to footnote 23 referrer

Footnote 24

The Total Allocation Funding for Strengthening the Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy has decreased to $0 as $10,000,000 has been reallocated through the 2018-19 Addressing the Opioid Crisis submission.

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Footnote 25

The 2019-20 Planned Spending for Strengthening the Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy has decreased to $0 as a result of reallocating $2,000,000 through the 2018-19 Addressing the Opioid Crisis submission and an inclusion of $1,700,000 carried over from 2018-19.

Return to footnote 25 referrer

Footnote 26

Health Canada will review and update the Theme performance indicator(s), target(s), date(s) to achieve target during Fall/Winter 2020-21.

Return to footnote 26 referrer

Footnote 27

Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP) performance indicator, target, date to achieve target will be reviewed with other CDSS partners in Fall/Winter 2020-21.

Return to footnote 27 referrer

Footnote 28

The Total Allocation Funding for the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) for Evidence Base activities have been decreased to $281,720 as $562,883 has been reallocated through the 2018-19 Addressing the Opioid Crisis submission. The Actual Results will not be reported in the 2019-20 Departmental Results Report CDSS Horizontal Initiative. As well, the Expected Result, Performance Indicator and Target will be removed in the 2021-22 Departmental Plan CDSS Horizontal Initiative.

Return to footnote 28 referrer

Footnote 29

This performance indicator has been replaced by "Number of awareness products" in the 2020-21 Departmental Plan CDSS Horizontal Initiative.

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Footnote 30

This performance indicator has been replaced by "Number of stakeholders reached" in the 2020-21 Departmental Plan CDSS Horizontal Initiative

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Footnote 31

This performance indicator has been replaced by "Number of partnerships and collaborations" in the 2020-21 Departmental Plan CDSS Horizontal Initiative

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Footnote 32

The target was not met in 2019-2020 due to Health Canada's continued focus on the inspection of pharmacies with a history of non-compliance. This risk-based, targeted inspection approach led to a lower percentage of industry compliance than the planned result. Health Canada will continue to target pharmacies with a higher risk of product diversion to protect the health and safety of Canadians.

Return to footnote 32 referrer

Footnote 33

The 2019-20 numbers are much higher than those reported in previous years given this sum includes internal website downloads relating to several synthetic drug products. As awareness of this website has increased, so too has its use.

Return to footnote 33 referrer

Footnote 34

This performance indicator has been replaced by "Percentage of funded research projects with a nature and scope that support CDSS' goals" in the 2020-21 Departmental Plan CDSS Horizontal Initiative.

Return to footnote 34 referrer

Footnote 35

This target has been replaced by "100% of the budget allocation is committed to support drug treatment programming for youth involved in the justice system" in the 2020-21 Departmental Plan CDSS Horizontal Initiative.

Return to footnote 35 referrer

Footnote 36

Based on available information in Drug Treatment Court Information System (DTCIS).

Return to footnote 36 referrer

Footnote 37

Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP) performance indicator and target will be reviewed with other CDSS partners in Fall/Winter 2020-21.

Return to footnote 37 referrer

Footnote 38

This indicator has been retired. Indigenous Services Canada Work is continuing to work with other CDSS partners to review and update the shared performance indicator(s).

Return to footnote 38 referrer

Footnote 39

This performance indicator has been updated to remove reference to "FSOC units" so that results can be presented for RCMP as a whole.

Return to footnote 39 referrer

Footnote 40

This performance indicator has been updated to remove reference to "FSOC units" so that results can be presented for RCMP as a whole. The term "investigations" has been changed to "occurrences" because not all occurrences result in an investigation.

Return to footnote 40 referrer

Footnote 41

This performance indicator has been updated to remove reference to "FSOC units" so that results can be presented for RCMP as a whole.

Return to footnote 41 referrer

Footnote 42

A target has not yet been established for this indicator. The program changed to a risk-based approach for planned inspection activities in December 2019, and requires a complete year of data to assess in order to establish the target.

Return to footnote 42 referrer

Footnote 43

This result was based on a total of 31 inspections conducted between December 2019 and March 2020, at which point inspections were temporarily suspended due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Return to footnote 43 referrer

Footnote 44

Represents monthly average.

Return to footnote 44 referrer

Footnote 45

Represents monthly average.

Return to footnote 45 referrer

Footnote 46

These case disclosures relate to suspicions of money laundering or terrorist financing where the predicate offence is believed to be drug distribution or production.

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Footnote 47

As part of the larger Annual Voluntary Contribution (AVC) Envelope earmarked for projects with OAS and UNODC, the GAC/Anti-Crime Capacity Building Program (ACCBP) utilized CDSS funds for seven projects (Ukraine Container Control, Latin American Container Control Program, SMART Labs, and Strengthening Gender Equality in Counter Drug Law Enforcement Agencies).

Return to footnote 47 referrer

Footnote 48

Technical assistance and technology provided by ACCBP to the Ukraine Container Control Program resulted in the seizure of over 10.6 tons of illegal narcotics, along with 1,123 pills and psychotropic substances; and the Latin American Container Control Program resulted in the seizure of over 49.6 tons of cocaine as well as 4,163 liters of precursor chemicals.

Return to footnote 48 referrer

Footnote 49

Data is pulled directly from the Offender Management System (OMS)/Integrated decision System (IDS). While data will be collected on an ongoing basis, it will be reported on annually.

Return to footnote 49 referrer

Footnote 50

A satisfaction survey will be conducted every five years. A survey was conducted in 2016-17, at the time of service delivery, which measured the satisfaction of those who access PBC services as observers at hearings. The next questionnaire is planned for 2022-23.

Return to footnote 50 referrer

Footnote 51

The information excludes any charges laid under the Cannabis Act which would have been previously included under the CDSA.

Return to footnote 51 referrer

Footnote 52

This includes engagement through the Canada-United States Action Plan on Opioids and the Organization of American States' Commission on Drug Abuse Control. In early December 2019, Public Safety Canada and other federal departments participated in the 4th North American Dialogue on Drug Policy (NADD) in Washington, D.C. The meeting helped advance discussions with Mexico and the United States on concrete actions NADD partners can take to address the opioid crisis. Similarly, in March 2020, officials participated in the 63rd session of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs to advance supply reduction policy efforts internationally. Information obtained by the Department was used to develop supply reduction policy options. In 2019-20, the Department needed to allocate a portion of funds to other pressing community safety priorities of the Government, notably the development of firearms regulations.

Return to footnote 52 referrer

Footnote 53

The FAMG file closing process occurs in April/May in consultation with Law Enforcement partner clients. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the closing of FAMG offices across the country, client consultation did not occur and the file closing process was postponed. It is expected that the number of closed files next year (2021-22) will be proportionately higher than normal.

Return to footnote 53 referrer

Footnote 54

Note that transnational refers to occurrences with an international nexus, and does not include those with an inter-provincial nexus.

Return to footnote 54 referrer

Footnote 55

This number reflects all RCMP investigations related to illegal drug production and distribution. Drug categories include: amphetamines; anabolic steroids; cannabis; Catha; cocaine; GBL; GHB; hallucinogens; ketamine; opioids; piperazine; precursers; sedatives and tranquilizers; other non-illegal drugs and prescription drugs; and some unknown/other categories.

Return to footnote 55 referrer

Footnote 56

This performance indicator has been replaced by "Percentage of health research publications related to problematic substance use" in the 2020-21 Departmental Plan CDSS Horizontal Initiative.

Return to footnote 56 referrer

Footnote 57

The Total Allocation Funding for the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) for Evidence Base activities has been decreased to $281,720 as $562,883 has been reallocated through the 2018-19 Addressing the Opioid Crisis submission. The Actual Results will not be reported in the 2019-20 Departmental Results Report CDSS Horizontal Initiative. As well, the Expected Result, Performance Indicator and Target will be removed in the 2021-22 Departmental Plan CDSS Horizontal Initiative.

Return to footnote 57 referrer

Chemicals Management Plan

General information

Name of horizontal initiative

Chemicals Management Plan

Lead department

Health Canada

Environment and Climate Change Canada

Federal partner organization(s)

Public Health Agency of Canada

Start date of the horizontal initiative

2007-08

End date of the horizontal initiative

2020-21

Description of the horizontal initiative

Originally launched in 2006, the Chemicals Management Plan (CMP) was designed to address substances of concern in Canada to protect human health and the environment.

Jointly managed by Health Canada and Environment and Climate Change Canada, the CMP brings all existing federal chemical programs together under a single strategy. This integrated approach allows the Government of Canada to address various routes of exposure to chronic and acute hazardous substances. It relies on authorities set out in a full suite of federal laws, which include the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (CCPSA), the Food and Drugs Act (F&DA), the Pest Control Products Act (PCPA), the Fisheries Act and the Forestry Act.

The third phase (CMP3) includes both substance groupings and single substance assessments. Similar to CMP2, groupings are created where possible to gain efficiencies in the assessment process. Where groupings are not possible, single substance assessments are conducted.

Integration across government programs remains critical since many remaining substances are found in consumer, cosmetic, health, drug and other products. In addition to releases from products, substances may be released at various points along other areas of their life cycle, such as during manufacturing and disposal.

The same core functions that have been part of phases one and two continue in phase three of the CMP: risk assessment; risk management; compliance promotion and enforcement; research; monitoring and surveillance; stakeholder engagement and risk communications; and, policy and program management. Information gathering is a key activity undertaken to support these core functions.

For more information, see the Government of Canada's Chemical Substances Portal.

Governance structures

In the overall delivery of the CMP, Health Canada and Environment and Climate Change Canada have a shared responsibility in attaining objectives and results. In meeting their obligations pursuant to the CMP, the Departments fulfill their responsibilities through established internal departmental governance structures, as well as a joint CMP governance structure to address shared responsibilities. Efforts are also made to harmonize vertical and horizontal performance reporting indicators (e.g., CMP Performance Management Strategy, the CMP contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy, etc.) for CMP.

The CMP has a horizontal governance framework, which ensures integration, co-ordination, joint decision-making and clear accountabilities. Under the CMP Integrated Horizontal Governance Framework, the joint CMP Assistant Deputy Ministers Committee (CMP ADM Committee) reports to both the Health Canada and Environment and Climate Change Canada Deputy Ministers.

The CMP ADM Committee is supported by a Director General (DG) Committee. The CMP DGs Committee consists of DGs from all partner programs within Health Canada and Environment and Climate Change Canada, and provides strategic direction, oversight and a challenge function for the CMP's overall implementation. The CMP DGs also play a lead role in directing, monitoring and providing a challenge function for the core elements of the CMP, namely the delivery of the chemicals agenda under CEPA. This DG-level committee is supported by the CMP Steering Committee, which is a Director-level committee intended to provide oversight on CMP issues related to the CEPA chemicals agenda.

Total federal funding allocated from start to end date (dollars)

$1,308,179,400

Total federal planned spending to date (dollars)

$1,209,522,110

Total federal actual spending to date (dollars)

$1,169,292,888 (includes Phases I, II and Phase III)

Date of last renewal of the horizontal initiative

October 2014

Total federal funding allocated at the last renewal and source of funding (dollars)

Phase III, $493,286,450; Source of funding: Budget 2015

Additional federal funding received after the last renewal (dollars)

Not applicable

Total planned spending since the last renewal

$394,629,160

Total actual spending since the last renewal

$393,207,740

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

Not applicable as the CMP program is scheduled to sunset in March 2021. The last evaluation was completed in 2019-20.

Performance highlights

Summary

In 2019-20, Health Canada (HC) and Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) continued to assess and manage the potential health and ecological risks from priority existing substances. Screening Assessment Reports and Risk Management Strategies for most priorities identified in a publicly available work plan were completed, and risk management measures continued to be developed, implemented, tracked and monitored. New substance notifications were also assessed within their mandated timelines, and risk management instruments were developed within mandated timeframes as required for substances considered harmful to human health and/or the environment.

HC continued to conduct risk assessments as well as develop and implement risk management measures to address risks posed by harmful substances in foods and food packaging materials, consumer products, cosmetics and drinking water while work continued on the re-evaluation of previously approved pesticides according to legislated initiation requirements under the Pest Control Products Act.

In 2019-20, Health Canada continued developing and publishing drinking water quality guidelines. These guidelines are used by all federal, provincial and territorial jurisdictions in Canada as the basis for establishing their drinking water requirements.

The program continued to conduct research and monitoring programs to address existing and emerging substances of concern to inform risk assessment and risk management activities and to address outstanding questions and knowledge gaps related to the effects and exposure of chemical substances to humans.

Compliance promotion strategies and enforcement plans were also developed and delivered for CMP substances. The focus in 2019-20 was on delivering compliance promotion and enforcement activities for the highest priority instruments as determined by the compliance and enforcement priority setting processes.

In the areas of stakeholder engagement and public outreach, the Healthy Home social marketing campaign on chemicals and pollutants in and around the home, which was launched in late 2018-19, was actively rolled out in 2019-20 and promoted through a combination of Health Canada and digital influencer social media, national media (print and radio) and in-person events across the country. The Healthy Home web site makes it easier for Canadians to find CMP information that is relevant to the general public and includes general safety messaging along with plain language information on CMP substances of concern.

The most recent evaluation found that the CMP had made progress in all functional activity areas, including risk assessment, risk management, stakeholder engagement and public outreach, research, monitoring and surveillance, and compliance and enforcement. The evaluation concluded that there was some evidence of Canadians and stakeholder groups accessing and using CMP information to avoid or minimize risks posed by harmful substances, as well as some evidence demonstrating industry compliance with certain risk management measures. There was limited evidence to support conclusions about whether the CMP had reduced the potential for exposure to harmful substances, although biomonitoring and environmental monitoring trend data is beginning to emerge.

Performance Details

Risk Assessment/Risk Management

In 2019-20, ECCC and HC published 28 Draft Screening Assessment Reports (dSARs) (representing 253 substances) and nine Final Screening Assessment Reports (fSARs) (representing 35 substances).

In 2019-20, HC's Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) completed three proposed re-evaluation decisions (risk assessment) for consultation on old pesticides (those registered prior to 1995), seven cyclical re-evaluations (those registered after 1995) and three special reviews. The planned publication of six proposed decisions in March 2020 were delayed as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

In 2019-20, HC's PMRA completed four re-evaluation decisions for older pesticides (those registered prior to 1995). Eight final decisions for cyclical re-evaluations and one special review were also completed. One older pesticide re-evaluation decision and three cyclical re-evaluation decisions on the published re-evaluation and special review work plan were also completed ahead of schedule.

Targeted risk management activities were published in 2019-20 for substances that were deemed harmful to human health and/or the environment. In total, there were seven risk management instruments put in place to manage more than 64 toxic substances, including six proposed risk management instruments and one final risk management (RM) instrument. Eight RM Scope documents and three RM Approach documents were also published, covering more than 174 substances.

In 2019-20, ECCC and HC collaboratively developed and finalized a Performance Measurement Evaluation Strategy on the Risk Management of Toxic Substances, in response to the Commissioner for the Environment and Sustainable Development's 2018 audit. The Strategy details the approach to performance measurement, including the selection of substances, expected results and how information will be shared with Canadians. Over time, implementation of the Strategy is expected to provide Canadians with greater confidence in ECCC and HC's efforts to manage toxic substances.

In 2019-20, 409 new substance notifications were received pursuant to section 81 of CEPA and the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers) and 379 were assessed. Seven Notices were published applying the Significant New Activity (SNAc) provisions to seven substances; seven Ministerial Conditions came into force on five new substances. Three SNAc Notices of Intent (NOIs) were issued for existing substances on a total of 111 substances.

During 2019-20, 27 notifications of new animate products of biotechnology were received and 18 were assessed under the New Substances Notification Regulations (Organisms). While no SNAc Notices or ministerial conditions were issued for new living organisms in 2019-20, an NOI proposing to apply the SNAc provisions to two existing living organisms was published.

HC also contributed to risk management activities related to drinking water quality in 2019-20, publishing 10 final and four draft Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality online. These are used by all jurisdictions in Canada to inform their regulatory requirements.

The Consumer Product Safety Program (CPSP) continued to manage potential risks related to chemicals in consumer products and cosmetics. The program completed its cyclical enforcement projects for eight product groups, which included 174 inspections and 180 samples, leading to 23 recalls. Program risk assessors and risk managers drafted two dSARs (parabens, and lotus corniculatus) that were published in 2019-20, as well as authored two dSARs (Sucrose Acetate Isobutyrate and triclocarban) and one FSAR (talc) which are planned to be published in 2020-21. Moreover, CPSP provided cosmetic notification data to support the assessment for a number of CMP substances. The Product Safety Laboratory developed methods and completed a survey to quantify chloro-phosphate flame retardants in consumer products. The lab also completed two surveys to identify chemical compositions to support the risk assessment of consumer products and chemicals (diethanolamine (DEA)/cocamide DEA and terpenes and terpineol oils).

The Health Products and Food Branch of HC continued to provide information to support the development of CMP screening assessments as well as provide a review function for food-related sections of those assessments. It also continued its commitment to re-evaluate and assess food additives, food contaminants, other food ingredients and food packaging materials for which CMP screening assessments and new science identified potential risks for consumers and where CMP assessments identified food as a contributing/main source of exposure.

The Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch (HECSB) and the Regulatory Operations and Enforcement Branch (ROEB) of HC continued to develop Human Health Soil Quality Guidelines to support the development of Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) Canadian Soil quality Guidelines for the Protection of Environmental and Human Health. Guidelines for perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and lead were finalized and submitted to CCME for publication and public review. HECSB and ROEB are also developing Soil Screening Values for a suite of energetic substances.

Stakeholder Engagement and Public Outreach

Stakeholder engagement activities delivered in 2019-20 focussed on targeted stakeholders in order to facilitate information sharing. The CMP Stakeholder Advisory Council (SAC) held one meeting in 2019-20. The purpose of the Council is to obtain advice and feedback from stakeholders regarding implementation of the CMP and to foster dialogue between stakeholders and the government to address any related concerns. A vacancy on SAC was filled in 2019-20 with an occupational health specialist. A multi-stakeholder meeting was also held in 2019-20 to allow for a broader representation of interested stakeholders to participate in consultations on current and future CMP topics.

The CMP Science Committee continues to provide a strong science foundation to the CMP by enabling external science professionals from national and international sources to share their expertise with HC and ECCC. The Science Committee met in June 2019 to discuss the topic "New Approaches for Integrating Chemical Fate and, Spatial and Temporal Scales in Exposure Assessment" and in February 2020 to discuss the topic "Considerations for Identifying Potential Risks from Exposure to Chemicals in the Workplace."

The program managed a rigorous posting schedule for the Chemical Substances Website content on Canada.ca to ensure the public had the opportunity to participate in CMP.

Building upon the previous year's launch of the Healthy Home campaign, social media posts on Facebook and Twitter were issued throughout the year to provide Canadians with tips on how to protect their families from chemicals and pollutants within the home. The Department partnered with parenting digital influencers to further promote the Healthy Home campaign and spread the message about household chemical risks and how parents can protect their families. Social media posts on Facebook and Twitter were issued throughout the year to inform Canadians of CMP assessment results in plain language for high profile substances of concern.

Public outreach activities (e.g., trade shows, workshops, learning events, etc.) were conducted across the country to increase Canadians' awareness of the health risks of chemicals in and around the home and provide information for them to take action to protect their health and that of vulnerable populations. Across Canada, more than 20,000 Canadians attended such events, including numerous healthcare professionals and early childhood educators who act as influencers and further disseminate environmental health information through their professional networks. Parents, new Canadians and Indigenous Peoples were also among the attendees, providing important representation from vulnerable populations.

Public outreach activities continued to be enhanced through the development of new outreach tools using a variety of technologies such as Virtual Reality and video animation. HC Regional Offices also began work on initiatives to explore alternative, virtual delivery formats to replace in-person workshops and learning events.

Research

Research at HC continued to address CMP3 priorities identified under the following themes: a) Nanomaterials; b) Integrated Hazard Characterization and Exposure Assessments for CMP3 priority chemicals, mixtures or CEPA substances; c) Monitoring and Surveillance of CMP priority chemicals; and, d) Methods and Tools Development for the assessment of CMP3 priority chemicals, mixtures or CEPA substances.

In 2019-20, one targeted research project was carried out to address short-term data needs for risk assessment to help meet 2020 CMP commitments. In addition, 30 research and monitoring and surveillance projects were conducted to support CMP3 priority substances in collaboration with RA and RM and to support key scientific regulatory areas. Data generated from CMP research projects and monitoring and surveillance projects were used to support the publication of eight DSARs.

At ECCC, 19 new research projects were initiated in fiscal year 2019-20. These projects will generate new knowledge to support risk assessment and risk management decision-making on priority substance, such as perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PCFAs) and perfluoroalkane sulfonates (PFSAs), Organic Flame Retardants, selected Rare Earth Elements, metals mixtures, textile mill effluents, benzophenones and nanomaterials.

Monitoring and Surveillance

HC and ECCC continued to conduct monitoring programs to address existing and emerging chemicals of concern, and to inform risk assessment needs and risk management activities. At ECCC, a total of 20 substances and/or groups of substances were measured in select media: fresh water, sediments, fish, bird eggs, ambient air, municipal wastewater, and biosolids.

At HC, the Maternal-Infant Research on Environmental Chemicals (MIREC) continued the assessment of prenatal exposure to chemicals and established national estimates of maternal and fetal exposures. In 2018, a follow-up study called MIREC-ENDO started to study the effects of prenatal exposure to environmental chemicals on puberty and metabolic function in the child, as well as maternal health. In 2019-20, 277 MIREC families were recruited to take part to the MIREC-ENDO study. The goal is to recruit 1,000 MIREC families by March 2021.

In summer 2019, a study was conducted to generate biomonitoring data from DEET, a common name for N,N-Diethyl-m-toluamide, an active ingredient in personal insect repellents, used by children in a camp setting. This study complements other HC studies that measure chemical exposures in children from typical use, will provide a better understanding of Canadian children's exposure to DEET, and will inform any future recommendations.

In November 2019, the Fifth Report on Human Biomonitoring of Environmental Chemicals in Canada was released providing human biomonitoring results from cycle 5 of the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS). The report included data for 99 environmental chemicals (e.g., alternate plasticizers, pesticides, and VOCs) in samples collected from approximately 5,800 Canadians between the ages of three and 79 years at 16 sites across Canada in 2016-17. The report provides important new knowledge to our understanding of Canadians' exposure to chemicals, including measurements of bisphenol A (BPA), metals, plasticizers, parabens, perfluoroalkyl substances and pesticides. In addition, sample collection for cycle 6 of the CHMS was completed in December 2019, and a project was initiated to analyze CHMS biobank samples to meet near-term data needs of stakeholders. Both ECCC and HC contribute to the Northern Contaminants Program (NCP) led by Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada. Four human biomonitoring and health project proposals were funded in 2019-20 under the NCP.

Information Gathering

HC and ECCC continue to conduct information gathering activities with industry to understand commercial use, import and manufacture of chemical substances, which help to inform prioritization, risk assessment, risk management, and performance measurement. The CMP information gathering approaches have evolved over time to include a range of mechanisms from the use of voluntary approaches and alternative data sources to targeted approaches. In 2019-20, voluntary surveys were conducted for Methylethyl ketone oxime (MEKO)/Ethyl Benzene to inform the performance measurement of the MEKO code of practice and to determine if SNAc provisions are needed for ethylbenzene. Additionally, a voluntary survey was conducted for Alkylbenzene sulfonates (ABS) and their derivatives to inform risk assessment activities.

Compliance and Enforcement

Compliance promotion activities focused on pollution, including the release of toxic substances to air, water or land, and the import and export of hazardous waste that presents a risk to the environment and/or human health. These activities aimed to increase voluntary compliance with regulatory and non-regulatory instruments, thereby mitigating consequential enforcement actions. ECCC conducted 913 inspections related to CMP regulations and issued 229 enforcement measures.

In 2019-20, compliance promotion activities were carried out for regulatory and non-regulatory instruments related to CMP substances. 11,414 known or potential regulatees received compliance promotion awareness materials and 6,132 stakeholders contacted compliance promotion officers for clarification of regulatory requirements and/or additional information.

Public Health Agency of Canada

During 2019-20, the Public Health Agency of Canada (the Agency) Environmental Health Officers (EHOs) continued their risk-based inspection program to identify and address human health risks associated with water, food and sanitation on passenger conveyances such as aircraft, trains, cruise ships and ferries. The Agency conducts inspections to measure compliance with the Department of Health Act, the Potable Water on Board Trains, Vessels, Aircraft and Buses Regulations as well as food safety provisions of the Food and Drugs Act.

Ninety-six percent (96%) of conveyance and facility operators successfully met public health requirements during or in response to 332 inspections. The number of inspections completed compared to previous years was reduced as a result of a shift in focus of Agency activities towards the COVID-19 response, In addition to completing inspections and providing guidance to partners and stakeholder groups, EHOs have provided emergency services and support in response to the COVID-19 global pandemic.

Contact information

Health Canada

Suzanne Leppinen
Director, Chemicals and Environmental Health Management Bureau
Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch
Suzanne.Leppinen@canada.ca
613-941-8071

Environmental and Climate Change Canada

Thomas Kruidenier
Acting Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement
Science and Technology Branch
Thomas.kruidenier@canada.ca
819-938-5086

Christina Paradiso
Executive Director, Chemicals Management Division
Environmental Protection Branch
Christina.Paradiso@canada.ca
819-938-4590

Shared Outcomes

Performance information

Horizontal initiative overview

Name of horizontal initiative Total federal funding allocated since the last renewal 2019-20 Planned spending
2019-20 Actual spending
Horizontal initiative shared outcome(s) 2019-20
Performance indicator(s)
2019-20
Target(s)
Date to achieve target 2019-20
Actual results
Chemicals Management Plan $493,286,450 $98,657,290 $99,864,020 Reduced threats to health and the environment from harmful substances. Long-term risk of a selected group of harmful substances where risk management actions have been put in place. Downward trend - This is a long-term outcome with no specific targets. March 31, 2028 (See text below)
SO-AR1
Risk management measures reduce the potential for exposure to harmful substances. Exposure or release levels of a select group of harmful substances where risk management measures have been put in place. (Substance-based Performance Measurement). Downward trend - This is a long-term outcome with no specific targets. March 31, 2022 (See text below)
SO-AR2
Canadians use the information (that meets their needs on the risks and safe use of substances of concern) to avoid or minimize risks posed by substances of concern. (i) Percentage of Canadians taking appropriate actions to address risks (targeted stakeholders/intermediaries). (i) 80% (i) March 31, 2022 97%
(ii) Percentage of Canadians taking appropriate actions to address risks (general public). (ii) TBD (ii) TBD
(Public Opinion Research administered every 3-5 years)
98%

SO-AR1: Over the duration of the CMP, significant investments have been and continue to be made towards measuring the final outcome in a meaningful manner. Specific to 2019-20, and building on the biomonitoring surveillance data collected as part of the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS), a retrospective public health focused pilot project has been developed with Statistics Canada. The pilot project will begin in 2020 with the goal to identify potential temporal trends in all 201 substances that were studied in the five cycles of the CHMS by linking biomonitoring data with critical health and diagnostic information from provincial medical records. Preliminary analysis is expected to be completed by end of the 2020-21 fiscal year.

SO-AR2: Work is ongoing to monitor the extent to which the Program's risk management activities are reducing the potential for exposure to harmful substances. In 2019-20, a Performance Measurement Strategy for the risk management of toxic substances was developed, which will be used to determine whether risk management actions have collectively met substance specific objectives. The evaluations for performance were also completed for Bisphenol A, Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDEs), Lead, Mercury, Isoprene, Pigment Red 3 and MEKO.

Theme 1 horizontal initiative activities

Departments Link to the department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since the last renewal 2019–20
Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity
2019–20
Actual spending for each horizontal initiative activity
2019–20
Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s)
2019–20
Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s)
2019–20
Horizontal initiative activity target(s)
Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target 2019–20
Actual result(s)
Health Canada Health Impacts of Chemicals Health Products:
Risk Assessment
$6,136,645 $1,227,329 $1,030,549 ER 1.1 PI 1.1.1 T 1.1.1 March 31, 2020 AR 1.1.1
Food Safety and Nutrition:
Risk Assessment
$6,186,965 $1,237,393 $881,617 ER 1.1 PI 1.1.2 T 1.1.2 March 31, 2020 AR 1.1.2
Env. Risks to Health:
Risk Assessment
$51,766,940 $10,353,388 $9,981,045 ER 1.1 PI 1.1.3 T 1.1.3 March 31, 2020 AR 1.1.3
ER 1.1 PI 1.1.4 T 1.1.4 March 31, 2020 AR 1.1.4
Consumer Product and Workplace Hazardous Materials:
Risk Assessment
$12,098,165 $2,419,633 $1,853,603 ER 1.1 PI 1.1.3 T 1.1.3 March 31, 2020 AR 1.1.3
Health Products:
Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement
$4,251,945 $850,390 $1,065,380 ER 1.2 PI 1.2.1 T 1.2.1 March 31, 2020 AR 1.2.1
Food Safety and Nutrition:
Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement
$5,901,575 $1,180,315 $1,175,707 ER 1.2 PI 1.2.1 T 1.2.1 March 31, 2020 AR 1.2.1
Env. Risks to Health:
Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement
$35,431,185 $7,086,237 $7,293,956 ER 1.2 PI 1.2.1 T 1.2.1 March 31, 2020 AR 1.2.1
ER 1.3 PI 1.3 T 1.3 March 31, 2020 AR 1.3
Consumer Product and Workplace Hazardous Materials:
Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement
$12,748,975 $2,549,795 $2,912,904 ER 1.2 PI 1.2.1 T 1.2.1 March 31, 2020 AR 1.2.1
Health Products:
Research
- - - N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Food Safety and Nutrition:
Research
$3,476,195 $695,239 $699,627 ER 1.4 PI 1.4 T 1.4 March 31, 2020 AR 1.4
Env. Risks to Health:
Research
$49,822,575 $9,964,515 $10,850,363 ER 1.4 PI 1.4 T 1.4 March 31, 2020 AR 1.4
Health Products:
Monitoring and Surveillance
- - - N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Food Safety and Nutrition:
Monitoring and Surveillance
$4,757,430 $951,486 $1,162,100 ER 1.5 PI 1.5 T 1.5 March 31, 2020 AR 1.5
Env. Risks to Health:
Monitoring and Surveillance
$49,298,520 $9,859,704 $12,215,830 ER 1.5 PI 1.5 T 1.5 March 31, 2020 AR 1.5
Food Safety and Nutrition:
Stakeholder Engagement and Risk Communications
$848,425 $169,685 $141,446 ER 1.6 PI 1.6 T 1.6 March 31, 2020 AR 1.6
Env. Risks to Health:
Stakeholder Engagement and Risk Communications
$14,076,085 $2,815,217 $2,359,272 ER 1.6 PI 1.6 T 1.6 March 31, 2020 AR 1.6
Env. Risks to Health:
Policy and Program Management
$11,041,590 $2,208,318 $2,642,544 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Pesticides Pesticides:
Risk Assessment
$22,817,180 $4,563,436 $4,828,597 ER 1.1 PI 1.1.5 T 1.1.5 March 31, 2020 AR 1.1.5
Pesticides:
Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement
$4,232,080 $846,416 $645,953 ER 1.2 PI 1.2.2 T 1.2.2 March 31, 2020 AR 1.2.2
Pesticides:
Research
- - - N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Internal Services – Health Canada $34,979,720 $6,995,943 $6,995,943 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Public Health Agency of Canada Border Health Security Border Health:
Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement
$15,914,255 $3,182,851 $2,543,044 ER 2.1 PI 2.1 T 2.1 March 31, 2020 AR 2.1
Environment and Climate Change Canada Substances and Waste Management Substances and Waste Management:
Risk Assessment
$19,367,335 $3,873,467 $3,873,467 ER 3.1 PI 3.1.1 T 3.1.1 March 31, 2020 AR 3.1.1
PI 3.1.2 T 3.1.2 AR 3.1.2
Substances and Waste Management:
Risk Management
$67,624,765 $13,524,953 $13,524,953 ER 3.2 PI 3.2 T 3.2 March 31, 2020 AR 3.2
Substances and Waste Management:
Research
$9,420,790 $1,884,158 $1,884,158 ER 3.3 PI 3.3 T 3.3 March 31, 2020 AR 3.3
Substances and Waste Management:
Monitoring and Surveillance
$24,399,675 $4,879,935 $4,038,190 ER 3.4 PI 3.4 T 3.4 March 31, 2020 AR 3.4
Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – Pollution:
Compliance Promotion
$4,272,045 $854,409 $798,807 ER 3.5 PI 3.5 T 3.5 March 31, 2020 AR 3.5
Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – Pollution:
Enforcement
$11,075,675 $2,215,135 $2,197,022 ER 3.6 PI 3.6 T 3.6 March 31, 2020 AR 3.6
Internal Services – ECCC $11,339,715 $2,267,943 $2,267,943 -
Total for all federal organizations $493,286,450 $98,657,290 $99,864,020

Expected results

Health Canada

Public Health Agency of Canada

Environment and Climate Change Canada

Performance indicators

Health Canada

Public Health Agency of Canada

Environment and Climate Change Canada

Targets

Health Canada

Public Health Agency of Canada

Environment and Climate Change Canada

Actual Results

Health Canada

Public Health Agency of Canada

Environment and Climate Change Canada

Implementing a New Federal Framework for the Legalization and Strict Regulation of Cannabis

General information

Name of horizontal initiative

Implementing a New Federal Framework for the Legalization and Strict Regulation of Cannabis

Lead department

Health Canada

Federal partner organization(s)

Health Canada
Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)
Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)
Public Safety Canada (PS)
Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

Note: Other government departments (e.g., the Department of Justice) are supporting the new federal cannabis framework. However, they are not captured in this Horizontal Initiative table, as they have not received funding through the Treasury Board Submission "Implementing a New Federal Framework for the Legalization and Regulation of Cannabis."

Start date of the horizontal initiative

April 1, 2017

End date of the horizontal initiative

March 31, 2022

Description of the horizontal initiative

The objective of this horizontal initiative is to implement and administer the federal framework to legalize and strictly regulate cannabis. The Cannabis Act received Royal Assent on June 21, 2018, and came into force on October 17, 2018. The objectives of the framework are to protect public health and public safety. More specifically, the initiative aims to prevent young persons from accessing cannabis, to protect public health and public safety by establishing strict product safety and product quality requirements and to deter criminal activity by imposing serious criminal penalties for those operating outside the legal framework.

Federal partner organizations implement ongoing delivery of the regulatory framework including licensing; compliance and enforcement; surveillance; research; national public education and awareness activities; and framework support.

The initiative also supports law enforcement capacity to collect and assess intelligence on the evolution of organized crime involvement in the illicit cannabis market and other related criminal markets. Activities are organized by five high-level themes:

  1. Establish, implement and enforce the new legislative framework;
  2. Provide Canadians with information needed to make informed decisions and minimize health and safety harms;
  3. Build law enforcement knowledge and engage partners and stakeholders on public safety;
  4. Provide criminal intelligence, enforcement and related training activities; and
  5. Prevent and interdict prohibited cross-border movement of cannabis while maintaining the flow of legitimate travelers and goods.

Governance structures

The Government of Canada has put in place a robust governance structure to facilitate whole-of-government coordination in implementing and administering the new federal framework to legalize and strictly regulate cannabis. At the federal level, this governance structure includes: an Assistant Deputy Minister's Committee that serves as a forum for government-wide coordination of policy and implementation activities; a Directors-General Committee that is responsible for coordinating policy, regulatory development, and implementation activities across federal departments and agencies; an Interdepartmental Communications Working Group to lead cannabis communications, public awareness and education efforts; and a Federal Partners Cannabis Data Working Group to promote horizontal collaboration and support evidence-based policy and program development.

Health Canada's Controlled Substances and Cannabis Branch assumes a central coordinating role in tracking key project milestones and in reporting to federal Ministers.

The Government is committed to ongoing collaboration and consultation with provincial and territorial partners. In May 2016, the Federal/Provincial/Territorial (F/P/T) Senior Officials Working Group on Cannabis Legalization and Regulation was established, to enable F/P/T governments to exchange information on important issues about the legalization and regulation of cannabis throughout the consultation, design and implementation of the legislation, regulations, and non-regulatory activities. Other F/P/T working groups and committees have also been established to facilitate ongoing engagement in key priority areas, including public education and awareness, data development and information sharing, national inventory tracking, ticketing and implementation. In addition, existing F/P/T bodies are also considering the implications of cannabis legalization, including F/P/T Deputy Ministers Responsible for Justice, Public Safety and Finance, and F/P/T Ministers Responsible for Health, Justice and Labour.

Total federal funding allocated from start to end date (dollars)

$546,807,456

Total federal planned spending to date (dollars)

$292,264,123

Total federal actual spending to date (dollars)

$258,201,556

Date of last renewal of the horizontal initiative

Not applicable

Total federal funding allocated at the last renewal and source of funding (dollars)

Not applicable

Additional federal funding received after the last renewal (dollars)

Not applicable

Total planned spending since the last renewal

Not applicable

Total actual spending since the last renewal

Not applicable

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2022-23

Performance highlights

The Cannabis Act and its associated regulations came into force on October 17, 2018, with the objective of protecting the public health and public safety of Canadians, particularly youth, while providing adults with legal access to regulated cannabis and reducing illicit activities. On the same date, the cost recovery regime was implemented to recover the Government's regulatory costs of administering the cannabis framework by fairly charging those that benefit from the new legal market, thereby reducing costs to taxpayers. It is expected that the Cannabis Fees Order will result in a transfer of costs from taxpayers to industry in the amount of $204 million over four yearsFootnote 1. Since the coming into force of the Cannabis Act, significant progress has been made towards achieving the government's public health and public safety objectives.

Rules for legal production and sale of edible cannabis, cannabis extracts and cannabis topicals were established.

On October 17, 2019, amendments to the Cannabis Regulations came into force, setting rules for the legal production and sale of edible cannabis, cannabis extracts and cannabis topicals. The Government of Canada worked closely with provinces and territories, Indigenous communities, the regulated industry, public health organizations and law enforcement to implement the amended Cannabis Regulations. The amended regulations contain safeguards to mitigate the public health and public safety risks associated with the new cannabis products, such as appeal to youth (e.g. restrictions on the use of ingredients such as sweeteners), overconsumption (e.g. standardized labels, health warning messages, tetrahydrocannabinol limits, and prohibiting health claims that might encourage consumption), and accidental consumption (e.g. child-resistant packaging). These new cannabis products became available for purchase by adult consumers in mid-December 2019.

A legal cannabis supply chain capable of displacing illegal activities has been established.

Early results show that spending on legally-sourced cannabis (medical and non-medical) has grown from $133 million in the third quarter of 2018 (just prior to coming into force of the Cannabis Act) to $709 million in the first quarter of 2020, with the share of legal spending on cannabis increasing from 9% to 46% during that same period. Legal spending from between the coming into force of the Cannabis Act in the fourth quarter of 2018 until the first quarter of 2020 totaled just over $3.4 billionFootnote 2.

To further support the establishment of a legal supply chain, Health Canada introduced changes to the cannabis licensing process in May 2019 to improve efficiency and overall wait times for licence approval. At the end of March 2020, 344 sites were licensed for cultivation, processing, and/or sale for medical purposes, including a growing number of micro licence sites, in addition to 1,513 sites for research, analytical testing, industrial hemp, and cannabis drug licences. Health Canada has also maintained a system that provides reasonable access to cannabis for medical purposes. The number of individuals registered to access cannabis for medical purposes, and the amount of cannabis sold, continues to grow.

Health Canada worked closely with Indigenous leaders, organizations and communities across the country to assist interested Indigenous groups in participating in the regulated cannabis sector, while also ensuring that their specific interests related to cannabis are carefully considered and addressed as appropriate. As of March 31, 2020, there were close to 200 engagement sessions with First Nations, Metis and Inuit leaders, organizations and communities to share information and seek feedback regarding their interests and needs related to the legalization and regulation of cannabis. As of March 31, 2020, there are 19 Indigenous-owned or -affiliated businesses located across Canada that received a Health Canada licence to cultivate or process cannabis, including one located on a reserve. As of March 31, 2020, approximately 60 Indigenous-owned or affiliated licensee applications from across Canada are in various stages of application review. Of these, 12 are located on reserves. Health Canada offers flexibility in the federal licensing process for Indigenous applicants, who have the option to submit their application without an already fully built site. Additionally, a dedicated cannabis licensing advisor supports Indigenous clients to strengthen their application before submission. Following application submission, the Indigenous Navigator Service helps clients through the federal application review process.

In accordance with the Federal Government's commitment to a renewed, nation-to-nation relationship with Indigenous peoples, Health Canada has engaged with Indigenous communities directly to assist in advancing their interests in the regulated cannabis sector. Since December 2018, under the direction of Ministers, federal officials engaged in trilateral discussions with First Nations communities and the provinces of Ontario, Saskatchewan and British Columbia.

Attitudes and behaviours towards cannabis use are stable.

Public education and awareness is a fundamental component of the Government's public health approach to reducing the harms associated with cannabis, especially for youth. The Government continues its extensive public education efforts – in collaboration with provinces and territories, Indigenous partners and other organizations – to help Canadians understand the health effects of cannabis use. This included continuing its national advertising campaign to raise awareness of the health effects of cannabis, lower-risk use practices and the differences between inhaling and ingesting cannabis. Health Canada also launched a do-it-yourself version of the Pursue Your Passion initiative to equip youth leaders and educators with the tools and resources to deliver cannabis education events that provide youth with fact-based information, thought-provoking activities, and inspiration to pursue a passion without the use of cannabis. Other public education initiatives aimed at increasing knowledge of the risk of developing psychosis or schizophrenia when cannabis is used more frequentlyFootnote 3 and the risk of cannabis use while trying to conceive or while pregnant and/or breastfeedingFootnote 4.

In 2019-20, Health Canada developed new health warning messages, which are evidence-based warnings that must be displayed on the labels of all cannabis products, to effectively communicate health risks associated with cannabis, including for dried cannabis and new cannabis products (edible cannabis, cannabis extracts and cannabis topicals). Updates were also made to Health Canada's Consumer Information Sheet, which is a public education resource providing consumers with important information about cannabis at the point of sale. Updates to the health warning messages and Consumer Information Sheet were informed by advice from scientific experts, the best available evidence from peer-reviewed scientific publications, the outcomes of public opinion research conducted in May 2018 and February 2019, and the feedback received during the public consultation on the proposed amendments to the regulations. Health Canada also updated information on its website about the new cannabis products and lower-risk use guidelines to support adult consumers in making informed decisions. In collaboration with partners, educators, and health professionals, the Public Health Agency of Canada developed tailored public education messages to help build resilience and prevent/reduce problematic cannabis use.

Although it is too early to determine the long-term impact of the Cannabis Act on public health and individual behavior, initial data is encouraging. According to the National Cannabis Survey, the rate of cannabis use has not changed among young people since the Cannabis Act came into force (e.g., remained unchanged at 27% when comparing the third quarter of 2018 and the third quarter of 2019). Among individuals who report having used cannabis in the past year, there has been no increase in the proportion that report using cannabis on a weekly or daily basis, which is one of the high risk behaviours closely being monitored by Health Canada (Canadian Cannabis Survey, 2019). Canadians understanding of the risks posed by cannabis also seems to be improving. When asked about how much they thought a person risked harming themselves by using various products on a regular basis, the majority of people overall perceived either moderate or great risk for smoking cannabis (74%, an increase from 72% in 2018), vaping cannabis (72%, an increase from 70% in 2018), and eating cannabis (68%, an increase from 66% in 2018).

Public Safety Canada also continued public education and awareness activities in 2019-20 with the Don't Drive High campaign, to provide Canadians, and in particular young Canadians aged 16-24, with information on the legal implications and laws associated with cannabis use and driving. Don't Drive High's third year featured two successful advertising campaigns, which took place in April to June 2019 and in March 2020. Advertisements were seen across Canada, on national television networks, in cinemas, on Spotify, Instagram, Snapchat, YouTube, websites and mobile applications. Digital advertisements alone were displayed over 142 million times. According to the Canadian Cannabis Survey, the proportion of respondents who believe cannabis use negatively affects driving increased in the year following the coming into force of the Cannabis Act from81% (2018) to 85% (2019). However, this change in attitudes has not yet translated into a change in behaviour. Continued efforts are still required to fully address drug-impaired driving.

Compliance, law enforcement and border controls continue to be implemented.

The Government of Canada has established, promoted compliance with, and enforced regulatory requirements to protect public health and public safety. Health Canada implemented an updated Compliance Promotion Strategy in the fall of 2019 to increase awareness, improve understanding, and foster ongoing compliance with the amended Cannabis Regulations among regulated parties, federal partners, provinces and territories. During inspections of licence holders in 2019-20, Health Canada found a 98% compliance rate with controls established under the Cannabis Act and regulations.

The RCMP played a key coordinating role in engaging partners, and in the development and sharing of national awareness and public education products to ensure consistency and support for stakeholder outreach. Through in-person engagement and the use of technology, the RCMP continued to focus on increasing awareness and education of cannabis legalization and regulation, with an emphasis on possession, production, and distribution of cannabis for Indigenous and youth populations.

In 2019-20, the RCMP aligned activities of its cannabis resources both at National Headquarters and across the country to identify trends related to organized crime infiltration and moneymaking schemes in relation to both the legitimate and the illegal markets. The RCMP worked collaboratively to develop appropriate responses, including targeted awareness products, through ongoing interactions with stakeholders.

In 2019-20, the RCMP also undertook activities to support the establishment of a federally licensed and regulated industry through the completion of law enforcement records checks to screen licence applicants. Work was undertaken to support the development and dissemination of intelligence to national law enforcement agencies, such as through the hosting of a national-level symposium on organized crime, which brought together law enforcement and non-law enforcement institutions to enhance knowledge of the threats posed by organized crime, including groups involved in the criminal cannabis market.

Cannabis interdictions continue to be a key area of enforcement for the CBSA, as the unauthorized cross-border movement of cannabis remains a criminal offence. Since coming into force of the Cannabis Act, there has been an observed increase in voluntary forfeitures by travellers, and the postal and courier environments have seen a 23% higher importation interdiction rate than the traveller stream. As part of a broad public education campaign to mitigate the risks of unintentional violations to national laws, the CBSA developed messaging, updated its website, and leveraged social media to inform Canadians and travelers to Canada of the prohibition against transporting cannabis across international borders without a valid permit or exemption issued by Health Canada. In fiscal year 2019-20, CBSA acknowledged 89% of the appeals received within 10 calendar days and decided 88% of the Enforcement and Trusted Traveller appeals within 180 days. In addition, the CBSA laboratory analyzed 26.5% of the suspect cannabis samples received from the ports of entry within 30 days. This percentage is expected to increase as testing and analysis methods continue to be refined over the next year. The CBSA also continued to develop policies and procedures related to the new traveller Administrative Monetary Penalty regime for contraventions of the Customs Act involving cannabis.

Public Safety Canada, in collaboration with federal, provincial and territorial partners and law enforcement agencies, also developed an action plan to address illicit online sales of cannabis. Additionally, an Act to provide no-cost, expedited record suspensions for simple possession of cannabis came into force on August 1, 2019. This Act expedites the pardons process for people convicted only of simple possession of cannabis, eliminating the application fee and any wait periods. Between the coming into force of the legislation and March 31, 2020, the Parole Board of Canada received a total of 436 applications for cannabis record suspensions. Of those, 240 applications were accepted, 178 applications were returned due to ineligibility or incompleteness; and 18 applications had not yet been accepted for processing by the end of the fiscal year.

The impacts of cannabis legalization and regulation are being monitored closely through ongoing population-based surveys. Health Canada is working closely with the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction (CCSA) and the Mental Health Commission of Canada (MHCC) on cannabis research priorities to better inform Canadians on the benefits and risks of cannabis use. The Cannabis Act is subject to a legislative review three years following its coming into force (to be completed by April 2023), which will provide an opportunity to assess progress towards the objectives of the Act, initial impact on public health and safety, and represents an opportunity for Canadians and stakeholders to share their perspective on Canada's new cannabis control framework.

Contact information

Health Canada

John Clare
Director General
Controlled Substances and Cannabis Branch
John.Clare@canada.ca
613-941-8371

Horizontal initiative:Implementing a New Federal Framework for the Legalization and Strict Regulation of Cannabis

Shared outcomes:

Horizontal initiative framework: departmental spending by theme (dollars)
Name of theme Theme Area 1: Establish, implement and enforce the new legislative framework Theme Area 2: Provide Canadians with information needed to make informed decisions and minimize health and safety harms Theme Area 3: Build law enforcement knowledge and engage partners and stakeholders on public safety Theme Area 4: Provide criminal intelligence, enforcement and related training activities Theme Area 5: Prevent and interdict prohibited cross-border movement of cannabis while maintaining the flow of legitimate travellers and goods Internal Services
Theme outcome(s)
  • A federally licensed and regulated (non-medical) industry is established [HC];
  • The federally licensed industry understands the legislation and regulatory requirements [HC];
  • The federally licensed industry is found to be compliant with regulatory requirements [HC]; and,
  • Law Enforcement Records Checks are conducted in support of Health Canada's security clearance decisions [RCMP].
  • Canadian youth understand the potential health and safety risks associated with cannabis use [HC];
  • Canadians use information to make informed decisions about the potential health and safety risks associated with the use of cannabis [HC];
  • Health care and social service professionals and public health officials have access to high-quality public health information [PHAC];
  • Health care and social service professionals and public health officials use information, knowledge and data products related to the public health impacts of cannabis and interventions to address them [PHAC];
  • Canadians are aware of the legal implications associated with cannabis use, and understand the laws associated with the new legislation [PS]; and,
  • Canadians use information provided by the program to make informed, lawful decisions [PS].
  • Law enforcement is well-informed to apply the new legislation [PS];
  • Evidence-based decision-making on organized crime and policing issues [PS];
  • Research projects related to cannabis and performance measurement implemented [PS];
  • Policy development and decision-making is informed by evidence and performance measurement [PS];
  • RCMP prevention and engagement activities support enhanced understanding among targeted partners and stakeholders, including youth and Indigenous communities [RCMP]; and,
  • Enhanced capacity of target populations, including partners and stakeholders, youth and Indigenous communities, to respond to the new cannabis regime [RCMP].
  • Information and intelligence products/advice related to illicit substances (including cannabis) are shared with Canadian law enforcement agencies and available to be used to target organized crime [RCMP];
  • Canadian law enforcement agencies have intelligence information to nationally coordinate activities to target organized crime groups involved in the Canadian cannabis market [RCMP];
  • RCMP staff have access to required training in regards to enforcement of the new cannabis regime [RCMP]; and,
  • RCMP employees have an increased ability to enforce the new cannabis regime [RCMP].
  • Travellers understand the requirements to declare cannabis and cannabis-related products when entering Canada [CBSA];
  • Travellers are provided a clear opportunity to declare cannabis in their possession at all primary inspection sites [CBSA];
  • CBSA has enhanced capacity to promote compliance and to enforce import-related laws [CBSA];
  • Prohibited cross border movement of cannabis is detected [CBSA];
  • Border-related regulations, accompanying policies and procedures, agreements, studies, and monitoring framework are developed and implemented [CBSA]; and,
  • Travellers and the import/export community have access to recourse mechanisms to challenge certain CBSA actions and decisions in a timely manner [CBSA].
Not applicable
Health Canada $370, 052,202 $16,121,003 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $44,485,622
Canada Border Services Agency Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $34,600,853 $5,095,567
Public Health Agency of Canada Not applicable $2,586,174 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $206,951
Public Safety Canada Not applicable $1,173,345 $3,810,640 Not applicable Not applicable $500,353
Royal Canadian Mounted Police $16,388,515 Not applicable $12,626,787 $18,304,524 Not applicable $20,854,921

Performance information

Horizontal initiative overview
Name of horizontal initiative Total federal funding allocated since the last renewal*
(dollars)
2019-20 Planned spending
(dollars)
2019-20 Actual spending (dollars) Horizontal initiative shared outcome(s) Performance indicator(s) Target(s) Date to achieve target Actual results
Implementing a New Federal Framework for the Legalization and Strict Regulation of Cannabis

HC:
$430,658,827

RCMP:
$68,174,747

CBSA:
$39,696,420

PS:
$5,484,338

PHAC:
$2,793,125

HC:
$96,496,257

RCMP: $15,285,429

CBSA:
$9,898,974

PS:
$1,094,793

PHAC:
$623,472

HC:
$ 92,196,289

RCMP: $14,648,050

CBSA:
$7,464,601

PS:
$944,118

PHAC:
$589,097

SO 1. Cannabis is kept out of the hands of Canadian children and youth [HC] Percentage of Canadians (aged 15-17 and 18-24) who used cannabis in the last 12 months [HC] To be established by Dec. 31, 2020 To be established by Dec. 31, 2020 26.9% overall (ages 15-24)
or
14.2% of Canadians aged 15-17 and 31.4% of Canadians aged 18-24Footnote 5
  SO 2. Criminal involvement in the illicit cannabis market is reduced [CBSA and RCMP] Qualitative assessment on trends related to criminal involvement in the illicit cannabis market [RCMP] 1 by March 31, 2020 > March 31, 2020 > 1
Number of cannabis import interdictions at the border [CBSA] 10% reduction (+/- 5% variance) to baseline of 20,933 March 31, 2020 18,197 cannabis imports (13% reduction)
Theme 1 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated since the last renewal
(dollars)
2019–20 Federal theme planned spending
(dollars)
2019–20 Federal theme actual spending
(dollars)
Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target Theme actual results
Theme Area 1: Establish, implement and enforce the new horizontal initiative

HC:
$370,052,202

RCMP:
$16,388,515

HC:
$79,197,394

RCMP:
$4,430,842

HC:
$79,022,608

RCMP:
$4,029,214

A federally licensed and regulated (non-medical) industry is established [HC] Number of licence applications (decisions) per year [HC] 1,050 March 31, 2020 2,261
Percentage of licence applications reviewed within internal service standards [HC] 75% March 31, 2020 Not availableFootnote 6
The federally licensed industry understands the legislation and regulatory requirements [HC] Percentage of federally licensed industry that indicates that they understand the regulatory requirements [HC] 80% March 31, 2020 Not availableFootnote 7
The federally licensed industry is found to be compliant with regulatory requirements [HC] Percentage of federally licensed industry that is found to be compliant with regulatory requirements [HC] 95% March 31, 2022 98%
Law Enforcement Records Checks (LERCs) are conducted in support of HC's security clearance decisions [RCMP] Percentage of LERCs completed within negotiated service standards [RCMP] 75%Footnote 8 March 31, 2020 49%Footnote 9
Theme 1 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to the department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since the last renewal*
(dollars)
2019–20 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2019–20 Actual spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity actual result(s)
Health Canada Cannabis Program License federal producers and other legal market participants; provide client registration and other client services $216,075,849 $48,267,659 48,538,434 ER 1.1.1 PI 1.1.1.1 T 1.1.1.1 March 31, 2020 AR 1.1.1.1
PI.1.1.1.2 T 1.1.1.2 March 31, 2020 AR 1.1.1.2
Compliance and enforcement: Design and promote compliance and enforcement; robust inspection program, involving pre- and post-licence inspections $153,976,353 $30,929,735 30,484,174 ER 1.1.2 PI 1.1.2 T 1.1.2 March 31, 2020 AR 1.1.2
ER 1.1.3 PI 1.1.3 T 1.1.3 March 31, 2022 AR 1.1.3
RCMP RCMP Departmental Security Build capacity to provide security screening reports (i.e., LERCs) to Health Canada to complete applications for the production of cannabis for non-medical purposes $16,388,515 $4,430,842 $4,029,214 ER 1.2 PI 1.2 T 1.2 March 31, 2020 AR 1.2
Theme 2 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated since the last renewal*
(dollars)
2019–20 Federal theme planned spending
(dollars)
2019–20 Federal theme actual spending
(dollars)
Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target Theme actual results

Theme Area 2: Provide Canadians with information needed to make informed decisions and minimize health and safety harms

HC:
$16,121,003

PHAC:
$2,586,174

PS:
$1,173,345

HC:
$905,366

PHAC:
$577,483

PS:
$214,669

HC:
4,069,443

PHAC:
$543,109

PS:
$204,858

Canadian youth understand the potential health and safety risks associated with cannabis use [HC] Percentage of youth (grades 7-12) who perceive that there is "no risk" in smoking cannabis on a regular basis [HC] 7% March 31, 2024 7%Footnote 10
Canadians use information to make informed decisions about the potential health and safety risks associated with the use of cannabis [HC] Percentage of parents who discuss cannabis with their teens [HC] TBD by December 31, 2020Footnote 11 December 31, 2020 86%Footnote 12
Health care and social service professionals and public health officials have access to high-quality public health information [PHAC] Number of health care and social service professionals and public health officials accessing high-quality public health information and data products developed [PHAC] 150,000 March 31, 2020 175,318
Health care and social service professionals and public health officials use information, knowledge and data products related to the public health impacts of cannabis and interventions to address them [PHAC] Percentage of Public Health Network members using information, knowledge and data products to make informed decisions [PHAC] 75% March 31, 2020 89%
Canadians are aware of the legal implications associated with cannabis use, and understand the laws associated with the new legislation [PS] Percentage of Canadians (aged 15-24) who indicate that they are aware of the new legislation, and the consequences related to making certain decisions involving cannabis [PS] 22% March 31, 2022 19%Footnote 13
Canadians use information provided by the program to make informed, lawful decisions [PS] Percentage of Canadians (aged 15-24) who have indicated that they have made informed, lawful decisions around cannabis that protected themselves, and the safety of others [PS] 34% - legal storefront
20% - legal online source
March 31, 2022 31% - legal storefront
17% - legal online sourceFootnote 14
Theme 2 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to the department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since the last renewal*
(dollars)
2019–20 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2019–20 Actual spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity actual result(s)
Health Canada Cannabis Program Public education and outreach: Provide Canadians with information about health and safety risks associated cannabis use $16,121,003 $905,366 $4,069,443 ER 2.1.1 PI 2.1.1 T 2.1.1 March 31, 2024 AR 2.1.1
ER 2.1.2 PI 2.1.2 T 2.1.2 December 31, 2020 AR 2.1.2
Public Health Agency of Canada Evidence for Health Promotion and Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention Program Develop public health advice to support the role of Canada's Chief Public Health Officer (CPHO) through knowledge translation and horizontal analysis $2,586,174 $577,483 $543,109 ER 2.2.1 PI 2.2.1 T 2.2.1 March 31, 2020 AR 2.2.1
ER 2.2.2 PI 2.2.2 T 2.2.2 March 31, 2020 AR 2.2.2
Public Safety Crime Prevention Public education and awareness $1,173,345 $214,669 $204,858 ER 2.3.1 PI 2.3.1 T 2.3.1 March 31, 2022 AR 2.3.1
ER 2.3.2 PI 2.3.2 T 2.3.2 March 31, 2022 AR 2.3.2
Theme 3 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated since the last renewal
(dollars)
2019–20 Federal theme planned spending
(dollars)
2019–20 Federal theme actual spending
(dollars)
Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target Theme actual results

Theme Area 3: Build law enforcement knowledge and engage partners and stakeholders on public safety

PS:
$3,810,640

RCMP:
$12,626,787
PS:
$779,053

RCMP:
$2,879,802
PS:
$638,199

RCMP:
$2,703,354
Law enforcement is well-informed to apply the new legislation [PS] Percentage of law enforcement knowledgeable about the changes to the new regime, and able to use the legislative framework as a result of the training materials [PS] 33% of frontline police officers access materials 75% of officers with access to materials find the materials helpful March 31, 2020 57%Footnote 15 - access materials
87%Footnote 16 - found materials helpful
Evidence-based decision-making on organized crime and policing issues [PS] Percentage of stakeholders who indicate that the materials informed decision making [PS] 75% March 31, 2020 N/AFootnote 17
Number of working meetings and consultations with stakeholders held [PS] 15 March 31, 2020 23
Number of new initiatives considered for implementation [PS] 2 March 31, 2021 3
Research projects related to cannabis and performance measurement implemented [PS] Percentage of research projects related to performance measurement completed and disseminated [PS] 100% March 31, 2020 40%Footnote 18
Policy development and decision-making is informed by evidence and performance measurement [PS] Percentage of stakeholders indicating that policy development and decision making was based on performance measurement results and lessons learned [PS] 50% March 31, 2020 N/AFootnote 17
RCMP prevention and engagement activities support enhanced understanding among targeted partners and stakeholders, including youth and Indigenous communities [RCMP] Percentage of targeted federal partners and stakeholders who strongly agree or agree with the statement "RCMP Federal Policing contributes to increased understanding specific to the new cannabis regime, organized crime, and the illicit cannabis market" [RCMP] 45% March 31, 2021 46%
Number of information inquiries responded to by the Centre for Youth Crime Prevention [RCMP] 150 March 31, 2020 143Footnote 19
Enhanced capacity of target populations, including partners and stakeholders, youth and Indigenous communities, to respond to the new cannabis regime [RCMP] Percentage of targeted partners/stakeholders who strongly agree or agree with the statement "RCMP Federal Policing contributes to an increased skills/ability to respond to the new cannabis regime" [RCMP] 30% March 31, 2020 40%
Percentage of youth resource officers who positively assessed the impact of training [RCMP] 80% March 31, 2020 100%Footnote 20
Theme 3 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to the department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since the last renewal*
(dollars)
2019–20 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2019–20 Actual spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity actual result(s)
Public Safety Serious and Organized Crime Training for law enforcement $3,810,640 $779,053 $638,199 ER 3.1.1 PI 3.1.1 T 3.1.1 March 31, 2020 AR 3.1.1
ER 3.1.2 PI 3.1.2.1 T 3.1.2.1 March 31, 2020 AR 3.1.2.1
PI 3.1.2.2 T 3.1.2.2 March 31, 2020 AR 3.1.2.2
PI 3.1.2.3 T 3.1.2.3 March 31, 2021 AR 3.1.2.3
Develop policies to inform operational law enforcement efforts See first amount for Serious and Organized Crime See first amount for Serious and Organized Crime   ER 3.1.3 PI 3.1.3 T 3.1.3 March 31, 2020 AR 3.1.3
ER 3.1.4 PI 3.1.4 T 3.1.4 March 31, 2020 AR 3.1.4
RCMP Sub-Sub-Program 1.1.2.5 Public Engagement Enhance RCMP's capacity to develop and deliver prevention and outreach activities on the new cannabis regime from a law enforcement perspective. $4,919,245 $1,096,594 $1,108,511 ER 3.2.1 PI 3.2.1.1 T 3.2.1.1 March 31, 2021 AR 3.2.1.1
PI 3.2.1.2 T 3.2.1.2 March 31, 2020 AR 3.2.1.2
Sub-Sub-Program 1.1.3.5 Operational Readiness and Response $7,707,542 $1,783,208 $1,594,843 ER 3.2.2 PI 3.2.2.1 T 3.2.2.1 March 31, 2020 AR 3.2.2.1
PI 3.2.2.2 T 3.2.2.2 March 31, 2020 AR 3.2.2.2
Theme 4 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated since the last renewal*
(dollars)
2019–20 Federal theme planned spending
(dollars)
2019–20 Federal theme actual spending
(dollars)
Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target Theme actual results
Theme Area 4: Provide criminal intelligence, enforcement and related training activities RCMP:
$18,304,524
RCMP:
$4,202,416
RCMP:
$4,217,543
Information and intelligence products related to illicit substances (including cannabis) are shared with Canadian law enforcement agencies and available to be used to target organized crime [RCMP] Number of RCMP information / intelligence products / advice that indicate organized crime groups' activities in the Canadian cannabis market shared with RCMP senior management, divisions, domestic partners (including Canadian law enforcement) or international partners [RCMP] 10 products annually March 31, 2022 44 products
Canadian law enforcement agencies have intelligence information to nationally coordinate activities to target organized crime groups involved in the Canadian cannabis market [RCMP] Number of organized crime groups involved in the illicit cannabis market for which there are intelligence gaps is reduced which will result in efficient and accurate targeting by the law enforcement community [RCMP] TBD by December 31, 2022Footnote 21 TBD by December 31, 2022 N/AFootnote 22
Number of information and intelligence products that are used to guide enforcement against organized crime groups in the Canadian cannabis market [RCMP] 3 products March 31, 2022 44 products
RCMP staff have access to required training in regards to enforcement of the new cannabis regime [RCMP] Percentage of target audience who have received the appropriate cannabis related training [RCMP] Federal Policing (FP) training: 100% FP training:
March 31, 2020
14%Footnote 23
Learning and Development: 80% Learning and Development:
October 31, 2020
14%Footnote 23
RCMP employees have an increased ability to enforce the new cannabis regime [RCMP] Percentage of training participants who reported an increased level of knowledge and ability to enforce the new cannabis regime [RCMP] FP training: 90% FP training:
March 31, 2020
74.1%Footnote 24
Learning and Development: 100% Learning and Development: October 31, 2020 74.1%Footnote 24
Theme 4 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to the department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since the last renewal*
(dollars)
2019–20 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2019–20 Actual spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity actual result(s)
RCMP Sub-Sub-Program 1.1.2.3 Criminal Intelligence Enhance RCMP's ability to collect, assess and disseminate information and intelligence related to the evolution of organized crime's involvement in the illicit substances market $3,929,767 $941,885 $954,930 ER 4.1.1 PI 4.1.1 T 4.1.1 March 31, 2022 AR 4.1.1
Sub-Sub-Program 1.1.2.2 Federal Policing Project-Based Investigations $8,543,907 $1,957,861 $1,902,463
Sub-Sub-Program 1.1.2.1 Federal Policing General Investigations $4,301,250 $996,750 $966,261 ER 4.1.2 PI 4.1.2.1 T 4.1.2.1 December 31, 2022 AR 4.1.2.1
Sub-sub-program 1.2.1.5 Criminal Intelligence Service Canada $1,529,600 $305,920 $393,889 PI 4.1.2.2 T 4.1.2.2 March 31, 2022 AR 4.1.2.2
Sub-Program 4.1.4 Human Resources Management Services Ensure that the RCMP is able to develop and deliver extensive training to its officers across Canada to support national implementation and ensure appropriate and standardized criminal enforcement of the new regime $2,436,237 $701,801 $883,842 ER 4.1.3 PI 4.1.3 T 4.1.3 FP training:
March 31, 2020
AR 4.1.3
Learning and Development:
October 31, 2020
Sub-Program 4.1.7 Information Technology Services $3,207,889 $130,450 $172,487 ER 4.1.4 PI 4.1.4 T 4.1.4 FP training:
March 31, 2020
AR 4.1.4
Learning and Development:
October 31, 2020
Theme 5 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated since the last renewal*
(dollars)
2019–20 Federal theme planned spending
(dollars)
2019–20 Federal theme actual spending
(dollars)
Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target Theme actual results
Theme Area 5: Prevent and interdict prohibited cross-border movement of cannabis while maintaining the flow of legitimate travellers and goods CBSA:
$34,600,853
CBSA:
$8,644,689
CBSA:
$6,210,317
Travellers understand the requirements to declare cannabis and cannabis-related products when entering Canada [CBSA] Percentage of ports of entry with displayed signage on cannabis [CBSA] 75% of major ports and 100% of other priority ports March 31, 2020 100%Footnote 25
CBSA awareness tools are in place to inform travelling public on prohibition of cross-border movement of cannabis [CBSA] 100% of the digital strategy launched March 31, 2020 100%Footnote 25
Travellers are provided a clear opportunity to declare cannabis in their possession at all primary inspection sites [CBSA] Percentage of relevant primary inspection kiosks, systems, training materials, operational guidelines and forms in all modes updated [CBSA] 100% March 31, 2020 100%Footnote 25
CBSA has enhanced capacity to promote compliance and to enforce import-related laws [CBSA] Number of cannabis import interdictions at ports of entry [CBSA] 10% reduction (+/- 5% variance) to baseline of 20,933 March 31, 2020 18,197 cannabis imports (13% reduction)
Prohibited cross border movement of cannabis detected Percentage of referred cannabis samples analyzed within 30 days 90% March 31, 2020 26.5%Footnote 26
Travellers and the import/export community have access to recourse mechanisms to challenge certain CBSA actions and decisions in a timely manner [CBSA] Number of cannabis seizures appealed [CBSA] Not applicableFootnote 27 Not applicableFootnote 27 Not applicableFootnote 27
Number of Trusted Travelers appeals due to cannabis-related enforcement action [CBSA] Not applicableFootnote 27 Not applicableFootnote 27 Not applicableFootnote 27
Number of Trade related appeals due to classification disputes of cannabis [CBSA] Not applicableFootnote 27 Not applicableFootnote 27 Not applicableFootnote 27
Percentage of appeals received that are acknowledged within 10 calendar days [CBSA] 85% March 31, 2020 89%
Percentage of Enforcement and Trusted Traveller appeals received that are decided within 180 calendar days [CBSA] 80% March 31, 2020 88%
Percentage of Trade related appeals – Tariff Classification – that are decided within 365 calendars days (for cases never held in abeyance) [CBSA] 85% March 31, 2020 Not applicableFootnote 28
Number/Percentage of appeal decisions further appealed at the Courts or Tribunals and defended by Recourse [CBSA] Not applicable March 31, 2020 Not applicableFootnote 29
Percentage of cannabis-related complaints for which the CBSA provides a final written response to the complainant within 40 calendar days after a written complaint is received [CBSA] 90% March 31, 2020 89%
Percentage of cannabis-related complaints for which the CBSA contact the complainant within 14 calendar days after a written complaint is received [CBSA] 85% March 31, 2020 61%Footnote 30
Theme 5 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to the department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since the last renewal*
(dollars)
2019–20 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2019–20 Actual spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity actual result(s)
CBSA Traveller Facilitation and Compliance Program Traveller awareness $1,008,014 N/A N/A ER 5.1.1 PI 5.1.1.1 T 5.1.1.1 March 31, 2020 AR 5.1.1.1
PI 5.1.1.2 T 5.1.1.2 March 31, 2020 AR 5.1.1.2
Port of entry processing $20,952,092 $5,967,239 $5,187,530 ER 5.1.2 PI 5.1.2 T 5.1.2 March 31, 2020 AR 5.1.2
Regulatory compliance and enforcement $4,074,333 $959,435 $38,618 ER 5.1.3 PI 5.1.3 T 5.1.3 March 31, 2020 AR 5.1.3
Laboratory Services $1,011,397 $204,979 $200,479 ER 5.1.4 PI 5.1.4 T 5.1.4 March 31, 2020 AR 5.1.4
Policy, Monitoring and Reporting $4,766,720 $1,011,058 $262,160 Completed in 2018-19
Recourse Regulatory compliance and enforcement $2,788,297 $501,978 $521,530 ER 5.1.5 PI 5.1.5.1 T 5.1.5.1 Not applicableFootnote 27 AR 5.1.5.1
PI 5.1.5.2 T 5.1.5.2 Not applicableFootnote 27 AR 5.1.5.2
PI 5.1.5.3 T 5.1.5.3 Not applicableFootnote 27 AR 5.1.5.3
PI 5.1.5.4 T 5.1.5.4 March 31, 2020 AR 5.1.5.4
PI 5.1.5.5 T 5.1.5.5 March 31, 2020 AR 5.1.5.5
PI 5.1.5.6 T 5.1.5.6 March 31, 2020 AR 5.1.5.6
PI 5.1.5.7 T 5.1.5.7 March 31, 2020 AR 5.1.5.7
PI 5.1.5.8 T 5.1.5.8 March 31, 2020 AR 5.1.5.8
PI 5.1.5.9 T 5.1.5.9 March 31, 2020 AR 5.1.5.9
Total spending, all themesFootnote *
Total federal funding allocated since the last renewalFootnote *
(dollars)
2019–20 Total federal planned spending
(dollars)
2019–20 Total federal actual spending
(dollars)
Theme 1 $386,440,717 $83,628,236 $83,051,822
Theme 2 $19,880,522 $1,697,518 $4,817,410
Theme 3 $16,437,427 $3,658,855 $3,341,553
Theme 4 $18,304,524 $4,202,416 $4,217,543
Theme 5 $34,600,853 $8,644,689 $6,210,317
Total, all themes $475,664,043 $101,831,714 $101,638,645
Footnote *

Total spending, all themes table does not include Internal Services

Return to table footnote * referrer

Theme 1: Establish, implement and enforce the new horizontal initiative

Expected results

Health Canada

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Performance indicators

Health Canada

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Targets

Health Canada

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Actual Results

Health Canada

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Theme 2: Provide Canadians with information needed to make informed decisions and minimize health and safety harms

Expected results

Health Canada

Public Health Agency of Canada

Public Safety Canada

Performance indicators

Health Canada

Public Health Agency of Canada

Public Safety Canada

Targets

Health Canada

Public Health Agency of Canada

Public Safety Canada

Actual Results

Health Canada

Public Health Agency of Canada

Public Safety Canada

Theme 3: Build law enforcement knowledge and engage partners and stakeholders on public safety

Expected results

Public Safety Canada

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Performance indicators

Public Safety Canada

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Targets

Public Safety Canada

75% of officers with access to materials find the materials helpful.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Actual Results

Public Safety Canada

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Theme 4: Provide criminal intelligence, enforcement and related training activities

Expected results

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Performance indicators

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Targets

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Learning and Development: 80%

Learning and Development: 100%

Actual Results

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Theme 5: Prevent and interdict prohibited cross-border movement of cannabis while maintaining the flow of legitimate travellers and goods

Expected results

Canada Border Services Agency

Performance indicators

Canada Border Services Agency

Targets

Canada Border Services Agency

Actual Results

Canada Border Services Agency

Variance Explanations:

Canada Border Services Agency

The variance between actual and planned spending is a result of not spending the planned contingency fund. In addition, IT work related to CBSA system enhancements to implement AMPs was delayed and resulted in the carry forward of some funds to FY 2020-21. Also, a change to internal CBSA funding allocation processes resulted in the work associated to policy being split amongst various program inventories.

Health Canada

The variance between actual and planned spending is due to additional funding received for advertising activities and a $7.1M reprofile for CSB accommodations (approved to 2020-21).

Public Safety Canada

The variance between actual and planned spending is due to events being rescheduled as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Footnote 1

Cannabis Fees Order: SOR/2018-198. http://gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p2/2018/2018-10-17/html/sor-dors198-eng.html

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

Detailed household final consumption expenditure, Canada, quarterly (x 1,000,000). https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/cv.action?pid=3610012401#timeframe

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Footnote 3

https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/publications/drugs-health-products/does-cannabis-use-increase-risk-developing-psychosis-schizophrenia.html

Return to footnote 3 referrer

Footnote 4

https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/publications/drugs-health-products/is-cannabis-safe-during-preconception-pregnancy-breastfeeding.html

Return to footnote 4 referrer

Footnote 5

Data collected in 2017 through the Canadian Tobacco, Alcohol and Drugs Survey (CTADS) between February and December 2017. Data for this survey is collected every two years. The baseline, which will be used to inform and set target values, will be available after the release of the 2019 Canadian Alcohol and Drugs Survey in 2020-21. The Canadian Alcohol and Drugs Survey replaced the Canadian Tobacco, Alcohol and Drug Survey (CTADS).

Return to footnote 5 referrer

Footnote 6

Data is unavailable at this time. As this indicator aggregates data from multiple licence types, and since the Cannabis program is working towards setting service standards for all licence types, cleaning data and changing processes, it is expected that the Cannabis Program will be able to start to collect data for the purpose of annual reporting from April 1, 2020, and that it will be able to report data accurately on this indicator for the fiscal year 2020-21.

Return to footnote 6 referrer

Footnote 7

This indicator has been modified in 2019-20 to better assess the impact of program activities on licence holders. Actual result will be available by March 31, 2021.

Return to footnote 7 referrer

Footnote 8

The RCMP has applied an internal service level objective of 75% of all files with no adverse information completed within 15 business days.

Return to footnote 8 referrer

Footnote 9

While the RCMP was unable to meet its service standard target in 2019-20, it worked with HC to prioritize urgent files. Urgent files were completed at a rate that met or exceeded the service standard, with 85% of files with no adverse information being completed within 15 business days. Furthermore, to address this issue, the RCMP increased recruiting and training efforts, resulting in the onboarding of additional FTEs to meet this service standard in future years.

Return to footnote 9 referrer

Footnote 10

Data collected in 2018-19 through the Canadian Student Tobacco Alcohol and Drugs Survey. Data is collected every two years.

Return to footnote 10 referrer

Footnote 11

The survey for this indicator has been discontinued. Moving forward, this indicator will be replaced by an indicator to measure the intended outcome "% of Canadians who strongly agree or somewhat agree that they have access to information about the health risks of cannabis to make informed decisions". This will be reflected in the 2021-22 Horizontal Initiative Annex.

Return to footnote 11 referrer

Footnote 12

Data collected in 2016.

Return to footnote 12 referrer

Footnote 13

A 2020 survey found that 19% of Canadians state they are aware, while 36% are somewhat aware, of the laws around cannabis and the legal consequences of breaking cannabis laws.

Return to footnote 13 referrer

Footnote 14

A 2020 survey found that 31% of Canadians who have used cannabis in the past 12 months said they typically acquire it from a legal storefront, and 17%, from a legal online source.

Return to footnote 14 referrer

Footnote 15

As of March 31, 2020, 57% of all law enforcement across Canada (including RCMP) had completed the courses on cannabis legislation. This represents an increase of 6% since the last reporting exercise. Most of the training for law enforcement related to the new cannabis legislation was undertaken in fiscal year 2018-19.

Return to footnote 15 referrer

Footnote 16

In fiscal year 2019-20, 87% of Officers with access to materials found the materials helpful.

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Footnote 17

Unable to measure this performance indicator at this time. However, Public Safety Canada will develop a survey for stakeholders in FY 2020-21 to gather data for this indicator.

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Footnote 18

During the 2019-20 fiscal year, 2 of 5 cannabis-related research reports were finalized and published on the Public Safety Canada website (40%). Three reports have not yet been published due to delays in the publishing process.

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Footnote 19

143 information inquiries responded to by the Centre for Youth Crime Prevention; additional 140 requests received to be granted access to the Cannabis classroom presentation.

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Footnote 20

Three (3) training sessions took place during fiscal year 2019-20 (in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Nova Scotia). A total of 68 Officers completed the training. 100% of Alberta respondents Agreed or Strongly Agreed that the presentation on Cannabis was very effective to their training. The surveys for the Saskatchewan and Nova Scotia training sessions, which were administered to officers on paper at the conclusion of the training sessions, were not available to include in the actual result.

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Footnote 21

A target and target date cannot be established at this time as the information available on organized crime groups in relation to cannabis is insufficient due to the reallocation of enforcement resources to other criminal threats. A target and a target date will be established by December 31, 2022, once a new data collection process is implemented.

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Footnote 22

Criminal Intelligence Service Canada (CISC) is collecting information to reduce intelligence gaps pertaining to the illicit cannabis market and will be establishing a National Working Group on Cannabis by November 2020.

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Footnote 23

This course does not require annual refreshers, so a year-to-year reduction is expected. The result in 2018-19 was 51%; the cumulative to date is therefore 65%. The target will be adjusted in future years to show a cumulative result since the launch of the course.

Return to footnote 23 referrer

Footnote 24

Individuals who completed the Cannabis course in the first year it was launched (2018-19) responded with an 83% satisfaction rate. This decrease in 2019-20 can be attributed to the fact that individuals are more likely to report that the training itself increased their knowledge on the subject. Those that have taken the course later may have learned something on the job first and felt the course did not teach them more. Also, given the smaller number of people that completed the course within the fiscal year, the sample size that actually completed the evaluation form is even smaller, thus the percentage results are based on an even smaller population.

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Footnote 25

This indicator has been achieved in fiscal year 2018-19 and is deemed complete.

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Footnote 26

In addition to sampling, time was spent to develop detailed cannabis analysis and testing methods. As a result, the number of samples able to be processed in fiscal year 2019-20 was lower than expected.

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Footnote 27

This indicator captures the volume of appeals received and does not inform the intended outcome. This indicator has been removed and this has been reflected in the 2020-21 Horizontal Initiative Annex. CBSA will continue to report on its service standards to inform this outcome.

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Footnote 28

Since cannabis legalization, no trade related appeal decisions for cannabis tariff classification were processed by the CBSA.

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Footnote 29

This indicator captures the volume of appealed at the Courts or Tribunals and defended by Recourse and does not inform the intended outcome. This indicator has been removed and this has been reflected in the 2020-21 Horizontal Initiative Annex. CBSA will continue to report on its service standards to inform this outcome.

Return to footnote 29 referrer

Footnote 30

The Recourse Program does not have an oversight function once complaints are assigned to the CBSA Office of Primary Interest (Branches and Regions). This is an Agency performance indicator and target. The program is responsible for logging, tasking and administrative closures of complaints.

Return to footnote 30 referrer

Gender-Based Analysis Plus

Institutional GBA+ Capacity

In 2019-20, Health Canada continued to strengthen the implementation of Gender-Based Analysis plus (GBA+) through its Sex and Gender Action Plan launched in 2017. The Action Plan provides a framework that strengthens the integration of sex, gender and diversity considerations (such as age and ethnicity) in externally as well as internally facing work of the Department. The priorities of the three-year Action Plan are to build departmental capacity, strengthen the evidence base and expertise, and increase accountability. Note that the terms Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+) and Sex and Gender-Based Analysis Plus (SGBA+) refer to the same concept. Health Canada has chosen to use SGBA+ to emphasize the fact that differences between women, men and gender-diverse individuals can be biological (sex related) and/or socio-cultural (gender related).

Each branch participated in at least one sex, gender and/or diversity related activity. The Department, in collaboration with the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), established research-policy partnerships, which support researchers, who have both subject matter and SGBA+ expertise, to engage with departmental staff on priority Health Canada initiatives.

Accountability mechanisms such as the requirement to include SGBA+ findings in Memoranda to Cabinet (MCs), Treasury Board (TB) submissions, budget proposals and regulations as well as the Department Results Framework, Performance Information Profiles, help ensure that sex, gender and diversity are systematically integrated in departmental decision-making processes.

The Gender and Health Unit, responsible for supporting the implementation of SGBA+ and integrating sex, gender and diversity related findings into departmental work, also tracks the use and quality of SGBA+ in decision-making processes such as those mentioned above. This information is included in reports to departmental senior management as well as the Women and Gender Equality Canada, and published annually on the Health Canada website. The integration of sex, gender and diversity in departmental work has also been advanced by the federal government's focus on gender equality, diversity and inclusion. This has increased the number of requests for SGBA+ advice and assistance and resulted in the need for more staff. The unit added a Director and an Analyst during this period.

Highlights of GBA+ Results by Program

Internal Services
External Services

Controlled Substances

Cannabis

Consumer Product Safety

Tobacco Control

Food and Nutrition

Health Impacts of Chemicals

Pesticides

Response to parliamentary committees and external audits

Response to parliamentary committees

CANADIANS AFFECTED BY RARE DISEASES AND DISORDERS: IMPROVING ACCESS TO TREATMENT

The House of Commons Standing Committee on Health (Committee) held five meetings and heard from 24 witnesses, including government officials, physicians, researchers, industry representatives and patient groups, and received 10 written submissions. These witnesses outlined key challenges Canadians face in accessing treatment for rare diseases in the following areas:

Witnesses told the Committee that there is a lack of coordination between federal regulatory approval processes for the sale of drugs for rare diseases and provincial and territorial processes that make reimbursement decisions about these drugs. This lack of coordination leads to delays in treatment for patients. Health Canada also needs to do a better job of communicating its regulatory decisions to physicians and patients.

The biggest barrier limiting patients' access to these drugs is their affordability. Drugs for rare diseases can cost between $500,000 to $4.9 million per person per year.

With more and more of these drugs coming to market, governments may not be able to cover the costs of the drugs without sacrificing other health care priorities. Governments also face difficulties justifying spending funds on the reimbursement of these drugs when there is limited evidence showing that they offer significant health benefits. At the same time, drug manufacturers must continue to have incentives to invest in the development of treatments in this area and to seek market authorization for the sale of these drugs in Canada.

The Committee agreed with witnesses that it is time to change Canada's approach towards drugs for rare diseases. The Committee made 19 recommendations in this report that focused on:

The Government Response supported the general intent of the Committee's Report.

Budget 2019 proposed investments to move forward on three foundational elements of national pharmacare building on the Government's ongoing commitment to its pharmaceuticals agenda. This included up to $1 billion over two years, starting in 2022-23, with up to $500 million per year ongoing, to help Canadians with rare diseases access the drugs they need by establishing a national strategy for high-cost drugs for rare diseases. This strategy will be developed in collaboration with Provincial and Territorial (PT) governments and other stakeholders. In addition, this strategy will be informed by the recommendations of the Advisory Council on the Implementation of National Pharmacare in their June 2019 final report.

Since 2016, improving the affordability, accessibility and appropriate use of prescription drugs for Canadians has been a shared priority of Federal, Provincial and Territorial governments. The Government continues to provide leadership and work collaboratively with PT governments to achieve improved coordination and greater efficiency in the management of prescription drugs in Canada. These actions have resulted in more timely and improved access to prescription drugs including high-cost drugs for rare diseases for Canadians and respond to many of the Report's recommendations.

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Response to audits conducted by the Office of the Auditor General of Canada (including audits conducted by the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development)

2018-19 Environmental petitions annual report

This year's Annual Report of the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development indicates that 12 petitions, addressing a wide range of issues, were received between July 1, 2018 and June 30, 2019 and three of these were directed to Health Canada. Canadians petitioned Health Canada for information regarding the use of the herbicide glyphosate (two petitions) as well as pesticides (one petition).

The report was tabled on December 10, 2019.

Response to audits conducted by the Public Service Commission of Canada or the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

Horizontal audit on credential validation

The objectives of the audit conducted by the Public Service Commission of Canada (PSC) were:

The audit examined a representative sample of 278 external appointments made between April 1, 2015, and March 31, 2016, across 15 departments and agencies, and across 20 occupations with responsibilities related to the health, safety or security of Canadians.

The audit findings indicate a high level of compliance with respect to educational and professional qualification requirements. The audit confirmed that all credentials claimed by appointees in 269 appointments were valid and issued by legitimate institutions. However, there were 9 appointments (out of the total sample of 278 appointments) where the audit team did not have enough information to complete validation, for reasons outlined in the report.

While the authenticity of the credentials claimed by appointees was largely confirmed, the audit did reveal a lack of understanding of the requirement for appointees to provide proof of Canadian equivalency for foreign credentials. Qualification standards, established by the Treasury Board of Canada, stipulate that candidates with foreign credentials must have those credentials assessed against Canadian educational standards and found to be comparable. Sub-delegated managers did not follow through on this requirement in 12 of the 24 appointments (50%) where it applied. This observation leads to the single recommendation stemming from the audit (made to the PSC). There were no recommendations for Health Canada.

The report was published on May 29, 2019.

Up-Front Multi Year Funding

Conditional Grant to Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement

General information

Name of recipient

Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI), formerly the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation (CHSRF)

Start date

1996-97

End date

Not applicable

Link to the Program Inventory

Description

When CHSRF was established as an independent organization, its priorities were to bring researchers and decision-makers together to identify gaps in applied health services research, fund the researchers who could investigate those gaps, and promote best practices of health services delivery and their outcomes. To reflect the evolution of its work, CHSRF was renamed the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI) in 2012. CFHI aims to identify proven innovations and accelerate their spread across Canada by supporting healthcare organizations to adapt, implement and measure improvements in patient care, population health and value-for-money.

Up-front multi-year funding to CFHI has included:

Audit findings by the recipient during the reporting year, and future plan

CFHI's financial records are reviewed and audited annually by independent external auditors. The 2019-20 external financial and pension audits showed no major concerns. Independent external auditors will continue to perform audits on an annual basis.

Evaluation findings by the recipient during the reporting year, and future plan

CFHI pursues ongoing internal evaluative and measurement work of its activities and reports its results through its website and annual reports. It also undertook an independent 5-year corporate evaluation for the period of 2014-2019 in 2019-20 to examine the relevance, effectiveness and efficiency of CFHI's work. The results were released in late June 2020 and included: CFHI is in very good alignment with the priorities and requirements of the various stakeholder groups it woks with; it has greatly contributed to the acceleration of healthcare improvements in Canada and it has achieved a high degree of success in achieving its outcomes; and it has a well-defined governance mechanism and policies in place at the Board of Directors level.

Summary of results achieved by the recipient

CFHI facilitates ongoing interaction, collaboration, and exchange of ideas and information between governments and others from the public and private health care sectors; patients, families and caregivers; and health and social service providers; It does so by finding and promoting innovators and innovations; driving rapid adoption of proven innovations; enabling improvement-oriented systems; and, shaping the future of healthcare. There are no new results associated with the conditional grant to report for 2019-20. With the announcement of ongoing funding through contribution funding (separate from this endowment funding) in Budget 2017, CFHI has been considering how to best use its remaining up-front multi-year funding (approximately $11 million) that has been held in reserve for potential costs related to a potential organizational wind-down (e.g., legal obligations related to its pension plan and contracts) should it be needed. In late 2019-20, CFHI and the Canadian Patient Safety Institute decided to amalgamate their organizations and as amalgamation activities and costs are finalized, CFHI may rely on a portion of its remaining up-front multi-year funding to cover amalgamation costs.

Financial information (dollars)
Total funding received 2019–20
Planned spending
2019–20
Total authorities available for use
2019–20
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
$151,500,000 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Explanation of variances -
Note: CFHI's contribution funding is reported under the Details on Transfer Payment Programs of $5 Million or More section of the Supplementary Information Tables.

Conditional Grant to Canada Health Infoway

General information

Name of recipient

Canada Health Infoway (Infoway)

Start date

March 31, 2001(a)

(a) The original allocation (2001) was governed by a Memorandum of Understanding. Presently, Infoway is accountable for the provisions of three active funding agreements, signed in: March 2003 (encompasses 2001 and 2003 allocations), March 2004, and March 2010.

End date

March 31, 2015(b)

(b) As per the 2010 funding agreement, the duration of the agreement is until the later of: the date upon which all Up-Front Multi-Year Funding provided has been expended; or March 31, 2015. Funds from the 2007 funding agreement (which was signed in March 2007) were expended in 2018-19.

Link to the Program Inventory

Description

Canada Health Infoway Inc. is an independent, not-for-profit corporation established in 2001 to accelerate the development of electronic health technologies such as electronic health records (EHRs) and telehealth on a pan-Canadian basis.

Between 2001 and 2010, the Government of Canada committed $2.1 billion to Infoway in the form of grants and up-front multi-year funding consisting of: $500 million in 2001 to strengthen a Canada-wide health infostructure, with the EHRs as a priority; $600 million in 2003 to accelerate implementation of the EHRs and Telehealth; $100 million in 2004 to support the development of a pan-Canadian health surveillance system; $400 million in 2007 to support continued work on EHRs and wait time reductions; and $500 million in 2010 to support continued implementation of EHRs, implementation of electronic medical records (EMRs) in physicians' offices, and integration of points of service with the EHRs systemFootnote 2. Infoway invests in electronic health projects in collaboration with a range of partners, in particular provincial and territorial governments, typically on a cost-shared basis. Project payments are made based on the completion of pre-determined milestones.

It is anticipated that Infoway's approach, where federal, provincial and territorial governments participate toward a goal of modernizing electronic health information systems, will reduce costs and improve the quality of health care and patient safety in Canada through coordination of effort, avoidance of duplication and errors, and improved access to patient data.

Audit findings by the recipient during the reporting year, and future plan

The annual independent financial and compliance audits were conducted during the year, and both resulted in unqualified audit reports. There were no other audits scheduled or conducted during the year.

Evaluation findings by the recipient during the reporting year, and future plan

Not applicable

Summary of results achieved by the recipient

Results associated with Infoway's legacy activities funded under Up-Front Multi-Year Funding (2001 to 2010) to Canada Health Infoway include the following initiatives and activitiesFootnote 3.

Closing the Circle of Care First Nations Expansion ProjectFootnote 4

Infoway and Mustimuhw Information Solutions Inc. are partners on the Mustimuhw solution, which focuses on the community health centre and will give people access to their health information when combined with the Mustimuhw Personal Health Record. This solution was developed by First Nations for First Nations. Secure messaging is an important component of the solution, enhancing interactions between patients and providers. This is especially helpful in northern and remote care settings. As of March 31, 2020, this initiative was serving 285 communities in seven provinces, out of a target of 226 communities across 10 provinces and territories.

Patient Portals

Patient portals are gaining momentum in several jurisdictions. They can include features such as access to appointment bookings, diagnostic imaging reports, lab test results, vaccines and immunization histories and prescription and medication history. Specific Infoway projects include:

Telehomecare

In 2019-20, Infoway continued to support telehomecare projects for individuals with chronic conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and congestive heart failure. In 2019-20, Infoway helped Newfoundland and Labrador deploy digital solutions in the homes of 913 patients living with chronic diseases and conditions, and the Ontario Community Paramedicine Remote Patient Monitoring project enrolled just under 1,300 patients. Recent (2018) telehomecare reports indicate a 44-85% reduction in hospitalizations and a 35-63% reduction in trips to the emergency department. These reports also indicate that telehomecare projects have resulted in improved patient experience and knowledge about their illness. Specifically, 91% of telehomecare patients feel more informed about their chronic condition, 91% are better able to manage their health condition as a result of the program, and 87% feel they have improved quality of life.

The use of Telehealth, including virtual technologies such as videoconferencing and tele-dermatology has exceeded one million consultations a year across Canada for the second year in a row. More than 1.4 million visits were offered through telehealth in 2019, an increase of more than 25% from 2018. Virtual technologies such as tele-mental health and tele-stroke helped patients living in rural and remote communities avoid more than 355 million kilometres of travel in 2019, resulting in an estimated annual reduction of 97,000 metric tons of CO2 emissions. More than 55,000 Canadians have enrolled in telehomecare programs since 2010, with 14,819 enrolling in 2019-20.

Pan-Canadian Leadership in Digital Health Knowledge and Collaboration

In 2019-20, Infoway continued to provide national leadership and insights in areas such as privacy, security, solution architecture and standards, interoperability, clinical engagement, change management and benefits evaluation. The 2019 Infoway Partnership Conference, "Driving Access to Care" included a diverse line-up of national and international speakers who discussed opportunities and addressed the challenges of transforming health care delivery in Canada. Infoway also supported the work of the Canadian Medical Association, the College of Family Physicians of Canada, and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, in the development and release of the Virtual Care Task Force's final report and recommendations for scaling up virtual care services in Canada. In partnership with the Canadian Nurses Association and the Canadian Nursing Informatics Association, Infoway conducted a survey to understand the current use of electronic record/clinical information systems by nurses in Canada across clinical practice settings.

In 2018-19, Infoway and Health Canada co-developed a national drug terminology called the Canadian Clinical Drug Data Set. This drug terminology is an important component of many digital health systems that Canadians rely on, such as e-prescribing, hospital discharge reports, and adverse drug reaction reporting. It will also be a foundational support for national pharmacare because information systems will need consistency in the language they use to describe medication characteristics, strengths, and forms. In 2019-20, the Canadian Clinical Drug Data Set was translated into French so that it is now operational in digital health systems across the country in both official languages.

Financial information (dollars)
Total funding received (dollars) 2019–20
Planned spending
2019–20
Total authorities available for use
2019–20
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2019–20 actual minus 2019–20 planned)
2,083,267,490 10,130,622 10,130,622 10,130,622 -
Explanation of variances N/A
Note: Budget 2016 and 2017 contribution funding to Infoway is reported under the Details on Transfer Payment Programs of $5 Million or More section of the Supplementary Information Tables.
Footnote 1

Note: This evaluation was completed in 2019-20, but was not approved by the Deputy Head until 2020-21 due to COVID-19 impacts.

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Footnote 2

Note that this report captures only those Infoway legacy activities remaining from historical up-front multi-year funding agreements. The bulk of Infoway's current activities relate to Budget 2017 contribution funding to Infoway, which is reported through the 2019-20 Departmental Results Report.

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Footnote 3

Please note that this section reports on Infoway's legacy activities funded under up-front multi-year funding agreements. The majority of Infoway's current activities relate to Budget 2017 contribution funding to Infoway that supports implementation of a multi-jurisdiction e-prescribing solution (Prescribe IT), as well as the ACCESS Health initiative that aims to provide Canadians with access to their personal health information and digital health solutions, and allow health care providers to share patient information.

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Footnote 4

The Closing the Circle of Care First Nations Expansion Project is partially funded by the 2003 funding agreement and by a contribution agreement for funds allocated under Budget 2017.

Return to footnote 4 referrer

Footnote 5

Carnet Santé is partially funded by the 2003 funding agreement and by a contribution agreement for funds allocated under Budget 2017.

Return to footnote 5 referrer

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