Supplementary Information Tables 2018-19 Departmental Plan: Health Canada

Table of Contents


Details on Transfer Payment Programs of $5 Million or More

Health Care Policy Contribution Program

General Information

Name of transfer payment program
Health Care Policy Contribution Program (HCPCP) (Voted)
Start date
September 24, 2002
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Contribution
Type of appropriation
Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2010-11
Link to Department's Program Inventory
Core Responsibility: Health Care Systems
Program 1: Health Care Systems Analysis and Policy
Description
The HCPCP provides up to $26.9M per fiscal year in time-limited contribution funding for projects that address specific health care systems priorities, including home and palliative, health care systems innovation, and health human resources. Through the implementation of contribution agreements and a variety of stakeholder engagement activities, Health Canada contributes to the development and application of effective approaches to support sustainable improvements to health care systems.
Expected results
Program funding will support a wide range of projects designed to ultimately contribute to improvements in health care systems. For example, health care innovation projects will support activities that develop, implement and evaluate tools, models, and practices that address identified health care systems priorities. Other projects will produce resources that enable health providers to maximize their roles in a range of settings; provide system managers and decision-makers with data and decision-making tools to enhance system planning and performance; and engage key stakeholders in collaborative efforts that contribute to specific health care systems improvements relevant to program priorities.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
2013-14
Decision following the results of last evaluation
Continuation
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
2018-19
General targeted recipient groups
Non-profit organizations, other levels of government and other national organizations
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients
The Program engages recipients, potential recipients, and the public in various ways, for example, through regular project monitoring stakeholder meetings and project site visits.
Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2020–21 Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 26,674,000 26,874,000 26,874,000 26,874,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 26,674,000 26,874,000 26,874,000 26,874,000

Contribution to the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement

General Information

Name of transfer payment program
Contribution to the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI) (Voted)
Start date
December 10, 2015
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Contribution
Type of appropriation
Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2015-16 (updated in 2017-18)
Link to Department's Program Inventory
Core Responsibility: Health Care Systems
Program 1: Health Care Systems Analysis and Policy
Description

The contribution to CFHI supports the federal government's interest in achieving an accessible, high quality, sustainable and accountable health system, adaptable to the needs of Canadians. It is designed to support CFHI's work to identify savings and efficiencies in the health system by: building leadership and skill capacity; enabling patient, family and community engagement; applying improvement methodology to drive measurable results; and, creating collaborative to spread evidence-informed improvements.

CFHI previously operated as the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation (CHSRF), an arm's-length, non-profit, charitable organization with a mandate to fund health services research and promote the use of research evidence to strengthen the delivery of health services. CHSRF received $151.5M in federal funding under three separate grants (1996-97 to 2003-04).

Expected results
Funding to CFHI will be used to identify and accelerate the spread of promising innovations across Canada by supporting health care organizations to adapt, implement and measure improvements in patient care, health status and value for money in health care spending. CFHI's activities are expected to result in: health care leaders that are knowledgeable and skilled in carrying out health care improvements; patients, families and communities that are engaged in health care improvement and co-design; and improvements to health care practices, delivery models and related policies of participating organizations. Over time, these best practices are expected to take hold in the system and spread within and across organizations, regions, provinces/territories and ultimately contribute to improvements in health care system performance in Canada.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
N/A (A recipient evaluation of CFHI was conducted in 2013-14)
Decision following the results of last evaluation
N/A
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
No planned evaluations at this time. An evaluation will be considered by Health Canada, in the context of its annual Five-Year Evaluation Plan.
General targeted recipient groups
CFHI is the sole recipient under the Terms and Conditions
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients
Health Canada works with CFHI to establish activities to be carried out under the funding agreement and maintains regular contact with CFHI to monitor progress and compliance under the funding agreement.
Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2020–21 Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 17,000,000 17,000,000 17,000,000 17,000,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 17,000,000 17,000,000 17,000,000 17,000,000

Note: CFHI is also reported under the "Up-Front Multi-Year Funding" section of the Supplementary Information Tables.

Contribution to the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health

General Information

Name of transfer payment program
Contribution to the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH) (Voted)
Start date
April 1, 2008
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Contribution
Type of appropriation
Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions

Updated 2017-18

Terms and Conditions (Ts and Cs) as approved for the Contribution Agreement will apply to future CADTH agreements until such time as they are superseded. The fiscal year for those Ts and Cs follows the traditional fiscal year calendar, from April 1 through March 31 of the following calendar year.

Effective April 1, 2013, the CADTH funding was transitioned to a Contribution Agreement from a Named Grant. The change allows Health Canada to augment monitoring and management of the funds. In December 2017, CADTH submitted a proposal for a five-year renewal of its existing funding (2017 to 2022) and the additional $36M investment announced in Budget 2017. The new funding agreement is currently being drafted.

The previous Named Grant covered the period of 2008 to 2013.

Link to Department's Program Inventory
Core Responsibility: Health Care Systems
Program 2: Access, Affordability, and Appropriate Use of Drugs and Medical Devices
Description

The CADTH is an independent, not-for-profit agency funded by Canadian federal, provincial, territorial governments and Canada's Research-Based Pharmaceutical Companies (the latter through fees) to provide credible, impartial advice and evidence-based information about the clinical and cost effectiveness of drugs and other health technologies to Canadian health care decision-makers.

The purpose of the renewed Contribution Agreement is to provide financial assistance to support CADTH's core business activities;

  • Health Technology Knowledge Products and Services, including Health Technology Assessment (HTA) and Optimal Use, to encourage optimal prescribing, purchasing, and use of health technologies and prescription drugs.
  • Formulary Reviews, comprised of the Common Drug Review (CDR) and the pan-Canadian Oncology Drug Review, that provide information on the clinical and cost-effectiveness of drugs and issue non-binding formulary listing recommendations to participating public drug plans.
  • Transition to a Health Technology Management Agency
Expected results

Through the creation and dissemination of evidence-based information that supports informed decisions on the adoption and appropriate utilization of drugs and non-drug health technologies (i.e., medical devices), in terms of both effectiveness and cost, the expected results are:

Short-term Outcomes:

  • Health care decision-makers access evidence on drugs and medical devices.
  • Health care decision-makers are equipped with increased knowledge, skills and supports on drugs and medical devices.

Medium-term Outcome:

  • Health care decision makers optimally use drugs and medical devices.

Long-term Outcome:

  • Canada has modern and sustainable health care systems.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
2016-17
Decision following the results of last evaluation
Continuation
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
2021-22
General targeted recipient groups
Non-profit organizations
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients
  • Drug Policy Advisory Committee and the Formulary and Optimal Use Working groups.
  • Recommendations from the CDR and pan Canadian Oncology Review expert committees.
  • Evidence and information from Optimal Use projects, HTA analyses and rapid responses.
  • Health Technology Analysis Exchange.
Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2020–21 Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 18,058,769 20,058,769 23,058,769 26,058,769
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 18,058,769 20,058,769 23,058,769 26,058,769

Strengthening Canada's Home and Community Care and Mental Health and Addiction Services Initiative

General Information

Name of transfer payment program
Strengthening Canada's Home and Community Care and Mental Health and Addiction Services Initiative (Voted)
Start date
November 09, 2017
End date
March 31, 2027
Type of transfer payment
Contribution
Type of appropriation
Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2017-18
Link to Department's Program Inventory
Core Responsibility: Health Care Systems
Program 3: Home, Community and Palliative Care
Program 4: Mental Health
Description

The Government of Canada is investing $11B over ten years (2017-2027) to support the provinces and territories (PTs) in implementing home care ($6B) and mental health and addictions ($5B) initiatives in their jurisdictions as per the Common Statement of Principles for Shared Health Priorities (CSoP) adopted on August 21, 2017.

By endorsing the CSoP, PTs fulfilled the conditions set out in the Budget Implementation Act 2017 to receive funding for fiscal year 2017-18 through a statutory appropriation ($300M). The remaining nine years of funding ($10.7B) will be provided through bilateral funding agreements with high level conditions to report on common indicators.

On mental health and addictions, provinces and territories have agreed to focus on:

  • Expanding access to community-based mental health and addiction services for children and youth (age 10-25), recognizing the effectiveness of early interventions to treat mild to moderate mental health disorders;
  • Spreading evidence-based models of community mental health care and culturally-appropriate interventions that are integrated with primary health services; and,
  • Expanding availability of integrated community-based mental health and addiction services for people with complex health needs.

On home and community care, provinces and territories have agreed to focus on:

  • Spreading and scaling evidence-based models of home and community care that are more integrated and connected to primary health care;  
  • Enhancing access to palliative and end of life care at home or in hospices;
  • Increasing support for caregivers; and,
  • Enhancing home care infrastructure, such as digital connectivity, remote monitoring technology and facilities for community based service delivery.

Currently the Government of Canada is working with jurisdictions to finalize bilateral agreements that set out the details of how each jurisdiction will use federal funding for future years.  These agreements also include details on conditions to receive funding including reporting to the Canadian Institute for Health Information on common indicators.

Expected results
It is expected that through these investments Canadians will experience tangible improvements in access to home and community care as well as mental health and addictions services. This will lead to better health outcomes and a more sustainable health care system, as care is shifted from expensive hospital care to home and community-based service delivery. These investments could also have a broader, positive impact on Canada's economy, by making the health care system more sustainable in the long term, and by enhancing workforce productivity and social participation.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
N/A
Decision following the results of last evaluation
N/A
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
2022-23
General targeted recipient groups
Provinces and Territories
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

With respect to mental health and addictions, the Government of Canada has engaged with provinces and territories, National Indigenous Organizations, mental health stakeholders, provincial and territorial medical associations and treatment centres, and academia.

With respect to the home and community care, the Government of Canada has engaged with a range of home care stakeholders including representatives from National Organizations working on home, community and palliative care, provincial home care providers, patient and family advocates, and national health professional associations (e.g., the Canadian Medical Association, Canadian Nurses Association and the College of Family Physicians of Canada), as well as academia.

Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2020–21 Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 0 850,000,000 1,100,000,000 1,250,000,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 0 850,000,000 1,100,000,000 1,250,000,000

The amounts are notional and subject to annual adjustments based on revised population data from Statistics Canada.

Mental Health Commission of Canada Contribution Program

General Information

Name of transfer payment program
Mental Health Commission of Canada Contribution Program (MHCC) (Voted)
Start date
April 1, 2017
End date
March 31, 2019
Type of transfer payment
Contribution
Type of appropriation
Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2017-18 to 2018-19
Link to Department's Program Inventory
Core Responsibility: Health Care Systems
Program 4: Mental Health
Description
The Mental Health Commission of Canada (MHCC), is an arm's length, not-for-profit organization established in March 2007 with a ten-year mandate to improve health and social outcomes for people and their families living with mental illness. Between 2007 and 2017, the Government of Canada invested $130M in the MHCC through a grant, to develop a mental health strategy for Canada, conduct an anti-stigma campaign and create a knowledge exchange centre. In 2016, the MHCC's mandate was renewed for a two-year period, from 2017-18 to 2018-19, with a contribution of $14.25M per year to advance work on mental health priorities, including problematic substance use, suicide prevention, support for at-risk populations and engagement.
Expected results
This initiative is expected to contribute to the improved mental health and well-being of Canadians, specifically in the areas of problematic substance use, suicide prevention, and stigma reduction.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
2015-16
Decision following the results of last evaluation
Continuation
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
2020-21
General targeted recipient groups
The MHCC is the sole recipient.
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients
Regular meetings with the recipient; analysis and follow-up of progress and financial reporting; and monitoring performance and results.
Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2020–21 Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 14,250,000 14,250,000 0 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 14,250,000 14,250,000 0 0

Substance Use and Addictions Program

General Information

Name of transfer payment program
Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP) (Voted)
Start date
December 4, 2014
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Contribution
Type of appropriation
Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2014-15
Link to Department's Program Inventory
Core Responsibility: Health Care Systems
Program 5: Substance Use and Addictions
Description

The overall objective of the SUAP is to facilitate the development of responses to legal and illegal substance use issues along the continuum of care from health promotion and prevention to harm reduction, treatment and rehabilitation by: preventing problematic substance use and reducing harms; facilitating treatment and related system enhancements; and improving awareness, knowledge, skills and competencies of targeted stakeholders and Canadians.

Expected results

Outputs and Indicators
Knowledge Products  

  • Number of knowledge products created by funded Recipients under the SUAP (by type)

Learning opportunities

  • Number of learning opportunities delivered (by funding Recipients, to targeted stakeholders and Canadians by intended audience, reach and purpose)

Outcomes and Indicators
Short-term:
Targeted stakeholders and Canadians access evidence-informed information on substance use.

  • Number of individuals accessing the knowledge products by: type (targeted stakeholder, targeted Canadian).
  • Number of participants in learning opportunities by: type of participant (targeted stakeholder, targeted Canadian).

Targeted stakeholders and Canadians are equipped with the capacity (knowledge, skills and supports) to inform their decisions and actions related to substance use.

  • Percentage of stakeholders and Canadians reporting that they gained knowledge by: sex; Official Language; type of knowledge.
  • Percentage of stakeholders and Canadians reporting that they gained skills by: sex; Official Language; type of skills.
  • Percentage of stakeholders and Canadians reporting that they have the social and physical supports they need by: sex; Official Language; type of supports.
  • Percentage of stakeholders and Canadians reporting that they intend to use knowledge and skills by: sex; Official Language.

Medium-Term:
Targeted stakeholders use evidence-informed information on substance use to change policies, programs, and practice.

  • Percentage of targeted stakeholders reporting that they made evidence informed improvements to substance use policies, programs and practice by: type of improvement.

Targeted Canadians take positive actions with respect to substance use.

  • Percentage of targeted Canadians reporting they used knowledge and skills to take positive actions by: sex; Official Language type of behaviour change (reduced use, safer use, not using, etc.).

Long-term:
Canadians have access to quality, evidence informed health promotion, prevention, treatment and harm reduction programs and services.

  • Percentage of stakeholders reporting that project(s) contributed to Canadians having access to quality, evidence informed health promotion, prevention, treatment and harm reduction programs and services.
  • Percentage of projects reporting they plan to sustain activities post-Health Canada funding.
  • Level of reduced duplication and/or cost savings (e.g. sharing of processes, tools, learnings).

Canadians have better health outcomes.

  • Extent to which project(s) contributed to Canadians having better health outcomes (e.g. reduction or cessation of substance use, improved health, relationships, engagement with community, etc.).
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
Evaluation of the Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund - 2014-15
Evaluation of the Drug Treatment Funding Program - 2013-14
Decision following the results of last evaluation
Continuation
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
2019-20
General targeted recipient groups
  • Canadian not-for-profit health organizations including hospitals, regional health councils and community health organizations;
  • Canadian not-for-profit organizations and registered not-for-profit charitable organizations, where there will be a preference for those with recent and significant experience addressing substance use and related issues;
  • Canadian institutions including universities, boards of education and other centres of education in Canada;
  • Other levels of government including provinces, territories and municipalities, and their agencies; and,
  • Off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit not-for-profit organizations.
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients
Applicants and recipients are engaged through: solicitation processes; project development discussion; and performance reporting and monitoring tools, processes and activities. The program also supports regular knowledge translation and exchange opportunities (in-person and online) between projects, Health Canada and other partners and stakeholders.
Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2020–21 Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 26,350,014 28,050,014 28,350,014 29,350,014
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 26,350,014 28,050,014 28,350,014 29,350,014

Contribution to Canada Health Infoway

General Information

Name of transfer payment program
Contribution to Canada Health Infoway (Voted)
Start date
April 1, 2016
End date
March 31, 2022
Type of transfer payment
Contribution
Type of appropriation
Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2016-17 (amended in 2017-18)
Link to Department's Program Inventory
Core Responsibility: Health Care Systems
Program 6: Digital Health
Description
Infoway is an independent, not-for-profit corporation that is federally funded to work with jurisdictions and other stakeholders to support the development and adoption of digital health technologies across Canada. Between 2001 and 2010, the Government of Canada has invested $2.1Billion in Infoway, through grants or up-front multi-year funding, to focus on electronic health records, and other priorities in digital health. Budget 2016 allocated $50M over two years to Infoway to support short-term digital health activities in e-prescribing and telehomecare, with the funds flowing as a Contribution Agreement. Budget 2017 allocated $300M over five years to Infoway to expand e-prescribing and virtual care initiatives, support the continued adoption and use of electronic medical records, help patients to access their own health records electronically, and better link electronic health record systems to improve access by all providers and institutions. These funds are to flow as a Contribution Agreement.
Expected results
Provincial/Territorial governments and stakeholders engaged in expanding digital health technologies; health care providers and patients accessing, and equipped with the knowledge and skills to use, digital health technologies and digital health information; health care providers using digital health technologies to provide more efficient and high quality health care; and patients using digital health technologies to manage and/or improve their health to a modern and sustainable health care system where Canadians have access to appropriate and effective health care.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
N/A
Decision following the results of last evaluation
N/A
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
An evaluation will be considered by Health Canada, in the context of its annual Five-year Departmental Annual Evaluation Plan.
General targeted recipient groups
Non-profit organizations
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients
Health Canada works with Infoway to establish activities to be carried out under the Contribution Agreement, and maintains regular contact with Infoway to monitor progress and compliance under the Contribution Agreement.
Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2020–21 Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 47,000,000 50,000,000 75,000,000 77,000,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 47,000,000 50,000,000 75,000,000 77,000,000

Note: Infoway is also reported under the "Up-Front Multi-Year Funding" section of the Supplementary Information Tables.

Contribution to the Canadian Institute for Health Information

General Information

Name of transfer payment program
Contribution to the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) (Voted)
Start date
April 1, 1999
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Contribution
Type of appropriation
Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2017-18

New Terms and Conditions (Ts and Cs) for the Health Information Initiative (HII) were approved by Treasury Board on June 15, 2017. These new Ts and Cs provide the Minister of Health the authority to renew Funding Agreements with the recipient without returning to Treasury Board Secretariat. There is no expiry date for the HII's Ts and Cs.

Link to Department's Program Inventory
Core Responsibility: Health Care Systems
Program 7: Health Information
Description

The CIHI is an independent, not-for-profit organization supported by federal, provincial and territorial governments (F/P/T) that provides essential data and analysis on Canada's health system and the health of Canadians. CIHI was created in 1994 by the F/P/T Ministers of Health to address significant gaps in health information.

Between 1994 and 2012 the Government of Canada allocated approximately $757M in total to CIHI through a series of funding agreements. Under the current agreement, close to $475M has been delivered to CIHI over 6 years (2012-13 to 2017-18). Negotiations for a new contribution agreement are underway and should be completed in early 2018. This contribution agreement will span five years from 2017-18 to 2021-22. Presently, Health Canada funds 78% of CIHI's total budget, while the P/T governments contribute 17%. The remaining funds are generated largely through product sales.

This funding allows CIHI to provide essential information on Canada's health care systems and the health of Canadians. CIHI provides comparable and actionable data and information that are used to accelerate improvements in health care, health system performance and population health across the continuum of care. CIHI's stakeholders use the broad range of the Institute's health system databases, measurements and standards, together with their evidence-based reports and analyses, in their decision-making processes. CIHI protects the privacy of Canadians by ensuring the confidentiality and integrity of the health care information they provide.

Expected results

The expected results are as follows:
Be a trusted source of standards and quality data by:

  • Increasing the use of health data standards to achieve quality data;
  • Closing the data gaps in priority areas;
  • Making data collection easier and improve timeliness; and,
  • Making data more accessible.

Expand analytical tools to support measurements of health systems by:

  • Comparing health systems in priority areas;
  • Enriching the information infrastructure, grouping methods and decision-support tools;
  • Expanding their analytical products using innovative approaches, including data linkage and predictive modelling; and,
  • Transforming CIHI's digital presence into a core strategic asset.

Produce actionable analysis and accelerate its adoption by:

  • Producing analyses that contribute new information and insights, working with external partners and with intended end-users to create a culture of co-development;
  • Engaging with stakeholders to enable better use of health data and information; and,
  • Providing customized products and services to support decision-making needs.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
2014-15
Decision following the results of last evaluation
Continuation
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
2018-19
General targeted recipient groups
The HII was developed to support CIHI only; as such, CIHI is the only recipient of HII funding. This caveat is noted in the Ts and Cs for the HII, which stipulates that CIHI is, and only ever will be, the recipient of HII funding.
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients
CIHI is the sole recipient of HII funding.
Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2020–21 Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 81,748,979 83,808,979 87,658,979 92,658,979
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 81,748,979 83,808,979 87,658,979 92,658,979
 

Contribution to the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer

General Information

Name of transfer payment program
Contribution to the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (CPAC) (Voted)
Start date
April 1, 2007
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Contribution
Type of appropriation
Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2017-18
Link to Department's Program Inventory
Core Responsibility: Health Care Systems
Program 10: Cancer control
Description

CPAC is an independent, not-for-profit corporation established to implement the Canadian Strategy for Cancer Control (CSCC). The CSCC was developed in consultation with more than 700 cancer experts and stakeholders with the following objectives:

  • Reduce the expected number of new cases of cancer among Canadians;
  • Enhance the quality of life of those living with cancer; and,
  • Lessen the likelihood of Canadians dying from cancer.

Health Canada is responsible for managing the funding to the corporation. CPAC was eligible to receive $250M from the federal government for its first five-year term (2007 to 2012) and $241M for its second five-year term (2012 to 2017). Budget 2016 confirmed ongoing funding for CPAC, which is governed by a five-year agreement (2017 to 2022) for $237.5M.

Expected results
  • Enhanced cancer control through knowledge management and the coordination of efforts among the provinces and territories, cancer experts, stakeholder groups, and Indigenous organizations to champion change, improve health outcomes related to cancer, and leverage existing investments.
  • A coordinated, knowledge-centered approach to cancer control is expected to significantly reduce the economic burden of cancer, alleviate current pressures on the health care system, and bring together information for all Canadians, no matter where they live.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
2015-16
Decision following the results of last evaluation
Continuation
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
2018-19
General targeted recipient groups
Non-profit organizations
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients
Health Canada works with CPAC to establish activities to be carried out under the funding agreement. This also includes maintaining regular contact with CPAC to monitor progress and compliance under the funding agreement.
Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2020–21 Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 39,900,000 43,100,000 51,000,000 51,000,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 39,900,000 43,100,000 51,000,000 51,000,000

Contribution to the Canadian Patient Safety Institute

General Information

Name of transfer payment program
Contribution to the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) (Voted)
Start date
April 1, 2013
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Contribution
Type of appropriation
Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2012-13
Link to Department's Program Inventory
Core Responsibility: Health Care Systems
Program 11: Patient Safety
Description
CPSI supports the federal government's interest in achieving an accessible, high quality, sustainable and accountable health system adaptable to the needs of Canadians. It is designed to improve the quality of health care services by providing a leadership role in building a culture of patient safety and quality improvement in the Canadian health care system through coordination across sectors, promotion of best practices, and advice on effective strategies to improve patient safety. The first five-year grant funding agreement with CPSI ended on March 31, 2008, and was renewed for an additional five years, starting April 1, 2008 and ending March 31, 2013. A new five-year contribution agreement began on April 1, 2013 and has been extended by one year to March 31, 2019.
Expected results

CPSI provides leadership and coordination of efforts to prevent and reduce harm to patients, with an emphasis on four key areas: safety improvement projects; making patient safety a priority across health care systems; influencing policy, standards, and regulations so that they incorporate best patient safety evidence and practices; and creating and strengthening alliances and networks with partners such as patients, governments, and industry who are committed to making care safer.

CPSI's work is expected to contribute to sustained improvements in patient safety across Canada, resulting in reduced incidence rates of preventable harm, and healthier Canadians.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
2017-18
Decision following the results of last evaluation
Continuation
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
2018-19
General targeted recipient groups
CPSI is the sole recipient under the Terms and Conditions
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients
Health Canada works with CPSI to establish activities to be carried out under the funding agreement and maintains regular contact with CPSI to monitor progress and compliance under the funding agreement.
Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2020–21 Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000

Canadian Blood Services: Blood Research and Development Program

General Information

Name of transfer payment program
Canadian Blood Services: Blood Research and Development Program (Voted)
Start date
April 1, 2000
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Contribution
Type of appropriation
Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2013-14
Link to Department's Program Inventory
Core Responsibility: Health Care Systems
Program 12: Blood System, Organs, Tissue and Transplantation
Description
To support basic, applied and clinical research, on blood safety and blood product safety and effectiveness issues under the auspices of the Canadian Blood Services.
Expected results
A strong Research and Development program that supports safety, quality and the supply of blood and blood products.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
2017-18
Decision following the results of last evaluation
Continuation
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
2022-23
General targeted recipient groups
Canadian Blood Services is the sole recipient.
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients
Meetings with recipients; knowledge transfer activities; site visits; analysis and follow-up of progress and financial reporting; and monitoring of performance and results.
Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2020–21 Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000

Official Languages Health Contribution Program

General Information

Name of transfer payment program
Official Languages Health Contribution Program (OLHCP) (Voted)
Start date
June 18, 2003
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Contribution
Type of appropriation
Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2017-18
Link to Department's Program Inventory
Core Responsibility: Health Care Systems
Program 13: Promoting Minority Official Languages in the Health Care Systems
Description

The OLHCP has a total budget of $174.3M (ongoing, over five years). The program is entering a new funding phase for 2018 to 2023.

The Program supports eligible activities under the following three program streams:

  1. Training and retention of health professionals
    Provide funding for French language academic health programs in 11 colleges and universities outside of Quebec, and to McGill University for English language academic training and for health professionals and intake personnel in Quebec.
  2. Health Networking
    Provide funding to 38 existing community based health networks across Canada to continue increasing or improving access for Official Language Minority Communities (OLMCs) to health services.
  3. Innovative Projects to Improve Access to Health Services for OLMCs
    Provide funding for projects aimed at improving access to health services for OLMCs in priority areas such as home care, mental health, and palliative and end of life care. Initiatives must support: health human resource integration; knowledge development and dissemination; and community health improvement.
Expected results
  • Increased access to bilingual health professionals in OLMCs;
  • Increased offer of health services targeted to OLMCs
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
2016-17
Decision following the results of last evaluation
Continuation
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
2021-22
General targeted recipient groups
Eligible recipients under the program are non-profit entities, provincially-accredited postsecondary institutions and provincial and territorial government bodies.
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Regular meetings are held between Health Canada officials and recipient organizations, including management meetings, community-based events (conferences, consultations), face-to-face meetings and site visits.

A new Federal Health Portfolio Consultative Committee for OLMCs, with representatives from Health Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, was created in November 2017 to share information related to OLMCs.

Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2020–21 Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 33,800,000 33,800,000 33,800,000 33,800,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 33,800,000 33,800,000 33,800,000 33,800,000

Canada Brain Research Fund Program

General Information

Name of transfer payment program
Canada Brain Research Fund Program (CBRF) (Voted)
Start date
April 1, 2011
End date
March 31, 2020
Type of transfer payment
Contribution
Type of appropriation
Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2016-17
Link to Department's Program Inventory
Core Responsibility: Health Care Systems
Program 14: Brain Research
Description

In Budget 2011 and 2016, the Government of Canada committed up to $120M, in matched funding with non-federal government donors, to establish the CBRF Program "to support the very best Canadian neuroscience, and accelerate discoveries to improve the health and quality of life for Canadians who suffer from brain disorders." The Government of Canada's objective in funding the CBRF was:

  • To serve as a focal point for private investment in brain research by attracting private and charitable donations to match federal funding; and,
  • To support research that advances knowledge of the brain through grants to researchers.
Expected results
The expected results for the program include:

Short-term:

  • Donors and partners invest in brain research;
  • Canadian researchers are equipped to undertake collaborative research on the brain and brain diseases/disorders; and,
  • Canadian researchers advance knowledge on the brain and brain diseases/disorders.

Medium-term:

  • Research stakeholders use research findings to inform future brain research (funding, agenda, and community); and,
  • Stakeholders use knowledge to inform the development of prevention, diagnostic, therapeutic, clinical, technological and health system solutions for brain diseases/disorders.

Long-term:

  • Canada has modern and sustainable health care systems; and,
  • Improvements in health outcomes of Canadians at risk of or affected by brain diseases/disorders.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
2016-17
Decision following the results of last evaluation
Based on the evaluation recommendation, Health Canada made adjustments to the matched funding model that is reflected in the current Terms and Conditions.
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
The current funding agreement ends in March 2020 and the program is not scheduled to undergo another evaluation.
General targeted recipient groups
University and research hospital-based neuroscientists from across Canada.
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients
N/A
Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2020–21 Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 20,000,000 23,500,000 13,174,646 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 20,000,000 23,500,000 13,174,646 0

Thalidomide Survivors Contribution Program

General Information

Name of transfer payment program
Thalidomide Survivors Contribution Program (Voted)
Start date
June 19, 2015
End date
March 31, 2021Footnote 1
Type of transfer payment
Contribution
Type of appropriation
Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2015-16
Link to Department's Program Inventory
Core Responsibility: Health Care Systems
Program 15: Thalidomide
Description

The program objectives are to ensure that, for the remainder of their lives, eligible thalidomide survivors:

  • Receive ongoing tax-free payments based on their level of disability; and,
  • Have transparent and timely access to the Extraordinary Medical Assistance Fund.
Expected results
Expected results are that thalidomide survivors will access care, treatment and/or support which in turn will contribute to their aging with dignity.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
N/A (new program)
Decision following the results of last evaluation
N/A
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
2019-20
General targeted recipient groups
Canadian not-for-profit and for-profit organizations
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients
Applicants and recipients are engaged through solicitation processes and regular monitoring activities such as reporting, performance measurement, meetings and ongoing communication to support simple, pro-active, accessible program delivery to meet the needs of thalidomide survivors. Key stakeholders are engaged in program design.
Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2020–21 Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 8,323,200 8,489,664 8,659,457 8,832,646
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 8,323,200 8,489,664 8,659,457 8,832,646

The Territorial Health Investment Fund

General Information

Name of transfer payment program
Territorial Health Investment Fund (THIF) (Voted)
Start date
April 1, 2014
End date
March 21, 2021
Type of transfer payment
Grant
Type of appropriation
Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2017-18
Link to Department's Program Inventory
Core Responsibility: Health Care Systems
Program 16: Territorial Health Investment Fund
Description

The Territorial Health Investment Fund (THIF) provided an investment of $70M over three years (2014-15 to 2016-17). Due to a significant delay resulting from a number of factors in implementing the contribution agreements in year one, the terms and conditions were extended, with no additional funding, until 2017-18 to ensure territorial governments could complete projects as planned). The THIF was subsequently renewed in 2017-18 with an additional $108M over four years (2017-18 to 2020-21). Of this funding, $54M will be allocated to Nunavut, $28.4M to Northwest Territories and $25.6M to Yukon. This funding will enable each territory to continue pursuing innovative activities in support of strong, sustainable health systems, while at the same time maintaining funding to offset costs associated with medical travel to improve Northerners' access to the health care they need.

Terms and Conditions of the THIF were amended in 2017-18 to enable the transfer of funds as a grant rather than a contribution. The use of grant agreements will minimize the administrative burden on territories related to financial reporting and thereby increase their ability to reduce overhead costs of the THIF.

Expected results
The THIF will support territorial efforts to innovate and transform their health care systems and help offset costs associated with medical travel. The THIF is expected to result, for Northerners, in: improved access to health care services; health care need being met; and, improved health status.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
N/A
Decision following the results of last evaluation
N/A
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
2018-19
General targeted recipient groups
Territorial governments (Government of the Northwest Territories, Government of Yukon, Government of Nunavut)
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients
Health Canada worked with territorial governments to establish four year work plans for use of the grant funding and to secure grant agreements. Health Canada will get annual updates on planned activities from the territorial governments (including through a Federal/Territorial Assistant Deputy Minister Working Group) and will work with territorial governments throughout the life of the agreements to monitor progress and compliance under the grant agreements.
Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2017–18 Forecast spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2020–21 Planned spending
Total grants 27,000,000 27,000,000 27,000,000 27,000,000
Total contributions 0 0 0 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 27,000,000 27,000,000 27,000,000 27,000,000

Disclosure of transfer payment programs under $5 million

Contribution to Strengthen Canada's Organs and Tissues Donation and Transplantation System

General Information

Name of transfer payment program
Contribution to Strengthen Canada's Organs and Tissues Donation and Transplantation System (Voted)
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Grant
Type of appropriation
Estimates
Link to Department's Program Inventory
Core Responsibility: Health Care Systems
Program 12: Blood System; Organs, Tissue and Transplantation
Main objective
To support the development of a national organ and tissue donation and transplantation system that will improve and extend the quality of the lives of Canadians while respecting the federal role and interest in organ and tissue donation and transplantation.
Planned spending in 2018-19
$3,580,000
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
2017-18Footnote 2
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
2022-23Footnote 3
General targeted recipient groups
The Canadian Blood Services is the sole recipient under the Terms and Conditions.

Climate Change and Health Adaptation Capacity Building Contribution Program

General Information

Name of transfer payment program
Climate Change and Health Adaptation Capacity Building Contribution Program (Voted)
End date
2021-22
Type of transfer payment
Grants and Contribution
Type of appropriation
Estimates
Link to Department's Program Inventory
Core Responsibility: Health Care Systems
Program 23: Climate Change
Main objective
To protect and improve the health of Canadians in a changing climate through better understanding of risks and effective adaptation measures, and by building needed capacity to implement them.
Planned spending in 2018-19
$1,000,000
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
Not applicable
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
2021-22
General targeted recipient groups
Provincial and territorial ministries of health; and established province-wide, regional and local health authorities and public health units.

Horizontal initiatives

Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy

General Information

Lead department
Health Canada

Federal partner organizations

  • Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)
  • Canada Revenue Agency (CRA)
  • Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)
  • Correctional Service Canada (CSC)
  • Indigenous Services Canada (ISC)Footnote 4
  • Department of Justice (DoJ)
  • Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC)
  • Global Affairs Canada (GAC)
  • Parole Board of Canada (PBC)
  • Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)
  • Public Prosecution Service of Canada (PPSC)
  • Public Safety Canada (PSC)
  • Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC); and
  • Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

Non-federal and non-governmental partner
Not applicable.

Start date of the horizontal initiative
April 1, 2017

End date of the horizontal initiative
2021-22 and Ongoing

Description of the horizontal initiative

The Government of Canada is committed to a comprehensive, collaborative, compassionate and evidence-based approach to drug policy, which uses a public health approach when considering and addressing drug issues. To that end, on December 12, 2016, the Minister of Health announced an updated drug strategy for Canada: The Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy (CDSS).

The CDSS is led by the Minister of Health, supported by Health Canada and 14 other federal departments and agencies. The CDSS formally restores harm reduction as a key pillar of Canada's drug strategy alongside prevention, treatment and enforcement. With this change, harm reduction-focused policies — such as support for properly established and maintained supervised consumption sites, and increased access to naloxone — are now a formal part of the Government's strategy. The public health focus on the CDSS, along with the inclusion of harm reduction as a core pillar of the strategy, will better enable the Government to address the current opioid crisis, and to work toward preventing the emergence of new challenges. Following the Budget 2017 announcement, CDSS received $102.4 million over 5 years (2017-18 to 2021-22) and $23.0 million ongoing to Health Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada, and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research to support the CDSS, building on its ongoing existing funding.

The CDSS replaced the National Anti-Drug Strategy (NADS). The NADS was established in 2007 and lead by the Department of Justice. Allocated federal funding from 2007-12 was $570.4M, with $114.1M ongoing, for twelve federal departments and agencies for prevention, treatment and enforcement action plans. In 2014, the NADS was expanded to activities to address problematic prescription drug use (with an additional investment of $44.32M over 5 years (2014-15 to 2018-19) with $5.01M ongoing (2019-20 onwards) to Health Canada and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

The objective of the Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy (CDSS) is to strengthen Canada's current approach to problematic drug and substance use by:

  • Adopting a comprehensive, collaborative, and compassionate approach;
  • Using a public health lens to address problematic drug and substance use issues;
  • Employing a strong evidence base; and
  • Addressing a broad range of psychoactive substances.

The four pillars of the CDSS are:

  • The prevention pillar supports and implements evidence-based initiatives to increase awareness of the risks of substance use, and reduce the use of controlled substances;
  • The treatment pillar supports evidence-based treatment options, improvements to treatment services, and collaboration and knowledge sharing on innovative approaches to treatment and rehabilitation;
  • The harm reduction pillar supports measures that reduce the negative health, social and economic effects of substance use on individuals, families and communities, including measures to address the harms caused by stigma; and
  • The enforcement pillar increases the capacity of law enforcement to target organized crime, supports the criminal justice system to investigate and prosecute drug related crimes, helps identify and control new and dangerous psychoactive substances, and helps to reduce the risk of diversion of controlled substances from otherwise legal activities.

A strong evidence base supports the use of timely, comparable, national-level data to help develop effective drug and substance policies.

The CDSS recognizes that the national approach to substance use requires coordinated efforts from all levels of government working in their respective areas of jurisdiction. It also recognizes the importance of incorporating stakeholder views on an ongoing basis, including people with lived and living experiences.

Governance structures

The CDSS is led by the Minister of Health. The strategy, which is in its first year, is currently coordinated through a Director-General (DG) level committee that reports to Assistant Deputy Ministers. This committee is supported by working groups that cover issues related to prevention, treatment, harm reduction, enforcement, evidence and reporting. Current federal/provincial/territorial (F/P/T) engagement is achieved through a number of F/P/T mechanisms, including the F/P/T Committee on Problematic Substance Use and Harms Committee that is co-chaired by Health Canada and the Province of British Columbia. Secretariat support for the CDSS is provided by the Controlled Substances Directorate of Health Canada.

Health Canada is currently working with federal partners under the CDSS to assess the existing governance structure of the strategy in order to increase its effectiveness and support the goals of the CDSS.

Total federal funding allocated (2017-18 to 2021-22)
$660,073,934

Total federal planned spending 2017-18 to March 31, 2017
$134,998,956

Total federal actual spending 2017-18 to March 31, 2017
2017-18 is the first full fiscal year of the CDSS horizontal initiative

Date of last renewal of the Horizontal Initiative
Not applicable.

Total federal funding allocated at the last renewal and source of funding (dollars)
Not applicable.

Additional federal funding received after the last renewal (dollars)
Not applicable.

Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners
Not applicable.

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
2021-22

Shared long-term outcomes of federal partners

As part of the work plan for the first year of the CDSS, Health Canada will work with other federal CDSS partners to revise and update the long-term outcomes (and their associated performance indicators and targets) to reflect the direction and goals of the CDSS, which is focused on implementing a comprehensive, collaborative, compassionate and evidence-based approach to drug policy, that is bassed on a public health approach. Current shared long-term outcomes are:

  • Reduced problematic prescription drug use (PPDU) in Canada;
  • Reduced demand for illegal drugs in targeted populations and areas;
  • Reduced negative health and social impacts and crime related to illegal drug use and problematic prescription drug use;
  • Reduced supply of illegal drugs; and
  • People who use drugs and substances experience reduced negative health impacts.

Performance Indicators

  • Extent to which Strategy activities have, or are contributing to, reduced problematic prescription drug use (PPDU) in Canada
  • Extent to which Strategy activities have, or are contributing to, reduced demand for illegal drugs (e.g. deterred or delayed onset of use among populations targeted for prevention)
  • Trends in illegal drug use among populations targeted (e.g. age of onset, prevalence, patterns of use)
  • Extent to which Strategy activities have, or are contributing to, a reduction in the health and social impacts of illegal drugs and PPDU in targeted areas
  • Extent to which Strategy activities have, or are contributing to, a reduction in crime related to illegal drug use in targeted areas
  • Extent to which Strategy activities have, or are contributing to, a reduction in the supply of illegal drugs within Canada
  • Number of apparent opioid-related deaths per 100,000 population
  • Percentage reduction in the number of new HIV diagnoses associated with injection drug use

Targets

Health Canada will work with the other federal CDSS partners to review and update the shared long term outcomes (and their associated performance indicators and targets) to increase its effectiveness and support the goals of the strategy.

Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners
Not applicable.

Horizontal Initiative Themes:

As described above, there are five key themes under the CDSS:

1) Prevention; 2) Treatment; 3) Harm Reduction; 4) Enforcement; and supported by a strong 5) Evidence Base. 

Prevention:
Health Canada will work with the other federal CDSS partners to review and update the shared outcomes (and their associated performance indicators and targets) for the Prevention pillar to reflect the direction and goals of the CDSS.

Treatment:
Health Canada will work with the other federal CDSS partners to review and update the shared outcomes (and their associated performance indicators and targets) for the Treatment pillar to reflect the direction and goals of the CDSS.

Harm Reduction:
Shared Outcome: Reduction in risk-taking behaviour among people with problematic drug or substance use
Indicator #1: Percentage of targeted Canadians reporting they used knowledge and skills by: sex, Official Language; type of behaviour change (reduced use, safer use, not using, etc.)
Target: 60% of targeted Canadians reporting they used knowledge and skills to take positive actions with respect to substance use behavior by 2021 (Baseline to be established in 2018-19)

Indicator #2: Percentage decrease of sharing drug use equipment among people who use drugs
Target: 10% decrease by 2020; 15% decrease by 2022

Indicator #3: Average percentage of First Nations people and Inuit per community who received problematic substance use community-based supports
Target: 14.04% by March 2021

Enforcement:
Health Canada will work with the other federal CDSS partners to revise and update the shared outcomes (and their associated performance indicators and targets) for the Enforcement pillar to reflect the direction and goals of the CDSS.

Evidence base:
Shared Outcome: Data and research evidence on drugs, and emerging drug trends, are used by members of the federal Health Portfolio and their partners
Indicator: Percentage of targeted stakeholders reporting that they made evidence informed improvements to substance use policies, programs and practice by: type of improvement
Target: 60% of targeted stakeholders reporting evidence informed improvements to substance use policies, programs, and practices by 2021 (Baseline to be established in 2018-19)

Planning highlights
All federal departments under the CDSS will work collaboratively to achieve the vision of a comprehensive, collaborative and compassionate approach to drug and substance use. This will include engagement with provincial and territorial governments and a wide range of stakeholders, including people with lived and living experience. Planning highlights will include:

  • Moving forward in priority areas, including working with provinces and territories to improve access to treatment, addressing stigma, supporting research and surveillance activities to build the evidence base, exploring new and innovative approaches to problematic drug and substance use, and ongoing enforcement and compliance activities;
  • Improving and enhancing the governance of the CDSS to strengthen collaboration and support the directions and goal of the strategy;
  • Strengthening relationships with drug policy stakeholders groups across Canada, including those with lived and living experience; and
  • Undertaking a detailed review of CDSS objectives, outcomes, and performance indicators.

Contact information

Michelle Boudreau
Director General
Controlled Substances Directorate
Health Canada
613-960-2496
Michelle.boudreau@canada.ca

Planning Summary
Federal organizations Link to department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activities Total allocation (from 2017-18 to 2021-22) (dollars) 2018–19 Planned spending (dollars) 2018–19 Expected results 2018–19 Performance indicators 2018–19 Targets Date to achieve target
Health Canada Controlled Substances Office of Controlled Substances
(Enforcement)
31,221,420Footnote i 6,244,284Footnote i [ER 1.1] [PI 1.1] [T 1.1] March 2019
Transfer to Regulatory Operations and Regions Branch for Compliance and Enforcement Activities
(Enforcement)
9,753,510Footnote i 1,950,702Footnote i
Strengthening the Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy
(Harm Reduction & Evidence Base)
5,802,490 1,187,402 [ER 1.2] [PI 1.2] [T 1.2] March 2019
April 2022
4,109,773 1,328,722
9,207,092 1,906,380
8,520,776 1,125,431
Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP)
(Prevention, Treatment, Harm Reduction & Evidence Base)
113,937,570Footnote ii 22,787,514Footnote ii [ER 1.3] [PI 1.3] [T 1.3] Not applicable
10,000,000Footnote ii 2,000,000Footnote ii March 2019
Drug Analysis Services
(Enforcement)
53,825,065Footnote i 10,765,013Footnote i [ER 1.4] [PI 1.4] [T 1.4] March 2019
Drug Analysis Services
(Harm Reduction)
6,572,662 4,100,027
Problematic prescription drug use (PPDU)  (Prevention) 18,601,487Footnote i 5,680,866Footnote i [ER 1.5] [PI 1.5] [T 1.5] March 2019
Health Canada Lead Role for the Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy 2,436,740 487,348 [ER 1.6] [PI 1.6] [T 1.6] March 2019
  Internal Services (CDSS Harm Reduction and Evidence Base) 2,280,107 472,938 Not applicable
Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) Chronic (non-communicable) Disease and Injury Prevention Chronic Disease and Injury Surveillance (Evidence Base) 844,603Footnote i 281,720Footnote i [ER 2.1] [PI 2.1] [T 2.1] April 2022
Communicable Diseases and Infections Control Grants and contributions - Transmission of Sexually Transmitted and Blood Borne Infections
(Harm Reduction)
30,000,000Footnote ii 6,000,000Footnote ii [ER 2.2] [PI 2.2] [T 2.2] April 2022
Internal Services (CDSS Evidence Base) 55,397 18,280 Not applicable
Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Research in Priority Areas Research on Drug Treatment Model
(Treatment)
6,874,990 1,974,998 [ER 3.1] [PI 3.1] [T 3.1] March 2019
Canadian Research Initiative in Substance Misuse (Evidence Base) 10,000,000 2,000,000 [ER 3.2] [PI 3.2] [T 3.2] April 2022
Indigenous Services Canada (ISC) Mental Wellness (First Nations and Inuit Mental Wellness Program) Grants and Contributions –Mental Wellness Program
(Harm Reduction)
15,000,000Footnote ii 2,000,000Footnote ii [ER 4.1] [PI 4.1] [T 4.1] March 2019; and
March 2021
Grants and Contributions – Mental Wellness Program
(Treatment)
60,357,585Footnote ii 12,071,517Footnote ii
Problematic prescription drug use (PPDU)(Prevention) 14,376,000 2,838,000 Not applicable
Department of Justice (DoJ) Drug Treatment Court Funding Program Youth Justice Fund
(Treatment)
18,156,380 3,631,276 [ER 5.1] [PI 5.1] [T 5.1] March 2019
Youth Justice Youth Justice (Treatment) 7,957,625 1,591,525 [ER 5.2] [PI 5.2] [T 5.2]
Internal Services 42,375 8,475 Not applicable
Public Safety Canada (PSC) Law Enforcement National Coordination of Efforts to Improve Intelligence, Knowledge, Management, Research, Evaluation
(Enforcement)
2,942,660 588,532 [ER 6.1] [PI 6.1] [T 6.1] March 2019
Internal Services 75,710 15,142 Not applicable
Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) Federal Policing (FP)
Prevention
Federal Policing Public Engagement (FPPE)
(Prevention)
11,555,602 2,335,986 [ER 7.1] [PI 7.1] [T 7.1] March 2019
Federal Policing (FP)
Investigations
Federal Policing Project-Based Investigations
(Enforcement)
85,974,790 17,379,960 [ER 7.2] [PI 7.2] [T 7.2] Not applicable
Internal Services 14,439,825 2,836,065 Not applicable
Correctional Services Canada (CSC) Correctional Interventions Case Preparation and Supervision of Provincial Offenders (Enforcement) 3,027,280 743,349 [ER 8.1] [PI 8.1] [T 8.1] March 2019
Community Supervision Case Preparation and Supervision of Provincial Offenders (Enforcement) 6,231,200 1,108,348
Parole Board of Canada (PBC) Conditional Release Decisions Conditional Release Decisions – (Provincial reviews)
(Enforcement)
5,557,500 199,000 [ER 9.1] [PI 9.1] [T 9.1] March 2019
Conditional Release Decisions Openness and Accountability Conditional Release Decisions Openness and Accountability (Provincial reviews)
(Enforcement)
2,137,500 97,000 [ER 9.2] [PI 9.2] [T 9.2] March 2019
Internal Services 1,710,000 35,000 Not applicable
Public Prosecution Service of Canada (PPSC) Drug, National Security and Northern Prosecutions Program Prosecution of serious drug offences under the CDSA to which mandatory minimum penalties are applicable. (Enforcement) 15,596,460 3,119,292 [ER10.1] [PI 10.1] [T 10.1] Not applicable
Prosecution and Prosecution-related Services (Enforcement) 33,182,275 6,636,455 [ER 10.2] [PI 10.2]
Internal Services Prosecution of serious drug offences under the CDSA to which mandatory minimum penalties are applicable. (Enforcement) 2,345,825 469,165 [ER 10.3] [PI 10.3] Not applicable
Targeting Intelligence Security Screening
(Enforcement)
4,863,660 972,732
Canadian Border Services Agency (CBSA) Risk Assessment Targeting Intelligence Security Screening
(Enforcement)
10,500,000 2,100,000 [ER 11.1.1]
[ER 11.1.2]
[ER 11.1.3]
[PI 11.1] [T 11.1]  
Criminal Investigations 1,000,000 200,000 [ER 11.2]
Internal Services 6,500,000 1,300,000 Not applicable
Global Affairs Canada (GAC) Diplomacy, Advocacy and International Agreements Annual Voluntary Contributions to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and the Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (CICAD) of the American States (OAS)
(Enforcement)
4,500,000 900,000 [ER12.1] [PI 12.1] [T 12.1] March 2019
Canada Revenue Agency Domestic Compliance Forensic Accounting Management Group (FAMG)
(Enforcement)
5,000,000 910,512Footnote i [ER 13.1] [PI_131] [T 13.1] March 2019
Public Services and Procurement Canada Specialized Programs and Services Financial Intelligence Program
(Enforcement)
3,000,000 600,000 [ER 14.1] [PI 14.1] [T 14.1] Not applicable
Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada
(FINTRAC)
Financial Intelligence Program Financial Intelligence Program
(Enforcement)
0 0 [ER 15.1] [PI 15.1] [T 15.1] Not applicable
Total for all federal organizations 660,073,934 134,998,956  

Total Funding Allocation and Planned Spending amounts are shown including EBPs @ 20% and PWGSC accommodation premium @ 13%, unless specified otherwise.

Footnote i

Amount includes EBPs @ 20%, PWGSC accommodation premium @ 13% and internal services

Return to footnote i referrer

Footnote ii

Amount constitutes Grants and/or Contributions, therefore do not include EBP or Accommodation premiums

Return to footnote ii referrer

Planning summary information

2018-19 Expected ResultsFootnote *

Health Canada

ER 1.1

  1. Authorizations to perform legitimate activities with controlled substances, precursor chemicals and industrial hemp are processed in a timely manner.
  2. Increased compliance and reduced risk of diversion of controlled substances, prescription drugs and precursor chemicals.

ER 1.2

  1. Increased availability of harm reduction services.
  2. Increased availability of data and research evidence on drugs and substances.

ER 1.3

Provide up to $26.3 million under the Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP) to support evidence-informed and innovative health promotion, prevention, harm reduction and treatment initiatives to address substance use, including core funding for the Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addition (CCSA). In 2018-19, the focus will be on funding and supporting the early implementation of a new cohort of prevention, treatment and harm reduction initiatives resulting from a call for proposals launched late in the 2017-18. As a result, performance measurement will focus on program output and short-term indicators.

ER 1.4

  1. Increased effectiveness in drug analysis.
  2. Data and research evidence on drugs and emerging drug trends are used by members of the federal Health Portfolio and their partners.

ER 1.5

  1. Increased availability of data and research evidence on drugs and substances.
  2. Increased compliance and reduced risk of diversion of controlled substances, prescription drugs and precursor chemicals.

ER 1.6

Effective coordination of the CDSS.

Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)

ER 2.1

The Public Health Agency of Canada, through national-level surveillance of opioid-related deaths and other harms, will provide a pan-Canadian picture of the public health impact of opioid overdoses to effectively guide policy, prioritize and develop evidence-based interventions, and drive research.

ER 2.2

Support for time-limited projects are expected to increase knowledge of how to reduce risk behaviours related to the sharing of injection and inhalant drug use equipment, and result in a reduction in risk-taking behaviours. The program will result in enhanced capacity to prevent infections associated with shared drug use equipment and increased access to harm reduction and other services, while also reducing stigma and discrimination among this population.

Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)

ER 3.1

In alignment with the CDSS goals, in 2018-19, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) will continue to fund the Canadian Research Initiative in Substance Misuse (CRISM) Network, a national research consortium in problematic substance use, with four research Nodes across Canada (located in British Columbia, the Prairies, Ontario, and Quebec and the Maritimes) that enhances collaboration between researchers, service providers, policy makers and people with lived experience.

In 2018-19, it is expected that CRISM will:

  • Continue to conduct research to enhance prevention, harm reduction and/or treatment for people living with problematic substance use;
  • Increase research capacity in the field of problematic drug and substance use disorder;
  • Build relationships with health care practitioners, policy makers and people with lived experience;
  • Continue recruitment of patients to the pan-Canadian clinical trial, OPTIMA, that compares two models of care for the treatment of opioid use disorder; and
  • Hold an annual meeting of their Network Executive Committee to discuss coordination of nationally-relevant activities, strategies, progress, best practices and challenges.

In 2018-19, CIHR will deliver up to 18 knowledge syntheses relevant to one or more of the four pillars of the CDSS (i.e., prevention, harm reduction, treatment and enforcement) and the opioid crisis.

ER 3.2

In 2018-19, a baseline will be established for the percentage (%) of federal health publications in areas related to problematic substance use (from Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada) citing CIHR-funded research.

Indigenous Services Canada (ISC)

ER 4.1

Indigenous Services Canada's First Nations and Inuit Health Branch has capacity to plan and deliver a range of treatment services and programs to First Nations and Inuit communities.
With ongoing CDSS investments, First Nations and Inuit Health Branch (FNIHB) plans to maintain the availability of, and access to, effective treatment services and programs for First Nations and Inuit populations in areas of need. The progress of this strategy will be measured by the nature of services that have been made available through funding in targeted areas and are based on research or best practices.
With CDSS investments, FNIHB also plans to maintain treatment programs and services to address drug dependency in First Nations and Inuit populations in areas of need. The progress of this plan will be measured by:

  • the proportion of treatment facilities accredited;
  • the proportion of addictions counsellors in treatment centres who are certified;
  • the changes in stakeholder perceptions regarding the extent to which treatment services have been improved in Strategy-supported investment areas;
  • the types of collaborative/partnerships with Indigenous organizations to strengthen systems, programs and services; and
  • the number of First Nations and Inuit communities that deliver harm reduction programming

Department of Justice

ER 5.1

The criminal justice system supports alternative ways of responding to the causes and consequences of offending.

ER 5.2

Increased availability of, and access to, drug treatment services and programs for youth involved in the justice system.

Public Safety Canada (PSC)

ER 6.1

Coordinated enforcement action to address illegal drugs and substances, including illegal opioids.  

Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

ER 7.1

The RCMP will increase awareness of drugs and illegal substances among stakeholders by developing education products, supporting outreach and engagement efforts, and building new partnerships.

ER 7.2

The RCMP will focus its efforts to undertake investigations and initiatives focussing on the highest threats related to organized crime networks including those involved in the importation and trafficking of illegal drugs, including illegal opioids.

Correctional Service Canada (CSC)

ER 8.1

Timely case preparation and supervision of provincial offenders with a drug offence (Schedule II).

Parole Board of Canada (PBC)

ER 9.1

Conditional release decisions contribute to keeping communities' safe.

ER 9.2

The timely exchange of relevant information with victims, offenders, observers, other components of the criminal justice system, and the general public.

Public Prosecution Service of Canada (PPSC)

ER 10.1

Provision of pre-charge legal advice and litigation support, as well as the prosecution of drug offences under the CDSA in all provinces and territories regardless of which police agency investigates the alleged offences, except Quebec and New Brunswick. In these two provinces, the PPSC prosecutes only drug offences investigated by the RCMP.

ER 10.2

Provision of pre-charge legal advice and litigation support, as well as the prosecution of serious drug offences under the CDSA to which mandatory minimum penalties are applicable.

ER 10.3
Support the work of the program by providing key corporate services.

Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)

ER 11.1.1

Continue to increase awareness and capacity to gather information and intelligence of illegal drug issues relative to the border.

ER 11.1.2

Continue to increase intelligence and analytical support to regional enforcement activities to interdict goods entering and leaving Canada under the CDSS.

ER 11.1.3

Continue to improve relationships and communication with partner agencies under the CDSS to identify opportunities and improve intelligence activities such as targeting, information sharing and laboratory analysis related to illegal drugs and other goods (such as precursor chemicals) identified under the CDSS as they relate to the border.

ER 11.2

Continue to sample, analyse and use of mobile laboratory capabilities to assist in the detection of precursor chemicals at the ports of entry.

Global Affairs Canada (GAC)

ER 12.1

  • To assist the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and the Organization of American States-Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (OAS-CICAD) to fulfill their respective mandates in the fight against drugs and transnational crime, including efforts to reduce the supply and availability of illegal drugs. The expected results for fiscal year 2018/2019 will be increased capacity of port officials in selected countries in the Americas to intercept and seize illegal drug smuggled via legal maritime containerized cargo.

Canada Revenue Agency

ER 13.1

30 audits of taxpayers involved in the production and distribution of illegal drugs resulting in (re) assessments of $2.0 million of federal taxes.

Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC)

ER 14.1

Increased operational capacity to provide forensic accounting services to law enforcement agencies. Forensic accounting services assist law enforcement and prosecution agencies in determining whether the assets of suspects were derived from criminal activities, thereby allowing the Government of Canada to seize the assets and remove the financial incentives for engaging in criminal activities.

Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC)

ER 15.1

In 2018-2019 FINTRAC will continue to be an unfunded partner within the CDSS. Given the importance of the CDSS initiative, FINTRAC will continue to work with law enforcement and intelligence agencies to ensure they receive financial intelligence related to drug production and distribution that is useful for further actions.

Footnote *

Expected Results reflect Budget 2017, Budget 2018 expected results are not reflected.

Return to footnote * referrer

2018-19 Performance Indicators
Health Canada

PI 1.1

Percentage of licensed dealers inspected that are deemed to be compliant with the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act and its regulations

PI 1.2

  • Percentage of applications for an exemption to operate a Supervised Consumption Site that receive a decision within the service standard from the time the review is complete
  • Percentage of the United Nations Annual Report Questionnaire completed with Canadian data

PI 1.3

  1. Number of knowledge products created by funding recipients
  2. Number of learning opportunity delivered by funding recipients
  3. Number of individuals accessing the knowledge products
  4. Number of participants in learning opportunities
  5. Percentage of target population reporting that they have the social and physical supports they need
  6. Percentage of target population reporting that they intend to use the knowledge and skills
  7. Percentage of stakeholders and Canadians reporting that they gained knowledge
  8. Percentage of stakeholders and Canadians reporting that they gained skills

PI 1.4

  1. Percentage of samples analyzed within service standards (60 days or negotiated date).
  2. Number of alerts issued to clients and to provincial and territorial health authorities on newly identified potent illegal drugs in communities.

PI 1.5

Percentage of pharmacies inspected that are deemed to be compliant with the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act and its regulations

PI 1.6

CDSS performance measurement strategy revised and implemented.

Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)

PI 2.1

  • Number of apparent opioid-related deaths per 100,000 population
  • Percentage of provinces and territories reporting on a quarterly basis

PI 2.2

  • Percentage reduction in the number of new HIV diagnoses associated with injection drug use.
  • Percentage decrease of sharing drug use equipment among people who use drugs.

Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)

PI 3.1

The proportion of funded research projects with a nature and scope that support CDSS' goals.

PI 3.2

  • Percentage of grant recipients producing policy-relevant knowledge products, such as research publications, policy briefs, guidelines for policies or practice, presentations to policy audiences, and media mentions.  
  • Number of health research publications related to problematic substance use.
  • Percentage of federal health publications in areas related to problematic substance use (from Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada) citing CIHR-funded research.

Indigenous Services Canada (ISC)

PI 4.1

  1. Number of First Nations and Inuit communities that deliver harm reduction programming
  2. Average percentage of First Nations people and Inuit per community who received substance use community-based supports

Department of Justice

PI 5.1

Percentage of Drug Treatment Court participants retained for 6 months or longer in the court-monitored treatment program.

PI 5.2

Number of active projects funded under Youth Justice Fund's Drug Treatment component per fiscal year.

Public Safety Canada (PSC)

PI 6.1

Timely sharing of evidence-based knowledge and intelligence to support law enforcement actions against illegal drugs and substances, including illegal opioids.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

PI 7.1

Awareness:

  1. Number and nature of awareness products. 
  2. Number and category (targeted audiences) of stakeholders reached.
  3. Percentage of participants from targeted audiences who demonstrate an increase in awareness of problematic drug and substance use.

Partnerships:

  1. Number and nature of number of partnerships and collaborations.
  2. Qualitative assessment of extent partners have been engaged.

PI 7.2

Investigations:

  1. Number and nature of collaboration and coordination efforts related to enforcement with domestic partners.
  2. Number and nature of collaboration and coordination efforts related to enforcement with international partners.
  3. Number of investigations initiated regarding illegal drug production and/or distribution.
  4. Number/type/nature of seizures made by Federal Serious and Organized Crime (FSOC) units related to investigations on illegal drug production and/or distribution.

Correctional Services Canada (CSC)

PI 8.1

  • Total number of provincial offenders convicted of a drug offence (Schedule II) supervised by CSC.
  • Total number of provincial offenders convicted of a drug offence (Schedule II) with a residency requirement.
  • Total number of case preparation reports (pre- and post-release) completed for all provincial offenders.

Parole Board of Canada (PBC)

PI 9.1

The number and proportion of provincial offenders convicted of drug offences who successfully complete parole.

PI 9.2

The percentage of individuals (i.e., general public and victims) who are satisfied with the quality of the service.

Public Prosecution Service of Canada (PPSC)

PI 10.1

  • Number of litigation files related to the prosecution of drug offences under the CDSA referred to the PPSC during the fiscal year.
  • Number of files for which legal advice was provided by PPSC counsel.

PI 10.2

  • Number of litigation files related to the prosecution of serious drug offences under the CDSA referred to the PPSC during the fiscal year to which mandatory minimum penalties are applicable.
  • Number of files for which legal advice was provided by PPSC counsel where mandatory minimum penalties are applicable.

PI 10.3

Percentage of overall CDSS-related expenditures for corporate support to in-house legal staff.

Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)

PI 11.1

Average dollar value of goods, shipments and conveyances seized attributed to Intelligence.

Global Affairs Canada (GAC)

PI 12.1

  • The number of illegal drug seizures made by GAC-financed/UNODC trained Port Control Units in beneficiary countries.
  • The volume of illegal drug seized by GAC-financed/UNODC trained Port Control Units in beneficiary countries.

Canada Revenue Agency

PI 13.1

80% or more of audits resulting in (re) assessments.

Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC)

PI 14.1

  • The number of active CDSS files (projects) worked on related to determining whether the assets of a suspect were derived from criminal activities
  • Number of reports produced. This is further measured by classifying stage or status of each report (for example; still in legal process, settled, gone to trial, or dropped).

Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC)

PI 15.1

Total number of FINTRAC disclosures of actionable financial intelligence made to regime partners, and the number of unique disclosures of actionable financial intelligence that relate to at least one drug-related offence.

2018-19 Targets
Health Canada

T 1.1

The target value will be identified/determined by March 31, 2019. The risk-based methodologies behind assigning compliance ratings are evolving, therefore more licensed dealers may be found compliant in 2018-19. An appropriate target for 2019-20 will be established once the 2018-19 compliance rate is known.

T 1.2

  • 90% by March 31, 2019
  • 90% by April 1, 2022

T 1.3

  • a-f. The target value will be determined by March 31, 2019, once the current call for proposals and recipient performance measurement plans are complete.
  • g. 80% of stakeholders and Canadians targeted under SUAP funded initiatives report that they gained knowledge by March 31, 2019.
  • h. 80% of stakeholders and Canadians targeted under SUAP funded initiatives report that they gained knowledge by March 31, 2019.

T 1.4

  1. 95% of certificates of analysis issued within service standards or negotiated date.
  2. Demand driven

T 1.5

95% by March 31, 2019.

T 1.6
Implemented by March 31, 2019

Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)

T 2.1

  1. Decrease in baseline year over year to 2022Footnote 6
  2. 100% by 2017-18

T 2.2

  1. 25% decrease by 2022
  2. 10% decrease in sharing of drug equipment among people who use drugs, by 2020, 15% decrease by 2022

Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)

T 3.1

100% annually.

T 3.2

  • 75% of grant recipients produce policy-relevant knowledge products by 2022.
  • 100% of grant recipients producing research publications related to problematic substance use by 2022.
  • 18% of federal health publications in areas related to problematic substance use (from Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada) cite CIHR-funded research by 2022.

Indigenous Services Canada (ISC)

T 4.1

  • 8 communities by March 2019 (Number of First Nations and Inuit communities that deliver harm reduction programming)
  • 14.04% by March 2021 (Average percentage of First Nations people and Inuit per community who received substance use community-based supports)

Department of Justice

T 5.1

50% of participants are retained for six months in federally funded Drug Treatment Court programs.

T 5.2

The budget allocation is fully committed to support drug treatment programming for youth involved in the justice system. 

Public Safety Canada (PSC)

T 6.1

100% completion of planned coordination activities based on an integrated law enforcement work plan.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

T 7.1

  1. 5 drug related awareness products
  2. Approximately 500 stakeholders will be reached (stakeholders include Police, Public/Youth, and Industry/Other stakeholders)
  3. 85% of participants from targeted audiences will demonstrate an increase in awareness
  4. At least 20 partnerships/collaborations;
  5. Qualitative assessment

T 7.2

Targets are not applicable as these will vary by province/territory and is based on need.

Correctional Services Canada (CSC)

T 8.1

  • Approximately 52 provincial offenders convicted of a drug offence (Schedule II) are supervised by CSC.
  • Approximately 34 provincial offenders convicted of a drug offence (Schedule II) have a residency requirement.
  • Approximately 832 case preparation reports (pre- and post-release) are completed for all provincial offenders.

Parole Board of Canada (PBC)

T 9.1

98% of provincial offenders serving sentences for drug offences who are on parole are not convicted of a violent offence during their supervision period.

T 9.2

80% of individuals are satisfied with the quality of the service.

Public Prosecution Service of Canada (PPSC)

T 10.1

Targets are not applicable owing to the nature of the PPSC's workload and mandate.

Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)

T 11.1

9:1 ratio

Global Affairs Canada (GAC)

T 12.1

  • Illegal drug seizures are made in all beneficiary countries benefiting from GAC-financed/UNODC trained port control units.
  • At least 20 tons of illegal drugs are seized by GAC-financed/UNODC trained port control units.

Canada Revenue Agency (CRA)

T 13.1

30 audits of taxpayers involved in the production and distribution of illegal drugs resulting in (re) assessments of $2.0 million of federal taxes.

Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC)

T 14.1

The Forensic Accounting Management Group (FAMG) is expected to maintain the equivalent of three dedicated resources to work with law enforcement agencies. The targets are dependent on the projects assigned to FAMG by law enforcement agencies and are based on the resource capacity of the three senior forensic accounts.

Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC)

T 15.1

FINTRAC seeks to closely align its financial intelligence products with the needs and priorities of its investigative partners. As such, the Centre does not set specific targets for the number or types of drug-related case disclosures it produces in any fiscal year.

Chemicals Management Plan

General Information

Lead departments
Health Canada and Environment and Climate Change Canada

Federal partner organization

Health Canada

Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch:

  • Safe Environments Directorate;
  • Consumer Product Safety Directorate; and,
  • Environmental and Radiation Health Sciences Directorate.

Health Products and Food Branch:

  • Biologics and Genetic Therapies Directorate;
  • Food Directorate;
  • Policy, Planning and International affairs Directorate; and,
  • Veterinary Drugs Directorate.

Pest Management Regulatory Agency
Regulatory Operations and Regions Branch:

  • Consumer Product Safety Program; and,
  • Environmental Health Program.

Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)

  • Health Security Infrastructure Branch; and,
  • Centre for Emergency Preparedness and Response.

Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC)
Environmental Protection Branch:

  • Industrial Sectors, Chemicals and Waste Directorate;
  • Legislative and Regulatory Affairs Directorate;
  • Energy and Transportation Directorate; and,
  • Environmental Protection Operations Directorate.

Science and Technology Branch:

  • Science and Risk Assessment Directorate;
  • Wildlife and Landscape Sciences Directorate;
  • Atmospheric Science and Technology Directorate; and,
  • Water Science and Technology Directorate.

Enforcement Branch:

  • Environmental Enforcement Directorate.

Strategic Policy Branch:

  • Economic Analysis Directorate.

Non-federal and non-governmental partners
Not applicable

Start date of the horizontal initiative
2007-08

End date of the horizontal initiative
2020-21

Description of the horizontal initiative

Originally launched in 2006, the Chemicals Management Plan (CMP) enables the Government of Canada to protect human health and the environment by addressing substances of concern in Canada. It is a science-based approach that includes:

  • Setting priorities and timelines for risk assessment and risk management of chemicals and other substances of concern;
  • Enhancing research, monitoring and surveillance;
  • Increasing industry stewardship and responsibilities for substances;
  • Collaborating internationally on chemicals assessment and management;
  • Communicating to Canadians the potential risks of chemical and other substances; and,
  • Engaging industry to inform risk assessment and risk management action while also enhancing trust in the program.

Jointly managed by Health Canada and ECCC, the CMP brings all existing federal chemical programs together under a single strategy. This integrated approach allows the Government of Canada to address various routes of exposure to chronic and acute hazardous substances. It also enables use of the most appropriate management tools among a full suite of federal laws, which include the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (CCPSA), the Food and Drugs Act (F&DA), the Pest Control Products Act (PCPA), the Fisheries Act and the Forestry Act.

In the second phase of CMP (CMP2, 2011-12 to 2015-16), priority setting for existing substances was refined and the remaining substances were grouped to provide efficiencies for risk assessment and risk management as a result of lessons learned from the first phase of the program (CMP1, 2007-08 to 2010-11). The third phase (CMP3, 2016-17 to 2020-21) includes both substance groupings and single substance assessments. Similar to CMP2, groupings are created where possible to gain efficiencies in the assessment process and to consider substances that may be used as alternatives. Where groupings are not possible, single substance assessments are conducted.

Integration across government programs remains critical since many remaining substances are found in consumer, cosmetic, health, drug and other products. In addition to releases from products, substances may be released at various points in their life cycle, such as during their manufacturing and disposal.

The same core functions that have been part of phases one and two continues in phase three of the CMP: risk assessment; risk management, compliance promotion and enforcement; research; monitoring and surveillance; stakeholder engagement and risk communications; and, policy and program management. Information gathering is a key activity undertaken to support these core functions.

For more information, see the Government of Canada's Chemical Substances Portal.

Governance structures

In the overall delivery of the CMP, Health Canada and ECCC have a shared responsibility in attaining objectives and results. In meeting their obligations pursuant to the CMP, the Departments fulfill their responsibilities through established internal departmental governance structures, as well as a joint CMP governance structure to address shared responsibilities. Efforts are also made to harmonize vertical and horizontal performance reporting indicators (e.g. CMP Performance Management Strategy, the CMP contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy, etc.) for CMP.

The CMP has a horizontal governance framework which ensures integration, co-ordination, joint decision making and clear accountabilities. Under the CMP Integrated Horizontal Governance Framework, the joint CMP Assistant Deputy Ministers Committee (CMP ADM Committee) reports to both the Health Canada and ECCC Deputy Ministers.

The CMP ADM committee is supported by a Director General (DG) committee. The CMP DG Committee consists of DGs from all partner programs within Health Canada and ECCC, and provides strategic direction, oversight and a challenge function for the CMP's overall implementation. The CMP DGs also play a lead role in directing, monitoring and providing a challenge function for the core elements of the CMP, namely the delivery of the chemicals agenda under CEPA.

This DG level committee is supported by the CMP Steering Committee, which is a Director level committee intended to provide oversight on CMP issues related to the CEPA chemicals agenda.

Total federal funding allocated (start to end date) (dollars)
$1,308,179,400 (includes all three phases)

Total federal planned spending to March 31, 2017 (dollars)
814,892,950 (phases one and two)
98,657,290 (phase three, year one, 2016-17)

Total federal actual spending to March 31, 2017 (dollars)
776,085,148 (phases one and two)
95,536,987 (phase three, year one, 2016-17)

Date of last renewal of the horizontal initiative
October, 2014

Total federal funding allocated at the last renewal and source of funding (dollars)
Phase three, 493,286,450; Source of funding: Budget 2015

Additional federal funding received after last renewal (dollars)
Not applicable

Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners
Not applicable

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
2019-20

Shared outcomes of federal partners

Final Outcome:

  1. Reduced threats to health and the environment from harmful substances

    Performance Indicator
    Long-term risk of a selected group of representative or significant harmful substances where risk management actions have been put in place.
    Target
    This is a long term outcome with no specific annual targets. The target value is substance-dependant. However, in general, the CMP is aimed at reducing risks to human health and the environment, and therefore a reduction in risk is desired.

  2. Risk management measures reduce the potential for exposure to harmful substances

    Performance Indicator
    Exposure or release levels for a select group of substances where risk management measures are in place. (Substance-based Performance Measurement)
    Target
    The target value is substance-dependant. However, in general, risk management actions are taken in order to reduce exposure, and therefore a downward trend in exposure levels is desired.

  3. Canadians use the information (that meets their needs on the risks and safe use of substances of concern) to avoid or minimize risks posed by substances of concern

    Performance Indicators

    1. % of Canadians taking appropriate actions to address risks (targeted stakeholders/intermediaries); and,
    2. % of Canadians taking appropriate actions to address risks (general public)

    Target
    TBD (2017-18)

  4. Canadians and stakeholder groups have access to information that meets their needs on the risks and safe use of substances of concern

    Performance Indicators

    1. % of knowledge transfer activities completed as planned related to substances of concern (risk communication); and,
    2. % of knowledge transfer activities completed as planned related to substances of concern (research).

    Targets

    1. TBD (2017-18); and
    2. 100%
  5. Knowledge, information and data on substances of concern is made available to Health Canada and ECCC recipients (or other stakeholders) to inform risk management; risk communication and stakeholder engagement; research; risk assessment; monitoring and surveillance; and international activities

    Performance indicator
    Percentage of CMP research projects conducted that address; risk assessment, risk management, economic research, monitoring and surveillance, research and international priorities.
    Target
    100%

  6. Industry conforms/complies with established risk management measures

    Performance Indicator
    Industry conforms or complies with established risk management instruments
    Target
    TBD ECCC's Enforcement Branch to complete an analysis of compliance in high risk regulated sectors

Expected outcome of non-federal and non-governmental partners
N/A

Name of theme
N/A

Planning highlights

In 2018-19, the program will continue to implement improvements as described in the Management Response and Action Plan resulting from the Program Evaluation conducted in 2015. The program will also assess and manage the potential health and ecological risks from the remaining priority existing substances from CMP1 and CMP2 and continue science-based assessments and risk management activities, as needed, on the potential health and ecological risks associated with approximately 1,550 existing substances included in CMP3.

A key activity undertaken to support the core functions of the CMP is information gathering. This involves a range of voluntary and mandatory activities, ensuring the engagement of stakeholders. Having up-to-date information and understanding trends in the Canadian marketplace are necessary to inform risk assessment and risk management activities and support sound decision making by Government. In 2018-19 key information gathering initiatives will include:

  • Surveys under s.71 of CEPA  surveys may be completed as needed to support prioritization, risk assessment and risk management activities in the third phase of the CMP; and to inform post-CMP activities; and,
  • Voluntary data gathering to inform data needs for the third phase of the CMP, including follow-up to industry stakeholders on the previous Inventory Update information to inform CMP3 risk assessment and risk management activities and Canadian Market Studies.

Draft Screening Assessment Reports covering approximately 104 petroleum stream sector substances and approximately 363 other phase three substances are planned to be published in 2018-19. In addition, Final Screening Assessments Reports for approximately 12 petroleum stream sector substances, 18 substances from the Groupings Initiative and approximately 371 substances from phase three are planned to be published.

Proposed Risk Management (RM) Instruments will also be developed and published in Part I of the Canada Gazette. These RM instruments include: Proposed Formaldehyde in Composite Wood Products Regulations and a Code of Practice for methylene diphenyl diisocyanates; Proposed Pollution Prevention Planning Notice for Triclosan, Proposed Volatile Organic Compound Concentration Limits for Certain Products Regulations, Proposed instrument for Disperse Yellow 3, Proposed amendments to the Products Containing Mercury Regulations, Proposed regulations to prohibit lead wheel weights, Amendments to the Concentration of Phosphorus in Certain Cleaning Products Regulations, Amendments to the Chromium Electroplating, Chromium Anodizing and Reverse Etching Regulations, Proposed Notice for the Pollution Prevention Plan of Triclosan; and, Proposed Regulations Repealing the Chlor-Alkali Mercury Release Regulations under CEPA.

Other instruments that will help strengthen CMP initiatives which will be published in Part I of the Canada Gazette include the Proposed Coal Mining Effluent Regulations.

Final RM Instruments will be published in Part I or Part II of the Canada Gazette, as required. These publications will include: Amendments to the Concentration of Phosphorus in Certain Cleaning Products Regulations, Final Notice for the Pollution Prevention Plan of Reaction products of two-propanone with diphynelamine (PREPOD), Regulations Repealing the Chlor-Alkali Mercury release Regulations under CEPA, Regulations Repealing the Chlor-Alkali Mercury Liquid Effluent Regulations under the Fisheries Act, Regulations Respecting reduction in the Release of Volatile Organic Compounds (Petroleum Sector), the prohibition of Asbestos and Asbestos Products Regulations; and, the Final Notice Requiring the Preparation and Implementation of Pollution Prevention plans in Respect of Hydrazine Related to the Electricity Sector.

The Amendments to the Metal Mining Effluent Regulations will also help strengthen CMP initiatives.

Health Canada and ECCC will also continue to use the new substances program to identify and manage, as appropriate, the human health and environmental risks of new substances before import to, or manufacture in Canada. The program will perform risk assessments on approximately 500 new substances, including chemicals, polymers, products of biotechnology, substances in the Food and Drugs Act (F&DA) regulated regulated products and nanomaterials prior to their introduction to Canada. The program will intervene as early as possible when the assessment identifies a risk to human health or the environment by developing any needed risk management measures.

The program will continue to conduct risk assessments and develop and implement risk management measures to address identified risks posed by harmful chemicals in foods and food packaging materials, products available to consumers, cosmetics and drinking water. Highlights for 2018-19 include updating the Consumer Products Containing Lead (Contact with Mouth) Regulations and Children's Jewellery Regulations, among others. Approval of up to five final guidelines/guidance documents, as part of the Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality, will also be sought from the provinces and territories.

Work will continue on substances/products regulated under the F&DA, including: the assessment of those substances on the Revised In Commerce List identified during prioritization as requiring further consideration; amendments to the Food and Drug Regulation pertaining to environmental assessments of products regulated under the F&DA; research and consultations on non-regulatory initiatives aimed at reducing the release of non-F&DA products and substances into the environment; and re-evaluation of food additives, food contaminants and food packaging materials. Work on a cyclical enforcement project aimed at assessing the use of certain prohibited chemicals and cosmetics will be completed.

The Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) will continue to work with passenger conveyance industry stakeholders in order to identify and address potential risks to travellers. In 2018-19, PHAC will continue the implementation of its risk-based inspection program to focus compliance and enforcement activities on areas of greatest risk related to potable water, food and sanitation in order to ensure safe environments for Canadians and travellers.

Work will also continue on the re-evaluation of the remaining 32 older chemicals (registered prior to 1995) and on the cyclical re-evaluation of pesticides registered after 1995, as per published work. As well, Health Canada will continue to monitor health and environmental incidents related to pesticides, analyzing trends and sales data, and taking regulatory action, as needed.

Health Canada and ECCC will continue to conduct targeted monitoring and surveillance activities to address existing and emerging chemicals of concern, and to inform risk assessment needs and risk management activities. Specific monitoring activities for 2018-19 include the data analysis for Cycle five and the development of the Fifth Report on Human Biomonitoring of Environmental Chemicals in Canada, which will present national biomonitoring data on the Canadian population's exposure to chemicals, collected as part of the Canadian Health Measures Survey. The report is planned to be released in 2019-20 and the data will also be made available on the Open Government Portal. Sample collection for cycle six will begin in January 2018 and continue until December 2019.

Health Canada will continue to support targeted monitoring and surveillance activities in the Canadian Arctic, in partnership with Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs through the Northern Contaminants Program (NCP). The NCP funds biomonitoring and human health projects on an annual basis. An annual summary of research reports will also be released through the NCP Secretariat.

Work will also continue related to the Total Diet Study, and other targeted studies, to fill in anticipated gaps for future CMP priorities. Environmental monitoring of priority chemicals in air, water, sediments, aquatic biota, birds, fish and wastewater to detect and characterize environmental change will continue in 2017-18, as well as the establishment of Environmental Quality Guidelines. Research will continue in order to address outstanding questions and knowledge gaps related to the effects and exposure of chemical substances to humans and the environment to inform risk management, risk assessment and international activities. Twenty research projects were approved for funding for the 2017-2020 CMP3 research cycle and are now being implemented. Opportunities for collaboration and synergy with government organizations, universities and international partners will be leveraged and expert engagement in the organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Test Guidelines Programme will continue. Results from research projects will continue to be shared with relevant internal and external stakeholders, as they become available. In addition, nine targeted research projects are ongoing in 2017-18 to address the Risk Assessment Program's short term data needs to help meet 2020 CMP commitments and four of them will continue into 2018-19.

The program will develop implementation strategies and will continue to deliver activities to raise regulatees' awareness and understanding of, and promote their compliance with regulatory requirements for certain assessed CMP substances. Focus will be on delivering compliance promotion activities and conducting inspections and investigations for the highest priority instruments.

The program will also continue to reach out to stakeholders and the public in order to implement the CMP successfully and help achieve the overall goal of protecting health and the environment for all Canadians. Focus will remain on increasing transparency and predictability, as well as expanding the reach of key stakeholder engagement activities. Public consultations in support of the development of a proposed approach for chemicals management in Canada post 2020 will continue.

The program will continue to increase proactive communications to the public to raise awareness of the risks and safe use of substances, including greater use of partnerships to expand the reach of messaging, with a focus on vulnerable populations. Regular stakeholder consultations, ongoing sector based working groups, conferences, workshops, working groups, and webinars are means that will continue to be explored and strengthened as part of an integrated stakeholder engagement plan. The renewed CMP Stakeholder Advisory Council and bi-annual publication of the CMP Progress report will continue to inform stakeholders about key activities related to the Government of Canada's recent work under the CMP. A stakeholders and indigenous led panel on vulnerable populations will provide recommendations though the CMP Stakeholder Advisory Council.

Efforts will also continue to advance the sound management of chemicals through participation in a range of international activities that support domestic efforts. These include active participation in work of committees and subsidiary bodies to the Basel, Rotterdam, Stockholm, and Minamata Conventions, international discussions on the global post-2020 agenda for chemicals, and efforts in other international fora.

Contact information

Suzanne Leppinen
Director, Chemicals and Environmental Health Management Bureau
Safe Environments Directorate
Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch
Health Canada
269 Laurier Avenue West
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0K9
Telephone: (613) 941-8071
E-mail: suzanne.leppinen@canada.ca

Julie Thompson
Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement
Program Development and Engagement
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate
Environment and Climate Change Canada
351, boul. Saint-Joseph, 6th Floor
Gatineau, QC, K1A 0H3
Telephone: (819) 938-5144
E-mail: julie.thompson3@canada.ca
Planning Summary
Federal organizations Link to department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activities Total federal allocation (from start to end date) 2018–19 Planned spending (dollars) 2018–19 Expected results 2018–19 Performance indicators 2018–19 Targets Date to achieve target
Health Canada Health Impacts of Chemicals Health Products:
Risk Assessment
9,437,645 1,227,329 ER 1.1 PI 1.1 T 1.1 See below
Health Products:
Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement
27,105,536 850,390
Health Products:
Research
2,479,000 0
Health Products:
Monitoring and Surveillance
1,172,000 0
Food and Nutrition:
Risk Assessment
15,820,926 1,237,393
Food and Nutrition:
Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement
17,370,505 1,180,315
Food and Nutrition:
Research
8,255,875 695,239
Food and Nutrition:
Monitoring and Surveillance
10,176,044 951,486
Food and Nutrition:
Stakeholder Engagement and Risk Communications
1,872,830 169,685
Environmental Risks to Health:
Risk Assessment
119,216,074 10,353,388        
Environmental Risks to Health:
Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement
148,668,626 7,086,237
Environmental Risks to Health:
research
127,637,665 9,964,515
Environmental Risks to Health:
Monitoring and Surveillance
126,597,444 9,859,704
Environmental Risks to Health:
Stakeholder Engagement and Risk Communications
24,214,067 2,815,217
Environmental Risks to Health:
Policy and Program Management
23,160,059 2,208,318
  Consumer Products Safety and Workplace Hazardous Materials:
Risk Assessment
24,878,577 2,419,633
Consumer Product Safety and Workplace Hazardous Materials:
Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement
38,292,551 2,549,795
Pesticides Pesticides:
Risk Assessment
53,620,643 4,563,436 See below
Pesticides:
Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement
22,204,309 846,416      
Pesticides:
Research
1,734,562 0      
Internal Services Health Canada 77,301,654 6,995,943  
Table 1 footnote *PHAC Border and Travel Health Border Health:
Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement
25,462,808 3,182,851 ER 2.1 PI 2.1 T 2.1 See below
ECCC Substances and Waste Management Substances and Waste Management:
Risk Assessment
49,911,390 3,873,467 ER 3.1 PI 3.1 T 3.1 See below
Substances and Waste Management:
Risk Management
200,971,125 13,524,953
Substances and Waste Management:
Research
21,203,225 1,884,158
Substances and Waste Management:
Monitoring and Surveillance
75,329,435 4,879,935
Compliance Promotion and Enforcement Pollution:
Compliance Promotion
8,609,790 854,409
Compliance promotion and Enforcement Pollution:
Enforcement
22,357,970 2,215,135
Internal Services ECCC 23,117,065 2,267,943  
Total for all federal organizations 1,308,179,400 98,657,290  

ER 1.1 Expected Results/ PI 1.1 Performance Indicators/ T 1.1 Targets: Health Canada

Information on risks of substances to inform risk management, monitoring and surveillance and research activities (Risk Assessment);

Performance Indicator: % of substances assessed within prescribed timelines (Existing Substances) against two-year rolling work plan
Target: 100%
Date to achieve target: March 2019

Performance Indicator: % of substances assessed within prescribed timelines (New Substances)
Target: 100%
Date to achieve target: March 2019

Performance Indicator: % of substances assessed within prescribed timelines (Revised In Commerce List)
Target: 100%
Date to achieve target: March 2019

Performance Indicator: # of CMP risk assessments that used information provided/generated by CMP partners (Foods, Consumer Products)
Target: TBD 2017-18
Date to achieve target: March 2019

Performance Indicator: Timely response to chemical-related risks to health (Health Products)
Target:  100% response time/year
Date to achieve target: March 2019

Performance Indicator:  % of food ingredients, food additives, food contaminants and food packaging material chemicals re-evaluated for which Chemical Management Plan assessments and new scientific knowledge identify potential risk (Foods)
Target: 100%
Date to achieve target: March 2019

Performance Indicator: % of dietary exposure assessments and/or hazard characterizations completed for substances for which Chemical Management Plan assessments have identified food as the contributing main source of exposure (Foods)
Target:  100%
Date to achieve target: March 2019

Performance Indicator: % of re-evaluations initiated for registered pesticides according to the re-evaluation work plan
Target: 80%
Date to achieve target: March 2019

Risk management measures under CEPA, PCPA, CCPSA and F&DA (Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement);

Performance Indicator: % of actions taken in a timely manner to protect the health of Canadians from substances found to be a risk to human health against planned
Target: 100%
Date to achieve target: March 2019

Drinking water quality guideline technical documents/guidance documents (Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement);

Performance Indicator: % of planned final water quality guidelines guidance documents approved through federal-provincial-territorial collaborative processes
Target: 100%
Date to achieve target: March 2019

Science-based information on the risks posed by substances, in accordance with annual research plans (Research);

Performance Indicator: % of CMP research projects conducted that support priorities for risk assessment, risk management, research, monitoring and surveillance, and international activities related to the health impacts of chemicals
Target: 100%
Date to achieve target: March 2019

Data generated on the use, release, exposure and presence of substances of concern in humans, the environment, food and consumer products (Monitoring and Surveillance);

Performance Indicator: % of monitoring and surveillance projects funded by CMP that support priorities for risk assessment, risk management, research, monitoring and surveillance, and international activities related to the health impacts of chemicals
Target: 100%
Date to achieve target: March 2019

Engagement, consultation and communication products to inform the public and stakeholders (Stakeholder Engagement and Risk Communications).

Performance Indicator: % of risk communication outreach activities and material distributed against plan
Target: 100%
Date to achieve target: March 2019

ER 2.1 Expected Results/ PI 2.1 Performance Indicators/ T 2.1 Targets: PHAC

Mitigation of human health risks associated with contamination of water, food and sanitation on board passenger conveyances (Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement).

Performance Indicator: % of inspected passenger transportation operators that meet public health requirements.
Target: 95%
Date to achieve target: March 2019

ER 3.1 Expected Results/ PI 3.1 Performance Indicators/ T 3.1 Targets: ECCC

Information on risks of substances to inform risk management, monitoring and surveillance and research activities (Risk Assessment);

Performance Indicator: % of substances assessed within prescribed timelines (Existing Substances) against two-year rolling work plan
Target: 100%
Date to achieve target: March 2019

Performance Indicator: % of substances assessed within prescribed timelines (New Substances)
Target: 100%
Date to achieve target: March 2019

Risk management measures under CEPA and/or Fisheries Act;

Performance Indicator: % of risk management controls of substances assessed as posing a risk to the environment under CEPA are introduced within 42 months of being deemed harmful to the environment.
Target: 100%
Date to achieve target: March 2019

Science-based information on the risks posed by substances, in accordance with annual research plans (Research);

Performance Indicator: % of CMP research projects conducted that support priorities for risk assessment, risk management, research, monitoring and surveillance, and international activities related to the environmental impacts of chemicals
Target: 100%
Date to achieve target: March 2019

Data generated on the use, release, exposure and presence of substances of concern in humans, the environment, food, consumer products and waste (Monitoring and Surveillance);

Performance Indicator: % of monitoring and surveillance projects funded by CMP that support priorities for risk assessment, risk management, research, monitoring and surveillance, and international activities related to the environmental impacts of chemicals
Target: 100%
Date to achieve target: March 2019

Information on obligations to conform or comply with risk management control measures (Compliance promotion)

Performance Indicator: The number of targeted regulatees under the Chemical Management Plan contacted by the Compliance promotion Program
Target: All regulatees identified in the Compliance Promotion Program database subject to priority instruments
Date to achieve target: March 2019

Inspections, investigations and enforcement actions (Enforcement)

Performance Indicator: % of follow-up inspections confirming a return to compliance
Target: TBD
Date to achieve target: March 2019

Federal Tobacco Control Strategy

General Information

Lead department
Health Canada

Federal partner organization
Health Canada

Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch

  • Tobacco Control Directorate

Communications and Public Affairs Branch

Regulatory Operations and Regions Branch

Indigenous Services Canada (ISC)

  • First Nations and Inuit Health Branch (FNIHB)

Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)

  • Public Health Infrastructure
  • Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention Branch

Public Safety Canada

  • Akwesasne Contribution Agreement
  • Policy Development

Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

  • Police Operations

Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)

  • Risk Assessment
  • Admissibility Determination

Canada Revenue Agency (CRA)

  • Taxpayer and Business Assistance

Public Prosecutions Service Canada

Non-federal and non-governmental partner
Not applicable

Start date of the horizontal initiative
April 1, 2001

End date of the horizontal initiative
On-going

Description of the horizontal initiative

The Federal Tobacco Control Strategy (FTCS) was initiated in 2001 to reduce the use of tobacco and the potential for tobacco-related death and disease in Canada.

This Strategy is going through a renewal process and will be finalized in 2018.

Governance structure

Health Canada is the lead department for the federal government with responsibility for the coordination and implementation of the FTCS.

Federal partners manage the control of tobacco products through monitoring and assessing the illicit and licit tobacco markets.

Health Portfolio (Health Canada, Indigenous Services Canada and PHAC)

  • Health Canada: Leads the legislative and regulatory program for tobacco products, including the development and implementation of policies and regulations, research, public outreach, and compliance.
  • PHAC: As part of its chronic disease prevention, the department works together with partners from the public and private sectors to promote healthy living aimed to reduce tobacco use as a chronic disease risk factor.
  • Indigenous Services Canada (ISC)Footnote 4: Provides support to First Nations on-reserve and Inuit communities to implement and strengthen comprehensive tobacco control measures (e.g. interventions and programs aim at reducing tobacco use).

Public Safety Portfolio (Public Safety Canada, RCMP and CBSA)

  • Public Safety Canada: Provides contribution funding to build on the capacity of the Akwesasne Mohawk Police Service to address contraband tobacco and its links to organized crime within the community and collect data to measure its effectiveness. It also provides leadership and strategy development, in consultation with federal partners, on international initiatives to combatting illicit trade in tobacco; including the development of Canada's position vis-à-vis the Protocol to Eliminate the illicit Trade in Tobacco Products under the World Health Organization Framework convention on Tobacco Control. Also, contributes to the development of domestic evidence-based policies and initiatives to support law enforcement efforts to fight organized crime involved in the contraband tobacco market, including co-chairing the inter-departmental Strategic Level Forum meetings.
  • RCMP: Collects and analyzes data related to the contraband tobacco market to provide an annual report to partner law enforcement agencies, government and non-governmental agencies. The RCMP participates in joint agency meetings and is involved in information and intelligence sharing with domestic and international law enforcement partners.
  • CBSA: Increases knowledge of contraband domestically and internationally by liaising with tobacco authorities at all levels and by monitoring and providing regular reports on both national and global contraband tobacco. CBSA provides reports, information and guidance to the Department of Finance Canada on matters that will impact the future tax structure of tobacco.

Canada Revenue Agency: Administers the Excise Act 2001, which governs federal taxation of tobacco products and regulates activities involving the manufacture, possession and sale of tobacco products in Canada.

Total federal funding allocated (from 2007-08 to 2021-22) (dollars)
791,143,426

Total federal actual spending 2007-08 to 2016-17
481,602,741

Total federal planned spending 2007-08 to 2017-18
574,919,950

Date of last renewal of the horizontal initiative
Ongoing

Total federal funding allocated at the last renewal and source of funding (dollars)
Ongoing

Additional federal funding received after the last renewal (dollars)
Not applicable

Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners (dollars)
Not applicable

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
2021-22

Shared outcome of federal partners

  1. ER 1 Short Term Expected Results
    • 1.1. Target populations participate in smoking cessation interventions
    • 1.2. Compliance activities are supported to enforce legislative and regulatory requirements in the tobacco industry
    • 1.3. Compliance activities are supported to enforce legislative and regulatory requirements in the tobacco industry
    • 1.4. Enhanced knowledge and awareness of the illicit tobacco market and links to organized crime
    • 1.5. Enhanced knowledge and awareness of the illicit tobacco market and links to organized crime
    • 1.6. High level of compliance with the Excise Act, 2001
    • 1.7. High level of compliance with the Excise Act, 2001
    • 1.8. Implementation plans for Indigenous community or strategy-based approaches to tobacco control are developed through regional engagement processes
    • 1.9. Indigenous peoples have improved capacity to support community - or strategy-based approaches to tobacco control
  2. ER 2 – Medium Term Expected Results
    • 2.1. Canadian youth do not use tobacco products
    • 2.2. Canadian tobacco product users increase cessation behaviours or switch to vaping products
    • 2.3. Canadian tobacco product users increase cessation behaviours or switch to vaping products
    • 2.4. Tobacco industry is compliant with legislative and regulatory requirements
    • 2.5. Tobacco industry is compliant with legislative and regulatory requirements
    • 2.6. Enhanced cooperation with domestic and international stakeholders to reduce contraband tobacco
    • 2.7. Indigenous peoples and communities are engaged in healthy behaviours, reduced smoking prevalence, and increased its number of smoke-free spaces
    • 2.8. Indigenous peoples and communities are engaged in healthy behaviours, reduced smoking prevalence, and increased its number of smoke-free spaces
  3. ER 3 Long Term Expected Result
    • 3.1 Reduced tobacco use prevalence among Canadians

Performance Indicators       

  1. PI 1 Short Term Indicators:
    • 1.1. # of cessation participants from target populations
    • 1.2. % of planned retail inspections completed
    • 1.3. % of planned product sampling completed
    • 1.4. # of engagements/forums among partners to support law enforcement efforts to address contraband tobacco and its links to organized crime
    • 1.5. # of research reports developed on contraband tobacco
    • 1.6. % of audits and regulatory reviews of tobacco licensees completed
    • 1.7. % of returns and rebates processed and the gross excise duty assessed
    • 1.8. % of regions that have developed implementation plans for Indigenous community- or strategy-based approaches to tobacco control
    • 1.9. # of recipients that are funded to implement/enhance community- or strategy-based approaches to tobacco control
  2. PI 2 Medium Term Indicators:
    • 2.1. % of Canadian students (grades 7-12) who have used any tobacco product (including cigarettes) in the past 30 days (by gender, and overall)
    • 2.2. # and % of participants who have not smoked in the past 30 days
    • 2.3. # and % of participants who have not smoked in the past 6 months
    • 2.4. % of tobacco product samples found to be non-compliant with selected legislative and/or regulatory requirements
    • 2.5. % of retail inspections found to be non-compliant with selected legislative and/or regulatory requirements
    • 2.6.# of reports related to contraband tobacco disseminated to domestic and international partners
    • 2.7. % of women in First Nations communities who report smoking during pregnancy
    • 2.8. # of smoke-free spaces (indoor or outdoor)
  3. PI 3 Long Term Indicator:
    • 3.1 % of Canadians (aged 15+) who have used any tobacco product in the past 30 days (by sex, and overall)

Target

  • T 1 Short Term Targets:
    • 1.1. Target to be set in 2018-19
    • 1.2. 100% by March 2018
    • 1.3. 100% by March 2018
    • 1.4. Three engagement/forums in 2018-19
    • 1.5. One research report
    • 1.6. 100% of audit and regulatory review coverage of federal tobacco licensees
    • 1.7. 100% of accounts maintained and transactions processed
    • 1.8. 100% of 7 regions by March 2049
    • 1.9. 40 by March 2019
  • T 2 Medium Term Targets
    • 2.1. Target to be set in 2018-19
    • 2.2. Target to be set in 2018-19
    • 2.3. Target to be set in 2018-19
    • 2.4. Less than 5% by March 2019
    • 2.5. Less than 10% by March 2019
    • 2.6. Three reports in 2018-19
    • 2.7. 40% of women by March 2030
    • 2.8. 1600 smoke-free spaces by March 2030
  • T3 Long Term Indicator
    • 3.1. Less than 5% by 2035

Expected outcome of non-federal and non-governmental partners
Not applicable

Name of theme
Not applicable

Planning Highlights

Tobacco use is a complex problem, and the prevalence of tobacco use is driven by many social, behavioural, cultural and individual factors which are only indirectly influenced by control measures implemented by the federal (and other levels of) government. There is no assurance that optimal implementation of all activities described above would achieve the desired prevalence targets. Surveillance data and performance trends can provide early indicators and guide subsequent interventions.

Planned activities:

Policy: Coordinate the development of cessation policy and policy approach for harm reduced products.

Plain and Standardized Packaging: Development of an approach for plain packaging requirements for tobacco products.

Labelling: Development of Health Warnings, Health Information Messages and Toxic Emissions Statements for tobacco products.
Changing the current regulatory regime for tobacco labelling to account for a merging and updating of current regulations.

Vaping: Support Tobacco Act legislative amendments and develop new compliance monitoring and enforcement training program;

Science: Continue to conduct scientific research and laboratory testing of tobacco products. Development of a research plan to evaluate public health consequences of Addictiveness Reduction.

Surveillance : Continue to implement the Canadian Student Tobacco, Alcohol and Drug Use Survey, the Canadian Tobacco, Alcohol and Drug Use Survey, and other surveys to support decision making and the development of policies and regulation.

Business Intelligence : Provide ongoing data support through reporting and monitoring of tobacco sales, market issues, industry, tobacco flavours and menthol. Support to policy and development of studies to support next generation of tax and price interventions.

Pan-Canadian Quitline: Help more Canadians quit smoking by providing provinces and territories with funding to support increased utilization of Quitline services as a result of the pan-Canadian Quitline and web address appearing on cigarette and little cigar packages.

International and Stakeholder Engagement: Federal lead for the domestic implementation of the World health Organization (WHO) Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC), in collaboration with federal and provincial/territorial partners as well as stakeholders from the tobacco control community. Lead Canada's participation at biennial meetings of the Conference of Parties to the WHO FCTC and actively engage on WHO FCTC Working Groups. Also, provide input on tobacco control and related issues to support Canada's engagement at WHO governing body meetings such as the World Health Assembly and Executive Board.

First Nations on-reserve and Inuit Community initiatives: Provide support to First Nations on-reserve and Inuit communities to implement and strengthen comprehensive tobacco control measures.

Marketing awareness and outreach: Encourage young adults aged 20 to 24 to quit smoking and stay smoke-free through the Break it Off tobacco cessation campaign. This campaign is a collaboration between Health Canada and the Canadian Cancer Society.

Chronic disease risk factors: Provide funding for tobacco related interventions that aim to reduce tobacco use as a chronic disease risk factor by aligning with broader disease prevention strategies.

Contraband: Continue to advance efforts to raise awareness and knowledge of the domestic and international contraband tobacco market by enhancing efforts to monitor, collect data and conduct compliance activities, participate international fora, enhance partnerships and information sharing with key stakeholders and support specialized policing of key First Nations to address organized crime-related issues around First Nations communities.

Contact Information

James Van Loon
Director General
Tobacco Control Directorate
Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch
Health Canada
1st Floor, Main Stats Building
150 Tunney's Pasture Driveway,
Ottawa, ON, K1A 0K9
Telephone: (613) 941-1977
E-mail: james.vanloon@canada.ca
Planning Summary
Federal organizations Link to department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activities Total federal allocation
(2017-18 to 2021-22)Footnote 1
2018–19 Planned spending (dollars) 2018–19 Expected results 2018–19 Performance indicators 2018–19 Targets Date to achieve target
Health Canada Tobacco Control Policy and International Commitments; Research and Surveillance; Regulations and Compliance. 148,244,995 29,648,999 ER1.1.2
ER1.1.3
ER2.2.1
ER2.2.4
ER2.2.5
ER3.3.1
PI1.1.2
PI1.1.3
PI2.2.1
PI2.2.4
PI2.2.5
PI3.3.1
T1.1.2
T1.1.3
T2.2.4
T2.2.5
T3.3.1
March 2018
March 2018
TBD
March 2019
March 2019
TBD
2035
Department of Indigenous Services Canada FNI Healthy Living Community Interventions 25,000,000 5,000,000 ER1.1.8
ER1.1.9
ER2.2.7
ER2.2.8
PI1.1.8
PI1.1.9
PI2.2.7
PI2.2.8  
T1.1.8
T1.1.9
T2.2.7
T2.2.8
March 2019
March 2019
March 2030
March 2030
*PHAC Chronic Disease Prevention Policy and International Commitments 1,025,000 205,000 ER1.1.1
ER2.2.2
ER2.2.3
PI1.1.1
PI2.2.2
PI2.2.3
T1.1.1
T2.2.2
T2.2.3
TBD
TBD
TBD
Chronic Disease Prevention Community Interventions 10,000,000 2,000,000
Public Safety Law Enforcement Leadership Akwesasne 2,250,000 450,000 ER1.1.4
ER1.1.5
ER2.2.6
PI1.1.4
PI1.1.5
PI2.2.6
T1.1.4
T1.1.5
T2.2.6
TBD
TBD
TBD
Policy Development 800,000 160,000
Footnote **RCMPFootnote 5 Federal Policing Criminal Intelligence 4,590,634 923,853 ER1.1.4
ER1.1.5
ER2.2.6
PI1.1.4
PI1.1.5
PI2.2.6
T1.1.4
T1.1.5
T2.2.6
TBD
TBD
TBD
Technical Services and Operational Support Technical Investigations 4,772,657 958,167 ER2.2.6 PI2.2.6 T2.2.6 TBD
Internal Services 1,351,432 265,008 Not applicable  
***CBSA Intelligence Collection and Analysis 15,095,640 2,717,208 ER1.1.4
ER1.1.5
ER2.2.6
PI1.1.4
PI1.1.5
PI2.2.6
T1.1.4
T1.1.5
T2.2.6
TBD
TBD
TBD
Canada Revenue Agency 1.4 Policy, Rulings, and Interpretations Excise and GST/HST Rulings 4,444,550 888,910 ER1.1.6 PI1.1.6 T1.1.6 TBD
1.1 Tax Services and Processing Business Returns Processing ER1.1.7 PI1.1.7 T1.1.7 TBD
Total for all federal organizations N/A N/A 216,223,476 43,254,057 N/A N/A N/A N/A

Footnotes

Footnote **

RCMP's planned spending figures have been adjusted to reflect approved annual reference levels within the Federal Policing Program. Under the RCMP's newly established Federal Policing Service Delivery Model, resources are continuously re-aligned to address the highest level operational priorities. As a result, actual expenditures for the Federal Tobacco Control Strategy can be expected to fluctuate from year to year based on emerging and shifting operational priorities.

Return to table footnote ** referrer

Implementing a New Federal Framework for the Legalization and Strict Regulation of Cannabis

General Information

Lead department
Health Canada

Federal partner organizations
Health Canada
Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)
Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)
Public Safety Canada (PS)
Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

Note: Other government departments (e.g., the Department of Justice) are supporting the new federal cannabis framework. However, they are not captured in this Horizontal Initiative table, as they have not received funding through the Treasury Board Submission “Implementing a New Federal Framework for the Legalization and Regulation of Cannabis.”

Non-federal and non-governmental partners
Not applicable

Start date of the horizontal initiative
April 1, 2017

End date of the horizontal initiative
March 31, 2022

Description of the horizontal initiative

At the time of publication of this horizontal initiative, Bill C-45, the proposed Cannabis Act, is undergoing review by Parliament. The objective of the horizontal initiative is to implement and administer a new federal framework to legalize and strictly regulate cannabis, should the Act receive Royal Assent and be brought into force. The initiative is designed to follow through on the Government's key objectives of protecting public health, safety, and security. More specifically, the initiative aims to prevent young persons from accessing cannabis, to protect public health and public safety by establishing strict product safety and product quality requirements and to deter criminal activity by imposing serious criminal penalties for those operating outside the legal framework.

The federal partner organizations will establish and implement ongoing delivery of a new regulatory framework including licensing, compliance and enforcement, surveillance, and research; national public education and awareness activities; and framework support.

The initiative will also increase law enforcement capacity to collect and assess intelligence on the evolution of organized crime's involvement in the illegal cannabis market and other related criminal markets.

Activities are organized by five high-level themes:

  1. Establish, implement and enforce the new legislative framework;
  2. Provide Canadians with information needed to make informed decisions and minimize health and safety harms;
  3. Build law enforcement knowledge and engage partners and stakeholders on public safety;
  4. Provide criminal intelligence, enforcement and related training activities; and,
  5. Prevent and interdict prohibited cross-border movement of cannabis while maintaining the flow of legitimate travelers and goods.

Governance Structure

The Government of Canada has put in place a robust governance structure to facilitate whole-of-government coordination in implementing and administering the new federal framework to legalize and strictly regulate cannabis. At the federal level, this governance structure includes: regular engagement among Deputy Ministers of Health, Justice and Public Safety to provide strategic direction and oversight on implementation activities; an assistant Deputy Ministers Committee that serves as a forum for government-wide coordination of policy and implementation activities; a Directors-General committee which is responsible for coordinating policy, regulatory development, and implementation activities across federal departments and agencies; an interdepartmental Communications Working Group to lead cannabis communications, public awareness and education efforts; and a Federal Partners Cannabis Data Working Group to promote horizontal collaboration and support evidence-based policy and program development.

Health Canada's Cannabis Legalization and Regulation Branch will assume a central coordinating role in tracking key project milestones and in reporting to federal Ministers.

The Government is committed to ongoing collaboration and consultation with provincial and territorial partners. In May 2016, the Federal/Provincial/Territorial (F/P/T) Senior Officials Working Group on Cannabis Legalization and Regulation was struck, to enable F/P/T governments to exchange information on important issues about the legalization and regulation of cannabis throughout the consultation, design and implementation of the legislation, regulations, and non-regulatory activities. Supporting F/P/T working groups and committees have also been established to facilitate ongoing engagement in key priority areas, including public education and awareness, data development and information sharing, national inventory tracking, ticketing and drug-impaired driving. In addition, existing F/P/T bodies are also considering the implications of cannabis legalization, including F/P/T Deputy Ministers responsible for Justice, Public Safety, Finance and F/PT Ministers responsible for Labour.

Total federal funding allocated (start to end date) (dollars)
546,807,456

Total federal actual spending to date (dollars)
Not applicable

Total federal planned spending to date (dollars)
Not applicable

Date of last renewal of the horizontal initiative
Not applicable

Total federal funding allocated at the last renewal and source of funding
Not applicable

Additional federal funding received after the last renewal (dollars)
Not applicable

Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners (dollars)
Not applicable

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
2023-24

Shared outcome of federal partners (1/2)

1. Cannabis is kept of out of the hands of Canadian children and youth

Performance indicator (PI)
PI 1. % of Canadians (aged 15-17 and 18-24) who have used cannabis in the last 12 months [Health Canada]
Target
T1 Target: To be established in 2020 (baseline: 17.5% of Canadians aged 15-17 and 28.4% of Canadians aged 18-24, data from 2015)

Shared outcome of federal partners (2/2)

2. Criminal involvement in the illegal cannabis market is reduced

Performance indicator
PI 2. Qualitative assessment on trends related to criminal involvement in the illicit cannabis market [RCMP]
PI 3. # of cannabis import interdictions at the border (CBSA)

Target
T2 Target: To be established in 2020 (baseline to be established in 2018-19)
T3 Target: To be determined once CBSA establishes a monitoring and reporting framework, which will also identify an appropriate baseline. CBSA could be in a position to report on this indicator in 2020.

Expected outcome of non-federal and non-governmental partners
Not applicable

Name of theme
Not applicable

Planning Highlights

In April 2017, the Government introduced the proposed Cannabis Act to provide legal access to cannabis and to control and regulate its production, distribution and sale. The objectives of the Act are to prevent young persons from accessing cannabis, to protect public health and public safety by establishing strict product safety and product quality requirements and to deter criminal activity by imposing serious criminal penalties for those operating outside the legal framework. The Act is also intended to reduce the burden on the criminal justice system in relation to cannabis.

Health Canada

Should the Cannabis Act receive Royal Assent and come into force, the following are associated planned initiatives:

  • Establish and administer a program to license the cannabis industry, take compliance and enforcement actions as necessary, and maintain a national Cannabis Tracking System. This will help ensure that the new industry is compliant with regulatory requirements and prevent diversion of cannabis into, and out of, the legal market;
  • Undertake public education and awareness activities, targeting youth and young adults in particular, to provide Canadians with the information they need to make informed decisions and minimize health and safety harms associated with cannabis use;
  • Maintain a distinct medical cannabis system to provide ongoing access to cannabis for Canadians with a medical need. This includes allowing registered individuals or their designated persons to produce a limited amount of cannabis for their own medical purposes; and,
  • Implement systematic data collection and surveillance activities to evaluate the success of the cannabis framework and inform evidence-based decision making. A key component of these activities is the Canadian Cannabis Survey, an annual survey that will provide information on Canadians' knowledge, attitudes and behaviours related to cannabis use, including frequency of use, products used, and methods of consumption.

Canada Border Services Agency

In 2018-19 CBSA will continue to advance initiatives that support the identification and interception of high-risk people, goods, and conveyances that pose a threat to the security of Canadians, including with respect to the illegitimate cross-border movement of cannabis. In anticipation of the proposed legalization of cannabis, CBSA will develop border-related compliance strategies to assist in preventing prohibited cannabis and cannabis-related products from crossing our borders.

CBSA will work to implement a cannabis monitoring and reporting framework in 2018-19 and beyond that will enable reporting on the Agency's capacity to prevent and interdict prohibited cross-border movement of cannabis while maintaining the flow of legitimate travellers and goods. Other planning highlights for 2018-19 include:

  • Promote public education and awareness activities, and port of entry processing efforts, to ensure public awareness of the fact that illegal importation and exportation of cannabis will remain a serious criminal offence after legalization;
  • Implement measures to maintain and monitor border integrity, which includes working with the RCMP to update interdepartmental cooperation protocols related to the illegal cross-border movement of cannabis; and,
  • Ensure that appropriate training, policies, and guidelines are in place within the Agency to inform enforcement efforts.

Public Health Agency of Canada

To support the role of Canada's Chief Public Health Officer, PHAC plans to undertake the following in 2018-19:

  • Tailor and promote the Lower-Risk Cannabis Use Guidelines with and for public health professionals;
  • Develop and promote messages and resources to help build resilience and prevent/reduce problematic cannabis and other substance use for youth with educators and public health professionals; and,
  • Tailor and promote messages with and for families and pregnant women participating in the Canadian Prenatal Nutrition Program and the Canadian Action Program for Children.

Public Safety Canada

Should the proposed Act receive Royal Assent and come into force, Public Safety Canada will work to implement the new cannabis framework in 2018-19 and beyond:

  • To ensure law enforcement is well-informed to apply the new legislation, Public Safety Canada will work with the RCMP and the Department of Justice to develop information packages and training materials on the new legislation by using existing online platforms. The Department plans to finalize these materials upon Royal Assent;
  • To provide policy assistance and support as a means to inform operational law enforcement efforts, PS will undertake research activities related to cannabis. This includes developing new indicators and collecting baseline data on organized crime in conjunction with Health Canada and the Department of Justice; and,
  • Public education and awareness: leading up to Royal Assent, partnership opportunities will be identified with provinces and territories and non-government organizations such as the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police to establish networks to disseminate details of the laws and regulations to target groups. Following Royal Assent, awareness products will be developed and disseminated.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

The RCMP will focus on several awareness, learning and education activities, as well as the collection and assessment of intelligence in 2018-19, in support of this horizontal initiative:

  • Design and develop training activities and materials to increase the knowledge and ability of RCMP employees to enforce the new cannabis regime. providing the legislation currently before Parliament receives Royal Assent.;
  • Develop and publish lesson plans on substance misuse and addiction for the Centre for Youth Crime Prevention, and release a new drug-impaired driving video. Launch Operation TOM (Think of Me), an awareness campaign to educate adults and young drivers on the risks and impacts of driving while impaired;
  • Review and amend the RCMP National Youth Officer Training Course, to include a section on cannabis awareness. Add a module to the Youth Leadership Workshop to educate on cannabis myths and facts;
  • Play a key coordinating role in partnership engagement, develop and share national awareness products to ensure consistency and support for stakeholder outreach;
  • Support lead department's decisions on security clearances, which will include verifications of information from  law enforcement agencies, by identifying criminality or associations to criminal organizations; and,
  • New positions will also be created and staffed for intelligence, research, guidance and subject matter expertise.

There are number of diverse risks associated with this initiative. Broadly, these include capacity risks, financial risks, legal risks, and risks related to the complexity of the cannabis framework, with the history of the issue, and with the pace of cannabis-related criminal activity as cannabis legalization and regulation moves forward. Many of these risks are linked to the uncertainty related to the level of interest from industry and how this industry will evolve.

Contact information

Eric Costen
Director General
Cannabis Legalization and Regulation Secretariat
Telephone: 613-941-0355
E-mail: eric.costen@canada.ca

Planning Summary
Federal organizations Link to department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activities Total federal allocation (from start to end date) 2018–19 Planned spending (dollars)Footnote 1 2018–19 Expected results 2018–19 Performance indicators 2018–19 Targets Date to achieve target

Health Canada

Cannabis Program

Licensing:
License federal producers and other legal market participants; provide client registration and other client services.

431,001,054

78,041,080

A federally licensed and regulated industry is established

# of licence applications approved per year

TBD in 2018

TBD by March 31, 2019

(Theme Area 1: Establish, implement and enforce the new horizontal initiative)

% of licence applications reviewed within internal service standards

TBD in 2018

TBD by March 31, 2019

Compliance and enforcement:
Design and promote compliance and enforcement; robust inspection program, involving pre- and post-licence inspections.

See first amount for Cannabis Program

See first amount for Cannabis Program

The federally licensed industry understands the legislation and regulatory requirements

% of federally licensed industry that indicates that they understand the regulatory requirements

TBD in 2018-19

TBD by March 31, 2019

(Theme Area 1: Establish, implement and enforce the new horizontal initiative)

The federally licensed industry is compliant with regulatory requirements

% of federally licensed industry that is found to be compliant with regulatory requirements

TBD in 2019-20

TBD by March 31, 2020

Public education and outreach:
Provide Canadians with information about health and safety risks associated cannabis use.

See first amount for Cannabis Program

See first amount for Cannabis Program

Canadian youth understand the potential health and safety risks associated with cannabis use

% of youth (grades 7-12) who perceive that there is “no risk” in using cannabis 

TBD in 2020 (baseline: 7%, data from 2014-15)

TBD

(Theme Area 2: Provide Canadians with information needed to make informed decisions and minimize health and safety harms)

Canadians use information to make informed decisions about the potential health and safety risks associated with the use of cannabis

% of parents who discuss the health and safety risks of cannabis with their teens

TBD in 2020 (tentative target: increase of 5%)

TBD

Canada Border Services Agency

Traveller Facilitation and Compliance Program

Traveller awareness.

35,842,394

6,756,252

Travellers understand the requirements to declare cannabis and cannabis-related products when entering Canada

% of ports of entry with displayed signage on cannabis

75% of major ports in FY 2018-19; 100% of other priority ports by March 2019

March 31, 2019

(Theme Area 5: Prevent and interdict prohibited cross-border movement of cannabis while maintaining the flow of legitimate travellers and goods)

CBSA awareness tools are in place to inform travelling public on prohibition of cross-border movement of cannabis

100% of the digital strategy launched in FY 2018-19

March 31, 2019

Port of entry processing.

See first amount for Traveller Facilitation and Compliance Program

See first amount for Traveller Facilitation and Compliance Program

Travellers are provided a clear opportunity to declare cannabis in their possession at all primary inspection sites

% of relevant primary inspection kiosks, systems, training materials, operational guidelines and forms in all modes updated

100% in FY 2018-19

March 31, 2019

(Theme Area 5: Prevent and interdict prohibited cross-border movement of cannabis while maintaining the flow of legitimate travellers and goods)

Regulatory compliance and enforcement.

(Theme Area 5: Prevent and interdict prohibited cross-border movement of cannabis while maintaining the flow of legitimate travellers and goods)

See first amount for Traveller Facilitation and Compliance Program

See first amount for Traveller Facilitation and Compliance Program

CBSA has enhanced capacity to promote compliance and to enforce import-related laws

# of cannabis import interdictions at ports of entry

TBD once reporting functionality is in place (CBSA does not have automated reporting capacity related to cannabis). Ability to report by 2020

TBD

Policy, monitoring and reporting.

(Theme Area 5: Prevent and interdict prohibited cross-border movement of cannabis while maintaining the flow of legitimate travellers and goods)

See first amount for Traveller Facilitation and Compliance Program

See first amount for Traveller Facilitation and Compliance Program

Border-related regulations, accompanying policies and procedures, agreements, studies, and monitoring framework are developed and implemented

% of regulations and agreements completed on time

100%

TBD by March 31, 2019

Recourse

Regulatory compliance and enforcement.

3,854,026

743,217

Travellers and the import/export community have access to recourse mechanisms to challenge certain CBSA actions and decisions in a timely manner

# of cannabis seizures appealed

TBD

The CBSA will report performance results on June 1, 2019 for fiscal year 2018-2019

(Theme Area 5: Prevent and interdict prohibited cross-border movement of cannabis while maintaining the flow of legitimate travellers and goods)

# of Trusted Travelers appeals due to cannabis-related enforcement action

TBD

# of Trade related appeals due to classification disputes of cannabis

TBD
(The CBSA will be able to report on these indicators once baseline data is generated and reporting capability is in place)

% of appeals received that are acknowledged within 10 calendar days

85%

% of Enforcement and Trusted Traveller appeals received that are decided within 180 calendar days

80%

% of Trade related appeals – Tariff Classification – that are decided within 365 calendars days (for cases never held in abeyance)

85%

# of cannabis-related complaints made against the CBSA. Complaints may be submitted to the Agency's Enhanced Complaints Mechanism 

The CBSA will aim to contact the client within 14 calendar days after a written complaint is received – 85%

The CBSA will aim to provide a final written response to the client within 40 calendar days after a written complaint is received-90%

# of appeal decisions further appealed at the Courts or Tribunals and defended by Recourse

TBD in FY 2019-20

The CBSA will be able to report on this indicator once baseline data is known

Public Health Agency of Canada

Evidence for Health Promotion and Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention Program

Develop public health advice to support the role of Canada's Chief Public Health Officer (CPHO) through knowledge translation and horizontal analysis.

2,793,125

623,472

Health care and social service professionals and public health officials have access to high-quality public health information

# of health care and social service professionals and public health officials accessing high-quality public health information and data products developed

TBD once baseline is established in 2018

TBD by March 31, 2019

(Theme Area 2: Provide Canadians with information needed to make informed decisions and minimize health and safety harms)

Health care and social service professionals and public health officials use information, knowledge and data products related to the public health impacts of cannabis and interventions to address them

% of Public Health Network members using information, knowledge and data products to make informed decisions

75% (baseline to be established in 2018-19)

TBD by March 31, 2019

Public Safety Canada

Crime Prevention

Public education and awareness

1,430,295

266,303

Canadians are aware of the legal implications associated with cannabis use, and understand the laws associated with the new legislation

% of Canadians (aged 15-24) who indicate that they are aware of the new legislation, and the consequences related to making certain decisions involving cannabis

TBD (tentative target: increase 5%)

TBD

(Theme Area 2: Provide Canadians with information needed to make informed decisions and minimize health and safety harms)

Canadians use information provided by the program to make informed, lawful decisions

% of Canadians (aged 15-24) who have indicated that they have made informed, lawful decisions around cannabis that protected themselves, and the safety of others

TBD (tentative target: increase 5%)

TBD

Serious and Organized Crime

Training for law enforcement

4,054,043

1,031,740

Law enforcement is well-informed to apply the new legislation

% of law enforcement knowledgeable about the changes to the new regime, and able to use the legislative framework as a result of the training materials

33% of frontline police officers access materials

TBD

75% of officers with access to materials find the materials helpful

TBD

(Theme Area 3: Build law enforcement knowledge and engage partners and stakeholders on public safety)

Evidence-based decision-making on organized crime and policing issues

% of stakeholders who indicate that the materials informed decision making

75%

TBD

# of working meetings and consultations with stakeholders held

TBD

TBD

# of new initiatives considered for implementation

TBD

TBD

Develop policies to inform operational law enforcement efforts.

See first amount for Serious and Organized Crime

See first amount for Serious and Organized Crime

Research projects related to cannabis and performance measurement implemented

% of research projects related to performance measurement completed and disseminated

100%

TBD

(Theme Area 3: Build law enforcement knowledge and engage partners and stakeholders on public safety)

Policy development and decision-making is informed by evidence and performance measurement

% of stakeholders indicating that policy development and decision making was based on performance measurement results and lessons learned

50%

TBD

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Sub-Program 4.1.1 Management and Oversight Services

Build capacity to provide security screening reports (i.e., Law Enforcement Records Checks / LERCs) to HC to complete applications for the production of cannabis for non-medical purposes.

21,481,709

2,971,385

LERCs are conducted in support of HC's security clearance decisions

% of LERCs completed within negotiated service standards

TBD once service standards are negotiated with HC

TBD once service standards are negotiated with HC

(Theme Area 1: Establish, implement and enforce the new horizontal initiative)

Sub-Sub-Program 1.1.2.5 Public Engagement

Enhance RCMP's capacity to develop and deliver prevention and outreach activities on the new cannabis regime from a law enforcement perspective.

6,216,128

1,146,737

RCMP prevention and engagement activities support enhanced understanding  among targeted partners and stakeholders, including youth and Indigenous communities

% of targeted federal partners and stakeholders who strongly agree or agree with the statement “RCMP Federal Policing contributes to increased understanding specific to the new cannabis regime, organized crime, and the illicit cannabis market”

TBD in 2019 (baseline data to be collected in 2018)

TBD in 2019

Sub-Sub-Program 1.1.3.5 Operational Readiness and Response

(Theme Area 3: Build law enforcement knowledge and engage partners and stakeholders on public safety)

9,873,555

2,232,247

# of information inquiries responded to by the Centre for Youth Crime Prevention

TBD in 2018

TBD in 2018

Enhanced capacity of target populations, including partners and stakeholders, youth and Indigenous communities,  to respond to the new cannabis regime

% of targeted partners/stakeholders who strongly agree or agree with the statement “RCMP Federal Policing contributes to an increased skills/ability to respond to the new cannabis regime”

TBD in 2019 (baseline data to be collected in 2018)

TBD in 2019

% of youth resource officers who positively assessed the impact of training

100% positive assessment by youth resource officers

2020

Sub-Sub-Program 1.1.2.3  Criminal Intelligence

Enhance RCMP's ability to collect, assess and disseminate information and intelligence related to the evolution of organized crime's involvement in the illicit substances market.

4,993,457

1,234,324

Information and intelligence products related to illicit substances (including cannabis) are shared with Canadian law enforcement agencies and available to be used to target organized crime

# or % of RCMP information / intelligence products incorporating organized crime groups' activities in the Canadian cannabis market shared with RCMP senior management, divisions, domestic partners (including Canadian law enforcement) or international partners

TBD once baseline data is generated in 2018

TBD in 2018

Sub-Sub-Program
1.1.2.2 Federal Policing Project-Based Investigations

10,971,475

3,028,200

Sub-Sub-Program 1.1.2.1 Federal Policing General Investigations 

5,521,049

1,720,152

Canadian law enforcement agencies have intelligence information to nationally coordinate activities to target organized crime groups involved in the Canadian cannabis market

# of organized crime groups involved in the illicit cannabis market for which there are intelligence gaps is reduced [which will result in efficient and accurate targeting by the law enforcement community]

TBD (aiming for year-over-year decrease in the number of organized crime groups involved in the illicit cannabis market for which there are intelligence gaps)

TBD

Sub-sub-program 1.2.1.5  Criminal Intelligence Service Canada

1,907,690

424,186

(Theme Area 4: Provide criminal intelligence, enforcement and related training activities)

# or % of information and intelligence products that are used to guide enforcement against organized crime groups in the Canadian cannabis market

TBD once baseline data is generated in 2018

TBD in 2018

Sub-Sub-Program 1.1.2.2 Federal Policing Project-Based Investigations

Ensure that the RCMP is able to develop and deliver extensive training to its officers across Canada to support national implementation and ensure appropriate and standardized criminal enforcement of the new regime.

See first amount for Sub-Sub-Program 1.1.2.2

See first amount for Sub-Sub-Program 1.1.2.2

RCMP staff have access to required training in regards to enforcement of the new cannabis regime

% of employees who have received the appropriate cannabis related training

TBD once baseline data is generated in 2018

TBD in 2018

Sub-Program 4.1.4 Human Resources Management Services

(Theme Area 4: Provide criminal intelligence, enforcement and related training activities)

3,293,194

825,335

RCMP employees have an increased ability to enforce the new cannabis regime

% of operational training participants who reported an increased level of knowledge and ability to enforce the new cannabis regime

TBD once baseline data is generated in 2018

TBD in 2018

Sub-Program 4.1.7 Information Technology Services

3,574,262

3,146,977

 

Total for all federal organizations

Not applicable

Not applicable

546,807,456

104,191,608

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Amounts include EBP@ 20%, PWGSC accommodation premium @ 13% and internal services

Return to table footnote 1 referrer

Gender-based analysis plus

Governance structures

Health Canada has been working on integrating sex and gender considerations into the Department's work since the late 1990s. To strengthen Health Canada's approach, the Department launched a Sex and Gender Action Plan in May 2017. Health Canada's strategy is to stimulate energy, engage senior leadership across the department, create momentum and provide employees with the time and expertise to conduct Sex and Gender Based Analysis (SGBA)Footnote 7 and implement the findings of their analyses in a meaningful way.

The three-year rolling Action Plan moves beyond an incremental approach to the integration of sex, gender and diversity considerations in all departmental activities.
The goal of the Action Plan is to establish Health Canada as an organization where sex and gender considerations are systematically integrated in all of the Department's research, legislation, policies, regulations, programs and services.
Three priority areas have been identified:

  • Building departmental capacity;
  • Strengthening the evidence base and expertise; and,
  • Increasing accountability.

A comprehensive set of activities focused on priority areas was developed, including:

  • Enhancing guidelines, processes and resources to integrate SGBA in policy and program design;
  • Increasing SGBA awareness and the provision of targeted training;
  • Forging partnerships and incorporating cutting edge SGBA research expertise through a collaboration with the Institute of Gender and Health (IGH) of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research) and,
  • Strengthening governance, accountability and transparency in the integration of sex and gender in Health Canada's decision-making through public reporting on the Intranet and Internet, internal reporting to the Deputy Minister and a formal evaluation to be completed in 2019.

Human Resources

Support to integrate sex and gender-based analysis in departmental activities is provided by the Gender Health Unit, staff with three Full-time equivalents.

Sixty-two sex and gender resource people have been identified across the Department with representatives from every Branch. These resource people are currently undergoing capacity building training.

The implementation of the Action Plan is supported by a departmental Coordinating Committee with representatives from all Branches and the IGH.

Planned initiatives

In addition to the routine application of sex and gender-based analysis on all files, every Branch in the Department will be engaged in signature initiatives to be implemented over the next two years. The development of knowledge products, learning opportunities as well as outcomes like access to and use of resources and skills and the systematic consideration of sex and gender in all departmental work, will be tracked by the Gender and Health Unit (GHU), in the Strategic Policy Branch.

  • The GHU is working with the Office of Audit and Evaluation (OAE) to finalize the Action Plan performance measurement strategy, indicators and targets. Once finalized, the indicators and targets will be posted on the internet as they become available and incorporated in the Department's performance measurement process and published in annual departmental reporting. The OAE will oversee evaluation of the Plan in 2020.
  • The five research-policy initiatives described below flow from the collaboration with IGH mentioned earlier, they have recently formed and are currently finalizing their approaches. A sixth initiative related to the role of fathers in indigenous communities, falls under the responsibility of First Nations and Inuit Health Branch which recently moved to the Department of Indigenous Services Canada. Despite two calls for proposals to identify a researcher to collaborate on this project, we have not been successful. A decision is needed on whether and if so how to proceed.

Targeted initiatives this year include:

  • Home care - maximising the benefits of digital technologies in home care.
  • Cannabis - informing public education and awareness on cannabis.
  • Health product labelling - analyzing consumer perceptions of health product labelling.
  • Health products - communicating on health products risks.
  • Workplace health - supporting a psychologically healthy workplace.

Additional Information

For more information on the Health Canada Sex and Gender Action Plan please visit Health Canada's website.  

For government employees, information is also available on GCPedia.

Planned evaluation coverage over the next five fiscal years

Planned evaluation coverage, 2018-19 to 2022-23Footnote 1
Program Last evaluation Evaluations planned in the next 5 years Fiscal Year of approval 2018-2019 Program spending covered by the planned evaluation (dollars) 2018-2019 Total program spending covered by all planned evaluations (dollars) 2018-2019
Total program spending
(dollars)
Rationales for not evaluating programs or spending
Health Care Systems Analysis and Policy Evaluation of the Health Care Policy Contribution Program (HCPCP) 2013-14 HCPCP 2018-19 38,798,267 55,657,046 55,657,046 N/A
Evaluation of Mental Health and Mental Illness Activities 2015-16 Home Care and Mental Health Services InitiativeFootnote 2 2021-22 16,756,000
Horizontal Evaluation of the Genomics Research and Development Initiative (GRDI) 2016-17 Horizontal Evaluation of GRDIFootnote 3 – Led by National Research Council (NRC) 2021-22 102,779
Access, Affordability, and Appropriate Use of Drugs and Medical Devices Synthesis Evaluation of Transfer Payments to pan-Canadian Organizations  2013-14 Synthesis Evaluation of Transfer Payments to pan-Canadian OrganizationsFootnote 4 2018-19 20,970,913 20,970,913 20,970,913 N/A  
Digital Health Synthesis Evaluation of Transfer Payments to pan-Canadian Organizations  2013-14 Synthesis Evaluation of Transfer Payments to pan-Canadian Organizations 2018-19 51,057,933 51,057,933 51,057,933 N/A 
Health Information Synthesis Evaluation of Transfer Payments to pan-Canadian Organizations  2013-14 Synthesis Evaluation of Transfer Payments to pan-Canadian Organizations 2018-19 84,866,912 84,866,912 84,866,912 N/A 
Cancer Control Evaluation of the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer Activities
2015-16
Synthesis Evaluation of Transfer Payments to pan-Canadian Organizations 2018-19 44,157,933 44,157,933 44,157,933 N/A 
Patient Safety Evaluation of the Canadian Patient Safety Institute Activities
2016-17
Synthesis Evaluation of Transfer Payments to pan-Canadian Organizations 2018-19 8,657,933 8,657,933 8,657,933 N/A  
Mental Health Evaluation of Mental Health and Mental Illness Activities 2015-16 Synthesis Evaluation of Transfer Payments to pan-Canadian Organizations 2018-19 31,250,000 265,307,933 265,307,933 N/A  
Evaluation of Mental Health and Mental Illness Activities 2015-16 Home Care and Mental Health Services Initiative 2021-22 234,057,933
The Territorial Health Information Fund N/A Territorial Health Investment Fund 2018-19 27,000,000 27,000,000 27,000,000 N/A 
Food and Nutrition Evaluation of the Food Safety and Nutrition Quality Program 2013-14 Food Safety (including Veterinary Drugs and Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy) 2018-19 56,112,142 56,441,928 60,072,300 This program includes $3,630,372 for Nutrition Policy and Promotion that is exempt from section 42.1 of the Financial Administration Act. Low Need: Evaluation conducted within last seven years (2014-2015). Program expected to undergo major changes in the short term.
N/A Horizontal evaluation of Canadian Food Safety Information Network – Led by Canadian Food Inspection Agency 2022-23 210,786
Horizontal Evaluation of the GRDI 2016-17 Horizontal Evaluation of GRDI – Led by NRC 2021-22 119,000
Internal Services Evaluation of Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan 2013-14 Horizontal Evaluation of Federal - Contaminated Sites Led by Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) 2018-19 248,919 248,919 248,919 N/A 
Health Impacts of Chemicals Evaluation of Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan 2013-14 Horizontal Evaluation of Federal - Contaminated Sites Led by ECCCFootnote 5 2018-19 1,693,316 61,061,432 61,061,432 N/A 
Evaluation of Phase II of the Chemicals Management Plan (CMP) 2015-16 CMP (including water quality) 2019-20 58,791,116
Horizontal Evaluation of the GRDI 2016-17 Horizontal Evaluation of GRDI – Led by NRC 2021-22 577,000
Home, Community and Palliative Care N/A Home Care and Mental Health Services Initiative 2021-22 601,057,933 601,057,933 601,057,933 N/A 
Substance Use and Addictions National Anti-Drug Strategy (NADS)- Horizontal Initiative 2017-18 Substance Use and Addictions Program 2019-20 30,692,738 30,692,738 30,692,738 N/A 
Canada Health Act N/A Canada Health Act N/A 1,643,801 N/A 1,643,801 This program is exempt from section 42.1 of the Financial Administration Act. Low Risk: Low program materiality.
Medical Assistance in Dying N/A Medical Assistance in Dying N/A $1,057,933 N/A  1,057,933 This program is exempt from section 42.1 of the Financial Administration Act. Low Need: Program is new and evaluation potential will be examined further in the fiscal year.
Blood Systems, Organs, Tissue and Transplantation Evaluation of Canadian Blood Services Contribution Programs
2017-18
Canadian Blood Services Contribution Programs 2022-23 8,580,000 8,580,000 8,580,000 N/A  
Promoting Minority Official Languages in the Health Care Systems Evaluation of the Official Languages Health Contribution Program 2017-18 The Official Languages Health Contribution Program 2021-22 35,218,752 35,218,752 35,218,752 N/A 
Horizontal Evaluation of the Roadmap for Canada's Linguistic Duality 2008-2013: Acting for
the Future 2012-13
Horizontal evaluation of Roadmap to Canada's Official Languages – Led by Canadian Heritage 2022-23 0
Brain Research Evaluation of the Contribution to Brain Canada Foundation's Canada Brain Research Fund 2016-17 Brain Research N/A 23,500,000 N/A  23,500,000 This program is exempt from section 42.1 of the Financial Administration Act. Low Risk: Low materiality; currently scheduled to sunset.
Thalidomide N/A Thalidomide Survivors Contribution Program 2019-20 8,489,664 8,489,664 8,489,664 N/A 
Pharmaceutical Drugs N/A Horizontal evaluation of Single Window InitiativeFootnote 6 –Led by Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) 2019-20 N/A  71,027,111 71,027,111 N/A 
Evaluation of the Drug Treatment Funding Program 2013-14 Drug Safety and Effectiveness Network (DSEN) 2019-20 539,692
Evaluation of the Drug Treatment Funding Program 2013-14 Pharmaceutical Drugs (Innovators) 2020-21 70,487,419
Biologics and Radiopharmaceuti-cal Drugs N/A Horizontal evaluation of Single Window Initiative –Led by CBSA 2019-20 0 43,959,566 43,959,566 N/A
Evaluation of the Biologics Program 2014-15 Biologics and Radiopharmaceutical Drugs 2020-21 43,205,566
Horizontal Evaluation of the GRDI 2016-17 Horizontal Evaluation of GRDI – Led by NRC 2021-22 754,000
Medical Devices N/A Horizontal evaluation of Single Window Initiative –Led by CBSA 2019-20 N/A 16,711,247 16,711,247 N/A
Evaluation of the Medical Devices Program 2013-14 Medical Devices 2019-20 16,711,247
Natural Health Products N/A Horizontal evaluation of Single Window Initiative –Led by CBSA 2019-20 N/A 15,646,976 15,646,976 N/A
Evaluation of the Natural Health Products Program 2015-16 Natural Health Products Program 2021-22 15,646,976
Air Quality Evaluation of Phase II of the CMP 2015-16 CMP (including water quality) 2019-20 1,600,289 19,435,292 19,435,292 N/A
Evaluation of the Clean Air Agenda's International Actions Theme 2015-16 Climate Change 2020-21 17,835,003
Climate Change Evaluation of the Clean Air Agenda's International Actions Theme 2015-16 Climate Change 2020-21 3,234,027 4,234,027 4,234,027 N/A
Evaluation of the Clean Air Agenda's International Actions Theme 2015-16 Horizontal evaluation of Adapting to Impacts of Climate Change – Led by ECCC 2021-22 1,000,000
Water Quality Evaluation of Phase II of the CMP 2015-16 CMP (including water quality) 2019-20 3,379,919 3,379,919 3,379,919 N/A
Consumer Product Safety N/A Horizontal evaluation of Single Window Initiative –Led by CBSA 2019-20 N/A 31,428,906 $31,428,906 N/A
Evaluation of the Consumer Products Activities 2013-14 Consumer Product Safety 2021-22 31,428,906
Workplace Hazardous Products N/A Workplace Chemical Safety 2019-20 3,494,289 3,494,289 3,494,289 N/A
Tobacco Control (including vaping) Evaluation of Federal Tobacco Control Strategy 2016-17 Horizontal evaluation of Federal Tobacco Control Strategy and Vaping Activities 2022-23 30,053,869 30,053,869 30,053,869 N/A
Controlled Substances NADS - Horizontal Initiative 2017-18 Canadian Drug and Substance Strategy 2021-22 41,028,964 41,028,964 41,028,964 N/A
Cannabis Cannabis for Medical Purposes
Program 2017-18
Cannabis N/A 54,538,725 N/A 54,538,725 Deputy Head approval is scheduled for 2023-24 (i.e., outside the scope of this Five-Year Plan).
Radiation Protection N/A Horizontal evaluation of Single Window Initiative -Led by CBSA 2019-20 N/A 16,324,955 16,324,955 N/A
Evaluation of Health Canada's Radiation Protection Activities 2016-17 Radiation Protection Activities 2020-21 16,324,955
Pesticides N/A Horizontal evaluation of Single Window Initiative -Led by CBSA 2019-20 N/A 33,370,092 33,370,092 N/A
Evaluation of the Pesticide Program 2015-16 Pesticides Program 2020-21 33,370,092
Specialized Health Services and Internationally Protected Persons Program N/A Specialized Health Services and Internationally Protected Persons Program N/A 18,092,793 N/A 18,092,793 This program is exempt from section 42.1 of the Financial Administration Act.
(For one program component, Health Canada is the delivery agent rather than program owner (Employee Assistance Services).
Not applicable N/A Sex and Gender-based Analysis 2020-21 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total N/A N/A N/A N/A 1,689,563,182 1,792,026,806  N/A
Table 6 Footnote 1

The Office of Audit and Evaluation is currently in the process of updating its Five-Year Evaluation Plan. As a result of this update, scheduled for Deputy Head approval in March 2018, planned evaluations, including planned start and completion dates, are subject to change.

The evaluation of the Home Care and Mental Health Services Initiative covers budget from three programs.

Return to table p6 note 1 referrer

Table 6 Footnote 2

The evaluation of GRDI covers budget from four programs.

Return to table p6 note 2 referrer

Table 6 Footnote 3

The Synthesis Evaluation of Transfer Payments to pan-Canadian Organizations covers budget from six programs.

Return to table p6 note 3 referrer

As reflected below, the evaluation of Federal-Contaminated Sites covers budget from a program and Internal services.

Return to table p6 note 4 referrer

As reflected below, the evaluation of Single Window Initiative is linked to seven programs.

Return to table p6 note 5 referrer

As reflected below, the evaluation of Single Window Initiative is linked to seven programs.

Return to table p6 note 6 referrer

Internal auditsFootnote 8

Internal audits
Title of internal audit Area being audited Status Expected completion date
Audit of Biologics and Radiopharmaceuticals Management Control Framework In progress June 2018
Audit of Controlled Substances Management Control Framework Planned June 2019
Audit of Contracting and Procurement Management Control Framework In progress January 2019
Audit of Grants and Contributions Phase II Grants and Contributions In progress January 2019
Audit of the Inspection Framework Management Control Framework Planned June 2019
Audit of Costing Information for Decision-Making Management Control Framework Planned October 2019
Audit of Acquisition Cards Management Control Framework Planned January 2020
Audit of Travel Expenditures Management Control Framework Planned October 2019
Audit of the Management of Privacy Practices Management Control Framework Planned June 2019

Up-Front Multi Year Funding

Conditional Grant to Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement

Name of recipient: Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI), formerly the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation (CHSRF)

Start date: 1996-97

End date: N/A

Link to department's Program Inventory

Core Responsibility: Health Care Systems

Program 1: Health Care Systems Analysis and Policy

Description:

When CHSRF was established as an independent organization, its priorities were to bring researchers and decision-makers together to identify gaps in applied health services research, fund the researchers who could investigate those gaps, and promote best practices of health services delivery and their outcomes. To reflect the evolution of its work, CHSRF was renamed the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI) in 2012. CFHI aims to identify proven innovations and accelerate their spread across Canada by supporting healthcare organizations to adapt, implement and measure improvements in patient care, population health and value-for-money. 

Up-front multi-year funding to CFHI has included:

  • 1996-97: A $66.5M endowment established the CHSRF. Additional federal grants were provided to CHSRF for the following purposes:
  • 1999: $25M to support a ten-year program to develop capacity for research on nursing recruitment, retention, management, leadership and the issues emerging from health system restructuring (Nursing Research Fund).
  • 1999: $35M to support its participation in the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.
  • 2003: $25M to develop a program to equip health system managers and their organizations with the skills to find, assess, interpret and use research to better manage the Canadian health care system (Executive Training for Research Application or EXTRA).
Up-Front Multi-Year Funding (in dollars)
Total Funding Approved Total Funding Received Planned Funding
2018-19
Planned Funding
2019-20
Planned Funding
2020–21
Note: CFHI is also reported under the Details on Transfer Payment Programs of $5 Million or More section of the Supplementary Information Tables.
151,500,000 1996: 66,500,000 N/A N/A N/A
1999: 60,000,000
2003: 25,000.000

Summary of annual plans of recipient:

CFHI facilitates ongoing interaction, collaboration, and exchange of ideas and information between governments, policy-makers, health system leaders and providers. It does so by converting evidence and innovative practices into actionable health care improvement policies, programs, tools and leadership development programs.

With the announcement of ongoing funding in Budget 2017, CFHI is now considering how to best use its remaining up-front multi-year funding that had previously been held in reserve for potential costs related to its organizational wind-down (e.g. legal obligations related to its pension plan and contracts) had it been needed.

Conditional Grant to Canada Health Infoway

Name of recipient: Canada Health Infoway (Infoway)

Start date: March 31, 2001Footnote 9

End date: March 31, 2015Footnote 10

Link to department's Program Inventory

Core Responsibility: Health Care Systems
Program 6: Digital Health

Description:

Canada Health Infoway Inc. is an independent, not-for-profit corporation established in 2001 to accelerate the development of electronic health technologies such as electronic health records (EHRs) and telehealth on a pan-Canadian basis.

Between 2001 and 2010, the Government of Canada committed $2.1B to Infoway in the form of grants and up-front multi-year funding consisting of: $500M in 2001 to strengthen a Canada-wide health infostructure, with the EHR as a priority; $600M in 2003 to accelerate implementation of the EHR and Telehealth; $100M in 2004 to support the development of a pan-Canadian health surveillance system; $400M in 2007 to support continued work on EHRs and wait time reductions; and $500M in 2010 to support continued implementation of EHRs, implementation of electronic medical records (EMRs) in physicians' offices, and integration of points of service with the EHR system. Infoway invests in electronic health projects in collaboration with a range of partners, in particular provincial and territorial governments, typically on a cost-shared basis. Project payments are made based on the completion of pre-determined milestones.

It is anticipated that Infoway's approach, where federal, provincial and territorial governments participate toward a goal of modernizing electronic health information systems, will reduce costs and improve the quality of health care and patient safety in Canada through coordination of effort, avoidance of duplication and errors, and improved access to patient data.
Up-Front Multi-Year Funding (in dollars)

Up-Front Multi-Year Funding (in dollars)
Total Funding Approved Total Funding Received Planned Funding
2018-19
Planned Funding
2019-20
Planned Funding
2020–21

Note: Budget 2016 and 2017 contribution funding to Infoway is reported under the Details on Transfer Payment Programs of $5 Million or More section of the Supplementary Information Tables.

Table 8 Footnote *

This amount only represents funds disbursed to Infoway since its creation in 2001 up to November 2017, including the immediate lump sum disbursements in 2001, 2003 and 2004 totaling $1.2 billion as well as funds disbursed through cash flow requests under the 2007 and 2010 funding agreements.

Return to Table 8 note * referrer

Table 8 Footnote **

As per both the 2007 and 2010 funding agreements, funds are to be disbursed according to the annual cash flow requirements identified by Infoway. These requirements are to be submitted to Health Canada no later than March 30, in advance of the upcoming fiscal year to which that cash flow statement applies. Also, Infoway can submit additional cash flow requests within a fiscal year, should the need for additional funding arise. Infoway has not provided an advance estimate of its 2018-19 to 2020-21 requirements.

Return to Table 8 note ** referrer

2,100,000,000 2,069,007,065Footnote * To be determinedFootnote ** To be determinedFootnote ** To be determinedFootnote **

Summary of annual plans of recipientFootnote 11:

Research from respected organizations like the Commonwealth Fund and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development consistently demonstrates that Canada spends more on universal health care than almost every other comparable country but ranks at or near the bottom on measures of timely, equitable access to appropriate care. Improving health care access for Canadians will require moving beyond traditional in-person care models to implementing innovative strategies for how we deliver care, including increasing the use of digital health solutions. These solutions are an important enabler of health system transformation with the ability to improve health, enhance quality, increase access and reduce costs. To maximize the potential of these solutions, Canada must greatly increase the scope of available health information and services offered, and the proportion of Canadians and their care teams who can access them.

Infoway is enabling these transformations through Driving Access to Care, a new strategic focus to empower Canadians and strengthen their care teams. Over the next four years (2018 to 2022), Infoway's role will be that of a catalyst and its focus will be large, multi-jurisdictional or pan-Canadian projects.

In 2018-19, Infoway will focus on the two strategic goals described below:

  1. Provide Safer Access to Medications, Starting with a Multi-Jurisdiction e-Prescribing Solution (PrescribeITTM)

    Infoway is working with Health Canada, the provinces and territories, and health sector stakeholders to create, operate and maintain PrescribeITTM as a financially self-sustaining multi-jurisdiction e-prescribing service and scale it for use across the country. With PrescribeITTM, prescribers electronically transmit a prescription through their existing EMR to a pharmacy management system at a patient's pharmacy of choice. PrescribeITTM helps the federal government deliver on its commitments to Canadians regarding prescription drugs and innovation in health care delivery. In particular, PrescribeITTM will help meet the federal Minister of Health's mandate “to ensure Canada's response to the current opioid crisis is robust, well-coordinated, and effective” by reducing the potential for prescription drug fraud and abuse.

    Plans for 2018-19 include the following:

    • Starting to scale deployment of the PrescribeITTM service in the two early adopter jurisdictions.
    • Planning the expansion of PrescribeITTM and beginning deployment in two additional jurisdictions.
    • Continued outreach and engagement with key stakeholders, including prescribers, pharmacists, patients, vendors, professional organizations and regulatory bodies to support future expansion.
  2. Provide Access to Personal Health Information and Digital Health Services for Canadians and their Providers

    Driving access to information and care through digital health technologies is crucial to improving the patient experience and health outcomes. Canadians who can access their health information digitally report improved knowledge of their health, as well as increased confidence in their ability to manage their conditions and have informed discussions with their doctors.

    Infoway will set out a coordinated approach to providing personal health information and digital health services across the country, empowering Canadians to better manage their health and strengthening health care teams. The program will address areas such as citizens' digital access to their health records and health services.

    Plans for 2018-19 include the following:

    • Working toward a multi-jurisdiction service that would locate patient information from various sources (including foundational EHR systems), deliver important alerts and reminders and enable email between patients and providers.
    • Collaborating with stakeholders to finalize the specifics of the service and secure the partnerships necessary for a successful launch.
    • Scaling access to personal health information with select jurisdictions, including Indigenous communities.
    • Accelerating the availability and use of digital health solutions and services to improve Canadians' access to care and their care experiences including in priority areas of youth mental health and addictions, and home and community care, including palliative care.
    • Providing national leadership and insights in areas such as privacy, security, solution architecture and standards, interoperability, clinical engagement, change management and benefits evaluation.
    • Working to bring Infoway's foundational EHR and EMR investment projects to or near completion.

    For additional information, please see Infoway's 2018-19 Summary Corporate Plan.

Report a problem or mistake on this page
Please select all that apply:

Thank you for your help!

You will not receive a reply. For enquiries, contact us.

Date modified: