Departmental Performance Report

For the period ending
March 31, 2014

Citizenship and Immigration Canada

Table of Contents

Foreword

Departmental Performance Reports are part of the Estimates family of documents. Estimates documents support appropriation acts, which specify the amounts and broad purposes for which funds can be spent by the government. The Estimates document family has three parts.

Part I (Government Expenditure Plan) provides an overview of federal spending.

Part II (Main Estimates) lists the financial resources required by individual departments, agencies and Crown corporations for the upcoming fiscal year.

Part III (Departmental Expenditure Plans) consists of two documents. Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) are expenditure plans for each appropriated department and agency (excluding Crown corporations). They describe departmental priorities, strategic outcomes, programs, expected results and associated resource requirements, covering a three-year period beginning with the year indicated in the title of the report. Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs) are individual department and agency accounts of actual performance, for the most recently completed fiscal year, against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in their respective RPPs. DPRs inform parliamentarians and Canadians of the results achieved by government organizations for Canadians.

Additionally, Supplementary Estimates documents present information on spending requirements that were either not sufficiently developed in time for inclusion in the Main Estimates or were subsequently refined to account for developments in particular programs and services.

The financial information in DPRs is drawn directly from authorities presented in the Main Estimates and the planned spending information in RPPs. The financial information in DPRs is also consistent with information in the Public Accounts of Canada. The Public Accounts of Canada include the Government of Canada Consolidated Statement of Financial Position, the Consolidated Statement of Operations and Accumulated Deficit, the Consolidated Statement of Change in Net Debt, and the Consolidated Statement of Cash Flow, as well as details of financial operations segregated by ministerial portfolio for a given fiscal year. For the DPR, two types of financial information are drawn from the Public Accounts of Canada: authorities available for use by an appropriated organization for the fiscal year, and authorities used for that same fiscal year. The latter corresponds to actual spending as presented in the DPR.

The Treasury Board Policy on Management, Resources and Results Structures further strengthens the alignment of the performance information presented in DPRs, other Estimates documents and the Public Accounts of Canada. The policy establishes the Program Alignment Architecture of appropriated organizations as the structure against which financial and non-financial performance information is provided for Estimates and parliamentary reporting. The same reporting structure applies irrespective of whether the organization is reporting in the Main Estimates, the RPP, the DPR or the Public Accounts of Canada.

A number of changes have been made to DPRs for 2013−14 to better support decisions on appropriations. Where applicable, DPRs now provide financial, human resources and performance information in Section II at the lowest level of the organization’s Program Alignment Architecture.

In addition, the DPR’s format and terminology have been revised to provide greater clarity, consistency and a strengthened emphasis on Estimates and Public Accounts information. As well, departmental reporting on the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy has been consolidated into a new supplementary information table posted on departmental websites. This new table brings together all of the components of the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy formerly presented in DPRs and on departmental websites, including reporting on the Greening of Government Operations and Strategic Environmental Assessments. Section III of the report provides a link to the new table on the organization’s website. Finally, definitions of terminology are now provided in an appendix.

Minister's Message

As Canada’s Citizenship and Immigration Minister, I am very pleased to present the Departmental Performance Report for 2013-2014.

This past year, my department and I continued our work to build a faster and more flexible immigration system that is better aligned with Canada’s economic needs. We did so, while also reuniting tens of thousands of loved ones and giving refuge to thousands of the world’s most vulnerable people. Indeed, all Canadians can be proud that Canada boasts one of the world’s most successful family reunification programs and most generous refugee systems. 

Looking ahead, we will soon launch the new Express Entry application management system to actively recruit the talented, skilled workers whose skills are most needed in the Canadian labour market. Those chosen under Express Entry will be more likely to work immediately upon their arrival, and will get here much sooner than ever before. With the launch of Express Entry for many of our most popular immigration streams, we can be more responsive to the changing needs of employers and Canada’s economy. This will help reduce employer reliance on temporary foreign workers in favour of permanent immigration that responds to Canada’s labour market needs.

We will continue to build on the reforms to the International Mobility Programs that we announced in June 2014.  A number of measures have been taken to reduce abuse of these programs and ensure they work in the best interests of Canadians. My department will continue to work with Employment and Social Development Canada to ensure that the Temporary Foreign Workers Program and the International Mobility Program are only used as intended: to fill labour shortages on a temporary basis when qualified Canadians are not available or there is a compelling rationale in Canada’s best interests.

We will continue to uphold our longstanding tradition of reuniting families. Since the Action Plan for Faster Family Reunification was launched in 2011, the Government has cut the backlog of parents and grandparents in half, and we expect to make further substantial progress by the end of 2015. To date, more than 40,000 families have discovered the ease and convenience of the Super Visa, which continues to be a wildly popular option allowing parents and grandparents to remain in Canada for up to two years at a time.

We will also continue to be a world-leader in resettling refugees and providing protection to the world’s most vulnerable populations. At a time where there are more displaced people around the world than at any other time since the Second World War, it is important that Canada’s refugee system works at its most effective. Our comprehensive reforms to the once-broken system are working and we will continue our efforts to provide refuge to those who most need Canada’s protection.

It is in Canada’s interest to ensure newcomers and refugees can successfully and quickly integrate into Canada’s labour market and Canadian communities. To that end, the Government of Canada will continue to invest in settlement services across Canada and expand pre-arrival employment and orientation services. Funding for settlement services in Canada has increased from less than $200 million in 2005-06 to approximately $600 million in 2013–2014. This is over and above the substantial funding we provide to the province of Quebec for immigration and settlement services there.

We continue to implement the measures contained in the Strengthening Canadian Citizenship Act. Passed by Parliament in June 2014, this legislation represents the most comprehensive set of reforms to the Citizenship Act in more than a generation. These will reinforce the value of Canadian citizenship and protect the integrity of our citizenship program while streamlining the application process and decreasing legacy backlogs. We expect to reduce processing times to less than one year by 2015-2016. 

We continue to introduce new measures to support legitimate trade and travel.  The launch of CAN+ and other facilitative travel programs for low-risk populations this past year will make it faster and easier for legitimate travellers in key global markets to get a visa to come to Canada. We are also modernizing our immigration network overseas and finding new ways to deliver better service to prospective visitors. The take-up, as measured by high volumes of multiple entry visas and record visitor visa issuance in many countries, speaks for itself. For Canada, the economic benefits of this are immense.

These are just some of the new ways in which we are making Canadian immigration more responsive to the needs of our economy. You can read more in the coming pages and be assured that the launch of Express Entry in the coming months will only contribute further to our country’s economy and to our collective prosperity.

I would like to close by thanking the dedicated employees who work in our offices across Canada and missions around the world for their efforts to further the goals outlined above and bring the benefits of global migration home to all Canadians.

The Honourable Chris Alexander, P.C., M.P.
Canada’s Citizenship and Immigration Minister

Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

Organizational Profile

Minister: Chris Alexander

Deputy Head: Anita Biguzs

Ministerial Portfolio:

Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism
Department: Department of Citizenship and Immigration
Special Operating Agency: Passport Canada
Statutory and Other Agencies: Citizenship Commission, Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
Crown Corporation: Canadian Race Relations Foundation

Enabling Instruments: Section 95 of the Constitution Act, 1867, the Citizenship Act, the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA), the Canadian Multiculturalism Act and the Canadian Passport Order.

Year Established: 1994

Organizational Context

Raison d’être

In the first years after Confederation, Canada’s leaders had a powerful vision: to connect Canada by rail and make the West the world’s breadbasket as a foundation for the country’s economic prosperity. This vision meant quickly populating the Prairies, leading the Government of Canada to establish its first national immigration policies. Immigrants have been a driving force in Canada’s nationhood and its economic prosperity—as farmers settling lands, as workers in factories fuelling industrial growth, as entrepreneurs and as innovators helping Canada to compete in the global, knowledge-based economy.

Responsibilities

Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) selects foreign nationals as permanent and temporary residents and offers Canada’s protection to refugees. The Department develops Canada’s admissibility policy, which sets the conditions for entering and remaining in Canada; it also conducts, in collaboration with its partners, the screening of potential permanent and temporary residents to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians. Fundamentally, the Department builds a stronger Canada by helping immigrants and refugees settle and integrate into Canadian society and the economy, and by encouraging and facilitating Canadian citizenship. To achieve this, CIC operates 27 in-Canada points of service and 68 points of service in 61 countries.

CIC’s mandate is partly derived from the Department of Citizenship and Immigration Act. The Minister for Citizenship and Immigration Canada is responsible for the Citizenship Act of 1977 and shares responsibility with the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness for the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA), which came into force following major legislative reform in 2002. CIC and the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) support their respective ministers in the administration and enforcement of IRPA. These organizations work collaboratively to achieve the objectives of the immigration and refugee programs.

In October 2008, responsibility for administration of the Canadian Multiculturalism Act was transferred to CIC from the Department of Canadian Heritage. Under the Act, CIC promotes the integration of individuals and communities into all aspects of Canadian society and helps to build a stronger, more cohesive society.

Jurisdiction over immigration is a shared responsibility between the federal, and the provincial and territorial governments under section 95 of the Constitution Act, 1867. Under section 91(25) of the Constitution Act, 1867, the federal government has jurisdiction over naturalization and aliens.

In July 2013, the primary responsibility for the Passport Program was transferred from the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada (DFATD) to CIC; Passport service delivery is now provided through Service Canada.

In August 2013, CIC assumed responsibility for International Experience Canada (IEC) – archived from DFATD. This transfer allowed the program to better align with government priorities and labour market demands in Canada by linking IEC to other immigration programs.

Strategic Outcomes and Program Alignment Architecture

  • Strategic Outcome 1: Migration of permanent and temporary residents that strengthens Canada’s economy
    • Program 1.1: Permanent Economic Residents
      • Sub-Program 1.1.1: Federal Skilled Workers
      • Sub-Program 1.1.2: Quebec Skilled Workers
      • Sub-Program 1.1.3: Provincial Nominees
      • Sub-Program 1.1.4: Live-in Caregivers
      • Sub-Program 1.1.5: Canadian Experience Class
      • Sub-Program 1.1.6: Federal Business Immigrants
      • Sub-Program 1.1.7: Quebec Business Immigrants
    • Program 1.2: Temporary Economic Residents
      • Sub-Program 1.2.1: International Students
      • Sub-program 1.2.2: Temporary Foreign Workers
  • Strategic Outcome 2: Family and humanitarian migration that reunites families and offers protection to the displaced and persecuted
    • Program 2.1: Family and Discretionary Immigration
      • Sub-Program 2.1.1: Spouses, Partners and Children Reunification
      • Sub-Program 2.1.2: Parents and Grandparents Reunification
      • Sub-Program 2.1.3: Humanitarian and Compassionate and Public Policy Considerations
    • Program 2.2: Refugee Protection
      • Sub-Program 2.2.1: Government-Assisted Refugees
      • Sub-Program 2.2.2: Privately Sponsored Refugees
      • Sub-Program 2.2.3: In-Canada Asylum
      • Sub-Program 2.2.4: Pre-removal Risk Assessment
  • Strategic Outcome 3: Newcomers and citizens participate in fostering an integrated society
    • Program 3.1: Newcomer Settlement and Integration
      • Sub-Program 3.1.1: Foreign Credentials Referral
      • Sub-Program 3.1.2: Settlement (Policy and Program Development)
        • Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.2.1: Information and Orientation
        • Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.2.2: Language Training
        • Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.2.3: Labour Market Access
        • Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.2.4: Welcoming Communities
        • Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.2.5: Contribution to British Columbia for Settlement and Integration
        • Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.2.6: Support for Official Language Minority Communities
      • Sub-Program 3.1.3: Grant to Quebec
      • Sub-Program 3.1.4: Immigration Loan
      • Sub-Program 3.1.5: Refugee Resettlement Assistance Program
    • Program 3.2: Citizenship for Newcomers and All Canadians
      • Sub-Program 3.2.1: Citizenship Awareness
      • Sub-Program 3.2.2: Citizenship Acquisition, Confirmation and Revocation
    • Program 3.3: Multiculturalism for Newcomers and All Canadians
      • Sub-Program 3.3.1: Multiculturalism Awareness
      • Sub-Program 3.3.2: Federal and Public Institutional Multiculturalism Support
  • Strategic Outcome 4: Managed migration that promotes Canadian interests and protects the health, safety and security of Canadians
    • Program 4.1: Health Management
      • Sub-Program 4.1.1: Health Screening
      • Sub-Program 4.1.2: Medical Surveillance Notification
      • Sub-Program 4.1.3: Interim Federal Health
    • Program 4.2: Migration Control and Security Management
      • Sub-Program 4.2.1: Permanent Resident Status Documents
      • Sub-Program 4.2.2: Visitors Status
      • Sub-Program 4.2.3: Temporary Resident Permits
      • Sub-Program 4.2.4: Fraud Prevention and Program Integrity Protection
      • Sub-Program 4.2.5: Global Assistance for Irregular Migrants
    • Program 4.3: Canadian Influence in International Migration and Integration Agenda
    • Program 4.4: Passport
    • Internal Services

Organizational Priorities

In 2013–2014, CIC identified the following four priorities.

Priority: Improving/modernizing client service

TypeFootnote 1: Ongoing

Strategic Outcomes: SO 1, 2, 3, 4—Enabling

Summary of Progress

CIC has continued the process of modernizing its client service through legislative changes and through the implementation of new technologies in program delivery. These changes allow for increased efficiency, strengthened program integrity and seamless service delivery of programs and services, as well as enabling CIC to better respond to client expectations. Key accomplishments included the following:

  • The expansion of the global Visa Application Centre (VAC) network was crucial to improve access to services for applicants and to increase processing efficiencies. As of March 31, 2014, CIC had 129 VACs in 92 countries. In addition to providing valuable administrative support services in local languages to applicants before, during and after the time when their application is assessed at a CIC office, VACs also collect biometrics from some clients, thereby improving CIC’s management of identity fraud risk.
  • Continuing the work of transferring business lines to the Global Case Management System (GCMS) in order to replace legacy systems. These changes improved service delivery, efficiency and security while allowing an integrated view of clients across business lines. GCMS also allowed applications created by one office to be transferred efficiently, in whole or in part, to any office in CIC’s global network for further processing. For example, London and New Delhi absorbed all Economic and Family Class production based on applicants’ country of residence for Islamabad, and Case Processing Region will process 100% of applications submitted in Canada as well as some non-complex cases submitted abroad. GCMS continued to develop and maintain system capabilities, incorporating new business and technology enhancements to improve functionality and business processes.
  • A dramatic increase in the use of multiple-entry visas (MEV) for low-risk frequent visitors is ongoing. An MEV allows visitors to enter Canada several times during the validity period of their visa (up to 10 years, but not beyond the expiry date of an individual’s passport), eliminating the need for clients to reapply for visas over the course of several years. The proportion of MEVs issued has increased from 48% in September 2013 to 94% in March of 2014. The fee for MEVs was also reduced from $150 to $100. Other new initiatives, such as opening new offices in China and India, will help meet the demand in these two key countries.
  • To build on program linkages and CIC’s suite of e-Tools, responsibility for the Passport Program was transferred to CIC with functions related to service delivery transferred to Service Canada. The transition was done successfully without any service disruptions to Canadians. CIC also introduced the 10-year passport option, which provides another choice for clients.
  • Responsibility for International Experience Canada (IEC) was also transferred to CIC, which will align the program with Canada’s economic and labour market needs.
  • Video conferencing equipment was installed in offices across Canada, enabling some clients to be interviewed via video conferencing rather than requiring them to appear in person, a particular benefit to those clients who live far from a CIC office. Video conferencing is currently being used for Pre-removal Risk Assessment, Humanitarian and Compassionate and Citizenship Hearings.
  • While the Professional Association of Foreign Service Officers’ job action in 2013 affected overseas processing offices with regard to meeting overall economic admission targets and adherence to service standards and processing times, CIC’s processing network has now recovered.

Priority: Emphasizing people management

Type: Ongoing

Strategic Outcomes: SO 1, 2, 3, 4—Enabling

Summary of Progress

In its commitment to create a high-quality workforce and a workplace founded on strong leadership, CIC successfully emphasized effective people management through various measures. Most notably:

  • In the transfer of responsibility for the Passport Program to CIC, senior leaders and managers were able to maintain or create the working conditions required for motivating employees to excel in an environment characterized by intense organizational changes and to help transform, through service modernization, the way CIC operates.
  • CIC fully implemented the Common Human Resources Business Processes across all human resources (HR) disciplines in order to streamline and standardize HR processes and to empower managers to more effectively manage the workforce while strengthening the strategic partnerships with HR professionals.
  • CIC reviewed and is now implementing national standardized core staffing services.
  • An online workforce dashboard was developed to provide CIC management and staff with various graphs and data charts extracted directly from the HR management system.
  • CIC worked closely with the Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer at the Treasury Board Secretariat to implement the new performance management program, including the clarification of the various roles and responsibilities, to train managers and to keep the workforce informed of each step in the implementation process.
  • In order to strengthen its leadership and people management capacity, CIC established mandatory Learning Roadmaps for executives, managers and supervisors.
  • The organization implemented mechanisms and tools to strengthen managers’ change management abilities by establishing partnerships with the Canada School of Public Service.
  • A new official languages governance structure was established to strengthen leadership accountability in implementing CIC’s official languages obligations and strategic direction.
  • The development of the 2013–2016 Official Languages Plan, which addresses the challenges outlined in CIC documents: 2011 Public Service Employee Survey results, Management Accountability Framework (MAF) assessment, Departmental Staffing Accountability Report, and 2011 Official Languages Quiz.
  • CIC’s Diversity and Employment Equity Champion worked closely with an Advisory Committee to establish additional strategies for the 2012–2015 Diversity and Employment Equity Plan.
  • CIC determined that post-employment conflict of interest situations continue to have a low risk of occurrence and a low impact on integrity. Such disclosures will be addressed on a case-by-case basis and mitigation measures will emphasize prevention.
  • Key issues and trends in HR management were presented to senior management on a quarterly basis.
  • The Department continued to strengthen its capacity to plan, measure and monitor the workforce through the ongoing improvement of internal tools, HR quarterly reports, and dashboards.
  • HR bulletins were published monthly to provide management and staff with important information and guidance on HR policies, initiatives and best practices to support strong people management.
  • A new executive (EX) action report was implemented to better streamline EX staffing and classification actions and empower senior management to more effectively manage the workforce.
  • As part of the Consolidation of Pay project, CIC prepared and transferred nearly 1,100 pay accounts for centralized processing and communicated changes to employees. Collaboration with stakeholders to clarify procedures and accountabilities was ongoing throughout.
  • During the Professional Association of Foreign Service Officers’ job action in 2013, the International Region mitigated the impacts of the job action by establishing a dedicated interdisciplinary team to manage issues, strategies and communications. To manage the workload, urgent humanitarian cases and student applications were prioritized and lower-risk cases were processed by the Ottawa Case Processing Office. While leave during the job action was restricted for Foreign Service Officers as well as locally engaged staff, it was important to be able to bring back full productivity at its conclusion. To assist in the full-scale resumption of work, open communication and mutual trust between employer and employees was essential to quickly resolve problems experienced by either or both sides.

By focusing on strong leadership that embodies a high standard of values and ethics, CIC created the working conditions that inspire employees to excellence, innovation and higher levels of productivity, in turn transforming how CIC does business and provides services to clients.

Priority: Promoting management accountability and excellence

Type: Ongoing

Strategic Outcomes: SO 1, 2, 3, 4—Enabling

Summary of Progress

CIC managed its corporate services effectively by continuing to focus on strong management practices, oversight and accountability, and by strengthening compliance and monitoring, simplifying internal rules and procedures, and improving internal services. This supported CIC in achieving its mandate and priorities.  

In 2013–2014, management practices and corporate infrastructure were further enhanced through the following initiatives:

  • CIC supported the Government of Canada Open Data Initiative by expanding access to the CIC Access to Information and Privacy online request application to 11 additional departments. In addition, CIC piloted GCDOCS (a document management system) and prepared for full roll-out in 2014–2015.
  • The Department improved internal service delivery by increasing standardization and implementing self-service options for managers. In particular, Common Human Resources Business Processes were implemented to standardize and streamline HR processes; nearly 1,100 pay accounts were sent for centralized processing as part of the Consolidation of Pay project; and procedures were established to enable implementation of the Performance Management Program.
  • As demonstrated by 2013–2014 MAF results, CIC continued to improve its management practices in the areas of Values and Ethics, Audit, Evaluation, Financial, and People Management. Greater integration of risk management with planning, reporting and performance measurement was achieved to ensure that the Department is well positioned to respond to requirements for the 2014–2015 MAF exercise.
  • CIC reviewed its HR policies and directives to ensure flexibility and adequate management controls.
  • The Department initiated the development of a risk-based Compliance Management Framework to ensure that CIC remains compliant with all central agency policies and legislation.
  • CIC enhanced the Department’s project investment management framework and continued to provide leadership in the promotion of investment planning and project management best practices within the Government of Canada community.

While managing the migration of Passport Canada into CIC and facilitating of responsibilities for service delivery to Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC), corporate Passport Program enablers provided the tools needed to support a healthy and high-performing workforce which ensured that service standards for passport services were maintained at all times. Full integration with accompanying cost savings and efficiencies will be achieved over the coming years through further alignment of corporate functions.

Priority: Strengthening outcomes-based management

Type: Ongoing

Strategic Outcomes: SO 1, 2, 3, 4—Enabling

Summary of Progress

In 2013–2014, the continued implementation of the departmental Performance Measurement Action Plan strengthened overall performance measurement and outcomes-based information and data throughout CIC. Key accomplishments included:

  • Improved horizontal governance of performance measurement, which ensured consistency across the Department, performance measurement data availability and performance results in support of decision making.
  • Development and dissemination of performance measurement resources and tools across CIC, including a departmental guide to performance measurement.
  • Further development of departmental research and performance measurement data and systems in support of outcomes-based reporting, such as the expansion of the Immigration Contribution Agreement Reporting Environment and the Refugee Claimant Continuum.
  • Strengthening of departmental data governance through the development of a data governance charter to ensure a higher degree of data integrity; to harmonize operational, research, and analytical data sets; and to streamline statistical reporting.
  • Implementation of revised outcomes-based performance indicators contained in the departmental Performance Measurement Framework with annual data collection, analysis and reporting.
  • Development of robust Performance Measurement Strategies in numerous program areas, such as Federal Skilled Workers/Federal Skilled Trades, Settlement, Temporary Residents Biometrics Project, and Start-up Visa, creating a strong foundation for ongoing monitoring and eventual evaluation.

Risk Analysis

Risk Risk Response StrategyNote A Link to Program Alignment Architecture

Program and service delivery
Responding quickly and effectively to rapidly changing socio-economic and policy environments while meeting the Department’s long-term strategic and operational objectives.

  • Advanced the development of the Express Entry system and introduced changes to the Temporary Foreign Workers Program.
  • To respond to priorities more flexibly and efficiently, CIC greatly reduced its inventories, expanded its network of Visa Application Centres and established governance and a strategy for integrated workload distribution.
  • SO 1
  • SO 2
  • SO 3
  • SO 4
  • Internal Services

Program integrity
Identifying fraud and ineffective internal business processes that may undermine the integrity of CIC programs.

  • Royal Assent given to three new acts —the Protecting Canada’s Immigration System Act, the Faster Removal of Foreign Criminals Act,  and the Strengthening Canadian Citizenship Act.
  • Managed national security cases, conducted anti-fraud activities for citizenship, rolled out biometrics collection and ePassports, advanced work in relation to immigration consultants, and addressed relationships of convenience.
  • Modernized work tools and the delivery of permanent resident cards; aligned settlement services.
  • SO 1
  • SO 2
  • SO 3
  • SO 4

Partner and stakeholder engagement
Engaging stakeholders to ensure achievement of CIC’s strategic outcomes.

  • Continued to work with provincial and territorial partners on the joint 2012–2015 FPT Vision Action Plan, implemented a new FPT partnership model, and repatriated settlement services in British Columbia and Manitoba.
  • Worked with other federal government departments to implement measures under the Canada-United States Beyond the Border Action Plan.
  • Established a governance structure for grants and contributions modernization, including a mechanism for reporting on progress and results.
  • SO 1
  • SO 2
  • SO 3
  • SO 4

Information management/information technology (IM/IT) capacity
Ensuring delivery of CIC programs and its transformation agenda given ongoing technological change, increasingly complex partnership-based IM/IT service offerings, dependence on third-party service provision for IT infrastructure, and an ambitious CIC modernization agenda that is based on the use of technology.

  • Renewed the strategic IM/IT action plan to ensure that IM/IT systems continue to deliver business value efficiently and securely.
  • Strengthened relationships with partners, including CBSA and Shared Services Canada.
  • Upgraded IT development tools, managed the impact of Shared Services Canada projects on the Department, and created a departmental data management strategy.
  • SO 1
  • SO 2
  • SO 3
  • SO 4
  • Internal Services

Managing change in a global context

CIC’s strategic directions, as well as its policies and operations, are influenced by a number of external factors such as emerging world events; Canadian and global economic, social and political contexts; and shifting demographic and migration trends. Furthermore, the fact that immigration is a shared area of jurisdiction between the federal government and the provinces and territories adds another layer of complexity to the effort of distributing the benefits of immigration across regions. CIC also works regularly with international and domestic partners on a range of migration issues. Information about international best practices for managing migration is acquired, and, thanks to the many international forums and meetings in which CIC participates, Canada has been able to advance its positions. Domestically, this past year CIC continued to work with the provinces and territories on the joint 2012–2015 FPT Vision Action Plan. The Plan is being overseen by FPT ministers of immigration and seeks to improve the coordination of immigrant selection and settlement within Canada.

Developing a more demand-driven economic immigration program

The Government continues to build a fast and flexible immigration system that supports Canada’s economy. The new Express Entry application management system will enable the immigration system to be more flexible and responsive to the needs of employers and Canada’s changing economic conditions and priorities by creating a pool of skilled workers ready to begin employment in Canada. Over the past year, CIC has engaged with the provinces and territories, other government departments, and employers on the design and implementation of the system in order to meet the objectives of the Government of Canada, as well as the needs of provinces, territories, and employers.

Over the past year, the Government has implemented a number of measures to ensure that the Temporary Foreign Workers (TFW) Program works in the best interest of Canadians and strengthens the Government’s ability to verify employers' compliance with the TFW Program rules; CIC works closely with ESDC to implement these reforms. These changes complement those already implemented as part of the Economic Action Plan (EAP) 2013, to support our economic recovery and growth while ensuring that more employers hire Canadians before hiring temporary foreign workers.

Reforms to the program to improve integrity and compliance in the past year include:

  • Strengthened authorities conferred in the 2013 amendments to IRPA through the Budget bill which allow CIC to revoke work permits and allow ESDC to revoke, suspend and refuse to process LMOs if the public policy considerations specified in Ministerial Instructions given by the Ministers of Citizenship and Immigration and Employment and Social Development warrant such a step.
  • New authorities to ESDC and CIC to impose conditions on employers, to conduct inspections for the purpose of verifying compliance with conditions, and to impose consequences for not meeting conditions after the issuance of a LMO or work permit. Employers found to be non-compliant with conditions may be added to an ineligibility list and banned from hiring TFWs for two years.

Immigration can also support the economy by creating jobs through new business ventures. On April 1, 2013, the Government launched the Start-Up Visa as a five-year pilot program to attract immigrant entrepreneurs with the potential to build innovative companies and who have the support of Canadian private sector organizations. In EAP 2014, the Government also announced its intention to terminate the existing federal Immigrant Investor and Entrepreneur Programs and their backlogs, as they offer limited economic benefit to Canada.

Providing strong service to clients is also necessary to rise to the challenge of creating a more responsive immigration system. The Department is modernizing its programs and processes, leveraging technology, and strengthening partnerships to more effectively and efficiently manage risks, workload and workforce, while keeping a strong focus on client service. Some examples of progress made in 2013–2014 include:

  • Expansion of CIC’s network of Visa Application Centres which, as of March 31, 2014, stood at 129 in 92 countries;
  • The Citizenship Program now has three offices dedicated to processing cases requiring additional scrutiny, and is moving toward the implementation of e-applications for citizenship; and,
  • The processing of temporary resident applications continues to be transformed to increase decision makers’ efficiency and productivity.

Striving for efficient and well-managed family and humanitarian immigration

The Government remains committed to upholding Canada’s tradition of reuniting families, resettling refugees and providing protection to those in need. Since the launch of the Action Plan for Faster Family Reunification in 2011, the Government has reduced the Parents and Grandparents Program backlog by half. The Department anticipates cutting the backlog by a total of 75% by the end of 2015. CIC also met the Action Plan commitment of admitting 50,000 parents and grandparents into Canada over two years (2012 and 2013). CIC reopened the Parents and Grandparents Program for new applications on January 2, 2014. At that time, new criteria were established to ensure the fiscal sustainability of the program over the long term, further reduce the backlog, prevent future backlogs, ensure that families have the financial means to support those they sponsor, and protect the interests of taxpayers.

Major reforms to Canada’s asylum system came into force on December 15, 2012. One goal of the new system is to provide faster protection to those in need while more quickly removing those with unfounded claims. Under the new system, processing times for asylum claimants have been significantly shorter than those before the new measures took effect. It now takes, on average, just over three months for the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB) to finalize a claim, which is markedly shorter than the 20 months this process took prior to the reform.

Improving outcomes for newcomers

The ability of newcomers to make an immediate impact and contribute to the Canadian economy and society is in part determined by their access to quality settlement and integration services. To that end, CIC manages a grants and contributions program to provide financial assistance to organizations that provide services to newcomers outside of Quebec. In addition, as of April 2014 the Government of Canada has assumed the administration of settlement services in British Columbia and Manitoba, whereby federal settlement services are for the first time provided in all provinces and territories outside Quebec. In order to ensure newcomers have the tools they need to achieve success, the Government of Canada has also significantly increased settlement funding across Canada since 2005–2006, from less than $200 million to approximately $600 million in 2013–2014.

Under the Canada-Québec Accord relating to Immigration and Temporary Admission of Aliens, the Government of Canada provides a grant to Quebec for settlement services in that province. CIC has worked with Quebec officials to develop a comparative study to ensure that the settlement and integration services offered in Quebec correspond to those available in the rest of the country.

Ensuring public health and safety; and maintaining program integrity

Extensive program and policy transformation means that CIC needs to manage change efficiently and effectively in order to uphold the integrity of its programs and to continue to meet its operational objectives. CIC must ensure that its programs continue to deliver services to the right people, for the right reasons, in a consistent manner, and at the lowest possible cost, while safeguarding the immigration system against the risk of fraud, misrepresentation and other abuses.

To this end, following the passing of the Protecting Canada’s Immigration System Act, CIC began requiring biometrics from certain visitors, students and temporary workers in September 2013. This screening helps strengthen the integrity of Canada’s immigration system by protecting the safety and security of Canadians, and safeguarding against fraud and abuse, while helping to facilitate legitimate travel.

Now that Royal Assent has been given to Bill C-43, the Faster Removal of Foreign Criminals Act, the Government has taken action to close some of the loopholes that allowed individuals found inadmissible to Canada to remain in this country. Among these changes, foreign nationals inadmissible on the most serious grounds of security, human or international rights violations or organized criminality no longer have access to humanitarian and compassionate consideration.

Efforts are also underway to ensure that people and goods can efficiently move across our borders while protecting the health, safety and security of Canadians. In 2013–2014, CIC continued to work with other federal departments, such as Public Safety Canada and its portfolio organizations, to implement measures under the Canada-U.S. Beyond the Border Action Plan. The Action Plan provides a practical road map for facilitating legitimate trade and travel across the Canada-U.S. border while protecting Canadians.

On June 19, 2014, Bill C-24, the Strengthening Canadian Citizenship Act received Royal Assent. This law reinforces the value of Canadian citizenship and protects program integrity while creating a faster and more efficient process for citizenship applications. It also represents the most comprehensive reform of the Citizenship Act in more than a generation.

CIC must also be prepared to respond in cases of emergency, both at home and abroad. Natural disasters or unexpected world events can happen anywhere, any time, and can place a strain on CIC as it strives to protect not only Canadians and migrants affected by these events, but also employees and assets worldwide. CIC’s ability to assist those in need depends on continued strong relationships with domestic and international partners so that planned, timely and coordinated responses can be implemented in relation to unforeseen events such as war, civil unrest, cyber attacks, pandemics and natural disasters.  

Remaining a well-managed organization

To ensure that CIC can effectively and efficiently deliver on its mandate and implement its ambitious change agenda, the Department continuously strives to improve its internal management practices and accountabilities by focussing on its two organizational priorities, “Emphasizing People Management” and “Promoting Management Excellence and Accountability”, described in the section above. In addition, the Department stringently monitors the finances of its programs and projects, continues to report quarterly against performance plans and targets, and expends considerable effort to achieve efficiencies and reduce backlogs.

The Department also focuses on strengthening performance-measurement capacity and the use of audits and evaluations to:

  • support evidence-based policy making and program development;
  • ensure that risks are well managed; and
  • ensure that the intended outcomes of CIC programs are achieved in an efficient and cost-effective manner.

Given ongoing technological change, complex partnership-based IM/IT services, and an ambitious CIC modernization agenda based on the use of technology, the Department increasingly relies on IM and IT systems and infrastructure to support the delivery of CIC business lines as well as selected business lines of other organizations (such as CBSA). In 2013–2014, CIC renewed its strategic IM/IT action plan for ensuring that its IM/IT systems deliver business value efficiently and securely. The Department also enhanced its efforts to better manage information across business lines and to better manage relationships with key partners, including CBSA and Shared Services Canada.

Actual Expenditures

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Main Estimates
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total Authorities
Available for Use
2013-14
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
Difference
(actual minus planned)
1,655,418,818 1,655,418,818 1,654,198,717 1,378,694,696 276,724,122
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents—FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
4,689 5,483 794
Budgetary Performance Summary for Strategic Outcomes and Programs (dollars)
Strategic Outcomes, Programs and Internal Services 2013-14
Main Estimates
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2013-14 Total Authorities Available for Use 2013-14
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2012-13
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2011-12
Actual Spending (authorities used)
Strategic Outcome 1: Migration of permanent and temporary residents that strengthens Canada's economy
1.1 Permanent Economic Residents 135,224,145 135,224,145 80,799,944 43,027,060 80,486,818 79,311,818 40,200,532 36,541,121
1.2 Temporary Economic Residents 22,315,694 22,315,694 34,918,556 36,687,258 24,764,395 20,831,035 20,617,661 23,659,011
Subtotal 157,539,839 157,539,839 115,718,500 79,714,318 105,251,213 100,142,853 60,818,193 60,200,132
Strategic Outcome 2: Family and humanitarian migration that reunites families and offers protection to the displaced and persecuted
2.1 Family and Discretionary Immigration 42,452,802 42,452,802 46,863,229 45,783,649 45,271,198 44,096,198 48,674,101 45,110,237
2.2 Refugee Protection 35,148,822 35,148,822 35,205,049 34,394,036 32,669,562 28,698,237 30,301,402 33,433,739
Subtotal 77,601,624 77,601,624 82,068,278 80,177,685 77,940,760 72,794,435 78,975,503 78,543,976
Strategic Outcome 3: Newcomers and citizens participate in fostering an integrated society
3.1 Newcomer Settlement and Integration 973,358,823 973,358,823 1,002,954,353 1,002,435,931 1,000,314,120 970,807,076 950,739,681 966,045,346
3.2 Citizenship for Newcomers and All Canadians 43,950,801 43,950,801 109,789,678 96,780,242 64,797,788 62,517,787 46,583,524 49,352,898
3.3 Multiculturalism for Newcomers and All Canadians 14,256,922 14,256,922 13,208,032 13,100,065 11,732,446 9,793,615 15,120,234 21,051,465
Subtotal 1,031,566,546 1,031,566,546 1,125,952,063 1,112,316,238 1,076,844,354 1,043,118,478 1,012,443,439 1,036,449,709
Strategic Outcome 4: Managed migration that promotes Canada's interests and protects the health, safety, and security of Canadians
4.1 Health Management 60,620,439 60,620,439 58,356,894 58,325,951 60,849,860 38,115,873 59,616,808 92,337,565
4.2 Migration Control and Security Management 87,096,376 87,096,376 84,966,649 84,402,341 112,701,893 93,642,100 76,410,491 66,771,311
4.3 Canadian influence in international migration and integration agenda 3,120,542 3,120,452 8,156,032 8,010,725 5,617,939 5,616,646 3,282,924 3,101,193
4.4 PassportNote B (254,192,238) (236,497,778) (29,101,484) (206,332,014)
Subtotal 150,837,357 150,837,357 (102,712,663) (85,758,761) 150,068,208 (68,957,395) 139,310,223 162,210,069
Internal Services Subtotal 237,873,452 237,873,452 164,414,885 159,175,833 244,094,182 231,596,325 231,778,110 246,086,861
Total 1,655,418,818 1,655,418,818 1,385,441,063 1,345,625,313 1,654,198,717 1,378,694,696 1,523,325,468 1,583,490,747

The 2013–2014 planned spending of $1,655.4 million decreased by $1.2 million due to Supplementary Estimates and other funding adjustments to provide total authorities of $1,654.2 million.

Actual spending was lower than total authorities by $275.5 million. A total of $71.3 million in anticipated operating expenditures was not used. Among the most significant factors explaining this positive variance are the reduction of costs related to the reform of the Interim Federal Health Program, which led to a reduction in the volume of Interim Federal Health Program claims from 837,000 in 2012–2013 to 464,000 claims in 2013–2014, as well as the Beyond the Border Action Plan for which costs were lower than anticipated in some areas. In addition, the delivery of the Temporary Resident Biometric Project was completed on time and under budget due to strong project management practices.

Also contributing to the amount not used was funding that had been set aside to offset costs in the delay of implementing new Citizenship and Temporary Resident Program regulations.

The remaining unused amount resides mostly in general operations, where management effectively managed funds in case of unforeseen events that could have impacted the Department.

Also contributing to the Department’s overall financial position was a $177.2 million excess of revenues over expenditures in the Passport revolving fund.

Alignment of Spending with the Whole-of-Government Framework

Alignment of 2013-2014 Actual Spending with the Whole-of-Government Framework (dollars)

Strategic Outcome Program Spending Area Government of Canada Outcome 2013-14 Actual Spending
Migration of permanent and temporary residents that strengthens Canada’s economy 1.1 Permanent Economic Residents Economic Affairs Strong Economic Growth 79,311,818
1.2 Temporary Economic Residents Economic Affairs Strong Economic Growth 20,831,035
Family and humanitarian migration that reunites families and offers protection to the displaced and persecuted 2.1 Family and Discretionary Immigration Social Affairs A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion 44,096,198
2.2 Refugee Protection International Affairs A safe and secure world through international engagement 28,698,237
Newcomers and citizens participate in fostering an integrated society 3.1 Newcomer Settlement and Integration Social Affairs A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion 970,807,076
3.2 Citizenship for Newcomers and All Canadians Social Affairs A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion 62,517,787
3.3 Multicultur­alism for Newcomers and All Canadians Social Affairs A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion 9,793,615
Managed migration that promotes Canadian interests and protects the health, safety and security of Canadians 4.1 Health Management Social Affairs Healthy Canadians 38,115,873
4.2 Migration Control and Security Management Social Affairs A safe and secure Canada 93,642,100
4.3 Canadian Influence in International Migration and Integration Agenda International Affairs A safe and secure world through international engagement 5,616,646
4.4 Passport International Affairs A safe and secure world through international engagement (206,332,014)

Total Spending by Spending Area (dollars)

Spending Area Total Planned Spending Total Actual Spending
Economic Affairs 157,539,839 100,142,853
Social Affairs 1,221,736,153 1,218,972,649
International Affairs 38,269,364 (172,017,131)
Government Affairs

Departmental Spending Trend

During 2013–2014, CIC’s spending to meet the objectives of its programs amounted to $1,378.7 million. The following graph illustrates CIC’s spending trend from previous years and planned spending for future years up to 2016–2017.

Departmental Spending Trend described below
Text version: Departmental Spending Trend
Fiscal Year Total Spending Sunset Programs
2011-12 1,583,490,747 0
2012-13 1,523,325,468 0
2013-14 1,378,694,696 0
2014-15 1,385,441,063 0
2015-16 1,345,625,313 2,736,683
2016-17 1,320,501,091 2,736,683

CIC has achieved cost savings in the overall level of departmental spending since 2011–2012 as it has contributed to the Government’s objective of reaching a balanced budget by 2015–2016.

Estimates by Vote

For information on CIC’s organizational votes and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2014 on the Public Works and Government Services Canada website.

Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome 1: Migration of permanent and temporary residents that strengthens Canada’s economy

CIC plays a significant role in fostering Canada’s economic development. By promoting Canada as a destination of choice for innovation, investment and opportunity, CIC encourages talented individuals to come to Canada and to contribute to our prosperity. Canada’s immigration program is based on non-discriminatory principles—foreign nationals are assessed without regard to race, nationality, ethnic origin, colour, religion or gender. Those who are selected to immigrate to Canada have the skills, education, language competencies and work experience to make an immediate economic contribution.

CIC’s efforts, whether through policy and program development or processing applications for the Federal Skilled Worker Program, the Quebec Skilled Workers Program, the Provincial Nominees Program or other programs, attract thousands of qualified permanent residents each year. Under the 2008 amendments to Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA) the Minister for Citizenship and Immigration Canada has the authority to issue instructions establishing priorities for processing certain categories of applications. In that regard, the Department analyses and monitors its programs to ensure they are responsive to emerging labour market needs.

CIC also facilitates the hiring of foreign nationals by Canadian employers on a temporary basis and implements a number of initiatives to attract and retain international students.

Performance Indicator Target 2013-14 Performance
Rank within the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) of employment rate for all immigrants ≤ 5 6

Benefits for Canadians

Immigration continues to have a significant influence on Canadian society and economic development. Permanent residents who arrive in Canada every year enhance Canada’s social fabric, contribute to labour market growth and strengthen the economy. Changes that modernize and improve the immigration system not only strengthen the integrity of the Permanent Economic Residents program but also benefit Canada by targeting skills Canadian employers need and admitting qualified individuals more quickly.

Temporary foreign workers help generate growth for a number of Canadian industries by meeting short-term and acute needs in the labour market that are not easily filled by the domestic labour force. International students contribute economically as consumers and enrich the fabric of Canadian society through their diverse experiences and talents. Some temporary workers and international students represent a key talent pool to be retained as immigrants.

Performance Analysis

Canada's average employment rate of the foreign-born rose to 70.1% in 2012, which is an increase from 2011 levels and the highest average employment rate since 2008. Canada rose from seventh to sixth place among OECD countries, which can be attributed to improvements in the economy in 2013–2014 compared to 2012–2013.

Canada’s Immigration Plan for 2013

The immigration levels set out in Canada’s immigration plan for 2013 reflect the important role of immigration in supporting Canada’s economic growth and prosperity. Further details can be found in the Annual Report to Parliament on Immigration, 2013.

New Permanent Residents Admitted in 2013, by Immigration Category
(Compared with the immigration plan) Note C
Immigrant Category 2013 Plan Admissions Ranges Number Admitted
Low High
Federal Skilled Workers 53,500 55,300 52,877
Federal Business 5,500 6,000 5,098
Canadian Experience Class 9,600 10,000 7,216
Live-in Caregivers 8,000 9,300 8,797
Provincial Nominee Program 42,000 45,000 39,915
Quebec-selected Skilled Workers 31,000 34,000 30,284
Quebec-selected Business 2,500 2,700 3,994
Total Economic 152,100 162,300 148,181
Spouses, Partners and Children (including Family Relations H&C) 42,000 48,500 49,513
Parents and Grandparents 21,800 25,000 32,318
Total Family 63,800 73,500 81,831
Protected Persons in Canada 7,000 8,500 8,149
Dependants Abroad of Protected Persons in Canada 4,000 4,500 3,714
Government-assisted Refugees 6,800 7,100 5,756
Visa Office Referred Refugees 200 300 153
Public Policy–Federal Resettlement Assistance 500 600 29
Privately Sponsored Refugees 4,500 6,500 6,277
Public Policy–Other Resettlement Assistance 100 400 --
Humanitarian and Compassionate Considerations 900 1,100 2,875
Other H&C cases outside the family class/Public Policy 1,934
Total Humanitarian 24,000 29,000 28,887
Permit Holders 100 200 44
DROC and PDRCC 10
Grand Total 240,000 265,000 258,953

Program 1.1: Permanent Economic Residents

Rooted in objectives outlined in IRPA, the focus of this Program is on the selection and processing of immigrants who can support the development of a strong and prosperous Canada, in which the benefits of immigration are shared across all regions of Canada. The acceptance of qualified permanent residents helps the government meet its economic objectives, such as building a skilled workforce, addressing immediate and longer term labour market needs, and supporting national and regional labour force growth. The selection and processing involve the issuance of a permanent resident visa to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total Authorities
(available for use)
2013-14
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
135,224,145 135,224,145 80,486,818 79,311,818 (55,912,327)

Actual spending was lower than planned spending by $55.9 million due to lower-than-forecasted fees returned for terminated applications.

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
295 384 89
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
The benefits of immigration are shared across all regions of Canada Percentage of new permanent residents who land outside of the Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver Census Metropolitan Areas (CMAs) > 50% 42.1%
Economic immigrants contribute to the growth of the Canadian labour force Incidence of Employment 3-5 years after landing relative to the Canadian average + 10% + 12%
Employment earnings 3-5 years after landing relative to the Canadian average 100% 78%
Rate of social assistance 5 years after landing ≤ 5% 3.9%
Percentage growth in labour force attributed to economic migration > 42% 62%
Successful permanent resident applicants are admitted in Canada Number of admissions 152,100 – 162,300 148,181
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

As shown in the first indicator, the percentage of new permanent residents who landed outside of the census metropolitan areas (CMAs) was 42.1%, a percentage that has ranged between 40% and 42% over the last three years. There has been a marked de-concentration of immigrant regional distribution during the past 10 to 15 years, namely a decrease in the proportion of permanent residents intending to reside in Ontario and an increase in those intending to reside in the Prairie Provinces.

For the second and third performance indicators, approximately 78% of permanent economic principal applicants show employment earnings three to five years after landing, which is 12% higher than the Canadian average of 66%. Economic permanent resident principal applicants are selected for their labour-market suitability and thus their ability to become economically established in Canada. The average entry employment earnings for permanent economic principal applicants are well above the average of all immigrants and, in addition, are on par with or surpass the overall Canadian average three years after landing. Permanent economic principal applicants have higher than average employment earnings relative to other immigrants and greater labour market attachment as measured by the incidence of employment earnings one year after landing. As demonstrated by the fourth indicator, these applicants also utilize social assistance at a rate lower than the Canadian average.

For the fifth indicator, 62% of labour force growth was attributed to economic immigration—a 1% increase from 2012 (63%). Immigration is increasingly accounting for most labour force growth and, therefore, increasingly contributes to positive economic consequences of a growing labour force, such as increased economic activity and greater tax revenue. The proportion of labour force growth due to immigration is expected to continue to increase as Canada’s population ages. However, Canadians continue to comprise the vast majority of new labour market entrants.

For the last indicator, 148,181 permanent residents were admitted to Canada in 2013 in economic class programs. CIC issued 149,500 visas (for overseas applicants) and authorizations (for applicants already in Canada) for permanent residence in this category in 2013.

CIC consulted provinces and territories on immigration levels planning; federal, provincial and territorial (FPT) ministers supported moving further toward a 70/30 economic-to-non-economic immigration split and committed to developing an action plan to achieve this goal.

CIC advanced the development of a new immigrant selection model. The Department led policy work to support the finalization of the design of Express Entry (EE) for initial launch, which were discussed with FPT Ministers in March 2014. In an effort to engage employers in design, CIC struck the Employer Technical Reference Group, and organized information sessions and roundtables across Canada. The Department also advanced work on mandatory Job Bank registration and engaged Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) to present the modernized Job Bank at the roundtables. IT business requirements were finalized and an implementation plan was developed.

To promote integrity in the immigration system, CIC launched a new campaign in partnership with the Immigration Consultants of Canada Regulatory Council (ICCRC) and the Federation of Law Societies of Canada that promotes awareness of the dangers of using an unauthorized immigration representative. Designated by the Government in 2011, the ICCRC’s mandate is to protect the consumers of immigration consulting services and ensure professional conduct among its members, known as Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultants.

Sub-Program 1.1.1: Federal Skilled Workers

The Federal Skilled Workers (FSW) Program is the Government of Canada's main selection system for skilled immigration, accounting for roughly 20% of all new permanent residents annually. The Program uses a “points system” to identify prospective immigrants with the ability to economically establish in Canada, based on their human capital (education, skilled work experience, language skills, etc.). The goal of the Program is to select immigrants who will make a long-term contribution to Canada's national and structural labour market needs, in support of a strong and prosperous Canadian economy. The selection and processing involve the issuance of a permanent resident visa to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned Spending
2013-14Note D
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
58,008,325
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
178
Performance Result
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Federally selected skilled workers contribute to the growth of the Canadian labour force FSW incidence of employment 3-5 years after landing relative to the Canadian average + 15% + 12%
Percentage of federally-selected skilled workers earning at or above the Canadian average 3-5 years after landing ≥ 35% 49%
Rate of social assistance for FSW principal applicants, 5 years after landing ≤ 2% 3.7%
Successful Federal Skilled Worker applicants are admitted to Canada Number of admissions 53,500 – 55,300 52,877
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the first indicator above, approximately 78% of federally selected skilled workers show employment earnings three to five years after landing, which is 12% higher than the Canadian average of approximately 66%.

For the second indicator, approximately 49% of federally selected skilled workers show employment earnings at or above the Canadian average five years after landing, significantly surpassing the target.

For the third indicator, the social assistance rate five years after landing was 3.7% for the 2011 tax year, the last year for which data is available. It is not surprising to see a low incidence of social assistance for FSWs, given their high employment earnings and the fact that they were selected for their labour market suitability.

For the last indicator, there were 52,877 FSW Program admissions in 2013.

Effective May 4, 2013, the eighth set of Ministerial Instructions (MI8) lifted the general pause on the FSW Program, and re-established an eligible occupations stream, with an overall cap of 5,000 new applications and subcaps of 300 applications in each of the 24 eligible occupations. MI8 coincided with the coming into force of the modernized FSW Program, which included new minimum language requirements and mandatory educational credential assessments of foreign educational credentials. MI8 also reset the cap for Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) applicants under the program (1,000 new applications each year) and for the Federal Skilled Trades Program (3,000 new applications each year) for the period of May 4, 2013 to April 30, 2014.

Sub-Program 1.1.2: Quebec Skilled Workers

The Canada-Quebec Accord specifies that the province of Quebec is solely responsible for the selection of applicants destined to the province of Quebec. Federal responsibility under the Accord is to assess an applicant’s admissibility and to issue permanent resident visas. The Quebec Skilled Workers (QSW) Program uses specific criteria to identify immigrants with the human capital and skills needed to economically establish in Quebec. Similar to the Federal Skilled Worker Program, applicants to the QSW are assessed according to their age, education, work experience, language proficiency (in French), and enhanced settlement prospects (previous education or work experience in Canada, or a confirmed job offer). The selection and processing involve the issuance of a permanent resident visa to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
4,671,873
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
53
Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Successful QSW applicants are admitted to Canada Number of admissions destined to Quebec 31,000–34,000 30,197
Successful QSW applicants are admitted to Quebec Number of admissions for Quebec 31,000–34,000 30,284
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The difference in the number of individuals who are destined to Quebec versus admissions to Quebec (a difference of 87 cases) can be attributed to individuals who are accepted to Canada under Quebec immigration programs but who decide to move elsewhere in Canada upon landing. For 2013, the Government of Quebec planned for 31,400–32,700 admissions for Quebec-selected skilled workers. CIC’s levels plan range, as indicated in the performance results above, does not match Quebec’s planned admissions because Quebec published its 2013 Levels Plan after CIC. Quebec ranges are always accommodated within CIC’s existing total planning range, and in 2013, CIC fell short of Quebec’s targeted planning range by 1,116 admissions.

Sub-Program 1.1.3: Provincial Nominees

The Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) supports the Government of Canada’s objective for the benefits of immigration to be shared across all regions of Canada. Bilateral immigration agreements are in place with all provinces and territories except Nunavut and QuebecFootnote 2, conferring on their governments the authority to identify and nominate for permanent residence immigrants who will meet local economic development and regional labour market needs, and who wish to settle in that specific province or territory.  As part of the nomination process, provincial and territorial governments assess the skills, education and work experience of prospective candidates to ensure that nominees can make an immediate economic contribution to the nominating province or territory.  CIC retains the final selection authority and verifies that nominees can economically establish in Canada and meet all admissibility requirements before issuing permanent resident visas. The selection and processing involve the issuance of a permanent resident visa to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
4,159,670
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
36
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Provincially nominated workers contribute to the growth of the Canadian labour force PNP incidence of employment 3-5 years after landing relative to the Canadian average ≥ +15%

+16%

Percentage of provincially-nominated workers earning at or above the Canadian average 3-5 years after landing ≥ 25%

46%

Rate of social assistance for PNP principal applicants, 5 years after landing ≤ 2%

1.1%

Provincially-nominated workers contribute to the growth of the labour force of the province/territory of nomination PNP incidence of employment, in their PT of nomination, 3-5 years after landing relative to that province or territory's incidence of employment earnings ≥ +10%

+16%

Successful Provincial Nominee applicants are admitted to Canada Number of admissions 42,000 – 45,000

39,915

Provincial Nominees contribute to the shared benefits of immigration in regions of Canada Percentage of provincially-nominated immigrants landing outside of Toronto and Vancouver Census Metropolitan Areas (CMAs) (excludes Quebec and QSW) ≥ 90%

83.3%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the first indicator, the incidence of employment for provincial nominees is approximately 82% three to five years after landing, which is 16% greater than the Canadian average of 66%.  For the second indicator, approximately 46% of provincial nominees show employment earnings at or above the Canadian average five years after landing, well above the target of 25%.  The third indicator demonstrates that rates of social assistance are quite low for this group.

For the fourth indicator, provincial nominees show incidence of employment, in all provinces, approximately 16% on average higher than that of Canadians. This result is not surprising given that the PNP is intended to address regional labour market shortages and that a significant proportion of provincial nominees have a job offer at the time of nomination.

The fifth indicator shows that the number of provincial nominees admitted to Canada remained relatively stable in 2013, at 39,915 admissions.

For the last indicator, 83.3% of provincial nominees were destined outside the CMAs of Toronto and Vancouver. (Immigrants selected under the QSW Program are excluded from these results.) The high proportion of provincial nominees settling outside these two cities demonstrates the program’s contribution to a more regionally balanced migration. The PNP is one of the main drivers in the marked deconcentration of immigrant regional distribution during the past decade.

Sub-Program 1.1.4: Live-in Caregivers

The Live-in Caregiver Program (LCP) allows persons residing in Canada to employ qualified foreign workers in private residences to provide care for children, elderly persons or persons with a disability. Eligible applicants come to Canada as temporary foreign workers, subject to their employer obtaining a neutral or positive Labour Market Opinion (LMO) from Human Resources and Skills Development Canada. The LMO considers whether a Canadian or permanent resident is available and the wage and working conditions being offered. The critical component of the program distinguishing it from the general pool of Temporary Foreign Workers is the requirement for the caregiver to reside in their place of employment. The program is also unique in that foreign workers arriving in Canada under the program are eligible to apply for permanent residence after two years or 3,900 hours of fulltime employment within four years of their arrival in Canada. They are granted permanent residence as part of the Live-in Caregiver category of the Economic Class, with established room under the Annual Levels Plan. The selection and processing involve the issuance of a permanent resident visa to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
4,442,856
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
70
Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Successful LCP permanent resident applicants are admitted to Canada Number of admissions 8,000–9,300 8,797
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013, there were 8,797 live-in caregiver admissions, which was within the target range. This result reflected operational planning and resource allocation to support the Department’s goal of reducing the backlog of LCP applications.

Sub-Program 1.1.5: Canadian Experience Class

The Canadian Experience Class (CEC) was introduced in 2008 as a path to permanent residence for those with eligible work experience in Canada, usually obtained as a result of temporary residence as a foreign worker or international student. The Program is complementary to the Federal Skilled Workers Program but uses simplified criteria, including eligible skilled Canadian work experience and a minimum level of proficiency in English or French. The Program provides a streamlined and usually faster route to permanent residence for those who have already established themselves in skilled work in Canada. This allows Canada to retain talented workers who have already contributed to the Canadian economy. The Program has two streams–one tailored for Temporary Foreign Workers wishing to transition to permanent residence, and the other for recent post-secondary graduates with eligible work experience. The selection and processing involve the issuance of a permanent resident visa to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
2,457,886
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
32
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Temporary residents transition to permanent residence contributing to the growth of the Canadian labour force CEC incidence of employment 3-5 years after landing relative to the Canadian average TBD N/A
CEC percentage of workers earning at or above the Canadian average 3-5 years after landing TBD N/A
Rate of social assistance for CEC principal applicants, 5 years after landing TBD N/A
Successful Canadian Experience Class applicants are admitted to Canada Number of admissions 9,600–10,000 7,216
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Canadian Experience Class helps to retain skilled individuals who have already demonstrated their ability to integrate into the Canadian labour market. Under the CEC, 7,216 people were admitted as permanent residents in 2013.

In November, 2013, the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration announced changes to improve the CEC so that the program would continue to attract top quality candidates, actions to reduce backlogs and processing times, and movement towards a more effective and efficient immigration system. In addition, in order to bring in as diverse a skill set as possible, the Department introduced subcaps of 200 applications in each of certain skilled occupations and identified six particular occupations that are not eligible for processing under the CEC.

CEC principal applicants report average employment earnings above the Canadian average in the first year following landing. They also have greater labour market attachment as measured by the incidence of employment earnings one year after landing, with rates recorded in 2011 in the 90% range. Data three to five years after landing is not yet available for CEC principal applicants.

Sub-Program 1.1.6: Federal Business Immigrants

This Program seeks to attract experienced business people to Canada who will support the development of a strong and prosperous economy. There are three streams of business immigrants in Canada: investors, entrepreneurs and self-employed persons. The Immigrant Investor stream brings business capital to Canada and distributes these resources across the country in cooperation with participating provinces. The Entrepreneur stream contributes to economic development through business and employment creation. The Self-employed stream selects persons with the intention and ability to be self-employed in Canada, thereby making a contribution to specified activities in our economy. The selection and processing involve the issuance of a permanent resident visa to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
5,094,586
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
12
Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Successful Federal Business Immigrant applicants are admitted to Canada Number of admissions 5,500–6,000 5,098
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Economic Action Plan (EAP) 2014 announced the Government’s intention to eliminate the existing Immigrant Investor program (IIP) and Entrepreneur program (EN), including their associated backlogs of applications. This was the result of a lengthy program review that concluded that these programs were no longer meeting Canada’s economic immigration needs.

Eliminating the IIP and EN programs and their associated backlog of applications, the Government plans to focus on attracting experienced business people and raising investment capital that is of maximum benefit to Canada’s economy. The Government will create more focused and effective pilot programs. This will complement CIC’s Start-Up Visa, enabling Canada to remain competitive in the global economy.

Sub-Program 1.1.7: Quebec Business Immigrants

The Canada-Quebec Accord specifies that the province of Quebec is solely responsible for the selection of applicants destined to the province of Quebec. Federal responsibility under the Accord is to assess an applicant’s admissibility and issue permanent resident visas. This Program seeks to attract experienced investors, entrepreneurs and self-employed persons to the province of Quebec, to support the development of a strong and prosperous economy in Quebec. The selection and processing involve the issuance of a permanent resident visa to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
476,622
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
3
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Successful Quebec business immigrant applicants are admitted to Quebec Number of admissions destined to Quebec 2,500–2,700 3,994
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013, CIC processed 3,994 Quebec Business Immigrant admissions. For 2013, the Government of Quebec planned for 3,400–3,700 admissions for Quebec-selected skilled workers. CIC’s levels plan range as indicated in the performance results above does not match Quebec’s planned admissions because Quebec published its 2013 Levels Plan after CIC. Quebec ranges are always accommodated within CIC’s existing total planning range, and CIC exceeded Quebec’s targeted planning range by 294 admissions in 2013.

Program 1.2: Temporary Economic Residents

Rooted in objectives outlined in IRPA, the focus of this Program is on processing and facilitating the entry into Canada of temporary foreign workers and international students. Temporary economic migration enhances Canada’s trade, commerce, cultural, educational and scientific activities, in support of our overall economic and social prosperity. The selection and processing involve the issuance of temporary resident visas, work permits and study permits to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total Authorities
(available for use)
2013-14
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
22,315,694 22,315,694 24,764,395 20,831,035 (1,484,659)

Actual spending was $1.5 million lower than planned spending, primarily due to funds set aside to offset the costs of delayed implementation of new regulations in the Temporary Economic Residents program.

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
254 297 43
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
TFWs and students benefit Canada’s economic development Approval rates of temporary worker applications for TFW permits ≥ 90% 89%
Approval rates of student applications for study permits 81–85% 83%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the first indicator, there was a slight decrease in the proportion of work permit applications approved, but the approval rate remained very close to the target range (at least 90%).

Canada continues to be a destination country for tourists, business travellers, students and temporary foreign workers alike. For those entering as temporary foreign workers through the new International Mobility Program, CIC is introducing changes to ensure Canadians and permanent residents get a first crack at available jobs in Canada. At the same time, there is sometimes a genuine need for employers to hire foreign workers, and these changes will help prevent potential misuse of the International Mobility Program. Some of the changes CIC will be instituting involve employers formally submitting their job offer to CIC, a new employer monitoring system, and new fees that will cover the cost of the compliance system and the gathering of better data. As for the second indicator, CIC met its target with approval rates of 83% for international student applications for study permits.

On August 31, 2013, CIC assumed responsibility for International Experience Canada (IEC), a program previously administered by the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada (DFATD). The IEC Program provides opportunities for young Canadians and foreign nationals, ages 18–35, to gain travel and work experience in each other’s countries for up to two years.

The transfer of the IEC Program allows it to better align with Government priorities and labour market demands in Canada by linking IEC to other immigration programs. The move strengthens Canada’s strategy to develop its human capital and attract talent, and provides an opportunity to fully exploit CIC’s existing expertise in centralized electronic processing of work permits. CIC will become the one-stop shop for applicants by streamlining the application process for IEC participants at one federal department.

Sub-Program 1.2.1: International Students

CIC supports a range of goals for immigration by facilitating the entry of international students to Canada. International students contribute to Canada’s educational and international competitiveness, and strengthen our educational institutions. International students are selected by these institutions according to their criteria, and CIC facilitates their presence in Canada to work and study by issuing study permits and, where necessary, visas, which allow them to obtain a Canadian education. CIC is responsible for ensuring that the proper documentation, financial, and security requirements are met, including the bona fides, or honest intentions, of all applicants. In order to provide the opportunity of the benefit of Canadian work experience, work permits are issued to qualified international students under CIC’s On-Campus, Off-Campus and Co-op/Internship Work Permit components. Students who want to work in Canada after graduation can apply for a work permit under the Post-Graduation Work Permit (PGWP) component, which allows them to gain up to three years of valuable Canadian work experience. Some PGWP holders of work permits will also be eligible to apply for permanent residence under the Canadian Experience Class or other programs. The selection and processing involve the issuance of temporary resident visas and study permits to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
9,848,318
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
98
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Qualified international students contribute to Canada’s economic prosperity and labour force growth Number of study permit holders transitioning to permanent residence under the economic class programs 5,000–10,000 5,672
International Students supplement labour force growth Number of work permits issued to International Students 86,000 91,048
Qualified International Student applicants are admitted to Canada Number of admissions 86,300 111,865
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The target of the first indicator was met, with 5,672 foreign students transitioning to permanent residence under an economic class program. Of those who transitioned, the highest proportion did so through the FSW Program (44%), followed by the PNP (33%).

For the second indicator, the high number of decisions rendered is reflective of the increased number of applications received by CIC every year. This increase is also reflective of the modernization and centralization of certain activities, which allows CIC to process more applications more quickly.

The number of International Student entries in 2013 (the last indicator) reached 111,865, exceeding the target by approximately 30%, which is a direct result of the high number of decisions rendered.

On February 12, 2014, CIC published International Students regulatory amendments. To support their implementation, CIC undertook the negotiation of bilateral CIC provincial/territorial (PT) arrangements, clarifying federal and PT roles and responsibilities in the administration of the Program when these new regulations come into force. These arrangements formalized provincial responsibility for the designation of educational institutions that may host international students. Work is underway on the creation of an electronic monitoring and compliance system that will enable CIC and Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) officers to review data on study permit compliance trends and enforce study permit conditions in cases where there is evidence of non-compliance.

Sub-Program 1.2.2: Temporary Foreign Workers

The Temporary Foreign Worker (TFW) Program allows employers to hire foreign nationals on a temporary basis. The Program contributes to the competitiveness and viability of Canadian businesses, since workers are recruited by employers or agencies to address labour or skill supply shortages. The Federal Government’s role is to facilitate the entry of foreign nationals to work, scrutinizing the job offer to ensure it is both consistent with our goals for economic immigration and has a neutral or positive effect on the Canadian labour market. In fulfilling this role, in order to hire a temporary worker some employers may require a Labour Market Opinion (LMO) from ESDC, which considers whether a Canadian or permanent resident is available and the wage and working conditions being offered. Once in possession of the LMO (if required), the applicant may then apply for the work permit at a mission abroad, at the port of entry (if eligible) or inside Canada (if eligible). The foreign national must meet all admissibility and eligibility requirements. There are a number of different streams under the TFW. One of these is the Live-in Caregiver Program, which allows persons residing in Canada to employ qualified foreign nationals to live and work in their private residence to provide care for children, the elderly and the disabled. The Seasonal Agricultural Worker component facilitates hiring workers from countries with these agreements with Canada. If an LMO is not required, such as for reciprocal employment exchanges, intra-company transfers, international agreements (including North American Free Trade Agreement, bilateral youth exchange agreements and other exceptions), the foreign national applies directly to CIC for a work permit and visa, and CIC considers the genuineness of the job offer and ensures the foreign national meets all admissibility and eligibility requirements. The selection and processing involve the issuance of temporary resident visas and work permits to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
10,982,717
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
199
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Temporary foreign workers contribute to Canada's economic prosperity and labour force growth Number of work permit holders transitioning to permanent residence under the Economic Class programs 15,000-30,000 36,091
Qualified TFW applicants are admitted to Canada, according to overall cyclical demand Number of admissions 180,200 221,310
Percentage adherence rate to 14 calendar day service standard for responses to employers on exemptions from labour market opinions ≥ 80% 60%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The first indicator shows that 36,091 temporary foreign workers transitioned to permanent residence under an Economic Class Program in 2013, a 12% increase from the previous year. Of those who transitioned, the highest proportion did so through the PNP (46%), followed by the FSW Program (25%).

For the second indicator, CIC approved 221,310 TFW admissions in 2013, exceeding the forecasted target by approximately 23%. Given that this line of business is demand-driven, exceeding the target reflects responsiveness to the number of applications received.

The third indicator shows that, unlike previous years, the network was challenged to meet this service standard in 2013–2014. This may be attributed to an increase in the processing of complex cases as well as a notable increase in enquiries (approximately 30%), which impacted processing.

In April 2013, CIC and ESDC announced changes to: introduce a moratorium on accelerated Labour Market Opinions (LMOs); require employers to pay TFWs the prevailing wage; allow the Government to suspend, revoke or refuse to process LMOs and to revoke work permits in order to better protect the Canadian labour market; restrict the use of non-official languages as job requirements for LMOs; and, increase the length and reach of advertising required by employers to ensure that no Canadians or permanent residents are available before they can turn to foreign workers.

In December 2013, further improvements included changes to: impose new conditions on employers of TFWs; provide the Government with the authority to conduct inspections to make sure employers are meeting the conditions of the Program; and, allow the Government to ban non-compliant employers from the program for two years and immediately add their names to a public list of ineligible employers.

As announced in the recent EAP 2014, the Government is investing $11.0 million over two years and $3.5 million per year ongoing to further strengthen the LMO process by realigning the application streams to: better identify vulnerable temporary foreign workers and improve processing times for certain applications; better limit the use of the program in high-unemployment regions; and, better ensure that employers transition to the Canadian workforce through better prevention, detection and response to employer non-compliance.

Significant changes relating to temporary foreign workers were announced in June 2014. For greater clarity and transparency, the TFW Program now refers to those streams under which foreign nationals enter Canada at the request of employers following approval through a Labour Market Impact Assessment and work permit application. The newly created International Mobility Program (IMP) incorporates those streams in which foreign nationals are not subject to a Labour Market Impact Assessment, and whose primary objective is to advance Canada’s broad economic and cultural national interests.

Within the new TFW Program, reforms are intended to ensure the program is only used to fill acute labour shortages on a temporary basis when qualified Canadians and permanent residents are not available. Among other measures, employers are now required to more clearly demonstrate their efforts to hire Canadians and to ensure that Canadians and permanent residents are not displaced by foreign workers.

Strategic Outcome 2: Family and humanitarian migration that reunites families and offers protection to the displaced and persecuted

The Government is committed to upholding Canada’s humanitarian tradition of reuniting families, resettling refugees and providing protection to those in need.

The Family Class, as set forth in IRPA allows permanent residents and Canadian citizens to sponsor their immediate family members (i.e., their spouse, common-law or conjugal partner, and dependent children), as well as parents and grandparents, for immigration to Canada. The permanent resident or Canadian citizen must undertake to provide for the basic needs of their sponsored relative for a set period of time, depending on the nature of the relationship. This program facilitates family reunification while ensuring that there is no undue cost to the general public.

As a signatory to the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees, the 1967 Protocol, and the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, and further to provisions set forth in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Canada has international and domestic legal obligations to provide safe haven to individuals in need of protection. Canada meets these obligations through the in-Canada refugee status determination system. In addition, Canada partners with other countries and with international and civil society organizations to come to the aid of individuals in need of protection through resettlement. Every year, Canada resettles 10,000 to 12,000—or one out of every 10—of the refugees resettled globally. CIC engages both domestic and international stakeholders to develop and implement timely, efficient and effective refugee protection policies and programs.

Benefits for Canadians

Promoting human rights and protecting refugees has been a cornerstone of Canada’s humanitarian tradition since the Second World War. The Government of Canada plays a significant role in upholding Canada’s international and domestic obligations and reputation with regard to refugees and in promoting the Canadian values of democracy, freedom, human rights and the rule of law. Through family sponsorship, CIC’s efforts enable Canadian citizens and permanent residents to reunite with family members.

Program 2.1: Family and Discretionary Immigration

Family and Discretionary programs support the Government of Canada’s social goals for immigration. The Program objectives are to reunite family members and to allow for the processing of exceptional cases. Family Class provisions of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act enable Canadian citizens and permanent residents of Canada to apply to sponsor eligible members of the family class, including spouses and partners, dependent children, and parents and grandparents. Discretionary provisions in the legislation are used in cases where there are humanitarian and compassionate considerations or for public policy reasons. These discretionary provisions provide the flexibility to approve exceptional and deserving cases not anticipated in the legislation and to support the Government of Canada in its humanitarian response to world events and crises. The selection and processing involve the issuance of a permanent resident visa or granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total Authorities
(available for use)
2013-14
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
42,452,802 42,452,802 45,271,198 44,096,198 1,643,396

Actual spending was higher than planned spending by $1.6 million due to internal allocations of additional authorities.

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
435 467 32
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Canada reunites families and provides assistance to those in need Number of admissions

65,300–75,600

81,831

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Canada admitted 81,831 new permanent residents in support of family reunification in 2013.  The average of the previous six years was in the range of 68,000.

In its Action Plan for Faster Family Reunification, the Government committed to making progress in reducing and eventually eliminating backlogs of applications under the Parent and Grandparent Program (PGP), including through high levels of admissions in 2012 and 2013 (50,000 persons over those two years). CIC has made a series of improvements to family reunification program requirements (especially in the PGP) which ensure backlogs are reduced and processing times are improved.

The admission of new permanent residents under the PGP in 2013 accounts for most of the excess over planned levels for family reunification. Admissions in this category therefore directly supported the Government’s stated goals for family class immigration, including the objective of faster reunification and the eventual elimination of backlogs.

Sub-Program 2.1.1: Spouses, Partners and Children Reunification

The objective of this program is to grant permanent resident status to foreign nationals who are the sponsored spouses, partners and dependent children (including adopted children) of Canadian citizens and permanent residents. This supports the Government’s objective to reunite close family members while ensuring that there is no undue cost to the general public. The sponsor, who is a permanent resident or Canadian citizen, is responsible for providing the basic needs of their spouse or partner for 3 years, and for their dependent children for up to 10 years.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
27,422,491
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
252
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Spouses, partners and children are admitted to Canada and are reunited with families Number of admissions 42,000–48,500 49,513
Percentage adherence to the 12 months service standard for cases processed overseas ≥ 80% 65%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the first indicator, in 2013, spouses, partners and children reunification admissions were 49,513, slightly exceeding the target range.

The second indicator shows that CIC continues to experience challenges in processing spouse and dependent child applications within published and target service standards. CIC’s ability to achieve the service standard goal can be affected by many factors, including those beyond departmental control, such as incomplete applications and the need for additional information. As a result of these and other factors, the percentage adherence to the 12-month service standard for cases processed overseas was only 65%, falling short of the target of 80%. In light of these types of challenges, finding ways in which CIC can best meet family class service standards is a departmental priority for 2014–2015.

On May 18, 2013, a proposal to reduce the age of dependent children (from under 22 to under 19) was prepublished in the Canada Gazette Part I, and on June 18, 2014, the final changes were published in the Canada Gazette Part II. With the coming into force of this change on August 1, 2014, the lower age applies to all permanent residence immigration programs. The change is also in line with most provincial standards regarding the age of majority in Canada; those over the age of 18 may apply independently to visit or immigrate to Canada. The new lower age threshold was introduced to better support Canada’s economic objectives for immigration as well as the integration of dependents in Canada. That said, there continues to be an exception for individuals, regardless of age, who are financially dependent on their parents due to a mental or physical condition.

Sub-Program 2.1.2: Parents and Grandparents Reunification

The objective of this Program is to grant permanent resident status to sponsored foreign nationals who are the parents and grandparents of Canadian citizens and permanent residents. This Program makes it possible for Canadian citizens and permanent residents to be reunited with their extended family members, while ensuring that there is no undue cost to the general public. Sponsors must demonstrate that they can meet their sponsorship obligations, which include providing for the basic needs of their parents and grandparents for 10 years. Particular sponsorship requirements and a lower processing priority distinguish this category from the spouses, partners and dependent children category. The selection and processing involve the issuance of a permanent resident visa to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
6,304,805
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
75
Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Parents and grandparents are admitted to Canada and are reunited with families Number of admissions 21,800–25,000 32,318
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013, the number of parents and grandparents reunification admissions reached 32,318, significantly exceeding the target range but in line with the commitment of the Government in its Action Plan for Faster Family Reunification. That Action Plan committed CIC to admitting 50,000 persons under the program over 2012 and 2013. CIC admitted just over 21,000 persons under the program in 2012 and just over 30,000 in 2013, thereby meeting that Action Plan commitment.

Growing backlogs in the PGP Program meant that, had the Action Plan for Faster Family Reunification not been introduced, families would have faced wait times of up to eight years or more to bring their loved ones from overseas. On June 15, 2013, new Ministerial Instructions (MI9) were issued to manage the processing of new applications for sponsorship of parents and grandparents as members of the Family Class. These MIs contain two measures: 1) the temporary pause on the acceptance of new applications for sponsorship of parents and grandparents—in place since November 5, 2011 and set to expire in November 2013—remained in place until January 1, 2014 in order to align with the expected coming into force of other program changes; and 2) placing a cap on the intake of new applications for 2014 (a maximum of 5,000 new complete applications for sponsorship of parents and grandparents would be accepted for processing each year, representing about 10,000 persons). This limit, which remains in place until a new instruction changes it, is necessary to support the continued reduction of the current backlog of applications.

Sub-Program 2.1.3: Humanitarian and Compassionate and Public Policy Considerations

The humanitarian and compassionate and public policy provisions of IRPA enable the Minister to address exceptional circumstances by granting an exception to any criteria or obligations of the Act or by granting permanent residence. These discretionary provisions provide the flexibility to approve exceptional cases which were not envisioned in the legislation. An applicant’s circumstances are assessed on a case-by-case basis, taking into account establishment in Canada, and other relevant circumstances brought forward for consideration. The public policy provision is a discretionary tool designed to grant permanent or temporary resident status to individuals in similar circumstances, all of whom must meet eligibility criteria defined in the public policy. The outcome of this Program is that exceptional cases are treated with appropriate flexibility, in accordance with Canadian values. The selection and processing involve the issuance of a permanent resident visa or granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
10,368,902
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
140
Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
On an exceptional basis persons are admitted or are allowed to remain in Canada and acquire Permanent Resident Status Number of persons granted permanent resident status on humanitarian and compassionate or public policy grounds due to their exceptional circumstances 1,500–2,100 4,838
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013, admissions due to humanitarian and compassionate (H&C) and public policy considerations were 4,838, exceeding the target range by 2,738 admissions in order to augment overall levels and to support the backlog reduction efforts specifically in the H&C business line.

As part of the Faster Removal of Foreign Criminals Act, which received Royal Assent in June 2013, the H&C provisions were amended to prevent foreign nationals deemed inadmissible on security grounds, for the violation of human or international rights or for organized criminality, from accessing H&C consideration under sections 25(1) and 25.1(1) of the Act.

In December 2013, the first of several groups of Tibetan refugees arrived in Canada as part of a public policy designed to facilitate immigration over the next two years of up to 1,000 displaced Tibetans living in the state of Arunachal Pradesh in India. Successful applicants are matched with an approved sponsor in Canada through the Project Tibet Society, the umbrella organization that is supporting the implementation of the public policy. This public policy is an example of the specific circumstances that can be addressed through use of this discretionary authority.

Program 2.2: Refugee Protection

The Refugee Protection Program is in the first instance about saving lives and offering protection to the displaced and persecuted. One arm of the program starts overseas where refugees and persons in refugee-like situations are selected by Canadian visa officers to be resettled as permanent residents to Canada. Flowing from Canada’s international and domestic legal obligations, the in-Canada asylum system evaluates the claims of individuals seeking asylum in Canada and grants permanent residence when a positive decision is rendered by the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB).

Financial Resources (dollars)
Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total Authorities
(available for use)
2013-14
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
35,148,822 35,148,822 32,669,562 28,698,237 (6,450,585)

Actual spending was lower than planned spending by $6.5 million due to lower costs for legal services and other general lower operating expenditures.

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
353 308 (45)
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Canada protects refugees in need of resettlement Percentage of resettled refugees in the world that Canada resettles (dependent on actions of other countries) 8–12% 12%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For this indicator, based on the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) data from UNHCR Global Trends 2013: War's Human Cost, over 93,200 refugees referred to countries by the UNHCR were resettled across the globe in 2013, and Canada resettled the second highest number of refugees per capita. Canada resettled 5,756 persons under the Government-Assisted Refugee (GAR) Program or 6% of the refugees identified by the UNHCR. This number does not include persons resettled under other programs, such as Canada’s Privately Sponsored Refugees Program. Globally, 98,400 Convention refugees and others in similar circumstances were resettled, and Canada’s total resettlement was 12,186 persons or 12%.

Sub-Program 2.2.1: Government-Assisted Refugees (GARs)

Working closely with the UNHCR or other referral agencies, Canadian visa officers within the Government-Assisted Refugees Program identify and select as permanent residents, members of the Convention Refugees Abroad and Humanitarian-protected Persons Abroad classes for resettlement in Canada when there is no other durable solution available within a reasonable period of time. The primary objective of the Program is to affirm Canada’s humanitarian commitment to assist refugees in need of international protection through the provision of governmental assistance and to assist the countries hosting them through responsibility sharing.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
8,000,858
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
18
Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
GARs are granted protection through resettlement in Canada Number of admissions 6,800–7,100 5,756
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For this indicator, GAR admissions were 5,756. Certain factors continue to affect the processing of refugee cases abroad, including security issues in refugee camps in Africa that prevent staff from accessing and selecting refugees.

To help overcome these challenges and improve on its coordination with the UNHCR, the provinces and settlement service providers, CIC has undertaken various initiatives, including identifying multi-year commitments (MYCs) for resettlement processing of specific refugee populations. There are now MYCs in place for the Bhutanese in Nepal, Iraqis in the Middle East, Colombians in Ecuador, Eritreans out of Sudan and Ethiopia, Congolese out of Burundi and Tanzania, and refugees based in Turkey.

These MYCs have been shared with provinces and territories, settlement service providers, and sponsors; the advance notice of MYCs will enable stakeholders to properly allocate their resources. CIC will continue to work with these stakeholders to improve the settlement outcomes of resettled refugees.

Sub-Program 2.2.2: Privately Sponsored Refugees (PSRs)

The primary objective of the Privately Sponsored Refugees Program is to affirm Canada’s commitment to providing durable solutions to more refugees than would otherwise be admitted under the Government-Assisted Refugees program.  Canadian visa officers select, as permanent residents, members of the Convention Refugees Abroad and Humanitarian-protected Persons Abroad classes for resettlement in Canada who are referred by private sponsors. These private sponsors then provide the social, financial and emotional support to the refugees upon their arrival in Canada. The program is unique as it ensures an additional number of refugees are offered protection over and above those sponsored by the government.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
2,041,645
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
22
Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
PSRs are granted protection through resettlement in Canada Number of admissions 4,500–6,500 6,277
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For this indicator, CIC met the target with admissions falling within the planned range. CIC continues to pursue an intake management strategy for reducing backlogs and improving processing times. The strategy involves a cap on the number of applications which a Sponsorship Agreement Holder (SAH) is permitted to submit each year, with the total number allocated among individual SAHs in cooperation with the Canadian Refugee Sponsorship Agreement Holders Association (SAHA).

As part of EAP 2012, the ratio of GARs and PSRs has been adjusted to allow for many refugees to be resettled under a new program that will see private sponsors, the Government of Canada and the UNHCR engage in another unique partnership. Under this new Visa Office Referred (VOR) Refugees Program, up to 1,000 refugees identified by the UNHCR and selected for resettlement in Canada will be matched with interested private sponsors by 2015. The Government of Canada will provide for up to six months’ income support from the Resettlement Assistance Program envelope, while sponsors will provide the emotional, social and remaining financial support for up to one year.

To support implementation of this new program, an information-sharing strategy was developed with SAHs, settlement service providers and other stakeholders to improve settlement outcomes for VOR populations. As a result of discussions with internal and SAH stakeholders, specific VOR population commitments for 2014–2015 were identified. External partners, such as the Refugee Sponsorship Training Program, were engaged to work with the refugee sponsorship community to find sponsors for VOR cases. Information brochures and bulletins on the refugee sponsorship programs were also shared with SAHA.

Sub-Program 2.2.3: In-Canada Asylum

Flowing from Canada's international and domestic legal obligations, Canada's asylum system provides protection to persons fleeing persecution and risk of torture, risk to life, or risk of cruel or unusual treatment or punishment, by way of legislative and regulatory measures that enable Canada to meet those obligations. The program establishes fair and efficient procedures that uphold Canada’s respect for the human rights and fundamental freedoms of all human beings, while maintaining the overall integrity of the Canadian refugee protection system. Canada’s asylum system includes the determination of eligibility for referral to the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada and the granting of permanent resident status to those determined by the Board to be Convention refugees or persons in need of protection as well as providing a pre-removal risk assessment to failed refugee claimants and others facing removal from Canada.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
12,343,829
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
178
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Decisions made on eligibility of refugee claims are rendered within three working days Percentage of decisions made (eligible, ineligible, or suspended) on eligibility of refugee claims rendered within three working days ≥ 97% 97.3%
Permanent residence granted to those upon whom protected person status has been conferred by the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada and their dependants abroad Number of individuals granted permanent residence who were previously granted protected person status by the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada and their dependants abroad 11,000–13,000 11,863
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the first indicator, CIC met its 97% target for rendering decisions on the eligibility of refugee claims within three working days. As for the second indicator, the target was met with 11,863 persons having been granted permanent residence. CIC will continue to process applications in a timely manner and will continue to work toward its goal of achieving an eligibility decision within three working days.

CIC continued to implement changes brought about by the Protecting Canada’s Immigration System Act with a view to ensuring that the domestic asylum system is efficient and fair. Metrics of Success  were developed, based on data contained in the Refugee Claimant Continuum and obtained from other departments involved in refugee processing (i.e., CBSA, Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), Department of Justice and IRB), and tracked quarterly throughout the year. The Metrics of Success is a performance measurement system used to monitor the new asylum system as well as to identify any challenges in a timely manner and enable CIC to recommend remedial action. This included monitoring of the IRB’s progress and efforts at reducing its backlog of pending claims. CIC continued to monitor and review country conditions to inform decisions regarding Designated Countries of Origin (DCOs). Two countries were added to the DCO list in 2013–2014, bringing the total to 37 countries, and as of March 31, 2014, eight countries have been exempted by CIC from the bar on Pre-Removal Risk Assessment.

Through Canada-United States cooperation on asylum issues under the Beyond the Border Action Plan, CIC and the United States Citizenship and Immigration Service ramped up its biometric information sharing on respective asylum claimants, and exchanged information and best practices on anti-fraud, forecasting of asylum intake, asylum system monitoring tools and backlog management, and established ongoing dialogue on irregular migration issues of mutual interest.

Sub-Program 2.2.4: Pre-Removal Risk Assessment (PRRA)

In accordance with its commitment to the principle of non-refoulement, CIC offers a risk assessment before removing a person from Canada. The principle of non-refoulement holds that people should not be removed to a country where they would be at risk of a danger of torture, a risk to their life, or a risk of cruel and unusual treatment or punishment. Under IRPA, people who have been issued a removal order must formally apply to CIC for a pre-removal risk assessment. When a person has already had a refugee protection claim assessed by the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, only new evidence, such as evidence that demonstrates a change in country conditions, is considered. Persons whose applications are approved become ‘protected persons’ and may apply and be granted permanent resident status.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
6,311,905
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
90
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Individuals with a PRRA and their dependants abroad are granted permanent residence Number of individuals granted permanent residence who previously received a positive PRRA decision and their dependants abroad 95-161 82
PRRA decisions are made in compliance with IRPA Percentage of applications for judicial review of PRRA decisions < 10% 16.5%
Percentage of PRRA decisions returned to CIC by the Federal Court for re-determination < 0.3% 0%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the first indicator, it is important to bear in mind that approved refugee claimants and non-112(3) PRRA applicants do not receive permanent residence automatically—they may apply for permanent residence. There is no deadline for doing so; and indeed, some never apply. In addition, some protected person applications for permanent residence are refused (e.g., due to certain inadmissibilities). As such, the target range provided is an estimate of the number of approved PRRA applicants who will apply for and receive permanent residence in a fiscal year.

With respect to the second target, changes were brought about in December 2012 through the Balanced Refugee Reform Act and the Protecting Canada's Immigration System Act resulting in increased litigation. However, litigation is expected to decrease over time, as it is normal for new legislation to be tested in the courts.

For the third indicator, the target was met and numbers are similar to the results achieved last year, when 0.05% of all decisions made were returned by the Federal Court to CIC for re-determination.

Strategic Outcome 3: Newcomers and citizens participate to their full potential in fostering an integrated society

Through the Canadian Multiculturalism Act, IRPA and the Citizenship Act, as well as a broader constitutional and legislative suite that includes the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, the Canadian Human Rights Act, the Official Languages Act and the Employment Equity Act among others, the Government of Canada is committed to facilitating the participation of all Canadians in the social, cultural, economic and civic spheres of Canadian society. Accordingly, the focus of this strategic outcome is on a “two-way street” approach that works with communities and Canadian institutions to assist individuals to become active, connected and productive citizens.

Working with a wide range of social supports, including other levels of government, voluntary sector and community partners, employers, school boards and others, CIC seeks to minimize income disparities and strengthen social integration by helping to remove barriers; enabling individuals to fully participate in the labour market; encouraging social and cultural connections among people of different backgrounds and identities; encouraging active civic participation; and fostering a sense of the rights and responsibilities of Canadian citizenship and the value of diversity.

Benefits for Canadians

Canadians enjoy a higher quality of life when citizens and newcomers actively participate in all aspects of society; contribute to a prosperous economy; have a strong sense of civic pride and attachment; and help build culturally vibrant and harmonious communities.

Program 3.1: Settlement and Integration of Newcomers

In accordance with the Canadian Multiculturalism Act, the Employment Equity Act and IRPA, programming is developed based on policies that support the settlement, resettlement, adaptation and integration of newcomers into Canadian society. All permanent residents are eligible for settlement and integration programs. Programming is delivered by third parties (including provincial and municipal governments, school boards and post-secondary institutions, settlement service organizations and other non-governmental actors, and the private sector) across the country. However, accountability for expended funds and attaining outcomes remains with Citizenship and Immigration Canada.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total Authorities
(available for use)
2013-14
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
973,358,823 973,358,823 1,000,314,120 970,807,076 (2,551,747)

Actual spending was lower than planned spending by $2.5 million, primarily due to lower-than-projected expenditures for the delivery of Settlement programs, as well as lower arrivals for GARs. Total authorities and actual spending increased due to supplementary funding for the Canada-Quebec Accord.

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
334 278 (56)
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
NewcomersNote E contribute to the economic, social, civic and cultural life of Canada Percentage variance of labour market participation of immigrants residing in Canada less than 5 years in comparison with the Canadian average > -3% (i.e., not less than 3% below the Canadian average) 0.7%
Percentage variance of labour market participation of immigrants residing in Canada 5 to 10 years in comparison with the Canadian average > -1% (i.e,. not less than 1% below the Canadian average) 6.6%
Percentage variance of voting rates of newcomers in comparison with the Canadian average > -15% (i.e., not less than 15% below the Canadian average) N/A
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the first indicator, the participation rate in the labour market of very recent immigrants who have resided in Canada for less than five years was 0. 7% above the Canadian average. As demonstrated by the second indicator, for immigrants who have resided in Canada for five to 10 years, the participation rate was 6.6% above the Canadian average.

As for the third indicator, the variance of voting rates was produced only once by Statistics Canada (it is not one of their standard products). To remedy this lack of data, CIC is developing a new Settlement Client Outcomes Survey that will capture information on voting rates of clients, to be tracked as part of the Settlement Program Performance Measurement Strategy as of 2015–2016.

Sub-Program 3.1.1: Foreign Credentials Referral

The Foreign Credentials Referral Office (FCRO) was established to help internationally trained individuals (ITIs) receive the information, path-finding and referral services to have their credentials assessed as quickly as possible so they can find work faster in the fields for which they have been trained. In Canada, Service Canada delivers in-person and telephone services on behalf of the FCRO. Information on foreign credential recognition (FCR) is also available through the FCRO website (www.credentials.gc.ca) to prospective immigrants overseas. The FCRO works with federal, provincial and territorial partners, and national associations, recognition bodies and employers to strengthen FCR processes across Canada. CIC, through the FCRO, is the lead department on the pre-arrival component of the Pan-Canadian Framework for the Assessment and Recognition of Foreign Qualifications.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
11,084,878
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
22
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Internationally trained individuals (ITIs) are employed quickly in positions commensurate with their skills and experience Percentage of ITIs working in the occupational skill level that matches their education level ≥ 57.2% N/A

Percentage of ITIs that have been in Canada for up to 12 months and are employed in an occupational skill level that matches their education level for males and females

TBD N/A
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Recent data from the Canadian Immigrant Integration Program (CIIP) Client Survey, although limited to CIIP participants, does show that the first target—internationally trained individuals (ITIs) working in the occupational skill level that matches their education level—was exceeded by ITIs who had participated in the CIIP (58%). For the second indicator, no target was set. CIIP data indicated that 55% of males and 60% of females in Canada for up to 12 months were employed in an occupational skill level that matched their education levels. Overall, the labour market participation rate of immigrants has been steady since the previous year.

CIC continued to meet the needs of ITIs through pre-arrival labour market support services, such as the CIIP, to help them participate in the Canadian economy. An overseas strategy was developed and international integration initiatives were advanced, including work with national regulatory bodies toward reaching country-to-country umbrella mutual recognition agreements in order to advance bilateral recognition of professional qualifications and support labour mobility with other countries, such as Australia.

Education Credential Assessment (ECA) was implemented in May 2013 with four organizations designated to assess credentials: World Education Services, Canada; International Credential Assessment Service of Canada; Comparative Education Service, University of Toronto; and the Medical Council of Canada. A fifth body, the Pharmacy Examining Board of Canada, was added in January 2014. Work was initiated on a strategy on the future of ECA, and includes analysis of ECA opportunities overseas.

Through the Foreign Qualification Recognition Working Group, CIC advanced work on alternative careers and pre-arrival services, including research and analysis on pre-arrival supports and tools for the initial 14 target occupations. An alternative careers workshop was also organized at the Canadian Network of National Associations of Regulators Conference in October. The workshop examined the role of regulators and other stakeholders in supporting ITIs who pursue alternative career pathways.

Sub-Program 3.1.2: Settlement

Settlement refers to a short period (three to five years) of adaptation by newcomers during which the government provides support and services. Ultimately, the goal of integration is to encourage newcomers to be fully engaged in the economic, social, political and cultural life of Canada. CIC’s Settlement Program assists immigrants and refugees to overcome barriers specific to the newcomer experience, such as a lack of official language skills, limited knowledge of Canada and the recognition of foreign credentials. The program provides language learning services for newcomers, community and employment bridging services, settlement information, and support services that facilitate access to settlement programming. Also, through the Foreign Credentials Referral Office, the program provides information, path-finding and referral services to internationally-trained individuals to have their credentials assessed quickly so they can find work in their fields. Most services are designed and delivered by service-provider organizations; however, certain services (such as information provision) are delivered directly by CIC in Canada and overseas.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
1,727,054
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
19
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Newcomers are provided appropriate support and services to assist in their settlement in Canada Percentage of newcomers who receive CIC-funded settlement services ≥ 26% 33%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For this indicator, the number of landings in Canada (except Quebec and British Columbia) over the last five years were used as a proxy for the number of newcomers eligible to receive settlement services, as newcomers are generally eligible for settlement services until they become citizens. Settlement service data from CIC’s settlement information systems was used to estimate the number of clients. The target was exceeded for this indicator. It is worth noting that not all newcomers require support to settle in Canada.

To promote greater consistency in the delivery of settlement services across Canada with a strong focus on attaining better integration outcomes for newcomers, CIC resumed delivery of federally funded settlement services in both British Columbia and Manitoba. Two calls for proposals were completed, leading to the signing of contribution agreements, effective as of April 1, 2014, with British Columbia and Manitoba settlement service providers.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.2.1: Information and Orientation

The provision of settlement-related information and orientation is fundamental to the successful settlement of newcomers in Canada. Tools are provided for individuals to enable them to take charge of their own settlement and integration pathways and to effectively navigate Canadian systems (e.g. acquiring a social insurance number card, drivers’ license, or health card). Increasingly these tools and information are available prior to arrival to enable newcomers to plan more effectively. This Program area has two interrelated objectives. First, it aims to provide newcomers with relevant, accurate, consistent, and timely information that is needed to make informed settlement decisions and access settlement services. Second, it seeks to promote a contextual understanding of life in Canada, including laws, rights, responsibilities of citizenship, and the democratic system. This programming is delivered in part by CIC itself and in partnership with a range of other government departments, other levels of government, and other partners including both national and international service provider organizations.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
254,995,625
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
72
Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Newcomers receive information that helps them make informed settlement decisions, access settlement services, and understand life in Canada Percentage of newcomers aware of information products and settlement services ≥ 90% 95%
Percentage of newcomers satisfied with the federal settlement information they have received ≥ 75% 75%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the first indicator, based on data from CIC’s Immigration Contribution Agreement Reporting Environment system, the target was met, as 95% of newcomers who are CIC clients were aware of CIC’s information products and services. The Settlement Outcomes Survey data also demonstrates that newcomers, including CIC clients, received useful information that helped with their settlement experience. CIC also produced and disseminated information products for newcomers.

For the second indicator, data from the CIIP Client Survey demonstrate that 75% of CIIP participants who were surveyed three months after landing in Canada felt that the information received during the CIIP sessions was useful.

CIC provides settlement information products and services through many different means. For 2015–2016, the new Settlement Client Outcomes Survey will provide more precise data regarding settlement information products and services, which will allow for a more comprehensive analysis for demonstrating the performance of CIC’s Settlement Program.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.2.2: Language Training

The ability of newcomers to communicate in one of Canada’s official languages has long been recognized as key to both the initial settlement and the longer term integration of immigrants. Language learning services are intended to help newcomers develop sufficient linguistic communication skills (including literacy) to enable newcomers to function in Canadian society and contribute to the economy. Through the Settlement Program, CIC funds service provider organizations to deliver various language learning services for newcomers, including language assessment and official language instruction.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
218,496,995
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
59
Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Newcomers acquire the official language skills they need in Canada Percentage of clients who exit training having achieved at least Canadian Languages Benchmarks/Niveau Competence Linquistique canadiens 4 (CLB/NCLC 4) in listening and speaking ≥ 67% 58%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The target of this indicator speaks to the language level that is required for newcomers to apply for Canadian citizenship, and the results indicate that the target was mostly met. CIC’s language training programming continues to meet the needs of clients in achieving basic language skills; at the Canadian Language Benchmarks/Niveau de Competence Linquistique canadiens 4 (CLB/NCLC 4) level in listening and speaking, clients are eligible to apply for Canadian citizenship.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.2.3: Labour Market Access

The majority of newcomers who come to Canada intend to enter the labour force, and for most adults it is their primary objective upon arrival. Many face difficulties integrating into the Canadian labour market. These difficulties include individual and systemic barriers such as foreign credential recognition, lack of Canadian experience, and lack of knowledge of workplace culture. In addition, employers face barriers including knowing how to integrate newcomers into their labour force. Labour market services are intended to address these barriers and equip newcomers with the skills, information and support they need to enter into the labour market and contribute to the economy. Labour market participation also provides opportunities to practice language skills and to connect with other Canadians. Labour market services include services such as job search skills, soft skills, networking, internships, mentorships, and work placements. This programming is delivered by a range of partners including service provider organizations, labour market organizations like chambers of commerce, and employers themselves in some cases.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
1,627,427
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
19
Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Newcomers are better prepared to enter the labour market Percentage of clients who report that they have the knowledge and abilities to find and apply for employment ≥ 85% 86%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Analysis of Immigration Contribution Agreement Reporting Environment data indicates that only 14% of clients evaluated by service-provider organizations demonstrated a need to improve language or other skills, such as literacy, numeracy, computer literacy or communications skills, in order to find employment. Analysis of this data assumes that once clients have these skills, they will be better equipped to apply for employment. However, clients may need to continue language training in order to access higher-level jobs.

Data from the Settlement Outcomes Survey shows that newcomers were generally knowledgeable about the Canadian work environment, including about accessing public services and community resources. Based on the survey, newcomers also felt they had the necessary skills to apply for employment.

The new Settlement Client Outcomes Survey for 2015–2016 will provide more precise data regarding labour market skills readiness, allowing for more comprehensive analysis to demonstrate the performance of CIC’s Settlement Program.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.2.4: Welcoming Communities

While language, information and orientation, and labour market access programming are focused on newcomers, welcoming communities balances this focus by increasing the capacity of Canadian communities to value and facilitate the contribution of newcomers. The Community Connections stream of the Settlement Program works with public institutions (e.g. schools, libraries and community health centres) to address newcomer needs, supports welcoming, safe and inclusive spaces where newcomers can access information, services and other public assets (e.g. Welcome Centres), enables local stakeholders to collaboratively develop plans, strategies and tools (e.g. Local Immigration Partnerships), communicates best practices and shares information and expertise, and connects vulnerable groups with their Canadian-born counterparts and established support networks (e.g. mentoring, connecting parents with young children to early childhood development networks, newcomer seniors to seniors networks, entrepreneurs to business networks, etc.). This programming is delivered through a range of partnerships including service provider organizations, public institutions such as libraries, school boards and community health centres, employers and other local partners.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
2,027,943
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
25
Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Newcomers are connected to Canadians, communities and public institutions Percentage of Canadian communities with sizable newcomer populations that have an established community immigration planning process

Note: Sizable means “CMA with 5 year average of more than 1,000 landings per year”

≥ 60% 88%
Percentage of contribution agreements/Service Provider Organizations that engage volunteers ≥ 80% 85%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The first indicator concerns the percentage of communities with sizable newcomer populations who have CIC-funded local immigration partnerships (LIPs). The result of 88% for this indicator clearly exceeds the target.

Through community partnerships, CIC builds welcoming and inclusive communities to support newcomers' integration, and the knowledge of local needs informs the Department's planning exercises. A plan was implemented to expand the impact of LIPs by creating new partnerships in western and eastern Canada, with a total of 20 new LIPs in operation by the end of the year.

For the second indicator, data were not available at the time of publication for 2013–2014. Since most contribution agreements span three years, it is very likely that the proportion will remain unchanged for 2013–2014. Data from the 2012–2013 Annual Project Performance Reports, produced by service- provider organizations, indicated that volunteers were engaged in 85% of contribution agreements. The target was exceeded.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.2.5: Contribution to British Columbia for Settlement and Integration

Under a signed agreement between the government of Canada and the province of British Columbia, CIC provides funding to the province for settlement and integration services that assist immigrants and refugees to overcome barriers specific to the newcomer experience. The Province has primary responsibility for the design, administration and delivery of these settlement and integration services. British Columbia informs CIC of its activities through an annual service plan and annual report. As a result of the 2012 Federal Budget, CIC will resume the management of federally funded settlement services in British Columbia, beginning in 2014-2015.

Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
104,134,025
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
0
Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
British Columbia provides settlement and integration services that achieve outcomes comparable to the outcomes of CIC-managed services Degree to which accountability identified in agreements is met Complete annual report submitted to CIC no later than August 31, 2013 Report submitted by B.C. on October 18, 2013
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Although the deadline was not met, CIC had agreed to a late submission of the report. To ensure comparability of services to newcomers and of settlement outcomes, CIC successfully resumed management of settlement services in British Columbia in April 2014. Settlement outcomes will be monitored as part of the Performance Measurement Strategy of the CIC Settlement Program.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.2.6: Support for Official Language Minority Communities

CIC has an obligation to take positive measures to foster the vitality of the official language minority communities under Part VII of the Official Languages Act. To that end, this program implements a cross section of promotion, recruitment and settlement activities to enhance the ability of these communities to welcome newcomers. The programming is delivered by a range of partners including other orders of government, employers and service provider organizations.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
1,157,026
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
12
Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Newcomers receive services in their official language of choice Percentage of Francophone clients who receive services in French ≥ 70% 75%
Percentage of Provinces and Territories, apart from Quebec, where an established francophone immigration network exists ≥ 92% 92%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The first indicator concerns clients whose preferred official language is French and who received services in French. The percentage of Francophone clients receiving services in French exceeded the target for 2013–2014.

The second indicator represents all provinces and territories except Quebec and Nunavut where an established Francophone immigration network exists. The data obtained showed that most these provinces and territories have an established Francophone immigration network.

CIC’s Settlement Program funding supports strong relationships with Francophone organizations and the Francophone Immigration Networks in ensuring the vitality of official languages minority communities.

Sub-Program 3.1.3: Grant to Quebec

Under the Canada-Quebec Accord, signed in 1991, Canada has devolved settlement and resettlement responsibility to Quebec, with a grant that includes reasonable compensation for costs. The compensation to Quebec covers services for the reception and the linguistic, cultural and economic integration from which Canada agrees to withdraw, provided that they are equivalent to similar federal services in other parts of the country. An objective of the Accord is, among other things, the preservation of Quebec’s demographic importance within Canada and the integration of immigrants to that province in a manner that respects the distinct identity of Quebec. The Accord provides Quebec with the exclusive responsibility for the selection of immigrants destined to the province (except for family reunification and asylum seekers in Canada) as well as the reception and linguistic and cultural integration of these immigrants (including resettlement of refugees). Under the Accord, Canada is responsible for defining overall immigration objectives, national levels, admissibility, selecting family category and asylum seekers in Canada and citizenship.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
319,967,000
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
0
Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Quebec provides settlement and integration services to newcomers in the province that are comparable to services provided across Canada Percentage of reception and integration services provided by Quebec that are comparable to services offered across Canada ≥ 80% N/A
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Despite a percentage not being an accurate representation of this indicator, Quebec provides settlement services that are similar in nature to those received by newcomers across Canada. CIC and Quebec’s Ministère de l’immigration, de la diversité et de l’inclusion conducted a comparative study of settlement services—La comparaison des services d’accueil et d’intégration offerts par le Canada et le Québec—based on seven broad areas. The study will serve as a baseline for future comparisons. The results were tabled at the September 2014 Comité Mixte meeting.  

Sub-Program 3.1.4: Immigration Loan

The Immigration Loan Program is a statutory program under IRPA. It ensures that some persons, otherwise unable to pay for the costs of transportation to Canada and medical admissibility exams, have access to a funding source. Assistance loans may also be approved for newcomers in need to cover initial settlement expenses such as rental and utilities deposits. The main target groups for the program are government-assisted refugees and privately sponsored refugees. These individuals have undergone hardship and most often have few personal resources and are therefore unable to access traditional lending institutions. Canadian visa officers authorize the transportation and admissibility loans and the International Organization for Migration arranges travel and medical exams for refugees and pays these costs. CIC reimburses them and the refugee reimburses CIC. Assistance loans are authorized by in-Canada officers. The interest bearing loans are repayable in full and payment plans vary by the value of the loan and the recipients’ ability to repay while integrating.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
1,849,759
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
12
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Individuals in need (as per CIC’s determination) receive transportation and medical support Proportion of resettled refugees that receive transportation and/or admissibility loans ≥ 99% 39.9%
Individuals in need (as per CIC’s determination) receive initial settlement support Proportion of resettled refugees that receive assistance loans 100% 13.26%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The targets for neither of these indicators were met, namely because the indicators do not adequately consider the need and effectiveness of the Immigration Loans Program. Loans are typically issued to the principal applicant and not to each family member, which prevents CIC from achieving the 99–100% target of assisting resettled refugees. Thus, these indicators do not reveal exactly how many resettled refugees ultimately benefited from the loans issued. New indicators and corresponding targets based on principal applicants will be developed to adequately measure the performance of the program.

Consequently, bearing in mind that most resettled refugees are accompanied by family members, the result of 39.9% of resettled refugees having received a transportation and/or admissibility loans is an expected result. This percentage does not take into account family members accompanying the principal applicant who may have also benefited from the loan. The Government’s provision of loans therefore continues to address this important need.

GARs are the primary recipients of assistance loans, which are provided to assist refugees in the payment of initial settlement costs such as first and last months’ rent or damage deposits. Yet, not all GARs are required to pay such costs, as practices vary from community to community. Nor do PSRs need assistance loans, as these types of costs are the responsibility of sponsors. Finally, again bearing in mind that such loans would only be issued to one family member, the result of 13.26% of resettled refugees having received such loans is within expectations.

Sub-Program 3.1.5: Refugee Resettlement Assistance Program

The Refugee Resettlement Assistance Program (RAP) provides direct financial support and immediate and essential services to RAP clients, including Government-Assisted Refugees, Privately Sponsored Refugees in blended initiatives, and persons in refugee-like situations admitted to Canada under a Public Policy, to meet their resettlement needs.

In most cases RAP clients have undergone extreme hardship and may lack the social networks and the financial resources to assist in addressing the needs associated with becoming established in a new country.  Income support is administered directly by CIC to RAP clients for up to 12 months if the RAP client’s income is insufficient to meet his or her own needs and the needs of any accompanying dependents. In some cases, RAP clients also receive start up allowances for expenses related to furniture and other household supplies. Immediate and essential services are supported through contributions to service provider organizations in all provinces in Canada except Quebec, which delivers similar settlement services through the Canada-Quebec Accord. RAP services include, but are not limited to, port of entry services, assistance with temporary accommodations, assistance opening a bank account, life skills training, orientation sessions, and links to settlement programming and mandatory federal and provincial programs.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
53,739,344
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
38
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
GARs have access to CIC settlement services Percentage of GARs who access settlement services within six months after arrival, where CIC manages the delivery of settlement services ≥ 85% 81%
GARs have their immediate and essential needs met Percentage of GARs, outside of Quebec, who receive temporary accommodation during their first month after arrival 100% 78%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

CIC continues to improve on recording take-up of both orientation services and temporary accommodations and is moving to a new data collection system. These results demonstrate steady progress over the results of the previous year.

For the first indicator, the services provided within six months after arrival are often offered to the entire family. Of the 19% of GARs who did not receive services, 70% were under the age of 15. In this case, the data on services received was likely collected for the adult head(s) of the family only, as opposed to the entire family unit, including children. This contributed to a lower percentage of GARs perceived to be accessing services.

As for the second indicator, the 22% of GARs who did not receive temporary accommodation may well have received the service as part of a family unit, as 17% of this group were under the age of 15 and a further 17% were between the ages of 15 and 24.

CIC continues to support services that meet the immediate and essential needs of RAP clients, and to ensure that RAP services are timely, accessible and useful. CIC also ensures that RAP clients are made aware of settlement services early in the integration process so that they can benefit from services such as language training and employment-related services.

Program 3.2: Citizenship for Newcomers and All Canadians

The purpose of the Citizenship Program is to administer citizenship legislation and promote the rights and responsibilities of Canadian citizenship. CIC administers the acquisition of Canadian citizenship by developing, implementing, and applying legislation, regulations and policies that protect the integrity of Canadian citizenship and allow eligible applicants to be granted citizenship or be provided with a proof of citizenship. In addition, the program promotes citizenship, to both newcomers and the Canadian-born, through various events, materials and projects. Promotional activities focus on enhancing knowledge of Canada's history, institutions, and values, as well as fostering an understanding of the rights and responsibilities of Canadian citizenship.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total Authorities
(available for use)
2013-14
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
43,950,801 43,950,801 64,797,788 62,517,787 18,566,986

Actual spending was higher than planned spending by $18.6 million due to the internal allocation of additional authorities for processing of citizenship grants and proofs.

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
548 722 174
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Canadian citizenship is a valued status Take-up rates of citizenship among eligible newcomers ≥ 75% 85.6%
Percentage of applicants referred to a citizenship hearing to protect the integrity of citizenship 5–10% 10%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Canada continues to have high take-up rates for citizenship, translating into a high value placed on Canadian citizenship.

On February 6, 2014, the Government introduced Bill C-24, the Strengthening Canadian Citizenship Act, the first comprehensive reforms to the Citizenship Act since 1977. On June 19, 2014, Bill C-24 received Royal Assent. This legislation will protect the value of Canadian citizenship for those who have it while creating a faster and more efficient process for those applying to obtain it. Canada's Citizenship Program will be streamlined by reducing the decision-making process from three steps to one, leading to an expected average processing time of under a year and a reduction in the current backlog by more than 80% by 2015–2016.

The Government will ensure that citizenship applicants maintain strong ties to Canada. This Act will clarify that the "residence" period to qualify for citizenship in fact requires a physical presence in Canada. More applicants will now be required to meet language requirements and pass a knowledge test to ensure that new citizens are better prepared to fully participate in Canadian society.

To improve program integrity, the legislation also includes stronger penalties for fraud and misrepresentation (a maximum fine of $100,000 and/or five years in prison) and expands the grounds to bar an application for citizenship to include foreign criminality. The Act contains measures to revoke citizenship from dual nationals who are convicted of terrorism, high treason and espionage offences (depending on the sentence received) or who take up arms against Canada. Permanent residents who commit such acts will be barred from citizenship.

Sub-Program 3.2.1: Citizenship Awareness

The Citizenship Awareness Program aims to enhance the meaning of Canadian citizenship for both newcomers and the Canadian-born and to increase a sense of belonging to Canada. Through knowledge of Canada's history, institutions and values, as well as the rights and responsibilities associated with citizenship, newcomers and the Canadian-born are better equipped for active citizenship and can contribute to the development of an integrated society. The program undertakes various knowledge-building and promotional activities such as: citizenship ceremonies; citizenship reaffirmation ceremonies; Citizenship Week; Citation for Citizenship award; and, the distribution of citizenship educational publications (e.g., Discover Canada citizenship study guide).

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
8,332,707
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
16
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Citizenship responsibilities and privileges are promoted to newcomers and established Canadians Percentage of off-site citizenship ceremonies held in partnership with community or external organizations ≥ 15% 13%
Percentage of applicants who pass the written citizenship knowledge test 80-85% 87%
Number of Discover Canada guides:
  1. distributed;
  2. downloaded; and
  3. viewed online.
  1. ≥ 250,000
  2. ≥ 600,000
  3. ≥ 300,000
  1. 201,700
  2. 613,558Note F
  3. 387,951
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Overall efforts to promote citizenship awareness by CIC were successful with targets being mostly met or exceeded in 2013–2014. CIC will continue to capitalize on this success by working with communities, organizations and partners to ensure that these enhanced types of ceremonies continue to take place.

Citizenship knowledge criteria are established to ensure that new citizens understand Canada's history, symbols, institutions and their rights and responsibilities as citizens. For the second indicator, the results are slightly above target, with a high percentage of citizenship applicants passing the knowledge test. CIC will continue to closely monitor the performance of the citizenship test and address any issues adversely affecting the overall pass rate.

For the third indicator, distribution of Discover Canada was wide, with the number of guides distributed, downloaded and viewed online exceeding the targets set. It should be noted that the below-target distribution of printed guides is likely due to the efforts within the Department to encourage the use of the electronic versions of the guide, which includes alternate formats such as PDF, e-book, e-book with audio and mobile application versions.

An evaluation of the Citizenship Awareness Program completed in October 2013 found that the program is reaching newcomers and that there is a continued need to promote citizenship and reinforce its value. Results also showed that more could be done to promote citizenship among all Canadians, and to better coordinate within CIC. The Department has developed a management response to address the recommendations of the evaluation and to ensure their timely implementation.

Sub-Program 3.2.2: Citizenship Acquisition, Confirmation and Revocation

Citizenship processing activities include interpreting and administering the Citizenship Act and Regulations, managing the naturalization process (whereby non-citizens become citizens), issuing proof of citizenship to those who are citizens by birth or by naturalization, and maintaining these records. The processing of Canadian citizenship helps newcomers fully participate in Canadian life and contributes to their successful integration into Canadian society. A person's citizenship is revoked if it is found that they have obtained their citizenship fraudulently, by misrepresentation or by knowingly concealing information during the course of their immigration or citizenship application process. CIC reviews files where there are allegations of fraud and collects and analyses information to determine if recommendation to initiate revocation proceedings should be made to the Minister.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
54,185,080
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
706
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Applications for proofs and grants are processed Total number of decisions for
  1. grants
  2. proofs
  1. 144,747 -
    160,531
  2. ≥ 38,000
  1. 183,405
  2.  51,814
Revocation processes are undertaken to revoke fraudulent citizenship acquisitions Total number of signed Notices of Intent to Revoke 5-10 11
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the first indicator, the target for citizenship grants was exceeded during the 2013 calendar year. For citizenship proofs, the target was also surpassed, with an acceptance rate of 92%. Output for total number of decisions for grants of citizenship was lower in the beginning of 2013 as a result of a number of program changes and limited resource capacity. However, funding received through Budget 2013 allowed the Department to increase the capacity of citizenship judges and citizenship officers, and resulted in much higher outputs in the second half of the calendar year.

For the second indicator, CIC surpassed the target with 11 Notices of Intent to Revoke signed by the Minister's Delegate. Signing a Notice of Intent to Revoke is the first step in the process of revoking a person's citizenship. The number of notices signed depends on the number of case referrals CIC receives from investigating partners where there are allegations of fraud in the immigration and/or citizenship process. The number of cases pursued for revocation of citizenship depends heavily on the results of these investigations.

The Department made significant strides in modernizing citizenship processes: CIC implemented refined risk-tiering procedures to allow lower-risk files to be processed more quickly while ensuring that higher-risk files receive more intense scrutiny; the issuance of residency questionnaires has been reduced; and there has been a significant decrease in citizenship knowledge hearings due to new procedures on retesting. All of these measures have led to streamlined processing.

Program 3.3: Multiculturalism for Newcomers and All Canadians

The Multiculturalism Program is the principal means of carrying out the Minister’s responsibilities under the Canadian Multiculturalism Act for promoting the full and equitable participation of individuals and communities of all origins. Grants and contributions to not-for-profit organizations, the private sector, provincial and municipal governments, non-federal public institutions and individuals seek to advance overarching Program objectives. These objectives are to: build an integrated, cohesive society (through intercultural understanding, civic memory and pride and democratic values, and equality of opportunity); improve the responsiveness of institutions to the needs of a diverse population; and, actively engage in discussions on multiculturalism and diversity at the international level. Direct public outreach and promotional activities by the Program primarily target young people. The Program assists federal partners to meet their obligations under the Act and ensures annual reporting to Parliament on its operation.

It also engages with non-federal public institutions seeking to respond to diversity. The Program provides a forum for cooperation with provinces and territories and is the locus for Canada’s participation in international agreements and institutions with respect to multiculturalism, anti-racism and related issues.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total Authorities
(available for use)
2013-14
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
14,256,922 14,256,922 11,732,446 9,793,615 (4,463,307)

Actual spending was lower than planned spending by $4.5 million primarily due to receiving fewer proposals for initiatives and events under Multiculturalism grants and contributions.

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
52 29 (23)
Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Program participants are enabled to support an integrated society (i.e., are given information or tools to support an integrated society Annual percentage of program respondents who report that they are more enabled to support an integrated society ≥ 70% 95%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Overall, the Multiculturalism Program achieved its expected results for 2013–2014.

Based on a survey of participants at Multiculturalism Program events, 95% reported that with the tools or information provided at the event, they were enabled to support an integrated society.

Through activities funded and/or initiated by the program, participants (i.e., the Canadian public and targeted federal and public institutions) were given the information and tools necessary to support an integrated society, were made aware of issues related to an integrated society, and were supported in fulfilling obligations to report on the operation of the Canadian Multiculturalism Act.

On February 3, 2014, the 25th Annual Report on the Operation of the Canadian Multiculturalism Act (2012–2013) was tabled in Parliament. The report highlighted a number of initiatives undertaken in 2012−2013 by CIC and other Government of Canada institutions to advance the objectives of the Act. The report also celebrates the 25th anniversary of the Canadian Multiculturalism Act which, since its passage, has contributed to wide recognition of Canada’s successful model of unity in diversity.

In 2013, Canada assumed chairmanship of the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance, providing a unique opportunity to lead international efforts to combat anti-Semitism, to promote Holocaust education, remembrance and research on the global stage, and to complement domestic efforts in this regard. This role was successfully concluded in February 2014 with the handover of the Chair to the United Kingdom, and the issuance of an inaugural annual public report to highlight the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance activities and accomplishments throughout the year. Among others, the report notes two international plenary meetings of the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance that brought together experts and policy makers from 31 member countries, four observer countries and six permanent observer organizations and highlights the achievement of international consensus on a working definition of Holocaust denial and distortion.

Sub-Program 3.3.1: Multiculturalism Awareness

Multiculturalism Awareness comprises a suite of policy, operational, and public engagement and promotional activities. In addition to developing policies that shape Canada's stance on diversity issues, project funding (grants and contributions) is disbursed to recipients (e.g. not-for-profit organizations, the private sector and individuals) seeking to address the Program's overarching objective of building an integrated, cohesive society through intercultural understanding, civic memory and pride and core democratic values, and equal opportunity to full participation in society and the economy. Multiculturalism Awareness also does direct public outreach and promotional activities, primarily targeting young people, designed to engage newcomers and Canadians on multiculturalism, racism and discrimination issues.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
9,266,217
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
23
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Program participants are informed about and value an integrated society Annual percentage of program participants reporting awareness of issues related to an integrated society ≥ 70% 95%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For this indicator, a survey conducted at Multiculturalism Program events demonstrated that 95% of participants reported that with the tools or information provided at the event, they were enabled to support an integrated society. Activities funded and/or initiated by the program provided information and tools to the Canadian public to support an integrated society and promote awareness of issues related to an integrated society.

Sub-Program 3.3.2: Federal and Public Institutional Multiculturalism Support

Federal and Public Institutional Multiculturalism Support efforts are directed towards improving the responsiveness of institutions to the needs of a diverse population. To assist federal institutions in meeting their obligations under the Canadian Multiculturalism Act, the Program leads a Multiculturalism Champions Network which serves as a forum for discussing shared challenges, best practices, lessons learned, and increasing awareness of tools available to institutions to help implement the Act. CIC develops the Annual Report on the Operation of the Canadian Multiculturalism Act for tabling in Parliament, which fulfils the Minister's obligations under the Act, and serves as an informative tool for institutions seeking best practices towards the implementation of the Act. Support is also provided through the Secretariat of the Network of Federal/Provincial/Territorial Officials Responsible for Multiculturalism Issues. The Program manages and disburses project funding (grants and contributions) to regional and municipal governments and non-federal public institutions. Lastly, the Program fosters policy relationships and portfolio management of the Canadian Race Relations Foundation and the Global Centre for Pluralism.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
527,398
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
6
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Federal institutions report on their responsiveness to a diverse society Percentage of respondents (federal institutions) who report on the operation of the Canadian Multiculturalism Act ≥ 75% 88%
Targeted institutions are supported Participation rate of targeted institutions ≥ 85% 69%
Number of support or outreach activities provided to targeted institutions ≥ 5 9
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the first indicator, the percentage of federal institutions featured in the Annual Report on the Operation of the Canadian Multiculturalism Act exceeded the target by 13% (88%, or 155 of 176 federal institutions). The program continued a three-year trend of increased federal participation (2011–2012 by 4%, and 2012–2013 by 11%). As more federal institutions participate in reporting activities, the Multiculturalism Program’s policy objectives are further ingrained into daily federal activities. Furthermore, as the quality and quantity of initiatives showcased in the report increase, so does the overall value of the report in highlighting best practices and a diversity of approaches. Timely follow-up with institutions that had not responded to the call for submissions and greater flexibility in submission due dates resulted in higher participation rates.

For the second indicator, participation of members of the network of federal provincial/territorial (FPT) multiculturalism officials fell short of its target by 16%. However, this shortfall did not impair program delivery, as the information intended for distribution and discussion was circulated to the entire group. Going forward, CIC will review and assess current approaches and consider potential common themes or priorities to enhance delivery of multiculturalism policy objectives.

For the third indicator, the program also exceeded the target of five support or outreach activities by launching nine initiatives (six across the Government of Canada and three within CIC). Compared to previous years, more multiculturalism-related activities were organized, increasingly attracting a greater number of participants from federal institutions. Four (rather than three) writing workshops for the annual report submission were organized. CIC was also invited by other organizations to share information on multiculturalism activities, such as through a promotional booth at the DFATD for their Official Languages Day and a presentation on the Canadian Multiculturalism Act to the Diversity Committee of the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages. Training sessions were also organized to showcase the new Multiculturalism Gateway and how to use it to share information on multiculturalism-related documents and events.

Strategic Outcome 4: Managed migration that promotes Canadian interests and protects the health, safety and security of Canadians

Canada welcomes thousands of permanent residents, temporary foreign workers, international students and visitors each year. CIC manages the movement of people within the context of a more responsive immigration system that benefits Canada’s economic, social and cultural development while at the same time protecting the health, safety and security of all Canadians. To manage health issues related to immigration, CIC develops and implements risk mitigation strategies in cooperation with the Public Health Agency of Canada, provinces and territories, and partner countries. Any residual public health risks regarding the transmission of infectious diseases are mitigated through medical surveillance of newly arrived permanent and temporary residents as required. To protect Canadians—and to ensure that the benefits of a more responsive immigration system are not undermined—CIC works with the CBSA, the RCMP and the Canadian Security Intelligence Service to conduct appropriate background screening of both immigrants and temporary residents and to identify applicants who could pose a security risk to the country. CIC shares information with these organizations, fostering timely and effective delivery of its program.

Internationally, migration and humanitarian issues continue to gain the attention of governments, bilateral and multilateral forums, non-governmental organizations, and academic and other research institutes. CIC plays an important role in framing and advancing international dialogues on migration and integration policy, refugee protection and governance. These dialogues explore the links between migration policy and development assistance, health, the environment, trade, and the movement of human capital. CIC works to develop and implement a strategic agenda on global migration and refugee protection, and to advance Canada’s policy and program priorities.

Benefits for Canadians

Growing international migration has increased the possibility of Canadians being exposed to disease outbreaks and infectious diseases. CIC and its partners in health management work to reduce the impact of identified risks on the Canadian population.

Policies and programs that affect the international movement of people—across Canada’s borders and outside them—have a direct bearing on the safety and security of Canada and Canadians at large, whether they are at home or travelling and conducting trade abroad. Strengthening Canada’s refugee programs and demonstrating continued leadership in refugee protection, human rights and the promotion of cultural diversity through active participation in various international and regional forums and partnerships support Canada’s broader contribution to a safe and secure world. Finally, coordinated and responsible sharing of information supports a fast response to threats to the safety and security of Canadians.

Program 4.1: Health Management

This program aims to provide effective immigration health services to manage the health aspect of migrant access and settlement to Canada, and facilitate the arrival of resettled refugees to Canada and their integration while contributing to the protection of the health and safety of all Canadians and contributing to the maintenance of sustainable Canadian health and social services.

The program aims to evaluate health risks related to immigration and coordinate with international and Canadian health partners to develop risk management strategies and processes to assess the health of applicants wishing to immigrate to Canada and develop pre-departure, in-transit, and post arrival interventions. The strategies, processes and interventions are intended to reduce the impact of the risks identified on the health of Canadians and on Canada’s health and social services.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total Authorities
(available for use)
2013-14
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
60,620,439 60,620,439 60,849,860 38,115,873 (22,504,566)

Actual spending was $22.5 million lower than planned spending due to lower than forecasted expenditures for the Interim Federal Health Program, including the impact of reduced refugee claims and backlogs.

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
91 69 (22)
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Applicants for permanent or temporary residence who pose a risk to public health or public safety or may be reasonably expected to cause excessive demand on the Canadian health care system are identified and if eligible, receive coverage for health treatment Percentage of applications refused for health reasons by visa officers over number of medically inadmissible cases identified in the Immigration Medical Assessment (IMA) process 100% 80.2%
Percentage of eligible clients who receive health coverage under the Interim Federal Health Program 100% 99.6%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the first indicator, of the 450 cases for which final decisions had been made in 2013 yet who were identified as medically inadmissible, 361 or 80.2% were refused by visa officers for health reasons. In fact, over 1,000 cases were deemed medically inadmissible in the same period, but a final decision was still pending for many of these cases.

Going forward, the target of 100% will be adjusted, as it fails to capture the reality that after being found inadmissible by a medical officer, there are a number of reasons why the case might not be refused at final decision. Some applicants withdraw their application upon being notified of medical inadmissibility. Others satisfy the visa officer of their ability and intent to mitigate excessive demand and, therefore, are not ultimately found to be inadmissible for excessive demand on the Canadian system. Finally, others may be accepted by the visa officer under humanitarian and compassionate grounds or other valid reasons, despite their medical inadmissibility.

For the second indicator, CIC did not meet its target by 0.4%, as Interim Federal Health Program (IFHP) certificates were not issued for 37 eligible refugee claimants. However, following a review of these cases and an identification and correction of errors, coverage was then provided to the eligible claimants. CIC receives monthly quality assurance reports to ensure the correct coverage is given to IFHP beneficiaries and to correct any errors.

Over the past year, the Department supported key initiatives to improve medical screening processes and support program integrity. In 2013, the successful worldwide deployment of eMedical and the Global Case Management System (GCMS) electronic assessment module resulted in improved client service, faster and less expensive paperless processing, electronic storage of medical records, standardization and improved program integrity. CIC continues to expand eMedical to the extent allowed by the technological infrastructure abroad.

Sub-Program 4.1.1: Health Screening

This program aims to manage the health risks related to permanent and temporary residence according to the three grounds for inadmissibility under IRPA, which are (1) danger to public health, (2) danger to public safety and (3) excessive demand on health or social services.

The Immigration Medical Exam (IME) is a tool used to screen for infectious diseases all applicants for permanent and temporary residence. The IME includes x-rays and lab tests that identify applicants who could pose health threats to Canadians or to the Canadian health and social systems. Those who are in good health are cleared for entry into Canada; those who are found with infectious disease are referred for treatment before admittance to Canada; those who are a danger to public health or public safety or are deemed to cause excessive demand on Canada’s health and social system are deemed inadmissible.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
7,244,631
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
45
Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Applicants for permanent and temporary residence who pose public health risks or public safety risks or excessive demand on the Canadian health care system are refused Percentage of applicants identified as medically inadmissible based on health grounds (public health, public safety, or excessive demand) 0.1% - 0.2% 0.21%
Percentage of new cases of active TB found during an Immigration Medical Assessment (IMA) over total number of IMAs < 0.08% 0.03%
Percentage of new cases of inactive TB found during an Immigration Medical Assessment (IMA) over total number of IMAs 1.88% 1.3%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013, 1,024 applicants were deemed inadmissible out of 492,211 immigration medicals that were assessed.

There were 143 cases of active tuberculosis found during an IME, all of which were treated and rendered inactive. All were, therefore, successfully treated. As well, there were 6,288 cases of inactive tuberculosis, or 1.3%, that were found during an IME and were then identified for medical surveillance.

The number of cases for both of the indicators for this reporting period, compared with those from previous years, has decreased. It is normal to expect some variation from year to year depending on the source countries and other variables.

CIC has done work over the past year to respond to changes in migration patterns and their impacts on public health by focusing on the development of global maps identifying diseases of public health concern, a comparative analysis of sexually-transmitted infections and blood-borne infections in Canada. Other measures supported CIC’s efforts, such as creating guidelines on vaccine-preventable diseases in Canada, initiating an epidemiological risk assessment tool, and establishing a health knowledge framework to identify knowledge and data gaps to support the development of a health admissibility policy.

Sub-Program 4.1.2: Medical Surveillance Notification

Section 38(1) of IRPA sets danger to public health as one condition of inadmissibility to Canada.

Applicants for temporary or permanent residence in Canada whose Immigration Medical Assessments demonstrate that they may pose risks to public health require further health assessment and monitoring following their landing in Canada in order to ensure that they do not represent a danger to public health.

The Medical Surveillance Notification Program informs provincial/territorial public health authorities of applicants who require medical surveillance in order to ensure that the terms and conditions of landing are met.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
579,308
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
9
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Provincial and Territorial Public Health authorities are notified of migrants who pose public health risks, for the purposes of medical surveillance Percentage of migrants identified as having inactive TB and/or adequately treated syphilis who landed in Canada and were reported to provincial/territorial health authorities 100% 91.6%
Percentage of identified cases of human immunodeficiency virus who landed in Canada and were reported to provincial/territorial health authorities (except for the provinces/territories of NS, PEI and NWT)Footnote 3 100% 95.5%
Percentage of clients who comply with the condition of provincial/territorial medical surveillance 100% 74%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the first indicator, in 91.6% of cases where CIC was made aware of the client's and the province of destination, CIC notified the corresponding province. However, some clients reported directly to the provincial or territorial public health authority as their landing package directed them to do, although CIC had not been advised of their landing and province of destination. CIC can only report on cases where it is notified by CBSA that the client has landed, including the province of destination. 

For the second indicator, although CIC did not meet its target (falling short by 4.5%), the process of identifying human immunodeficiency virus cases that landed in Canada has improved. A new electronic system allows identification of a greater number of cases, thus reducing the chance of missing any. The difference between the proposed notification target of 100% and the actual percentage of notifications done in 2013 is explained by the lack of documentation of residential address upon arrival in Canada. Human immunodeficiency virus notifications are made to provincial/territorial public health authorities who have elected to receive the information. Nova Scotia and Nunavut have elected not to receive the information; all other provinces and territories do. Notification is done solely with the purpose of assisting newcomers who may need direction with respect to the Canadian health system or health education. 

For the third indicator, between September 1, 2012 and August 31, 2013, 7,389 individuals in need of medical surveillance entered Canada and were reported to CIC. As of June 2014, 5,478 compliance reports were received by the provincial/territorial public health authorities, representing 74% of the total notifications received by CIC. Of the 74% of compliance reports already received, 21% (1,159) of the individuals complied within 30 days of arrival in Canada and 48% (2,644) within the first 90 days. The outstanding 26% of non-compliant reports could be due to many factors: public health authorities are unable to locate the individuals; CIC is unable to inform the public health authorities because there is no residential address in Canada; the individuals have not self-reported; and/or the public health authorities have not yet sent the compliance reports.

Over the past year, 492,211 IMAs were finalized and 6,237 notifications were made to the appropriate provincial/territorial authority.

An evaluation of the Medical Surveillance Notification Program is underway, with results available in 2014–2015.

Sub-Program 4.1.3: Interim Federal Health

The Interim Federal Health Program (IFHP) is a discretionary program that provides limited, temporary coverage of health care costs for specific groups of people including protected persons, refugee claimants, rejected refugee claimants, and certain persons detained under IRPA. The Program helps protect public health and public safety, and offers access to urgent and essential health services and products to some of the eligible groups above. The Program primarily offers four types of coverage: health care coverage, public health or public safety health care coverage, Immigration Medical Examinations, and coverage for detainees.

In general, eligibility for the IFHP is restricted to those who are not eligible for provincial or territorial health insurance. The IFHP does not cover services or products for which a person may make a claim under a private insurance plan.

The IFHP provides coverage to eligible beneficiaries, via a contracted claims administrator, through a network of registered health-care providers across Canada. Health-care providers are reimbursed directly for covered services rendered to eligible beneficiaries.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
30,291,934
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
15
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Eligible clients receive urgent and essential health services that reduce risks to Canadian public health and safety Percentage of refugee claimants who received an immigration medical examination funded by the IFHP 100% 93%
Percentage of clients who obtain health services for public health and public safety conditions relative to the number of clients identified in the Immigration Medical Assessment as having public health and public safety risks 100% 95.4%
Percentage of clients eligible for coverage who receive vaccinations or immunizations through the IFHP 100% 0.05%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the first indicator, of all eligible refugee claimants, 93% had an IME that was covered by the IFHP. Another 5.8% had an IME that was not covered by the IFHP, as they withdrew their claim or they may have paid for the IME themselves. The other 1.2% did not have an IME, most likely because they left Canada without informing CIC or the CBSA.

With regard to the second indicator, the target was mostly met. IME data captures information on eight public health or public safety conditions. From September 2012 to September 2013, 241 refugee claimants had one of the eight conditions, and 230 received health services from the IFHP.

For the third indicator, from September 2012 to September 2013, of the 81,473 persons eligible for IFHP vaccination or immunization coverage, only 44 received coverage through the IFHP. This low number could be attributed to the fact that almost all immunization benefits covered by the IFHP are normally provided through federally funded public health systems in the provinces and territories. These services can be covered by the provincial/territorial health authorities, in which case the information is not captured by the IFHP. Given this context, the indicator will be reviewed.

Reforms to the IFHP were introduced in July 2012. These reforms ensure that Program beneficiaries do not receive taxpayer-funded benefits that are more generous than those provided to Canadians. They also support the recent changes to Canada's asylum system by removing a draw factor that may have encouraged people to file unfounded refugee claims in order to receive generous health and social benefits.

Program 4.2: Migration Control and Security Management

This Program aims to ensure the managed migration of foreign nationals and newcomers to Canada. As such, in accordance with IRPA and accompanying Regulations, CIC facilitates the travel of bona fide permanent residents, visitors, students and temporary workers while protecting the health, safety and security of Canadians by effectively managing migration access and controlling entry. This is accomplished through a variety of policy and operational measures, including visa policy interventions, anti-fraud measures, eligibility and admissibility criteria, negotiations of bilateral and multilateral information sharing agreements and treaties, security updates to travel and immigration status documents, as well as revisions to identity management practices. Strategic partnership engagements with security and public safety-related departments are another essential component of this Program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total Authorities
(available for use)
2013-14
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
87,096,376 87,096,376 112,701,893 93,642,100 6,545,724

Actual spending was $6.5 million higher than planned spending, primarily due to supplementary funding for the Electronic Travel Authorization, Entry/Exit and the Global Assistance for Irregular Migrants contribution.

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
577 728 151
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
A managed migration of people to Canada that facilitates the movement of genuine travellers, while denying entry to Canada at the earliest point possible to those who pose a safety or security risk, or are otherwise inadmissible under IRPA Number of refused Electronic Travel Authorizations (eTA) TBD N/A
Number of inadmissible cases detected through biometrics TBD N/A
3-year average Immigration Violation Rate (IVR) following a visa policy decision on a country (as a % of all travellers from that country) ≤ 3% N/A
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the first indicator, CIC will not be able to report on the number of refused Electronic Travel Authorizations until 2015, when this initiative will be launched.

Nor can CIC provide annual results for the second indicator, as the program was only launched part way through the reporting period.

The immigration violation rate (IVR) continues to be a useful indicator of potential risk posed by a given country with respect to irregular migration when analysing their potential eligibility for visa-free status. For example, in 2012, the IVR for Botswana, which was visa-exempt until September of that year, was 26.5%. Following the visa imposition, the violation rate dropped to 3.8% in 2013, demonstrating that visa screening was a needed tool to deter and detect non-genuine travellers from that country.

On the other hand, Taiwan is an example of a country/territory where a visa exemption was appropriate when the decision to lift was made, and continues to be appropriate today. Before being granted a visa exemption in 2010, their IVR was 0.6%, an indication that Taiwanese travellers are low risk. Since then, Taiwan has maintained a low violation rate, with 0.3% in 2013.

CIC will revisit this third performance indicator to express more clearly the impact of IVR monitoring.

The Department continues to manage migration through a variety of policies and tools, most of which are intended to facilitate the entry of low-risk travellers while screening out those who pose a threat to Canada at the earliest point possible in the immigration continuum. CIC's visa policy has clearly demonstrated that visa screening is an effective tool to deter and detect non-genuine travellers.

The Faster Removal of Foreign Criminals Act received Royal Assent on June 20, 2013. Provisions that are now in force will make it faster to remove foreign criminals by further limiting their access to appeals and limiting recourse for those inadmissible for security, human or international rights violations, or organized criminality. In addition, foreign nationals could be denied temporary entry in exceptional cases under a new ministerial authority.

CIC successfully implemented biometric screening to reduce identity fraud in the temporary resident visa program. By the end of March 2014, CIC deployed a global network of biometric collection service points in 92 countries consisting of 129 Visa Application Centres and 51 CIC visa offices.

Sub-Program 4.2.1: Permanent Resident Status Documents

In accordance with IRPA, CIC must process and issue to all permanent residents a secure status document for travel purposes. The Permanent Resident Card (PR Card) serves as proof of permanent resident status in Canada and may be easily verified by commercial carriers and border officers. While the PR Card also meets international travel document standards it is not a travel document. The PR Status Documents Program makes it difficult to access Canadian territory fraudulently. The Program establishes a mechanism to verify compliance with the residency requirement, provides permanent residents with a status document confirming their right to live, work and study in Canada, provides permanent residents with access to government services and enables them to be recognized and processed quickly at the border, thereby enhancing border security. While not mandatory within Canada, the PR Card is required for all permanent residents as proof of their status when seeking to re-enter Canada on a commercial carrier. It contains security features to reduce the risk of fraud. Permanent residents who obtained their status under previous immigration legislation or those who wish to replace an expired, lost or stolen PR Card may obtain one upon application. Limited use travel documents are also issued by visa offices overseas to qualified Permanent Residents outside of Canada who do not have a valid PR Card, to facilitate return travel to Canada.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
23,728,030
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
208
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Permanent residents have required documentation to re-enter Canada Percentage of Phase One (new) Permanent Resident cards (PR cards) that are issued within service standard ≥ 80% 43%
Number of Phase One (new) permanent resident cards issued and number of Phase Two (existing) permanent resident cards issued ≥ 240,000
≥140,000
261,213
270,380
Number of permanent resident travel documents issued 10,000–20,000 14,155
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Various reasons contributed to the performance result for the first indicator, including errors on the form, unacceptable photographs which needed to be retaken, as well as the time lapse between when the client is landed at a port of entry and the date the form is received at the processing centre, which is also included in the overall processing time.

The two targets for the number of PR cards issued (phases One and Two) were exceeded by 9% and 93% respectively. The demand for Phase Two PR cards significantly exceeded the target, putting considerable pressure on PR Card processing centres. One-time extra resources were provided to support application volume, which is purely demand-driven.

The volume of permanent resident travel documents declined in 2012 and 2013 following the mailing of 90% of Phase Two PR cards, suggesting that some Phase Two PR cards are being sent out of Canada; fewer permanent residents outside of Canada need permanent resident travel documents if they can obtain PR cards without returning to Canada.

Sub-Program 4.2.2: Visitors Status

Under IRPA, all visitors to Canada require a Temporary Resident Visa (TRV), except citizens of countries for which an exemption has been granted under the Regulations. A foreign national who wishes to come to Canada, and from a country for which a TRV is imposed, needs to apply at a Canadian Embassy abroad prior to travelling to Canada. The Visitors Status Program aims to ensure that each applicant is screened to determine whether they meet the entry requirements, including that they will abide by the terms and conditions of entry, and are not inadmissible to Canada. The screening of travellers requiring a TRV is carried out by CIC in cooperation with its federal security partners. Once individuals arrive in Canada, their status needs to be maintained, regardless of whether they needed a visa to enter the country.

The TRV is designed to prevent individuals who would abuse temporary entry from coming to Canada, and to facilitate the entry to Canada of genuine temporary residents. The requirement to obtain a TRV limits the number of immigration violations (i.e., refugee claims, no proper travel documents, not leaving Canada once the period of stay has expired, working illegally, etc.) and protects the health, safety and security of Canadians.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
22,502,007
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
219
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Visitors have been screened to ensure they do not pose a risk to the health, safety and security of Canadians Percentage of applicants referred to partners for security screening
  1. overseas
  2. in-Canada
  1. 3.5-4.5%;
  2. 0.5-2.5 %
  1. 2.6%
  2. N/A
Percentage of applicants refused for being found not to be genuine visitors
  1. overseas
  2. in-Canada
  1. 16-19%;
  2. 8-11%
  1. 17.1%
  2. N/A
Percentage of applicants refused for inadmissibility
  1. overseas
  2. in-Canada
  1. 1-4%;
  2. 1-4%
  1. 0.1%
  2. N/A
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

CIC screens prospective visitors to Canada by way of the TRV application process, thereby enabling CIC to facilitate the travel of genuine visitors and to protect public health and safety through effective and efficient screening.

CIC, in cooperation with its federal security partners, continually reviews screening indicators to keep the information comprehensive, relevant and current. Indicators may change as a result of changes to a particular country environment and therefore may result in more targeted referrals to security partners.

The overseas referral rate is less than projected, which represents an increase in the effectiveness and efficiency of the screening process. CIC has started tracking the in-Canada referral rate since April 2014, which will improve its ability to report on this in future.

For the second and third indicators, the overseas approval rate is 82.8%. CIC prides itself on maintaining a high acceptance rate, every year, while ensuring the program’s integrity and the safety and security of Canada and its people.

For greater transparency, CIC is also now able to break down the overseas visitor refusals by type of refusal reason. This analysis shows that 17.1% of overseas clients were refused for not being genuine visitors and that 0.1% of overseas clients were refused for being inadmissible under sections 34 through 40 of the IRPA. Since more than one million decisions were taken on overseas visitor applications by CIC during 2013, the 0.1% corresponds to more than 1,000 cases.

In view of the roll-out of GCMS, CIC has started tracking the in-Canada visitor record refusals by type of refusal reason, which will improve its ability to report on this in future.

Canada continues to be a destination country for tourists, business travellers, temporary foreign workers and students alike. The high number of decisions rendered is reflective of the increased number of applications received by CIC every year. This number may in fact increase in the coming years, as the demand to visit Canada is projected to increase year over year. To meet this demand, CIC is further modernizing its activities where possible to provide more efficient service and provide more clarity to clients as to their options to come to Canada (i.e., single- versus multiple-entry Temporary Resident Visas). CIC is making efforts to ensure processing times do not lengthen through the realignment of the processing network; however, demand continues to grow, which could result in longer wait times for TRV and other temporary-resident processing, such as Temporary Foreign Workers.

On February 6, 2014, CIC introduced multiple-entry visas which allow qualified visitors to enter and leave Canada for six months at a time for up to 10 years without having to reapply each time. The fee for the TRV has been reduced from $150 to $100 for the processing of either a single- or multiple-entry visa.

By harmonizing the single- and multiple-entry visa fees, the visa application process is simpler for applicants and promotes tourism and trade by increasing the number of eligible travellers who are able to make multiple visits to Canada.

Sub-Program 4.2.3: Temporary Resident Permits

Persons seeking temporary residence in Canada who do not meet IRPA requirements are subject to refusal of a Temporary Resident Visa abroad, denial of entry at ports of entry, or refusal of extensions inland. In some cases, however, there may be compelling reasons for an officer to issue a Temporary Resident Permit (TRP) to allow a person who is otherwise inadmissible to enter or remain in Canada. Under the Temporary Resident Permits Program, designated officers may issue these permits abroad, at a port of entry or in Canada, depending on the circumstances. Grounds for issuance of a TRP include, among others, inadmissibility due to medical reasons, criminality, reasons of security, infringement of human or international rights, or organized crime. TRPs are issued for a limited, often short, period of time and are subject to cancellation at any time. TRPs provide officers with the flexibility to address exceptional circumstances and, in so doing, maintain the integrity of Canada’s immigration program and protect the health, safety and security of Canadians.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
5,269,771
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
19
Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result

People seeking to enter or remain in Canada who would otherwise be inadmissible are granted a temporary resident permit (TRP)

Note: When reasons to issue the TRP are compelling and sufficient to outweigh any potential risk the individual may pose to Canada

Percentage of TRPs issued for:
  1. security, organized crime, war crimes and/or crimes against humanity;
  2. criminality and/or serious criminality;
  3. other inadmissibilities
  1. 0.75%-1.0%
  2. 57.5%-62.5%
  3. 38%-42%
  1. 0.5%
  2. 58%
  3. 41.5%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

TRPs are issued only in exceptional circumstances. Therefore, the number of TRPs issued in a given year cannot be predetermined. Specific cases in which TRPs are issued for security, organized crime and war crimes may be overestimated. The results for the first indicator—percentage of TRPs issued for security, organized crime, war crimes and/or crimes against humanity—was slightly below the target. However, this is not problematic, as the issuance of a lower number of TRPs is considered positive from an operational perspective. For the second and third indicators, the target was met, which is also considered positive, as fewer inadmissible foreign nationals sought to enter Canada.

TRP processing contributes to higher-level results in supporting migration that significantly benefits Canada's economic, social and cultural development while protecting the health, safety and security of Canadians. As mandated by the IRPA, designated officers are authorized to issue TRPs to foreign nationals who do not meet IRPA requirements. These permits are issued when there are compelling reasons to admit an otherwise inadmissible individual into Canada.

Sub-Program 4.2.4: Fraud Prevention and Program Integrity Protection

Under this Program, policy is developed and procedures are designed in order to maintain confidence in Canada's citizenship and immigration system and to protect the safety and security of Canada while effectively delivering on economic and social objectives by selecting only those applicants that meet program needs. Program integrity is achieved through case processing procedures that filter out applicants who fail to meet eligibility requirements, admissibility requirements or who commit fraud, and through referral of these cases for enforcement action where appropriate.

Identity management contributes to strengthened program integrity by ensuring that services are delivered to the correct individual, developing efficiencies across the multiple business lines, and allowing CIC to streamline interactions with repeat clientele. Identity management involves the application of procedures to establish, fix, and manage client identity across CIC operations and between key partners based on personal identifiers, identity documents, and biometrics identifiers.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
39,056,717
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
282
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
The integrity of Canada’s citizenship and immigration programs is assured

Percentage of applications processed for which risk indicator criteria have been applied in processing for:

  1. citizenship applications
  2. permanent resident applications
  3. temporary resident applications
  1. 80%;
  2. 50%;
  3. 50%
  1. 78%
  2. 32%
  3. 0%

Percentage of refused cases over the total number of applications processed for:

  1. Family Class (spouses)
  2. Temporary Resident Visa

TBD

  1. 11%
  2. 17%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the first indicator, CIC almost met its target of processing 80% of the applications for which risk indicator criteria were applied during the citizenship application process. However, it did not meet its target for processing PR applications, namely because risk indicator criteria were not applied to PR applications for spouses and common law partners until fiscal year 2014–2015. Finally, CIC did not meet its target for TR applications, as CIC has not yet applied risk indicator criteria to these applications.

With regard to the second indicator, a target was not established. However, compared to the 2012 rate of 14% for the Family Class (Spouses), there is a small decrease in the refusal rate. The refusal rate for TRVs is relatively consistent with the 2012 rate of 15.5%.

In April 2011, CIC introduced the Program Integrity Framework to integrate risk management, quality assurance as well as fraud deterrence and detection into CIC's day-to-day operations. Program integrity issues and instructions continue to be addressed in both operational instructions and manuals. Strengthened program integrity activities are expected to result in increased detection of fraud, which may be evident in refusal rates, including increased refusals for misrepresentation, and referrals to partners. New data will continue to be available as GCMS and data analytics continue to be rolled out to support antifraud and program integrity activities.

In August 2013, CIC launched a new tip line through the CIC Call Centre where tips on suspected citizenship fraud cases can be reported. CIC continued to work with enforcement partners (RCMP and CBSA) to prevent fraud in the Citizenship Program, and the ongoing large-scale fraud investigations conducted by the RCMP and the CBSA have identified more than 3,000 citizens and 5,000 permanent residents linked to major investigations, a majority of them related to residence fraud. In addition, nearly 2,000 individuals linked to the citizenship fraud investigations have withdrawn their applications.

CIC is working in cooperation with provincial and territorial partners to ensure that these partners are able to share information and to implement antifraud and quality assurance mechanisms for strengthening program integrity and service delivery.

Sub-Program 4.2.5: Global Assistance for Irregular Migrants

The Global Assistance for Irregular Migrants (GAIM) ProgramFootnote 4 provides transfer payments in the form of contributions to trusted international, intergovernmental, and non-governmental organizations (such as the International Organization for Migration) to fund activities and support for intercepted irregular migrants, such as meeting basic needs, providing medical care, identifying migrants to be referred to the appropriate authorities for refugee status determination, and facilitating voluntary return and reintegration in the country of origin if determined not to be in need of protection. The GAIM Program responds to the need for Canada to have a permanent program to manage the consequences of disrupting human-smuggling activities believed to be destined for Canada. It is triggered when the Prime Minister’s Special Advisor on Human Smuggling identifies an event involving these activities and CIC agrees to implement the program. It also addresses the need for complementary activities that demonstrate Canada’s commitment to transit states and international partners that would otherwise be encumbered with the costs of unintended consequences arising from smuggling-prevention activities. Offers of capacity-building and support in managing the consequences of successful prevention of human smuggling have been critical in securing bilateral cooperation from transit states. The GAIM Program reflects CIC’s role in Canada’s whole-of-government strategy to combat human-smuggling activities. This Program uses transfer payment funding from the Contribution in support of the Global Assistance for Irregular Migrants Program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
3,085,575
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
0
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Migrants who are determined not to be refugees reintegrate in their countries of origin

Percentage of migrants who received assistance to establish a business are “very satisfied”, “satisfied” or “moderately satisfied” with the performance of their business

Note: The returning migrants who request assistance are first given a seminar by the implementing organization on how to identify business opportunities and to prepare a business plan. Once they submit a detailed business plan, the implementing organization reviews and works with the migrant to refine it. Once this is done the implementing organization provides funding (e.g., for tools and woodworking equipment for a carpentry business or down payment for a truck for a transportation business) and other assistance (e.g., registering the business, help in finding premises, help in identifying suppliers, etc.) to start the business. All of this is done by the implementing organization using funds provided by CIC under GAIM.

90% 97%
Percentage of migrants surveyed who received reintegration assistance who are “positive” about their future in their home country 80% 98%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the first indicator, CIC surpassed its target by 7%. Almost all migrants were satisfied with the performance of their business, indicating that there is a strong level of satisfaction among migrants who return to their country of origin in terms of the supports they receive.

This is directly linked to the next indicator that only 2% of migrants surveyed were not positive about their future in their home country. These results are overwhelmingly positive; however, the program is new and small, and any overarching conclusions from these results will require further survey data to ensure they are a real reflection of satisfaction.

Even though this is a small sample, these positive results indicate that the program is making an initial impact on the life of migrants. As more time passes, CIC will monitor how these results translate into migration decisions.

Program 4.3: Canadian Influence in International Migration and Integration Agenda

Reflecting part of CIC’s mandate, this Program aims to influence the international migration and integration policy agenda. This is done by developing and promoting, together with other public policy sectors, Canada’s position on international migration, integration, and refugee protection issues and through participation in multilateral, regional and bilateral forums.

CIC works closely with partner countries to ensure the effective administration of immigration laws through the exchange of information, including biometric data. This international migration policy development helps Canada advance its interests in the context of international migration as well as meet its international obligations and commitments.

CIC supports international engagement and partnerships through membership in the International Organization for Migration, and contributions to other international migration policy organizations.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total Authorities
(available for use)
2013-14
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
3,120,542 3,120,542 5,617,939 5,616,646 2,496,194

Actual spending was $2.5 million over planned spending due to the internal allocation of additional authorities.

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
10 23 13
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Canadian positions on managed migration, integration and international protection are advanced in international fora

Percentage of decisions/reports from international meetings and fora identified as important which reflect the delivered CIC migration-related position.

Note: Important international meetings or fora are defined as those which provide an opportunity to advance a position which furthers the objectives in CIC's International Strategy or annually defined priorities.

≥ 60% 100%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For this indicator, the number of initiatives that promote Canadian goals changes from year to year, depending on topics that arise in international fora and with bilateral partners, but continues to increase from year to year.

CIC worked with CBSA to finalize preparations for the Five Country Conference which Canada chaired in April 2014 in Quebec City. For its year as Chair, Canada is focusing on traveller facilitation issues, with a long-term objective of allowing low-risk travellers to receive improved access to benefits throughout the five countries. Canada is also leading an important privacy and legal review exercise to better understand gaps and opportunities as the Five Country Conference works toward achieving collaborative objectives over the next several years.

In 2013–2014, Canada was actively engaged in the preparatory process for the United Nations High Level Dialogue on Migration and Development. In October 2013, Canada's interests and positions were successfully advanced at the High Level Dialogue to promote managed migration, maximize the development benefits of migration, and leverage existing global and regional fora.

CIC continued to advance Canada’s priorities and global dialogue on migration through numerous bilateral relations and through other regional and international fora, including the Regional Consultations on Migration; Intergovernmental Consultations on Migration, Asylum and Refugees; and, the UNHCR.

Further to a 2013 evaluation of the Migration Policy Development Program (MPDP), CIC has been working to align MPDP-funded migration-related research and priorities with departmental planning and to more systematically disseminate and manage forum information.

Program 4.4: PassportFootnote 5

CIC is accountable for the Passport Program, and collaborates with Service Canada and Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada for the delivery of passport services. The Program is managed through the Passport Canada Revolving Fund. The Program enables the issuance of secure Canadian travel documents through authentication of identity and entitlement, facilitates travel and contributes to international and domestic security.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
  Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates) 2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total Authorities
(available for use)
2013-14
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
Gross Expenditure 256,258,005 256,477,588 256,477,588
Respendable Revenue (285,359,489) (462,809,602) (462,809,602)
Net Revenue (29,101,484) (206,332,014) (206,332,014)
Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
549
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Canadians have access to secure travel documents

Percentage compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization Annex 9 standards and recommended practices

Note: Annex 9 to the Convention on International Civil Aviation contains standards and recommended practices on border clearance formalities related to travel document security and issuance. Specifically, CIC’s Passport Program has direct responsibility for eight legally binding standards and six recommended practices.

100% 100%
Percentage of Canadians having access to a passport point of service within 100 kilometres in Canada 90% 97.9%
Canadians are satisfied with passport services Percentage of clients who report they have been satisfied with services they have received 90% N/A
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

On July 2, 2013, the accountability for Passport Canada was transferred from the Minister of Foreign Affairs to the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration. The change in management will facilitate modernization of the Passport Program. The Passport Canada Program Modernization Initiative is being planned as a phased approach over the next five years with the aim of enhancing security and integrity, modernizing service through the use of CIC's technological platform and Service Canada's service delivery network.

In June, 2013, deployment of the ePassport was completed, which included the introduction of new printing technology across Canada. Adopting the ePassport enhanced the security of the Canadian passport document in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization recommended practices. The document is more difficult for criminals to forge or alter and provides a means to improve inspection capability at borders. The 10-year validity passport is currently the preferred option for Canadians, with 82% of adult passport holders choosing this option.

The Passport Canada Program's 100% compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization standards and practices is an indication that the program is being delivered in accordance with international duties and obligations, which, in turn, facilitates the travel of Canadians. Security and integrity of the Passport Canada Program were also ensured through expansion of the efficiency of the Facial Recognition Program and through working relationships with the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, RCMP, CBSA and Public Safety Canada, focussing on security threats.

The Passport Program continues to meet all performance targets in meeting its service delivery commitments to Canadians. Service performance was not impacted during the transition of the program from the DFATD to CIC and Service Canada. Some 98% of Canadians continue to have access to passport services within a 100 km range in Canada.

For the third indicator, no current data is available as the last client satisfaction survey was conducted in 2008. Information will be gathered for the purpose of evaluating the program and results will be published once the evaluation is completed in 2014–2015.

Program 5.1: Internal Services

CIC’s internal services are groups of activities and resources that help the Department achieve its strategic outcomes. Internal services apply across CIC and are not linked to a specific program. These services include management and oversight, communications, legal services, human resources management, financial management, IM, IT, real property, materiel, acquisition, and travel and other administrative services.

Financial Resources ($ millions)
Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total Authorities
(available for use)
2013-14
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
237,873,452 237,873,452 244,094,182 231,596,325 (6,277,127)

Actual spending was lower than planned spending by $6.3 million due to lower-than-expected spending on government advertising programs and IT projects as well as other general operating lapses.

Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
2013-14
1,740 1,629 (111)

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

CIC benefited from Passport integration through knowledge transfer on files such as the Common Human Resources Business Processes and preparations for the staffing processes audit. Efficiencies resulted from unification of contracting policies and tools and integration of information management and technology functions, human resources and security. While absorbing new business and higher volumes, CIC maintained internal service levels and supported the workforce.

As outlined in Section I under the organizational priority Promoting Management Accountability and Excellence, CIC piloted and prepared for full roll-out of GCDOCS, a new Government of Canada (GoC) document and records management software; developed a comprehensive Information Technology Security Plan to ensure business continuity; aligned business processes to ensure compliance with Treasury Board Secretariat recordkeeping directives; and, supported the GoC Open Data Initiative by expanding access to the CIC Access to Information and Privacy online request application to six additional departments. Strategic procurement capacity was developed through assignment of dedicated resources to support ongoing tactical discussions on procurement. CIC also updated contracting guidelines and Proactive Disclosure reporting in order to synchronize Passport and CIC best practices.

As described in Section I, under the organizational priority Emphasizing People Management, the Common Human Resources Business Processes were implemented and pay accounts were transferred to Miramichi while the implementation of the Performance Management Program was undertaken. Key human resources concerns such as values and ethics, public service renewal and change management were addressed, and improved services were provided through centralization in areas such as payroll.

CIC continued to implement its Action Plan in response to the 2011 Public Service Employee Survey by taking targeted action to address employee concerns related to: leadership (improved communications and access to strategic information, leadership development); workforce (personal learning plans, employee networks, mentoring); workplace (better alignment of workload with resources, change management support, zero tolerance for reprisals against formal recourse); and harassment and discrimination (respectful workplace campaign, learning activities and tools). For the next survey, CIC will focus efforts on areas identified as having higher impacts.

CIC received the best Government of Canada Management Accountability Framework assessment scores in 2013–2014 and is consistently recognized as a leader in management practices. CIC continued to implement innovative integrated risk management tools, introduced a risk-based sustainable development triage tool; enhanced project investment management; and developed a risk-based review approach for its Compliance Management Framework.

Section III: Supplementary Information

Financial Statements Highlights

The transfer of responsibilities for Passport Canada from the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development to Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) and Employment and Social Development Canada affected the presentation of this year’s financial information. In addition, the International Experience Canada Program (IEC) and its respendable (vote-netted) revenue authority have been transferred from the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development to CIC.

The financial highlights presented within this report are intended to serve as a general overview of CIC’s Consolidated Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position and Consolidated Statement of Financial Position as presented in CIC’s unaudited financial statements. These are prepared in accordance with accrual accounting principles and, therefore, are different from the information published in the Public Accounts of Canada, which are prepared on appropriation-based reporting. The complete unaudited financial statements can be found on CIC’s Web site: www.cic.gc.ca/english/resources/publications/finance/statement2014.asp

Condensed Consolidated Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position

Citizenship and Immigration Canada
Condensed Consolidated Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position
(unaudited)
For the Year Ended March 31, 2014
(dollars)
  2013-14
Planned
Results
2013-14
Actual
2012-13
Actual
(restated)
Difference (2013-14 actual minus 2013-14 planned) Difference (2013-14 actual minus 2012-13 actual)
Total expenses 1,811,498,170 2,093,073,971 1,800,704,550 281,575,801 292,369,421
Total revenues 14,912 468,923,208 5,810 468,908,296 468,917,398
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 1,811,483,258 1,624,150,763 1,800,698,740 (187,332,495) (176,547,977)
Departmental net financial position 135,554,809 74,834,304 22,770,251 (60,720,505) 52,064,053

Total departmental expenses have increased by $292 million or 16%, from $1.8 billion in 2012–2013 to $2.1 billion in the current year. This increase is mostly due to the integration of the Passport program that became effective on July 2, 2013.

Similarly, total expenses for 2013–2014 are $282 million or 16% higher than the planned results reported in CIC’s 2013–2014 Future-Oriented Financial Statements. The variance is mainly attributable to the Passport program expenditures that were not accounted for in the planned results, as well as to the variance of salary and employee benefits expenses from migration control and Citizenship for Newcomers programs between the estimates used in the preparation of the Future-Oriented Financial Statements and the subsequent actual results.

Transfer payments comprise a significant portion of the Department’s expenses (46%, or $953 million) followed by employee costs, which include salaries and benefits (34%, or $701 million).

Most of the Department’s spending was under the Settlement and Integration of Newcomers program, comprising 47% or $973 million, of the Department’s expenses, of which $940 million are transfer payments.

The charts below outline CIC’s expenses by program and CIC’s net cost of operations before government spending and transfers:

Expenses by Program described below
Text version: Expenses by Program

The pie chart above shows a percentage breakdown of Expenses by Program. The table below provides the percentages as indicated in the pie chart.

Expenses by Program Percentage
Settlement and Integration of Newcomers 47%
Passport Canada 12%
Migration Control and Security Management 9%
Permanent Economic Residents 4%
Family and Discretionary Immigration 4%
Citizenship for Newcomers and All Canadians 4%
Internal Services 12%
OtherNote G 8%


Net Cost of Operations Before Government Spending and Transfers ($ millions) described below
Text version: Net Cost of Operations Before Government Spending and Transfers ($ millions)

The chart above shows a breakdown of Net Cost of Operations Before Government Spending and Transfers ($millions). The table below provides the numbers as indicated in the chart.

Net Cost of Operations Before Government Spending and Transfers ($ millions)
Planned 2013-2014 1,811
Actual 2013-2014 1,624
Actual 2012-2013 (restated) 1,801

Departmental revenues earned on behalf of government were $497 million in 2013–2014 and represent 51% of the Department’s revenues. Revenues earned on behalf of government increased by 12%, or $52 million, compared with the previous year’s revenues. Most revenues are for immigration service fees, which accounted for 38%, or $371 million, of the total revenues.

For respendable revenues, there is a $459 million variance between the 2013–2014 planned results and the actual revenues, which is mostly derived from the transfer of Passport Canada and the IEC Program and which generated $469 million in respendable revenues.

The charts below outline all CIC’s revenues by type:

Revenues by Type described below
Text version: Revenues by Type

The pie chart above shows a percentage breakdown of Revenues by Type. The table below provides the percentages as indicated in the pie chart.

Revenues by Type Percentage
Passport respendable revenues 47%
Immigration service fees 38%
Right of permanent residence 9%
Citizenship service fees 3%
IEC respendable revenues 1%
Other revenuesNote H 2%

Table note

Revenues including respendable revenues ($ millions) described below
Text version: Revenues including respendable revenues ($ millions)

The chart above shows a breakdown of Revenues including respendable revenues ($ millions). The table below provides the numbers as indicated in the chart.

Revenues including respendable revenues $ millions
Planned 2013-2014 507
Actuals 2013-2014 966
Actual 2012-13 (restated) 446

Condensed Consolidated Statement of Financial Position

Citizenship and Immigration Canada
Condensed Consolidated Statement of Financial Position
(unaudited)
As at March 31, 2014
(dollars)
  2013-14 2012-13 (restated) Difference
(2013-14 minus 2012-13)
Total net liabilities 422,802,167 489,365,745 (66,563,578)
Total net financial assets 322,758,011 361,934,865 (39,176,854)
Departmental net debt 100,044,156 127,430,880 (27,386,724)
Total non-financial assets 174,878,460 150,201,131 24,677,329
Departmental net financial position 74,834,304 22,770,251 52,064,053

The total net liabilities decrease of $67 million is mostly due to a decrease of $64 million in immigration investor program (IIP) liabilities. This is mainly due to the progressive return to investors of $113 million refunded to CIC by the Northwest Territories after retracting from the IIP in 2012.

Total net financial assets have decreased by $39 million due to a decrease of $99 million in the amount due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund (CRF) and an increase of $58 million in accounts receivable and advances. This variance is mainly attributable to a decrease in accrued liabilities; a decrease in the liability for the IIP; and, the increase of Receivable at Year End from Other Government Departments due to the integration of Passport Canada.

Overall, the Department’s net financial position increased by $52 million due to an increase in non-financial assets, such as prepaid expenses, consumable inventory, inventory held for resale and capital assets, and a decrease in departmental net debt.

The charts below outline CIC’s net liabilities and net financial assets:

Total Net Liabilities described below
Text version: Total Net Liabilities

The pie chart above shows a percentage breakdown of Total Net Liabilities. The table below provides the percentages as indicated in the pie chart.

Total Net Liabilities Percentage
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities 63%
Immigrant Investor Program 26%
Vacation pay and compensatory leave 5%
Employee future benefits 6%
Total Net Financial Assets described below
Text version: Total Net Financial Assets

The pie chart above shows a percentage breakdown of Total Net Financial Assets. The table below provides the percentages as indicated in the pie chart.

Total Net Financial Assets Percentage
Due from Consolidated Revenue Fund  63%
Accounts receivable and advances 23%
Loans receivable  11%
Inventory held for resale 3%

Supplementary Information Tables

The supplementary information tables listed in this report can be found on the CIC Web site.

  • Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy;
  • Details on Transfer Payment Programs;
  • Internal Audits and Evaluations;
  • Response to Parliamentary Committees and External Audits;
  • Sources of Respendable and Non-Respendable Revenue;
  • Status Report on Transformational and Major Crown Projects;
  • Status Report on Projects Operating With Specific Treasury Board Approval;
  • Up-Front Multi-Year Funding; and
  • User Fees Reporting.

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication. The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication are the sole responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Section IV: Organizational Contact Information

For any additional information on this report or other parliamentary reports, please contact ParliamentaryReports-RapportsParlementaires@cic.gc.ca.

Appendix: Definitions

Appropriation:
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
Budgetary expenditures:
Include operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Departmental Performance Report:
Reports on an appropriated organization’s actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Reports on Plans and Priorities. These reports are tabled in Parliament in the fall.
Full-time equivalent:
Is a measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
Government of Canada outcomes:
A set of 16 high-level objectives defined for the government as a whole, grouped in four spending areas: economic affairs, social affairs, international affairs and government affairs.
Management, Resources and Results Structure:
A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization’s inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.
Non-budgetary expenditures:
Include net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
Performance:
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve and how well lessons learned have been identified.
Performance indicator:
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
Performance reporting:
The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
Planned spending:

For Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) and Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs), planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their RPPs and DPRs.

Plans:
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
Priorities:
Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).
Program:
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.
Results:
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.
Program Alignment Architecture:
A structured inventory of an organization’s programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.
Report on Plans and Priorities:
Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated organizations over a three-year period. These reports are tabled in Parliament each spring.
Strategic Outcome:
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.
Sunset program:
A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.
Target:
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
Whole-of-government framework:
Maps the financial contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations by aligning their Programs to a set of 16 government-wide, high-level outcome areas, grouped under four spending areas.
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