Appendix 4 – Strength and quality of evidence summary: Canadian recommendations for the prevention and treatment of malaria

An Advisory Committee Statement (ACS) from the
Committee to Advise on Tropical Medicine and Travel (CATMAT)

Preamble

The Committee to Advise on Tropical Medicine and Travel (CATMAT) provides the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) with ongoing and timely medical, scientific, and public health advice relating to tropical infectious disease and health risks associated with international travel. PHAC acknowledges that the advice and recommendations set out in this statement are based upon the best current available scientific knowledge and medical practices, and is disseminating this document for information purposes to both travellers and the medical community caring for travellers.

Persons administering or using drugs, vaccines, or other products should also be aware of the contents of the product monograph(s) or other similarly approved standards or instructions for use. Recommendations for use and other information set out herein may differ from that set out in the product monograph(s) or other similarly approved standards or instructions for use by the licensed manufacturer(s). Manufacturers have sought approval and provided evidence as to the safety and efficacy of their products only when used in accordance with the product monographs or other similarly approved standards or instructions for use.

Appendix IV: Strength and quality of evidence summary

Strength and quality of evidence summary table:

Categories for the strength of each recommendation
Category Definition
A Good evidence to support a recommendation for use
B Moderate evidence to support a recommendation for use
C Poor evidence to support a recommendation for or against use
D Moderate evidence to support a recommendation against use
E Good evidence to support a recommendation against use
 
Categories for the quality of evidence on which recommendations are made
Category Definition
Source: Committee to Advise on Tropical Medicine and Travel. Evidence-based medicine. CCDR 1994;20:145–47.
I Evidence from at least one properly randomized, controlled trial
II Evidence from at least one well-designed clinical trial without randomization; from cohort or case-controlled analytic studies, preferably from more than one centre; from multiple time series; or from dramatic results in uncontrolled experiments
III Evidence from opinions or respected authorities on the basis of clinical experience, descriptive studies, or reports of expert committees
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