Investment overview for Preventing Gender-Based Violence: the Health Perspective

Gender-based violence can have serious impacts on both physical and mental health. As part of It's Time: Canada's Strategy to Prevent and Address Gender-Based Violence, the Public Health Agency of Canada provides funding for projects that prevent gender-based violence, and its impacts, from a health perspective.

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About the project streams

The Preventing Gender-Based Violence: the Health Perspective investments support the following 3 streams of projects.

Promoting healthy relationships and preventing dating violence among teens/youth

Projects funded through this stream are developing, implementing and testing programs that teach young people about consent, respect and healthy relationships. These programs aim to change knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviour to prevent violence and abuse. They incorporate research to learn and share "what works" to promote healthy youth relationships.

Preventing child maltreatment through parenting support programs

Projects funded through this stream help build the evidence base of "what works" to support positive parenting, promote strong family attachments, and teach alternatives to harsh discipline. Programs that foster healthy parent-child relationships can help prevent child maltreatment and lay a foundation for healthy relationships throughout life.

Equipping providers to recognize and respond safely to Gender-Based Violence

Projects funded through this stream help equip health professionals and other service providers with training, resources and support to recognize, prevent and respond safely to gender-based violence, applying trauma- and violence-informed approaches.

Promoting healthy relationships and preventing dating violence among teens/youth

HRY: Making the Case for Youth Facilitated Dating Violence Prevention Programs

The Antigonish Women's Resource Centre and Sexual Assault Services Association is delivering and rigorously evaluating a peer-facilitated school-based violence prevention program called Healthy Relationships for Youth (HRY).

The program will provide Grade 9 students in 4 regions in Nova Scotia with skills to help them build and maintain healthy relationships. These students are primarily from rural-based communities, including Mi'Kmaq and African Nova Scotian communities, and newcomers to Canada. Evaluation will allow providers to make improvements to the program, and, if effective, to promote and disseminate it widely.

The Public Health Agency of Canada is contributing $999,984 over 5 years to support this project.

Healthy Connections: Preventing Gender-Based Violence through Youth Healthy Relationships

Boost Child and Youth Advocacy Centre will deliver and evaluate the Youth Healthy Relationships program in Toronto schools.

The program will teach young people the skills to build positive, healthy relationships; recognize unhealthy relationships; and prevent abuse and violence in dating relationships. The curriculum will be delivered through the Toronto District School Board and the Toronto District Catholic School Board.

The Public Health Agency of Canada is contributing $792,745 over 4 years to support this project.

Preventing Teen Dating Violence: Engaging BGC Youth in Building Safe and Healthy Relationships

Boys and Girls Clubs of Canada will lead a national project to develop, deliver and test a community-based dating violence prevention program for youth in grades 7 to 9, addressing an important gap in knowledge and evidence about effective dating violence prevention programs in community settings.

Boys and Girls Clubs are located in vulnerable communities, serving youth who face multiple risk factors for dating violence perpetration and victimization, and equipped to have a significant influence on youth experiences with violence.

The Public Health Agency of Canada is contributing $574,563 over 4 years to support this project.

Preventing Youth Dating Violence: Building Capacity for Comprehensive Sexuality Education in Canada

The Canadian Public Health Association (CPHA), in collaboration with the Centre for Sexuality, will adapt, deliver and evaluate an existing comprehensive sexuality education curriculum that has shown promise for preventing youth dating violence in a school and a community setting in 6 locations across Canada.

The project will reach youth of all genders within schools (grades 7 to 12 with an emphasis on Grade 9 students) as well as youth accessing community-based programs (youth between the ages of 12 to 19). The project will increase youth's understandings of issues related to healthy relationships, gender equity, and consent. It will also contribute to the development of the skills they need for healthy sexual and social relationships that are free of violence.

The Public Health Agency of Canada is contributing $999,118 over 5 years to support this project.

Building Solutions for Safety: Bridging the Knowledge and Expertise of Teens/Youth and Service Providers to Prevent Dating Violence among LGBTQI2S Youth

Egale Canada will use an innovative "hackathon" approach to design a dating violence prevention program for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, questioning, intersex, and two-spirit (LGBTQI2S) youth.

The project will match social service providers, researchers and LGBTQI2S youth in 5 teams to participate in a 2-day hackathon in Toronto in winter 2020. The teams will be challenged to design a program founded on evidence and geared towards the needs and realities of LGBTQI2S youth. The results of the hackathon will inform the development of the program, which will be tested in 5 communities across Ontario and also increase knowledge sharing.

The Public Health Agency of Canada is contributing $619,293 over 5 years to support this project.

"UMatter" Stop Youth Dating Violence Project

This project will integrate curricula designed to prevent teen and youth dating violence into existing programming delivered by Ka Ni Kanichihk (Cree for "those who lead"). The Winnipeg-based, Indigenous-led organization aims to tailor dating violence prevention programs to include historical and cultural context and healthy relationship dynamics. Three unique programs will be developed for children aged 9 to 12, youth aged 13 to 17, and young adults aged 18 to 24.

The project will also work with First Nation communities and reach out to Indigenous Manitoba populations through urban peer and rural community capacity building training.

The Public Health Agency of Canada is contributing $1 million over 5 years to support this project.

Tsʼídāne a ̄́ʼ nezen?: Youth for Dignity in Relationships

Liard Aboriginal Women's Society (LAWS) aims to address gender-based and relationship violence among youth in Watson Lake, Yukon. Watson Lake is an isolated First Nations community that has experienced high rates of family and youth violence.

The project will support students from grades 8 to 12 at Watson Lake Secondary School. The focus will be on increasing students' understanding and knowledge of the issues and causes of gender-based violence and unhealthy relationships. Youth will be involved throughout the development and delivery of the project, beginning with a youth advisory forum to inform the project's goals and objectives.

This project will also examine the impact that culturally relevant and youth-led programming can have on reducing gender-based and relationship violence, while increasing the connection youth have with Kaska culture.

The Public Health Agency of Canada is contributing $987,556 over 5 years to support this project.

Multicultural Youth and Safe Relationships

MOSAIC will develop, deliver, and test the effectiveness of a teen healthy relationships program for youth and parents or caregivers that will be tailored to immigrant, refugee, and racialized families in British Columbia.

In addition to consulting with communities, MOSAIC will draw from several evidence-based teen dating violence prevention programs to create a unique program that will be culturally relevant to this priority group. Program activities will include youth and caregiver workshops and family activity booklets that can be completed at home to promote intergenerational learning.

The Public Health Agency of Canada is contributing $956,584 over 5 years to support this project.

Building Relationships

Ndinawemaaganag Endaawaad Inc. (Ndinawe) will lead this community-driven and culturally adapted dating violence prevention program for Indigenous teens in Winnipeg, aged 12 to 17. The development, delivery and evaluation of the Building Relationships project involves a collaboration of 3 Winnipeg organizations: Ndinawe, Ma Mawi Wi Chi Itata Centre (Ma Mawi) and Research and Education for Solutions to Violence and Abuse (RESOLVE).

The design and implementation of this initiative will involve a design team composed of a Youth Advisory Council, Elders and staff from Ndinawe, Ma Mawi and RESOLVE.

The Public Health Agency of Canada is contributing $965,843 over 5 years to support this project.

Building Healthy Relationships: Preventing Teen Dating Violence through Skills-Based Education

Planned Parenthood Ottawa will design, implement and evaluate a series of classroom-based workshops for students in grades 8 and 9 to reduce teen dating violence among youth of all genders.

The project will include extensive youth engagement and will focus on increasing awareness and understanding of healthy relationships. The project will be supported by York University and implemented in partnership with the Ottawa Coalition to End Violence Against Women. The project will reach students, educators and caregivers throughout the Ottawa area.

The Public Health Agency of Canada is contributing $954,220 over 5 years to support this project.

Building, Growing, and Leveraging a Community of Practice to Address Teen/Youth Dating Violence in Canada

PREVNet (Promoting Relationships and Eliminating Violence Network) is a network of 130 leading Canadian research scientists and 62 national youth-serving organizations, which works to foster healthy relationships among children and youth.

Through this project, PREVNet will facilitate a community of practice to enhance collaboration and consolidate learning from across the various teen dating violence prevention projects that the Public Health Agency of Canada is funding as part of its Preventing Gender-Based Violence: the Health Perspective program. This community of practice will leverage expertise from a diverse group of stakeholders to maximize the overall impact of investments by the Public Health Agency of Canada to end gender-based violence.

The Public Health Agency of Canada is contributing $2,198,158 over 5 years to support this project.

PortraitX

Raison d'Art will develop, deliver, and evaluate the effectiveness of PortraitX, a school-based prevention program that integrates technology and art therapy tools to teach adolescents how to identify and prevent gender-based violence. PortraitX will be delivered at select schools in Montréal, Quebec, and Oakville, Ontario. Students will explore topics around gender-based violence through an online, interactive platform using arts-based approaches that will help build self-awareness, empathy and communications skills.

The project will reach youth from a range of backgrounds and communities, including racial and ethnic minorities, Indigenous peoples, and people with diverse gender and sexual identities.

The Public Health Agency of Canada is contributing $999,970 over 5 years to support this project.

Jeunes Leaders des Relations Saines

Réseau–Femmes Colombie–Britannique will develop, deliver, and test a school-based violence prevention program to address the needs of francophone youth (grades 9 to 12) living in minority linguistic settings in 4 francophone schools in British Columbia.

This project is particularly important as it will be developed where few violence prevention programs and resources are available in the youth's first language. The researchers are working towards better understanding the perspectives of youth and caregivers, and exploring ways they can be involved in the research process.

The Public Health Agency of Canada is contributing $998,388 over 5 years to support this project.

Be the Program

The Students Commission of Canada will develop a youth dating violence intervention that will be designed, delivered and evaluated by youth, for youth, in 15 communities across the country.

The project will help young Canadians identify the influence of social, cultural and environmental factors on dating violence and gender inequality. Participants will examine issues such as social norms, toxic masculinity, and the influence of media, online content, and family and school settings on attitudes.

The Public Health Agency of Canada is contributing $999,161 over 5 years to support this project.

Youth Violence Prevention in Thunder Bay and District

The Thunder Bay District Health Unit will adapt, deliver and evaluate the Fourth R, an evidence-informed, curriculum-based, classroom intervention for grades 7 to 9 that uses a healthy relationships approach to the social and emotional development of youth.

This project will bring together stakeholders in the District of Thunder Bay, Ontario, to adapt and evaluate key Fourth R materials for students in a Northern context, and invest in building the capacity of local teachers and health promoters to recognize, prevent, and respond to teen dating violence.

The Public Health Agency of Canada is contributing $995,111 over 5 years to support this project.

Promoting Positive Youth Relationships (+PYRP Program)

The Université du Québec à Montréal will develop, implement and evaluate a multi-component violence prevention program targeting students in grades 9 and 10, peer supporters, school staff and parents/caregivers. The program aims to prevent teen dating violence and promote healthy relationships among youth.

The school-based workshops will be implemented in English and French and evaluated in urban and rural settings in the Province of Quebec. In addition to a peer-led program, training and tools will be provided to equip school staff and parents/caregivers to safely and effectively address and respond to teen dating violence.

The Public Health Agency of Canada is contributing $1,221,088 over 4 years to support this project.

Fostering Healthy Relationships among LGBTQ2+ Youth in British Columbia

Through a collaboration between the Stigma and Resilience Among Vulnerable Youth Centre and the McCreary Centre Society, the University of British Columbia will develop, implement, and evaluate a healthy relationship program for sexual and gender minority youth throughout British Columbia.

The program will be co-developed with LGBTQ2+ youth for LGBTQ2+ youth and will consist of five 20-minute modules that are based on the Information-Motivation-Behavioural Skills model of health behaviour change. These modules will be designed to be delivered during secondary school lunch periods, when most Gender Sexuality Alliance Clubs meet. Modules may also be bundled together for delivery as part of after-school or community programming.

The Public Health Agency of Canada is contributing $999,980 over 5 years to support this project.

Preventing TDV through Gender-Based Healthy Relationships Promotion - The WiseGuyz Program

The University of Calgary will deliver and evaluate WiseGuyz, a community-facilitated, school-based, gender-transformative healthy relationships program for Grade 9 boys in Alberta. WiseGuyz aims to reduce male-perpetrated teen dating violence (TDV) by helping participants identify and deconstruct health-harming gender norms, and explore healthier, more inclusive ways of "being a guy."

WiseGuyz is currently the only evidence-informed program designed in Canada that specifically addresses boys and healthier masculinities as a dating violence prevention strategy. This project will help build a more rigorous evidence base and, if results are positive, will position the program to be scaled up, delivered more widely, and adapted for a variety of settings.

The Public Health Agency of Canada is contributing $1,254,484 over 5 years to support this project.

"Girl, you got this!" Adapting an Evidence-based Program to Help Teen Girls Effectively Resist Sexual Dating Violence

The University of Windsor will adapt, deliver, enhance, and test the Enhanced Assess, Acknowledge, Act Sexual Assault Resistance program (also known as Flip the Script) to reach girls aged 14-17 in Ontario.

This program is an evidence-based sexual violence resistance intervention currently implemented in several universities to help young women effectively resist sexual coercion and assault while reducing self-blame. The adapted intervention will help girls identify risk for sexual assault and address emotional and cognitive processes related to sexual victimization, help them to develop confidence and skills to verbally and physically fight back, and identify their own sexual and relationship values and boundaries.

The Public Health Agency of Canada is contributing $991,017 over 5 years to support this project.

Project Respect - Preventing Dating Violence by SHIFTing Culture

Victoria Sexual Assault Centre (VSAC) will deliver and evaluate SHIFT, which is a program that aims to prevent gender-based teen dating violence by creating shifts toward consent culture within and across school communities. The program explores the factors that contribute to gender-based violence and teaches youth how to identify and communicate sexual boundaries, the importance of asking for consent, and why challenging gender stereotypes is crucial for creating positive and equal relationships.

The program will also include youth leadership and social action training and the delivery of workshops to school staff to create safer, more inclusive school communities. SHIFT will be delivered in 7 schools in Victoria, British Columbia. In addition, VSAC will work in partnership with the W̱SÁNEĆ Leadership Secondary School and the ŁÁU, WELNEW Tribal School to deliver culturally relevant programming through workshops and youth leadership training.

The Public Health Agency of Canada is contributing $1 million over 5 years to support this project.

A Healthy Relationships Approach to Violence Prevention and Mental Health Promotion with Vulnerable Youth

The University of Western Ontario will adapt, deliver and evaluate Healthy Relationships Plus (HRP), an evidence-informed, small group program that promotes skills and protective factors required to prevent teen/youth dating violence (TDV). This project will develop and evaluate 4 unique adaptations of the HRP program for under-served populations: high-risk youth involved with children's mental health services, child protection services or youth justice; LGBTQ2+ youth; Indigenous youth; and newcomer youth.

The project will also provide training and mentoring for educators and other health and allied professionals to implement the HRP programs that best fit the needs of youth in their setting. This project will reach youth and providers in Ontario, Alberta and the Northwest Territories.

The Public Health Agency of Canada is contributing $5,138,842 over 5 years to support this project.

Dating Safe - A Dating Violence Prevention Program

YWCA Vancouver will develop, deliver, and evaluate the effectiveness of a school-based program to provide youth with knowledge and skills for healthy relationships that are free from violence and abuse. Dating Safe will be delivered during school hours as part of the new provincial physical health education curriculum, and will be open to all students, regardless of their previous experience with dating violence, sexual orientation, or background.

The program will be delivered in schools in the Vancouver School Board and the Surrey School District, where student populations are ethnically and culturally diverse and students identify with a range of sexual orientations and identities (such as LGBTQ2+, refugees, newcomers, and Indigenous teens/youth).

The Public Health Agency of Canada is contributing $992,309 over 5 years to support this project.

Preventing child maltreatment through parenting support programs

Promoting Healthy Families: A Canadian Evaluation of Triple P

McMaster University will lead a national project addressing the gaps in availability of evidence about the effectiveness of 2 interventions to contribute to the development of healthy family relationships and the prevention of child maltreatment.

Triple P (Positive Parenting Program) is a multilevel, public health intervention designed to reduce behavioural and emotional problems in children, and improve parenting practices by increasing parents' levels of knowledge, skills, and confidence.

Baby Triple P is an adapted version of the Triple P delivered postnatally (throughout the first 12 months), designed to promote healthy infant development, reduce family risk factors for child maltreatment, and improve parental mental health.

The Public Health Agency of Canada is contributing $3,447,049 over 5 years to support this project.

Equipping providers to recognize and respond safely to gender-based violence

Being Trauma Aware Phase 2

The Calgary and Area Child Advocacy Centre will build on the first phase of its Being Trauma Aware (BTA) initiative. BTA is an online, trauma-informed program that aims to improve understanding of the physical and mental health effects of child maltreatment by equipping front-line service providers so that they can deliver safe and appropriate care to survivors of trauma and abuse.

Created in 2016 with funding from the Public Health Agency of Canada, the program was piloted with more than 400 participants in Alberta. This project will enhance and expand BTA for access by a network of child advocacy centres, their partners, and community stakeholders across the country to provide resources and increase knowledge on trauma and child abuse.

The Public Health Agency of Canada is contributing $866,682 over 5 years to support this project.

Building the Field of Teen Healthy Relationships

Through this project, the Canadian Women's Foundation aims to enhance communication and collaboration amongst health professionals, researchers, policy makers, youth serving agencies, funders, Indigenous communities, and youth working to prevent and address teen and youth dating violence.

This will be achieved through the creation of a First Nations, Métis and Inuit Working Group and a network of regional hubs, as well as the development of a youth engagement strategy. Throughout the project, the Foundation expects to engage directly with 50 diverse organizations. By leveraging the working group and regional hub partners, they will expand the reach of the project to 750 organizations across the country.

The Public Health Agency of Canada is contributing $999,800 over 5 years to support this project.

Preventing and Addressing Gender-Based Violence in Sport

Coaches are in a unique position to change parts of sport culture that may contribute to unhealthy relationship behaviour. Through this project, the Coaching Association of Canada will develop, implement and evaluate an intervention, available in English and French, to assist coaches in recognizing, preventing and addressing gender-based violence and teen dating violence, and promoting healthy relationships in and through sport.

Online educational resources and a toolkit for coaches will support approximately 6,000 coaches across Canada to address issues such as bystander empowerment, men and boys as allies in the prevention of violence, and locker room gender-based violence. The resources and tools will also be shared with Canada's 82 National Sport and Multisport Service Organizations to complement efforts to address abuse, harassment and discrimination in sport.

The Public Health Agency of Canada is contributing $935,576 over 5 years to support this project.

Understanding Gender-Based Violence in LGBTQ2S Communities: A Model of Responsible Engagement for Health and Social Service Providers

OUTSaskatoon Inc. will lead a project that seeks to improve the quality of care for LGBTQ2S people in Saskatchewan and throughout the Prairies by training and mentoring educators and health and social service providers on how to recognize, prevent, and respond safely to gender-based violence as it impacts LGBTQ2S people of all ages and backgrounds.

The Public Health Agency of Canada is contributing $567,112 over 5 years to support this project.

Supporting Educators' Capacity to Prevent Dating Violence and Promote Healthy Relationships through a Gender-Based Lens

PREVNet (the Promoting Relationships and Eliminating Violence Network), at Queen's University, will develop and test 4 models through which educators can deliver a healthy relationship curriculum to youth. Educator training will take place in diverse settings across Canada. Providing new tools to educators to increase their capacity to deliver this type of programming is an important step forward in helping to prevent dating violence among youth.

The Public Health Agency of Canada is contributing $550,000 over 3 years to support this project.

Violence in Intimate and Loving Relationships among LGBTQ2+ Populations: Document the Phenomenon to Better Equip and Train Health and Social Service Professionals

Université Laval will conduct in-depth interviews with LGBTQ2+ victims of intimate partner violence to document their needs and experiences. Through collaborations with researchers, partners offering services to the LGBTQ2+ community, as well as other collaborators, these documented experiences will support the development of interventions to prevent violence and support victims.

This work will include tailored resources and training to equip health and social service professionals in Quebec to better support and meet the needs of the LGBTQ2+ community. Areas of focus will include violence prevention, how to recognize intimate partner violence, and strategies to enhance safety.

The Public Health Agency of Canada is contributing $605,995 over 4 years to support this project.

Building Competencies, Building Capacity: LGBTQ2+ Focussed Trauma-Informed Care

The University of Toronto will develop, deliver, and evaluate the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary outcomes of an intervention designed to increase LGBTQ2+ competency among providers delivering services to address violence and/or trauma across the Province of Ontario. If successful, the resulting intervention could then be scaled up nationally and investigated for potential delivery via other means (e.g., video conference, webinar).

The Public Health Agency of Canada is contributing $241,766 over 2 years to support this project.

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