Canada Revenue Agency Quarterly Financial Report
For the quarter ended September 30, 2020

Statement outlining results, risks and significant changes in operations, personnel and program

Introduction

This quarterly financial report has been prepared by management as required by section 65.1 of the Financial Administration Act in the form and manner prescribed by the Treasury Board. This report should be read in conjunction with the Main Estimates.

Further details on the Canada Revenue Agency’s (CRA) program activities can be found in the Departmental Plan and Main Estimates.

Basis of presentation

This quarterly report has been prepared by management using an expenditure basis of accounting. The accompanying Statement of Authorities includes the CRA's spending authorities granted by Parliament and those used by the CRA consistent with the Main Estimates for the 2020-2021 fiscal year. This quarterly report has been prepared using a special purpose financial reporting framework designed to meet financial information needs with respect to the use of spending authorities.

The authority of Parliament is required before moneys can be spent by the Government. Approvals are given in the form of annually approved limits through appropriation acts or through legislation of statutory spending authority for specific purposes.

The CRA uses the full accrual method of accounting to prepare and present its annual departmental financial statements that are part of the departmental performance reporting process. However, the spending authorities voted by Parliament remain on an expenditure basis.

This quarterly report has not been subject to an external audit or review.

Highlights of fiscal quarter and fiscal year-to-date results

Impact of the pandemic on authorities available for use

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and limited sessions in the spring for Parliament to study supply, the Standing Orders of the House of Commons were amended to extend the study period into the fall. As a result, the CRA’s 2020-2021 quarter 2 authorities reflect interim supply of the Main Estimates, which includes 9/12 (approximately 75%) of Vote 1 and Vote 5, 100% of authorities available for use from the prior fiscal year, and 100% of statutory authorities. This corresponds to a decrease of $886 million in authorities available for use. The Treasury Board Secretariat is working to provide full supply (100%) to departments for the 2020-2021 Main Estimates in December 2020.

Although the duration and full impact of the COVID-19 outbreak is unknown at this time, the CRA continues to be well positioned to respond to this evolving situation. The CRA moved from operating under a critical services mode to a phased transition to full business resumption on June 26, 2020. As of fall 2020, the CRA has resumed some compliance activities while still ensuring that employees and taxpayers are at the centre of decisions, as part of the CRA’s “People-first” philosophy. The CRA’s business resumption is based on the following principles: Health and Safety; Fair Treatment of Clients; Service as a Priority; and Communication and Transparency. Business resumption is being closely monitored, including the monitoring of client service pressures and emerging compliance risks.

Analysis of authorities

This report reflects the results for the current fiscal year in relation to the Main Estimates for which interim supply was released on March 13, 2020 and authorities available for use from the prior fiscal year.

The CRA’s total Budgetary Authorities available for use have increased by $2,664 million, or 57%, from $4,677 million in 2019-2020 to $7,341 million in 2020-2021.

As noted above, the CRA has not received full supply of its Main Estimates. If full supply had been released, the CRA’s total Budgetary Authorities would be $8,227 million, an increase of $3,550 million. The impacts of the limited supply are primarily seen in the Vote 1 Gross Operating Expenditures Authority.

The components of the Vote 1 Gross Operating Expenditures Authority, Vote 5 Capital Expenditures Authority, and Budgetary Statutory Authorities are outlined below.

The Vote 1 Gross Operating Expenditures Authority decreased by $832 million, from $4,008 million in 2019-2020 to $3,176 million in 2020-2021. If full supply had been released the Vote 1 Gross Operating Expenditures Authority in 2020-2021 would be $4,142 million, an increase of $134 million from 2019-2020.

This increase in authorities, assuming full supply had been released, is mainly due to:

In 2020-2021, the CRA expects to spend $391 million to fulfill its administrative responsibilities in support of the CPP and EI programs, compared to $364 million in 2019-2020, an increase of $27 million. The increase in Vote 1 Gross Operating Expenditure Authority is offset by an equivalent increase in revenues recovered from the CPP and EI Accounts. Due to interim supply, the CRA currently has authorities of $293 million for the program, a decrease of  $71 million, until full supply is released.

The Vote 5 Capital Expenditures Authority increased by $8 million, from $57 million in 2019-2020 to $65 million in 2020-2021. If full supply had been released the Vote 5 Capital Expenditures Authority in 2020-2021 would be $74 million, an increase of $17 million from 2019-2020. This increase in authorities, assuming full supply had been released, is mainly due to:

Total Budgetary Statutory Authorities increased by $3,417 million, from $975 million in 2019-2020 to $4,392 million in 2020-2021. The CRA has received full supply of its Budgetary Statutory Authorities. The increase in authorities is attributable to:

Analysis of expenditures

A two-year comparison of the CRA's annual net authorities available for use against year-to-date and second quarter net expenditures as at September 30 is presented in Figure 1. Certain components of the quarterly year-over-year expenditure variances are attributable to timing differences in invoices and payments, which will be resolved by the end of the fiscal year, as well as to the status of major project investments.

Figure 1: Annual Authorities against Year-to-Date Expenditures and Second Quarter Expenditures

This graphic provides a two-year comparison of the Agency’s annual authorities available for use as of September 30 against year-to-date and second quarter expenditures for 2020-2021 and 2019-2020. In 2020-2021, the Agency’s annual authorities available for use were $7,341M, while year-to-date and second quarter expenditures were $4,969M and $1,418M. In comparison, 2019-2020 annual authorities available for use were $4,667M, while year-to-date and second quarter expenditures were $2,231M and $1,111M. This graphic also shows the portion of authorities and expenditures related to Climate Action Incentive (CAI) payments. In 2020-21, $3,405M of the annual authorities, and $2,656M year-to-date expenditures and $270M second quarter expenditures were related to CAI payments. In comparison, there were no CAI payments in 2019-2020.

Figure 1: Annual Authorities against Year-to-Date Expenditures and Second Quarter Expenditures
  2020-2021 1 2019-2020 2, 3
Table 1 Notes
Table 1 Note 1

The 2020-2021 authorities represent interim supply, which includes 9/12 of Vote 1 (including CPP/EI) and Vote 5 and 100% of statutory authorities. The majority of the increase in authorities from 2019-2020 to 2020-2021 is attributable to new CAI payments.

Return to table 1 note 1 referrer

Table 1 Note 2

The 2019-2020 authorities represent full supply and exclude CAI payments.

Return to table 1 note 2 referrer

Table 1 Note 3

The 2019-2020 expenditures exclude CAI payments.

Return to table 1 note 3 referrer

Authorities - Excluding CAI 3,936.0 4,677.0
Authorities - Climate Action Incentive Payments (CAI) 3,405.0 -
Expenditures - Excluding CAI 2,313.0 2,231.0
Expenditures - Climate Action Incentive Payments (CAI) 2,656.0 -
Second Quarter Expenditures - Excluding CAI 1,148.0 1,111.0
Second Quarter Expenditures - Climate Action Incentive Payments (CAI) 270.0 -

A) Expended in the second quarter by authority

The CRA’s second quarter expenditures have increased by $307 million, or 28%, from $1,111 million in 2019-2020 to $1,418 million in 2020-2021. The components of this year-over-year change are presented below.

Second quarter Net Vote 1 Operating Expenditures have decreased by $60 million, or 7%, from $849 million in 2019-2020 to $789 million in 2020-2021. This change is primarily due to a $51 million net decrease in gross operating expenditures related to increased expenditures for COVID-19 activities that have been recovered from Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) and are recorded under the Budgetary Statutory Authorities as spending of revenues. The remaining variance is due to a $9 million increase in revenues netted against expenditures, in support of the CPP and EI program.

Second quarter Vote 5 Capital Expenditures have increased by $2 million, from $15 million in 2019-2020 to $17 million in 2020-2021, an increase of 12%. This increase is tied to expenditures for development work and the acquisition of capital goods to support the COVID-19 Economic Response Plan.

Second quarter Budgetary Statutory Authorities have increased by $365 million, from $247 million in 2019-2020 to $612 million in 2020-2021. Almost the entire increase, $270 million, is attributable to the new payment for the CAI. The spending of revenues has also increased by $92 million, as a result of the CRA’s response to COVID-19. The remaining $3 million variance is the result of an increase in payments under the Children’s Special Allowances Act.

B) Expended in the second quarter by standard object

Second quarter personnel expenditures have increased by $35 million, or 4%, from $887 million in 2019-2020 to $922 million in 2020-2021. The increase is a result of the settlement of the PIPSC-AFS collective agreement, which has increased salary expenditures by approximately $15 million. Additionally, the extension of the tax filing season, new benefit programs, and overtime as part of the response to COVID-19 have increased expenditures by $1 million.

The majority of the remaining increase results from the implementation and administration of measures that pertain to compliance, cracking down on tax evasion, combatting tax avoidance, enhancing tax collections, improving client services, and the federal carbon pollution pricing system announced in previous federal budgets.

Second quarter transportation and communications expenditures have decreased by $7 million, or 24%, from $28 million in 2019-2020 to $21 million in 2020-2021. This is due to a decrease in travel expenditures, primarily related to the CRA’s compliance and collection activities, which is a direct result of COVID-19’s impact on the CRA’s operations.

Second quarter information expenditures have decreased by $1 million, or 23%, from $4 million in 2019-2020 to $3 million in 2020-2021. The decrease in expenditures is related to a decrease in communications professional, online database, and printing services.

Second quarter professional and special services expenditures have increased by $16 million, or 15%, from $103 million in 2019-2020 to $119 million in 2020-2021. The variance is partially attributable to increased IT services from Shared Services Canada (SSC) of $9 million, and a $3 million increase in legal services expenditures, primarily Department of Justice services. Fluctuations throughout the year are normal for these two items and any timing differences will be resolved by year-end. Expenditures for IT consultants have also increased by $4 million, a result of the impact of COVID-19 on the CRA’s operations.

Second quarter rentals expenditures have increased by $20 million, or 35%, from $56 million in 2019-2020 to $76 million in 2020-2021. Whereas second quarter purchased repair and maintenance expenditures have decreased by $18 million, or 88%, from $20 million in 2019-2020 to $2 million in 2020-2021. The variances for these two standard objects, are related to the accounting classification of expenditures for accommodation and real property services and any variances will be resolved by year-end.

Second quarter utilities, materials, and supplies expenditures have decreased by $1 million, or 34%, from $3 million in 2019-2020 to $2 million in 2020-2021. This decrease is primarily the result of a reduction to forms and publications expenditures and office supply purchases. This variance is a direct result of COVID-19’s impact on the CRA’s operations.

Second quarter transfer payments have increased by $273 million, from $88 million in 2019-2020 to $361 million in 2020-2021. Almost the entire increase, $270 million, is attributable to the new payment for the CAI. The remaining increase of $3 million is due to increased payments under the Children’s Special Allowances Act.

Second quarter other subsidies and payments have decreased by $1 million, or 94%, from $1 million in 2019-2020 to almost zero in 2020-2021. This decrease is due to a reduction in salary overpayments tied to the Phoenix pay system.

C) Year-to-date expenditures by authority

Year-to-date expenditures by authority have increased by $2,739 million, from $2,230 million in 2019-2020 to $4,969 million in 2020-2021. The components of this year-over-year increase are discussed below.

Year-to-date Net Vote 1 Operating Expenditures have decreased by $20 million, or 1%, from $1,742 million in 2019-2020 to $1,722 million in 2020-2021. As mentioned above, the decrease in gross operating expenditures is offset by an increase in spending of revenues, recovered from ESDC.

Year-to-date Vote 5 Capital Expenditures have increased by $4 million, or 20%, from $23 million in 2019-2020 to $27 million in 2020-2021. This increase is tied to expenditures for development work and the acquisition of capital goods to support the COVID-19 Economic Response Plan.

Year-to-date Total Budgetary Statutory Authorities have increased by $2,754 million, from $466 million in 2019-2020 to $3,220 million in 2020-2021. Almost the entire increase, $2,656 million, is attributable to the new payment for the CAI. Another $77 million of the increase is due to increased spending of revenues, and the remaining $21 million is due to increased payments under the Children’s Special Allowances Act.

D) Year-to-date expenditures by standard object

Year-to-date personnel expenditures have increased by $71 million, or 4%, from $1,791 million in 2019-2020 to $1,862 million in 2020-2021. The increase is partially the result of the settlement of the PIPSC-AFS collective agreement in 2019-2020, which has increased salary expenditures year-to-date by approximately $30 million.

An additional $11 million of the increase is a combination of incremental salary costs as a result of the tax filing season extension, new benefit programs, and overtime to support the COVID-19 Economic Response Plan. The majority of the remaining increase results from the implementation and administration of measures announced in previous federal budgets.

Year-to-date transportation and communications expenditures have decreased by $10 million, or 15%, from $64 million in 2019-2020 to $54 million in 2020-2021. This change can mainly be attributed to a $14 million decrease in travel expenditures, primarily related to the CRA’s compliance and collection activities. The decrease is offset by a $5 million increase in postage and communication expenditures. These variances are a direct result of the impact of COVID-19 on the CRA’s operations.

Year-to-date information expenditures have decreased by $2 million, from $7 million in 2019-2020 to $5 million in 2020-2021, due to decreased expenditures for online database, advertising, and communications professional services.

Year-to-date professional and special services expenditures have increased by $9 million, or 5%, from $187 million in 2019-2020 to $196 million in 2020-2021. The majority of the increase pertains to a $4 million increase in IT consultants, offset by a decrease in training costs of $3 million and a decrease in conference fees of $1 million. These variances are a direct result of the impact of COVID-19 on the CRA’s operations.

IT services from SSC have increased by $7 million, legal fees have increased by $3 million and lease management fees have decreased by $1 million. Fluctuations throughout the year are normal for these three items and any timing differences will be resolved by year-end.

Year-to-date rentals expenditures have increased by $20 million, or 15%, from $137 million in 2019-2020 to $157 million in 2020-2021. Whereas year-to-date purchased repair and maintenance expenditures have decreased by $19 million, or 87%, from $22 million in 2019-2020 to $3 million in 2020-2021. The variances for these two standard objects, are related to the accounting classification of expenditures for accommodation and real property services and any variances will be resolved by year-end.

Year-to-date utilities, materials, and supplies expenditures have decreased by $1 million, from $6 million in 2019-2020 to $5 million in 2020-2021. This decrease is primarily the result of a reduction to electronic data processing supplies and office supply purchases. This a direct result of COVID-19’s impact on the CRA’s operations.

Year-to-date acquisition of machinery and equipment expenditures increased by $11 million, from $16 million in 2019-2020 to $27 million in 2020-2021. This is a result of the purchase of office equipment, including computer equipment and office furniture, as the CRA has expanded remote working capabilities to support the COVID-19 Economic Response Plan.

Year-to-date transfer payments have increased by $2,678 million, from $175 million in 2019-2020 to $2,853 million in 2020-2021, as discussed earlier, the majority of the increase, $2,656 million can be attributed to the new payment for the CAI. The remaining variance can be explained by increased payments of $22 million under the Children’s Special Allowances Act.

Year-to-date other subsidies and payments decreased by $1 million, from $5 million in  2019-2020 to $4 million in 2020-2021, primarily related to salary overpayments.

Risks and uncertainties

Careful analysis and assessment of risks are an integral part of the CRA’s business as a tax and benefit administration. While employees and managers across most of the Agency’s business lines are engaged in managing risks on a daily basis, the CRA also dedicates significant effort to managing risk at the enterprise level. The CRA’s annual Corporate Risk Profile (CRP) is a key part of this process. It outlines the direction and decisions on the potential risks that could affect its ability to meet its strategic priorities and objectives. In light of the current pandemic, the CRA established more frequent dashboard reporting, designed to provide timely information on emerging issues, their potential impacts on existing CRP risks, and mitigation activities. Some of the top tier risks being closely monitored include employee health, well-being, and safety, service experience, public image, cybersecurity, protection of taxpayer information, and business continuity.

COVID-19

On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization confirmed COVID-19 as a pandemic. Due to the emergency measures enacted by the Government of Canada, the CRA was unable to operate at full capacity during the first quarter. To mitigate the risks to operations, the CRA prioritized critical services according to its National COVID-19 Business Continuity Plan (BCP), and more recently, began its phased transition to full business resumption as outlined in its National Business Resumption Plan (NBRP).

The BCP provides national direction for coordinated implementation at the local level and outlines the CRA's prioritization of services. Activating the Incident Management Committee (IMC) and invoking the BCP in the first few days of the pandemic helped ensure that the CRA could carry out priority activities in support of the economic well-being of Canadians, while safeguarding the health, safety and security of its employees. In the case of non-critical services, the CRA ensured there was no negative impact on taxpayers. The BCP is reviewed on a regular basis and incrementally adjusted to reflect an ever changing landscape, including the particular circumstances brought on by COVID-19.

The NBRP details the stages of the resumption of various program and corporate activities and operations that did not resume during the CRA’s critical services phase under the BCP. The NBRP is being reviewed on a regular basis to systematically resume services in a thoughtful and phased approach that takes into consideration both the health and safety of employees and the needs of Canadian taxpayers.

The financial impacts related to the CRA's contributions to the response and supporting the workforce are being monitored closely.

Service experience

As part of the Government of Canada’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic, a number of federal relief measures were put into place such as the Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB) and the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy (CEWS). The CRA was charged with the responsibility of promptly delivering these benefits to millions of Canadians. The service experience risk is closely being monitored to ensure the CRA continues to successfully deliver benefits, while simultaneously delivering its broader mandate of tax administration.

Cybersecurity

The cybersecurity risk was assessed as the CRA’s top enterprise risk in the 2020-2021 CRP. This risk has shown a consistent upward trend in risk exposure for the past five years. This is due to the increased prevalence and sophistication of cyber threats, as well as the emergence of new threats. The CRA continues to take action to ensure that its cyber security posture keeps pace with the changing environment.

Protection of taxpayer information

The protection of taxpayer information was also assessed as a top-tier risk in the 2020-2021 CRP. This risk results from the CRA's vast information holdings and associated linkages to cybersecurity, as well as the increasing number of external incidents occurring in the private sector, and to some extent, the public sector, of which some have lead to identity theft to access emergency relief measures. Over the past few years, the CRA has invested in several programs and initiatives to protect data under its responsibility, including taxpayer information, in order to manage this risk appropriately.

The CRA currently has a rigorous security program in place to guard against both external and internal threats and has recently implemented an additional funding envelope for smaller IT security sustainability initiatives. A Privacy Management Framework, which articulates the CRA’s vision, objective, and commitment to privacy, including how the CRA handles and protects personal information, has been recently developed and implemented.

Additionally, continued participation in international forums such as the International Public Sector Fraud Forum allows the CRA to learn about Five Eyes best practices and share potential mitigation strategies.

Significant changes in relation to operations, personnel, and programs

The COVID-19 pandemic and resulting emergency measures to combat the spread of the virus have had significant impacts on the CRA's operations. The CRA continues to contribute to the broader Government of Canada response, especially as it relates to assisting individuals and businesses in coping with the economic impacts of the pandemic.

Critical services were prioritized according to the BCP, leading to some non-critical programs and services being temporarily impacted. A large number of employees were reassigned to administer and respond to public enquiries related to the Government of Canada’s COVID-19 Economic Response Plan. The CRA has processed 22 million CERB applications on behalf of ESDC. The CRA has also processed over 1 million CEWS, 2 million Canada Recovery Benefit (CRB) and half a million Canada Recovery Caregiving Benefit (CRCB) and Canada Recovery Sickness Benefit (CRSB) applications, which will provide support to millions of Canadians.

In order to continue to deliver on these and other emergency measures, the CRA is seeking funding for the CERB, Canada Emergency Student Benefit, CEWS, CRB, CRCB, CRSB, Goods and Services Tax (GST) Credit top up administration, Canada Child Benefit top up administration, filing and payment due date deferral administration, call centres, Canada Emergency Rent Subsidy, and the 10% Temporary Wage Subsidy for Employers.

To ensure CRA programs and services continue to be delivered to Canadians, while keeping staff safe, the CRA has expanded remote working capabilities significantly.

A transition towards full business resumption began at the end of quarter 1 as outlined in the CRA’s NBRP, restoring all programs and services administered by the CRA. The CRA continues to work on setting the right conditions to resume the full operational capacity of the CRA in a timely and appropriate manner, while ensuring the health and safety of personnel.

Approval by Senior Officials

Approved by:

[original signed by]

________________________

Bob Hamilton, Commissioner 

[original signed by]

_____________________________

Janique Caron, Chief Financial Officer

Ottawa, Canada

Date: November 25, 2020

Statement of Authorities (unaudited) - Fiscal year 2020-2021
(in thousands of dollars)
  Total available for use for the year ending March 31, 2021table 2 note 1 Used during the quarter ended
September 30, 2020
Year to date used at quarter-end
Table 2 Notes
Table 2 Note 1

As of Quarter 2, the 2020-2021 authorities for Vote 1 and Vote 5 include 75% of Main Estimates (interim supply) and 100% of authorities available for use from the prior fiscal year. Statutory authorities reflect 100% of Main Estimates.

Return to table 2 note 1 referrer

Vote 1 - Operating expenditures      
Gross Operating expenditures 3,176,336 886,941 1,917,145
Revenues netted against expenditures (293,024) (97,739) (195,479)
Net Vote 1 - Operating expenditures 2,883,312 789,202 1,721,666
Vote 5 - Capital expenditures 65,370 17,058 27,206
Budgetary Statutory Authorities      
Contributions to employee benefit plans 451,936 112,984 225,968
Children's Special Allowance payments (Children's Special Allowances Act) 361,000 91,474 196,636
Climate Action Incentive payments 3,405,000 269,688 2,656,000
Spending of revenues received through the conduct of its operations pursuant to section 60 of the Canada Revenue Agency Act 174,160 137,767 141,230
Minister's salary and motor car allowance 89 22 45
Collection Agency Fees under section 17.1 of the Financial Administration Act - - -
Court awards - Supreme Court - - 3
Court awards - Tax Court of Canada - 39 408
Spending proceeds from the disposal of surplus Crown Assets - 21 21
Energy Cost Benefit - 1 (1)
Refunds of previous years revenue - - -
Total Budgetary Statutory Authorities 4,392,186 611,996 3,220,310
Total Budgetary Authorities 7,340,868 1,418,256 4,969,182
Statement of Authorities (unaudited) - Fiscal year 2019-2020
(in thousands of dollars)
  Total available for use for the year ending March 31, 2020table 3 note 1 Used during the quarter ended
September 30, 2019
Year to date used at quarter-end
Table 3 Notes
Table 3 Note 1

Includes only authorities available for use and granted by Parliament at quarter-end.

Return to table 3 note 1 referrer

Vote 1 - Operating expenditures      
Gross Operating expenditures 4,008,555 938,002 1,919,998
Revenues netted against expenditures (363,803) (89,034) (178,068)
Net Vote 1 - Operating expenditures 3,644,752 848,968 1,741,930
Vote 5 - Capital expenditures 57,047 15,255 22,700
Budgetary Statutory Authorities      
Contributions to employee benefit plans 458,824 112,848 225,696
Children's Special Allowance payments (Children's Special Allowances Act) 337,000 88,215 175,274
Climate Action Incentive payments - - -
Spending of revenues received through the conduct of its operations pursuant to section 60 of the Canada Revenue Agency Act 178,954 45,807 63,868
Minister's salary and motor car allowance 88 22 44
Collection Agency Fees under section 17.1 of the Financial Administration Act - 0 0
Court awards - Supreme Court - - -
Court awards - Tax Court of Canada - 318 909
Spending proceeds from the disposal of surplus Crown Assets - 15 62
Energy Cost Benefit - 0 0
Refunds of previous years revenue - 0 27
Total Budgetary Statutory Authorities 974,866 247,225 465,880
Total Budgetary Authorities 4,676,665 1,111,448 2,230,510
Departmental Budgetary Expenditures by Standard Object (unaudited)
Fiscal year 2020-2021
(in thousands of dollars)
  Planned expenditures for the year ending March 31, 2021table 4 note 1 Expended during the quarter ended September 30, 2020 Year to date used at quarter-end
Table 4 Notes
Table 4 Note 1

Planned expenditures for the year ending March 31, 2021 are based on interim supply, consistent with the 2020-2021 authorities.

Return to table 4 note 1 referrer

Expenditures:      
Personnel 2,900,732 921,835 1,862,162
Transportation and communications 176,090 21,293 53,935
Information 5,010 3,147 4,936
Professional and special services 452,739 119,016 195,734
Rentals 211,649 76,160 156,769
Purchased repair and maintenance 50,243 2,479 2,890
Utilities, materials and supplies 26,566 1,986 5,203
Acquisition of machinery and equipment 44,623 8,830 26,754
Transfer payments 3,766,000 361,163 2,852,635
Other subsidies and payments 240 86 3,643
Total Gross Budgetary Expenditures 7,633,892 1,515,995 5,164,661
Less: Revenues netted against expenditures 293,024 97,739 195,479
Total Net Budgetary Expenditures 7,340,868 1,418,256 4,969,182
Departmental Budgetary Expenditures by Standard Object (unaudited)
Fiscal year 2019-2020
(in thousands of dollars)
  Planned expenditures for the year ending March 31, 2020 Expended during the quarter ended September 30, 2019 Year to date used at quarter-end
Expenditures:      
Personnel 3,570,349 887,315 1,791,485
Transportation and communications 191,284 27,964 63,524
Information 4,488 4,061 6,556
Professional and special services 513,012 103,066 186,643
Rentals 279,800 56,372 136,684
Purchased repair and maintenance 72,342 20,158 21,523
Utilities, materials and supplies 29,834 2,987 6,515
Acquisition of machinery and equipment 42,159 8,977 15,436
Transfer payments 337,000 88,215 175,275
Other subsidies and payments 200 1,367 4,937
Total Gross Budgetary Expenditures 5,040,468 1,200,482 2,408,578
Less: Revenues netted against expenditures 363,803 89,034 178,068
Total Net Budgetary Expenditures 4,676,665 1,111,448 2,230,510
Report a problem or mistake on this page
Please select all that apply:

Thank you for your help!

You will not receive a reply. For enquiries, contact us.

Date modified: