Economics and social science services (EC) group - Job Evaluation Standard

2017

Table of contents

Policy context

1. Effective date

1.1 This revised standard takes effect on .

2. Application

2.1 This standard applies to the core public administration as defined in section 11 of the Financial Administration Act, unless excluded through specific acts, regulations or Orders in Council.

2.2 This standard is to be used to establish the appropriate level for work allocated to the Economics and Social Science Services occupational group and evaluated using the Economics and Social Science Services job evaluation standard.

3. Context

3.1 This standard is a key component of the classification system and must be read in conjunction with the Policy Framework for the Management of Compensation, the Policy on Classification, the Directive on Classification, the Directive on Classification Grievances, and occupational group definitions.

3.2 The classification system is the infrastructure that is put in place to effectively manage the classification of positions within the core public administration. Classification entails allocating positions by occupational group and level using the appropriate job evaluation standard to ensure that the relative value of work is respected across the core public administration.

3.3 This standard is issued pursuant to sections 7 and 11.1 of the Financial Administration Act.

4. Consequences

4.1 The consequences identified in the Policy on Classificationapply in cases of non-compliance with this standard.

5. Related policies and publications

  • Policy on Classification;
  • Directive on Classification;
  • Directive on Classification Grievances;
  • Occupational group definitions;
  • Guide to Allocating Positions Using the 1999 Occupational Group Definitions;
  • Table of Concordance;
  • Job evaluation standards;
  • Other policy instruments and guides that may be published from time to time.

Enquiries

Please direct enquiries about this standard to your departmental corporate classification office. For information on the application of this standard, representatives of the departmental corporate classification office should contact:

Workforce Organization and Classification
Compensation and Labour Relations Sector
Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer
Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat
Ottawa, Ontario  K1A 0R5
Email: publicenquiries-demandesderenseignement@tbs-sct.gc.ca

Introduction

The classification standard for the Economics and Social Science Services (EC) Group is a point rating plan consisting of an introduction, the definition of the occupational group, the rating elements in the job evaluation plan, the rating scale, and the level point boundaries.

Point rating is an analytical, quantitative method of determining the relative values of jobs. Point rating plans define characteristics or elements common to the jobs being evaluated, define degrees of each element and allocate point values to each degree. The total value for each job is determined by the sum of the point values assigned by the evaluators.

Elements

Nine elements are used in this plan. Each element contains a number of degrees that describe the scope of work that may be present in EC jobs.

Element weighting

The importance of the characteristics of work in terms of assessing the relative value of each element is reflected in the maximum point values assigned to the elements. Each element in the EC Classification Standard is designed as a continuum of value, ranging from low to high. The overall value of a given job using this system is therefore the sum of the points for each selected rating in each element.

Elements Percentage of total points Maximum point values
Decision making 21 210
Leadership and operational management 14 140
Communication 18 180
Knowledge of specialized fields 10.5 105
Contextual knowledge 10.5 105
Research and analysis 21 210
Physical effort 1.5 15
Sensory effort 1.0 10
Working conditions 2.5 25
Total 100.0% 1,000

Notes to raters

Notes to raters describe the definition and design intent of the element. In some cases, the notes to raters will reference important links with other elements in the standard or give key definitions or caveats that must be considered to fully understand the element.

Specific guidelines

The specific guidelines, which follow the element rating scale, provide information on the structure and mechanics of the element, and elaborate on how to use the rating scale by providing clarification of each degree and indications of how to differentiate among degrees.

Benchmark positions

Benchmark descriptions are used to exemplify degrees of each element and illustrate progression in the job evaluation standard, the application of the elements and relationship between elements. Each description consists of a list of the principal duties and specifications describing the degree of each element to which the position is rated. The benchmark positions have been evaluated, and the degree and point values assigned to each element are shown in the specifications.

The rating scales identify the benchmark position descriptions that exemplify each degree. These descriptions are an integral part of the point rating plan and are used to ensure consistency in application of the rating scales.

Use of the standard

There are six steps in the application of this job evaluation standard.

  1. The position description is studied to ensure understanding of the position as a whole. The relation of the position being rated to positions above and below it in the organization is also studied.
  2. Allocation of the position to the group is confirmed by reference to the definitions and the descriptions of inclusions and exclusions.
  3. Tentative degrees of each element in the job being rated are determined by comparison with degree definitions in the rating scales. Uniform application of degree definitions requires frequent reference to the descriptions of elements and the notes to raters, and specific guidelines.
  4. The description of the element in each of the benchmark positions exemplifying the degree tentatively established is compared with the description of the factor in the position being rated. Comparisons are also made with descriptions of the element in benchmark positions for the degrees above and below the one tentatively established.
  5. The point values for all elements are added to determine the tentative total point rating.
  6. The position being rated is compared as a whole to positions to which similar total point values have been assigned, as a check on the validity of the total rating.

Economics and social science services (EC) group definition

The Economics and Social Science Services Group comprises positions that are primarily involved in the conduct of surveys, studies and projects in the social sciences; the identification, description and organization of archival, library, museum and gallery materials; the editing of legislation or the provision of advice on legal problems in specific fields; and the application of a comprehensive knowledge of economics, sociology or statistics to the conduct of economic, socio-economic and sociological research, studies, forecasts and surveys; the research, analysis and evaluation of the economic or sociological effects of departmental or interdepartmental projects, programs and policies; the development, application, analysis and evaluation of statistical and survey methods and systems; and the development, analysis and interpretation of qualitative and quantitative information and socio-economic policies and recommendations.

Inclusions

Notwithstanding the generality of the foregoing, for greater certainty, it includes positions that have, as their primary purpose, responsibility for one or more of the following activities:

  1. the conduct of surveys, studies, projects and tests requiring a practical knowledge of a specialized field such as economics, history, law or psychology and requiring the development of specialized techniques and procedures, or the development and use of related processing applications, or the interpretation of findings;
  2. the identification, description, classification, organization and location of archival, gallery, library or museum materials; or the creation, manipulation, verification, analysis and transmission of descriptive records pertaining to such materials, both of which require a practical knowledge of the subject matter;
  3. the editing of legislation or the conduct of studies in matters such as land conveyancing, expropriation, litigation and labour relations requiring a practical knowledge of the specific legal area to interpret findings or prepare submissions;
  4. the application of a practical knowledge of a specialized field such as economics, history, law or psychology to the use and modification or adaptation of computer systems, utilities or software;
  5. the application of a comprehensive knowledge of economics, sociology or statistics to economic, socio-economic or sociological studies, forecasts and surveys in a variety of subject areas in domestic and/or international settings;
  6. the application of a comprehensive knowledge of economics, sociology or statistics to the development, application and evaluation of statistical and survey methods and indicators for use in natural or social science research projects, or in the planning of surveys and censuses or in the determination of statistical measures and techniques for data analysis and reporting;
  7. the provision of advice in the fields of economics, sociology and statistics; and
  8. the leadership of any of the above activities.

Exclusions

Positions excluded from the Economics and Social Science Services Group are those whose primary purpose is included in the definition of any other group or those in which one or more of the following activities is of primary importance:

  1. the operation, scheduling or controlling of the operations of electronic equipment used in the processing of data for the purpose of reporting, storing, extracting and comparing information or for solving formulated problems according to prescribed plans;
  2. the collecting, recording, arranging, transmitting and processing of information, the filing and distribution of information holdings, and the direct application of rules and regulations;
  3. the planning, development, delivery or management of policies, programs, services or other activities directed to the public or to the Public Service;
  4. the explanation, promotion and publication of federal government programs, policies and services;
  5. the application of a comprehensive knowledge of mathematics to the development or application of mathematical and analytical methods, including those of mathematical statistics; and
  6. the planning, development, delivery and management of economic development policies, programs, services and other activities designed to promote the establishment, growth and improvement of industry, commerce and export trade and the regulation of trade and commerce.

Point boundaries

Level Min. Max. Spread
1 40 99 59
2 100 169 69
3 170 249 79
4 250 344 94
5 345 454 109
6 455 584 129
7 585 749 164
8 750 1,000 250

Rating scale

Degree 1
Decision making
2
Leadership and operational management
3
communication
4
Knowledge of specialized fields
5
Contextual knowledge
6
Research and analysis
7
Physical effort
8
Sensory effort
9
Working conditions
1 5 5 5 5 5 5 3 2 5
2 15 20 25 15 20 30 4 3 8
3 35 50 50 35 40 75 6 5 12
4 60 90 75 55 60 120 10 10 17
5 90 140 100 80 80 165 15 n/a 25
6 125 n/a 140 105 105 210 n/a n/a n/a
7 165 n/a 180 n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a
8 210 n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a
% Total 21 14 18 10.5 10.5 21 1.5 1.0 2.5

Benchmark index

BM# Title Rating/Points by Element Total points Level
1
Decision Making
2
Leadership and Operational Management
3
Communication
4
Knowledge of Specialized Fields
5
Contextual Knowledge
6
Research and Analysis
7
Physical Effort
8
Sensory Effort
9
Working Conditions
BM 1 Data Production Recruit 1/5 1/5 2/25 1/5 2/20 1/5 1/3 1/2 1/5 75 1
BM 2 Economist/Sociologist 2/15 1/5 2/25 2/15 2/20 2/30 1/3 1/2 1/5 120 2
BM 3 Junior Paralegal 2/15 1/5 2/25 2/15 2/20 2/30 2/4 1/2 2/8 124 2
BM 4 Cataloguing Technician 2/15 1/5 2/25 2/15 2/20 2/30 4/10 2/3 2/8 131 2
BM 5 Senior Research Assistant 3/35 2/20 3/50 3/35 3/40 2/30 1/3 1/2 1/5 220 3
BM 6 Program Evaluation Officer 3/35 1/5 4/75 3/35 3/40 3/75 1/3 1/2 1/5 275 4
BM 7 Economist/Sociologist 3/35 3/50 4/75 3/35 2/20 3/75 1/3 1/2 2/8 303 4
BM 8 Paralegal 3/35 2/20 4/75 4/55 3/40 3/75 2/4 1/2 2/8 314 4
BM 9 Health Policy Analyst 4/60 2/20 4/75 4/55 4/60 4/120 1/3 1/2 1/5 400 5
BM10 Economic Policy Analyst 4/60 2/20 4/75 4/55 4/60 4/120 1/3 1/2 1/5 400 5
BM11 Social Policy Researcher 4/60 2/20 5/100 4/55 4/60 4/120 1/3 2/3 3/12 433 5
BM12 Regional Statistician 4/60 4/90 4/75 4/55 4/60 4/120 1/3 1/2 2/8 473 6
BM13 Senior Program Evaluation Analyst 5/90 3/50 5/100 4/55 5/80 4/120 1/3 1/2 1/5 505 6
BM14 Advisor/Economist 6/125 3/50 5/100 4/55 4/60 4/120 1/3 1/2 2/8 523 6
BM15 Expert Paralegal 5/90 3/50 6/140 4/55 4/60 4/120 2/4 1/2 2/8 529 6
BM16 Manager, Economic or Socio-Economic Policy Research 6/125 3/50 5/100 5/80 5/80 5/165 1/3 1/2 2/8 613 7
BM17 Chief, Analytics and Data Systems 6/125 4/90 6/140 5/80 5/80 5/165 1/3 1/2 2/8 693 7
BM18 Senior Policy Manager 7/165 4/90 7/180 5/80 6/105 6/210 1/3 1/2 2/8 843 8
BM19 Senior Negotiator 8/210 4/90 7/180 5/80 6/105 5/165 2/4 1/2 3/12 848 8

Element 1: Decision making (Responsibility)

This element measures the latitude applied and the impact of decision making in EC work. The latitude required measures the scope to make decisions and the risks involved in reaching solutions or making decisions. The impact of decisions may range from the modification of work methods to the design of complex research and analytical studies, and from single issues to policy or program development and direction. This element recognizes formal decision making, as well as the responsibility for making effective recommendations.

Notes to raters:

  1. Latitude measures the scope to make decisions and the risks involved in reaching solutions or making decisions. It measures the freedom and initiative to act and associated risks. The existence of and the requirement for precedents limits the latitude. Latitude increases as the implications of decisions become less clear. Latitude increases with the risks in making decisions.
  2. Impact measures the effect of decisions on organizations, cases, policies, geographical areas, etc. Impact increases as these effects increase.

The following provides a definition of the eight degrees of latitude and the impact of the decisions and effective recommendations made. If an exact measure of the scope, risk and impact cannot be made with one of the following degrees then a "best fit" determination should be made.

Degree Latitude and Impact Points BM
1
  • Decisions are issue-specific and have an impact on own work unit activities, single cases or individual clients.
  • There is latitude to select and apply established guidelines, procedures and work practices to meet established objectives.
  • Risks and implications are negligible.
5
2
  • Decisions and recommendations are issue-specific and have an impact on components of a project, study, survey, processing operation or case.
  • There is latitude to modify methods and approaches to be used within existing precedents.
  • Risks and implications are minor and apparent.
15
3
  • Decisions and recommendations are related to multiple issues and have an impact on specific projects, studies, surveys, processing operations or cases.
  • There is latitude to resolve issues that may require the adaptation of precedent.
  • Decisions and recommendations may lead to improved work methods.
  • Risks and implications are significant and apparent.
35
4
  • Decisions and recommendations are related to specific subject matter areas, industrial sectors, segments of the population, or geographical areas and have an impact on projects, studies, surveys, cases, unit operations or policy issues.
  • There is latitude to resolve issues that lack precedent within established objectives.
  • Decisions and recommendations may lead to improved analytical or research methodologies.
  • Risks and implications of actions are significant and not readily apparent.
60
5
  • Decisions and recommendations are related to multiple subject matter areas, industrial sectors, population segments or geographical areas and have an impact on multiple projects, studies, research or analytical methodologies or a specific departmental program or policy.
  • There is latitude to resolve issues within the framework of established programs.
  • Decisions and recommendations may lead to improvement of study/project design or a specific program or policy.
  • Risks and implications of actions are significant and not readily apparent.
90
6
  • Decisions and recommendations are related to multiple subject matter areas, industrial sectors, private sectors, population segments or geographical areas and have an impact on departmental programs or policies or business directions.
  • There is latitude to modify or devise new courses of action.
  • Decisions and recommendations typically lead to improvements in programs or policies.
  • Risks and implications of actions are significant and often difficult to determine.
125
7
  • Decisions and recommendations are related to a number of subject matter areas, industrial sectors, private sectors, population segments or geographical areas across programs and have an impact on multiple government programs or policy areas.
  • There is latitude to develop solutions to interrelated issues that are often sensitive.
  • Decisions and recommendations typically lead to improvements in program/policy design.
  • Risks and implications of actions are uncertain and require significant risk analysis.
165
8
  • Decisions and recommendations are related to a number of subject matter areas, industrial sectors, private sectors, population segments or geographical areas across levels of government and have an impact on the direction of government policies and programs and are authoritative and often precedent setting.
  • There is latitude to determine objectives for diverse and poorly defined issues that involve significant trade-offs.
  • Risks and implications of actions are uncertain and require significant risk analysis.
210

Specific guidelines

At degree 1, initiative is used when handling non-routine issues and determining a course of action which is typically of a low risk nature and influences own work activities, single cases and clients. Guidance is sought when solutions are not apparent.

At degree 2, initiative is used when issues are typically resolved independently. Choices to modify or recommend enhancements to aspects of projects or processes are within existing precedents and minor risks and implications are apparent.

At degree 3, initiative is used when selecting options, which involve risks. Issues are broader in nature and require the adaptation of precedent. Decisions and recommendations may impact specific cases, which require the modification of existing techniques, methods and approaches or development of new ones.

At degree 4, issues are greater in depth and affect a broader scope of clients and sectors. Initiative requires that decisions and recommendations performed normally be related to industrial sectors (e.g., transportation, agriculture, health), segments of the population, geographic areas (e.g., Prairies, Atlantic) or specific subject matter areas (e.g., specific program or policy such as finance or medicine). Initiative is required when resolving issues, which may lack precedent within established objectives, and when recommending new approaches for the department to deal with issues.

At degree 5, options typically involve risks that need to be managed. Initiative is required to develop alternative strategies and recommendations which impact on the outcome of cases and multiple subject matter areas which in turn can lead to improvements to methods, studies, and projects. There is autonomy to resolve issues within the parameters of established programs.

At degree 6, issues are broad, typically more complex and are related to multiple areas, sectors and diverse subject matter areas which require initiative and latitude to select from a number of options or courses of actions, where risks and implications are not easily determined. Decisions and recommendations impact departmental programs or policy redesign, which leads to improvements.

At degree 7, issues are often interrelated, complex, and sensitive and require initiative to determine objectives and develop solutions. Decisions influence a number of interrelated areas such as multiple government sectors and industry. Precedents do not always exist. Risks are uncertain, difficult to manage and can lead to new business and policy/research program directions.

At degree 8, issues are complex, sensitive and poorly defined and require initiative to determine objectives and develop solutions. Recommendations impact major departmental entities across government. The implications across levels of government of proposed new approaches are unknown. Decisions are often precedent setting and require significant risk analysis and trade-offs.

Element 2: Leadership and operational management (Responsibility)

The Leadership and Operational Management element measures the responsibility for leading, planning and being accountable for human, financial and materiel resources to achieve work objectives.

Notes to raters

  1. All work has some leadership role. This element is used to evaluate work in terms of the continuing responsibility for human, financial and materiel resources. These responsibilities may include, but are not limited to the following: selecting, coaching, and training personnel; planning and assigning work, monitoring to ensure results are achieved, developing and implementing work plans and priorities, approving and monitoring expenditures, managing, and being accountable for one or more organizational units.
  2. This element measures delegated and non-delegated responsibility for human, financial and materiel resources. In this element, "project teams" and "work groups" may include "committees," "task forces," etc., and are intended as general terms for work units that do not have an internal hierarchy.
  3. In this element, the terms "budget planning exercises" and "budgeting process" include planning for human, financial and materiel resources.
  4. This element is an example of a cumulative progression or "pyramid"-style element. A rating at a higher degree assumes that the responsibility described in the lower degrees is already included. For example, degree 3 captures degree 1 and degree 2.
  5. While all of the work characteristics in a degree definition do not need to be present in the work to evaluate it at that degree, the work should demonstrate the presence of the majority of responsibilities described in the degree definition. Some work may include responsibilities from higher degrees. However, the majority of statements in the higher degree definition must apply when determining the final rating.
  6. Occasional supervision or management of people and/or finances performed during absences of the supervisor or manager should not be rated.

The five degrees of this element are described below. All of the work characteristics in the degree definition do not need to be present in the work in order to rate it at that degree. However, the work needs to be described by the majority of statements in that degree to determine the "best fit."

Degree Leadership and Operational Management Points BM
1

Responsible for:

  • assisting colleagues in adapting to the work environment;
  • explaining or demonstrating work functions or processes;
  • working as a team member;
  • participating in work groups;
  • occasionally leading ad hoc work groups;
  • ensuring confidentiality of information;
  • maintaining materiel resources used in own work;
  • tracking contract work;
  • providing information to contract workers.
5
2

Responsible for:

  • assigning work;
  • explaining responsibilities;
  • providing guidance or coaching;
  • providing training; sharing knowledge and expertise;
  • monitoring and reporting on progress of projects;
  • providing feedback on team member performance;
  • recommending project team members;
  • caring for books, periodicals, equipment, archival material;
  • ensuring classified information and documents are protected;
  • verifying that contract work is completed before payment approval and invoice is processed.
20
3

Responsible for:

  • assigning work according to expertise or need;
  • reviewing work and providing advice;
  • monitoring work in progress;
  • assessing work unit or project results;
  • evaluating employee performance;
  • developing work plans from objectives;
  • implementing work plans; adjusting priorities;
  • adjusting workloads;
  • making recommendations regarding human resources;
  • making recommendations regarding materiel resources;
  • making recommendations regarding financial resources;
  • providing input to budget planning exercises;
  • recommending training;
  • disposing of and archiving information;
  • identifying work needs and resources and time requirements and recommending contract services.

Most performance issues are handled directly, but complex situations are referred to managers at higher levels.

50
4

Responsible for:

  • providing functional direction;
  • managing subordinate supervisors/managers;
  • monitoring work against timelines;
  • ensuring that objectives and results are met;
  • providing input on project team performance;
  • establishing priorities and work plans; establishing goals;
  • conceiving overall plan and approach to projects;
  • identifying, recommending and/or establishing human resource requirements;
  • identifying, recommending and/or establishing materiel resource requirements;
  • identifying, recommending and/or establishing financial resource requirements;
  • re-allocating human resources to meet changes in work priorities;
  • making comprehensive cost projections and analysis in the planning and budgeting process;
  • managing an operating budget;
  • re-allocating funds within a pre-established budget;
  • monitoring expenditures; disbursing funds;
  • selecting project team members;
  • leading recruitment efforts;
  • establishing human resource plans;
  • approving training plans;
  • taking disciplinary action;
  • stipulating parameters of contracts;
  • authorizing contracts;
  • recommending payment for services rendered.
90
5

Responsible for:

  • ensuring program and/or project objectives are achieved;
  • reporting on results and outcomes;
  • establishing broad priorities and division of responsibilities;
  • developing long-term program and/or project plans and direction;
  • developing work plans, milestones and timelines;
  • selecting, approving and allocating human, materiel and financial resources;
  • long-term resource planning;
  • directing and controlling resources to meet long-term objectives and results;
  • approving budget submissions;
  • managing operating and/or salary budgets;
  • approving expenditures;
  • re-allocating financial resources based on changing priorities;
  • selecting team members for interdepartmental and inter-governmental projects;
  • authorizing contractual agreements and professional services;
  • negotiating contractual agreements and professional services.
140 n/a

Specific guidelines

At degree 1, there is a requirement to assist colleagues in adapting to the work environment; explain work processes; work as a team member; ensure confidentiality of information; and maintain own office materiel resources.

At degree 2, there is a requirement to lead short-term project teams or work groups with shared goals and objectives. There may be a need to oversee the work of students and provide input on their work performance, but there is no requirement for formal or sustained supervision, budgetary responsibility or formal performance evaluation. There is a requirement to verify that contract work is completed before payment is approved and invoice is processed.

At degree 3, there is a requirement to provide on a continuing basis direct supervision within a work unit or to lead departmental project teams or work groups to achieve specific goals and objectives. Responsibilities include training and guidance on specific tasks; using office service and equipment effectively; modifying established procedures; and assessing work results and employee performance. Work may include participating in the staffing process. There may be requirement to provide input/recommendations to budget planning exercises.

At degree 4, there is a requirement to manage operations and resources in a work unit or to plan and lead departmental or interdepartmental project teams. Issues and initiatives cover a range of areas of responsibility and participants may have varied and sometimes conflicting goals and objectives. Work is often the first level of management. There is a requirement to ensure that human, financial and materiel resources policies are carried out. The focus is managing teams, which includes recruiting; evaluating and monitoring staff performance; planning, analyzing and evaluating programs and projects; providing input and analysis on cost estimates for the budget process; and setting deadlines to attain and complete specific milestones.

At degree 5, responsibility and authority for leadership and operational management is delegated and performed through subordinate unit heads, managers and supervisors. There is a requirement to design, plan and lead multidisciplinary project teams and coordinate the activities of intergovernmental task forces or advisory committees. These committees are composed of senior personnel from other government departments, other levels of government or non-governmental organizations. Issues and initiatives are high profile, sensitive, or unconventional. The leadership scope is typically broad in nature, (e.g., across subject matter areas, branches/functional areas, or involve multiple stakeholders or interests within and outside the department, and the goals and objectives of the participants are diverse.) Responsibilities include managing considerably more complex operations that involve a larger staff, a variety of major programs or functions and layers of management accountability. Develops longer-term plans; carries out major projects; negotiates to meet objectives; coordinates major functions; plans the utilization of space, equipment and services; evaluates staff performance; approves alternate ways to accomplish objectives; administers a budget; and approves and monitors expenditures.

Element 3: Communication (Skill)

This element measures the skills required to express and receive information orally and in writing, the scope of the communication and the reasons why the work requires contacts.

Notes to raters

  1. Communication skills measure the nature and complexity of the subject matter and the required level of communication skills.
  2. Specialized terminology: EC work often uses specialized terminology to explain concepts, theories, and methodologies. Normally, individuals outside the discipline are unfamiliar with this specialized terminology. Consequently, at higher degrees, there may be a need to explain methods, theories, concepts, etc., in a language that non-specialists understand.
  3. Specialized information uses specialized terminology that can apply to specialized fields or to subject matter area.
  4. Complex information is interrelated specialized information from specialized fields or subject matter areas.

The following provides a definition of the degrees of the communication skills. The highest degree required of the work should be chosen.

Degree Communication Skills Points BM
1 Convey or obtain information to maintain collaborative working relationships, provide straightforward explanations and meet day-to-day activities. 5 n/a
2 Exchange specialized information or share expertise to meet defined objectives. 25
3 Provide interpretation of specialized information to improve understanding. 50
4 Adapt information or messages for audiences who are not familiar with the specialized terminology to ensure understanding. 75
5 Adapt complex information for audiences who are not familiar with the specialized terminology to meet broad objectives and facilitate co-operation and consensus. 100
6 Defend positions and advance arguments to promote organizational or mutual business interests and influence approaches on sensitive issues. 140
7 Persuade where there are significant challenges for acceptance to resolve strategic issues on highly complex, critical, contentious or high profile situations. 180

Specific guidelines

At degree 1, there is no particular need to understand specialized terminology to receive or relay the information.

At degree 2, communication involves conveying and exchanging information and includes practical explanations, examples and/or demonstrations. Communications can be within the work organizations, with other areas of the organization, or outside the department.

At degree 3, work requires elaboration or explanation of information using specialized terminology, to improve understanding of meaning, intent and nuance. This level of communication requires explaining work objectives or the validity of approaches used to other members of the same field.

At degree 4, communication involves conveying in a common language to non-specialist audiences, complex information, analysis, conclusions on interrelated studies or issues, and ensures understanding of their implications

At degree 5, work requires communication skills to adapt complex specialized information to gain the co-operation and agreement of others. Communication involves achieving consensus on approaches where objectives may be unclear.

At degree 6, work requires communication skills to defend the validity of approaches, analysis, conclusions, positions, and advance logical arguments.

At degree 7, work requires persuading audiences, who do not share the views presented, to accept a course of action.

Element 4: Knowledge of specialized fields (Skill)

This element measures the required depth and breadth of knowledge of specialized fields, including concepts, theories, principles, methods, techniques and practices. Such knowledge can be acquired through formal education, experience, specialized or on-the-job training, self-education or a combination.

"Specialized field" includes economics, sociology, statistics, or other social sciences, and the conduct of surveys, studies and projects in the social sciences; the identification, description and organization of archival, library, museum and gallery materials; the editing of legislation or the provision of advice on legal problems in specific fields.

Notes to raters

  1. For the purpose of the EC Standard, "specialized field" encompasses those fields or disciplines normally associated with Social Sciences, Law, Statistics and Library/Archival, including gallery- and museum-type work.
  2. Social Science in the EC Standard includes economics, political science, anthropology, sociology, history, psychology, geography, criminology and other disciplines associated with Social Science.
  3. Each EC group job requires knowledge of specialized fields and knowledge of related subject matter and other contextual areas. Knowledge of Specialized Fields and Contextual Knowledge are measured independently.
  4. In evaluating Knowledge of Specialized Fields, evaluators should consider the overall intent of the degree definition. Evaluators should consider only the knowledge required to perform the work.
  5. Each degree defines the level of knowledge required to perform the work and the depth of knowledge required in one or more relevant specialized fields (basic, general, in-depth, advanced, expert). These phrases serve to differentiate and are aligned with the balance of the degree text.

The following provides a definition of the degrees of knowledge of specialized fields.

The highest degree required of the work should be chosen.

Degree Knowledge of Specialized Fields Points BM
1 Basic knowledge of aspects of specialized field(s) to accomplish defined activities by applying methods, techniques and established practices. 5
2 General knowledge of methods, techniques and practices of specialized field(s) and basic knowledge of theories and principles of a specialized field and the relevancy of their application. 15
3 In-depth knowledge of methods, techniques and practices and general knowledge of theories and principles of a specialized field. 35
4

Advanced knowledge of specialized methodologies of a specialized field with an understanding of their underlying concepts.
or
In-depth knowledge of theories and principles of a specialized field.

55
5 Advanced knowledge of theories or principles of a number of specialized fields and their interrelationships. 80
6 Expert knowledge of the underlying theoretical concepts of a specialized field and of the complex interrelationships with other fields. 105 n/a

Specific guidelines

Degree 1 requires a basic knowledge of the specialized field to follow established practices, use basic technical methodologies or understand basic principles. This knowledge is applied to standard situations.

Degree 2 requires an increased knowledge of methods, techniques and practices of a specialized field and a sufficient basic knowledge of the application of theories and principles of a specialized field to have an understanding of the application of work assignments.

Degree 3 requires an in-depth knowledge of methods, techniques and practices of a specialized field and general knowledge of the theories and principles within that field. This degree links in-depth knowledge of methods, techniques or practices to a general understanding of the theories and principles of a specialized field.

Degree 4 requires advanced knowledge of specialized methodologies with an understanding of the underlying concepts of a specialized field, or an in-depth knowledge of the theories, concepts and principles of a specialized field.

Degree 5 requires an advanced knowledge of a variety of complex theories and principles, including knowledge to assess interrelationships of specialized fields to address or explain various phenomena.

Degree 6 recognizes an expert level of knowledge in a specialized field. Work requires an authoritative level of knowledge that allows for recognition as the departmental/governmental expert. Such expertise requires knowledge of complex underlying concepts and theories that constitute specialized field situations and applications. The depth of knowledge of the primary field and the breadth of knowledge of secondary fields increase significantly.

Element 5: Contextual knowledge (Skill)

This element measures the required depth and breadth of contextual knowledge, including, but not limited to, subject matter, communities, organizations, networks, external environments, policies, legislation, regulations, or management. Such knowledge can be acquired through any combination of formal education, experience, specialized or on-the-job training or self-education.

Notes to raters

  1. Contextual knowledge refers to knowledge of subject matter, rules, procedures, guidelines, regulations, policies, legislation, administrative requirements, roles and mandates of the organization and of other organizations involved or impacted by the work or results, client organizations for which work is performed, and other levels of government and non-governmental organizations.
  2. Each EC Group job requires knowledge of a related subject matter area and other contextual areas. "Contextual Knowledge" is measured independently from "Knowledge of Specialized Fields."
  3. The knowledge of subject matter required will be dictated by the nature of the work.
    • For example, finance, medicine, transportation, land claims and agriculture are each considered as a subject matter area.
    • The specialized field for one type of work may be the subject matter area for another. For example, the subject matter area can be economics, history, law, archives, etc. when they are the subject of statistical analysis.

The following provides a definition of the degrees of contextual knowledge. The highest degree required of the work should be chosen. If an exact measure of the highest degree cannot be made with one of the following degrees, a "best fit" determination should be made.

Degree Knowledge of subject matter, communities, organizations, networks, external environments, policies, legislation, regulations, management principles, etc. Points BM
1
  • Basic knowledge of specific subject matter area(s) and of clients and/or other contacts, in defined and practical work situations.
  • Awareness of aspects of work-related legislation/policy.
5 n/a
2
  • General knowledge of specific subject matter area(s) and clients and/or other contacts.
  • Knowledge of aspects of work-related legislation/policy.
20
3
  • General knowledge of broad subject matter area(s) and clients and/or other contacts.
  • Knowledge of departmental business lines.
  • Knowledge of legislation/policy related to the mandate and objectives of the department.
40
4
  • In-depth knowledge of subject matter area(s).
  • Knowledge of subject matter area interrelationships.
  • Knowledge of related business lines of other departments and private sectors.
  • Knowledge of legislation/policy related to other departments and private sectors.
60
5
  • Advanced knowledge of subject matter area(s).
  • Knowledge of the implications for other subject matter areas and interrelationships across multiple programs, issues, other levels of government, and/or other external sectors.
  • Knowledge of legislation/policy governing current activities, and their interrelationships and linkages across other departments.
80
6
  • Extensive knowledge of subject matter area(s).
  • Knowledge of the domestic or international environments at the strategic level and of the socio-economic, political, cultural and other external sectors involving one or more related subject area matters.
  • Knowledge of government plans, priorities and directions.
  • Knowledge of legislation, policies and programs related to varied and complex business contexts.
105

Specific guidelines

Degree 1 requires only knowledge regarding the subject matter and context within which specific activities are carried out. The knowledge is not heavily experience-based. There is some requirement to understand straightforward needs of clients and an overall appreciation of the organizational context in which the work is performed. Most work assignments are governed by well-understood practices and guidelines.

Degree 2 requires greater contextual knowledge to understand client requirements and ensure that choices of options meet client needs. The work requires some knowledge of various work-related legislation and/or policies as they impact the service provided to clients.

Degree 3 requires a general understanding of broader subject matter area(s), client and other contact needs, departmental objectives, policies and legislation.

Degree 4 requires an in-depth knowledge of the subject matter area and of interrelationships to various other subject matter areas that may be impacted by work outcomes (i.e., policies and interests within the department and other departments and agencies.). The work requires knowledge of business lines and legislation/policies related to other departments and the private sector.

Degree 5 requires an advanced knowledge of legislation, policies, current issues and activities in other jurisdictions. This requires both breadth and depth of the subject matter involving multiple interrelationships with other programs, clients, and stakeholders to understand linkages between different subject matters and impact on the issues.

Degree 6 requires knowledge of subject matter at the strategic expert level and a sound understanding of the external environment. The external environment is domestic and international, and includes the socio-economic and political issues governing them. There is a requirement to have a thorough knowledge of government plans, priorities and programs within this context and horizontal understanding of departmental operational and business processes.

Element 6: Research and analysis (Skill)

This element measures the requirement to research and analyze both qualitative and quantitative information in EC work.

Notes to raters

  1. Information is both oral and written and can refer to a wide variety of files and documents, including data, policies, procedures, legislation, project specifications, client documents, legal documentation, databanks and any other information sources required to fulfill the job responsibilities.
  2. This element is structured so that each degree measures the nature and complexity of the research and analytical skill and concentration required at that work level.
  3. The emphasis of degrees 4 through 6 is on complex research and analysis involving conceptual frameworks. A conceptual framework explains, either graphically or in narrative form (or both), the key factors, constructs or variables to be studied and the presumed relationships among them.

The following is a definition of each of the six degrees of research and analysis. The highest degree required of the work should be chosen. If an exact measure cannot be made with one of the following degrees, a "best fit" determination should be made.

Degree Research and Analysis Points BM
1
  • Conduct information searches, organize, review and process information and perform directed, routine analysis.
  • Ensure the accuracy and completeness of the information.
5
2
  • Determine and select information relevant to a particular area of study, compile and verify information and perform directed, non-routine analyses.
  • Ensure consistency, coherence and information integrity.
30
3
  • Study a range of information and identify and interpret trends and patterns, determine gaps in research and develop comprehensive background material for further analysis;
    or
  • Assess a range of information and evaluate and compare current approaches and practices for the gathering, dissemination or analysis of information. Identify possible modifications or alternative approaches when current methodology is inadequate.
75
4
  • Synthesize and interpret complex information from diverse sources and identify the conceptual frameworks related to the area of study.
  • Account for subtle interrelationships among variables or determine the need for new analytical methodologies, systems or approaches.
120
5
  • Investigate and challenge existing conceptual frameworks.
  • Examine multiple variables from distinct sources within a subject matter area and reach conclusions and/or generate solutions.
165
6
  • Integrate distinct broad-based qualitative or quantitative analyses.
  • Create/adapt conceptual frameworks for the development, application, interpretation, and evaluation of studies, methodologies, strategies and policies.
210

Specific guidelines

At degree 1, directed, routine analysis may involve such activities as determining deficiencies in the coverage and scope of gathered information or existing series. The information gathered comes from reliable and accurate sources previously associated with the area of study. The research and analytical methods applied are limited in variety and complexity.

At degree 2, directed, non-routine analysis may involve such activities as identifying unusual or irregular data; conducting a preliminary data quality check; assessing information suitability; and identifying variations in the information. Information sources are related to the area of study and can include, for example, numerical data, descriptive text, policy, legislation and historical information. Work requires selecting from a variety of established and specialized methods, techniques and procedures associated with gathering and arranging information.

At degree 3, research and analysis involve a significant level of information scrutiny. Conclusions are drawn based on studying or assessing a range of information and applying a broad range of research and analytical methodologies. The relation of the information to the area in question is not obvious and the sources of information are generally unprescribed.

The emphasis of degrees 4 through 6 is on complex research and analysis involving conceptual frameworks.

Degree 4 identifies the components existing within conceptual frameworks, analyzes the relationships between components and understands the framework concepts. Conceptual frameworks are generally more complex to research and analyze. Synthesizing and interpreting complex information is complicated because the relationships on which conclusions are reached are not obvious. Information must be linked to a conceptual framework, and generally requires the use of diverse sources.

Degree 5 involves investigating and challenging the effectiveness, efficiency, and reliability of established structures, processes, etc. to reach conclusions and/or generate solutions or new information. The consideration of multiple aspects of a subject matter area determines the complexity.

Degree 6 adapts existing theory to new and unusual situations. The relationships between diverse conceptual analyses are complex and difficult to define. Analysis often has government-wide or national implications on programs and policies and may involve creating complex modelling. Strategies may include studies in such specialized fields as epidemiology, sociology and economics, etc. to support activities such as program and policy development, or government negotiation strategies.

Element 7: Physical effort (Effort)

This element measures the intensity of physical effort and how regularly this effort is required to perform EC work. Only those activities that occur for a significant period of time are considered.

Notes to raters

  1. This element measures physical exertion in performing EC work and considers the intensity, duration and frequency of physical effort.
  2. Regular requirement of work" means that the duties are performed as an integral part of the work regardless of specific time periods. Physical effort associated with regular office work is measured at degree 1.

The following examples give an indication of the intensity and frequency. Work of equivalent intensity should be rated at that degree.

Degree Physical Effort Points BM
1 Regularly keyboarding or performing other activities requiring small muscle movement. 3
2 Occasionally standing, walking, bending, reaching or lifting or moving items up to 10 kg. 4
3 Regularly standing, walking, bending, reaching or lifting or moving items up to 10 kg. 6 n/a
4 Occasionally carrying, lifting or moving items over 10 kg. 10
5 Regularly carrying, lifting or moving items over 10 kg. 15 n/a

Specific guidelines

Degree 1 recognizes the physical exertion required to sit while performing activities requiring small muscle movements such as keyboarding, sitting at a desk while using a computer and telephone and/or using a pen and notepad in meetings. It includes some reaching and bending to obtain reference material or adjust equipment; moving from one location to another (i.e., going from an office to a meeting room).

Degree 2 recognizes the effort required to perform work for a significant duration or with significant frequency while standing, walking, bending or reaching. Standing and walking includes only the equivalent of such work activities as carrying out a physical inspection at a large site. Bending and reaching only includes such activities as assembling an exhibit on a table requiring standing, bending and moving light objects about. Activities with greater intensity such as climbing a small ladder to obtain light objects or restrained movement in confined spaces would also be considered.

Degree 3 recognizes the effort required to perform work for a significant duration or with significant frequency while standing, walking, bending or reaching regularly or continuously. The intensity is the same as degree 2, but the work is a regular or continuous requirement. Examples include carrying out a physical inspection at a large site on a frequent or regular basis; assembling an exhibit on a table requiring standing, bending and moving light objects frequently or regularly; climbing a small ladder to obtain light objects frequently or regularly; and restrained movement in confined spaces.

Degree 4 recognizes the effort required to perform work while occasionally lifting, carrying or moving items over 10 kg. Work includes such activities as assembling an exhibit on a table requiring standing, bending and moving heavy (over 10 kg) objects. Carrying lighter objects such as books or artefacts up and down ladders would also rate at this degree even though the objects weigh less than 10 kg.

Degree 5 recognizes the effort required to perform work while lifting, carrying or moving items over 10 kg regularly or continuously. Such activities include assembling an exhibit on a table requiring standing, bending and moving heavy (over 10 kg) objects on a regular basis; carrying lighter objects such as books or artefacts up and down ladders regularly even if the objects weigh less than 10 kg.

Element 8: Sensory effort (Effort)

This element measures the intensity, duration and frequency of the sensory effort associated with the exclusive use of one or more senses (hearing, feeling, seeing, smelling, tasting) in performing EC work and how regularly this effort is required. Only those activities that occur for a significant period of time are considered.

Notes to raters

  1. "Regular requirement of work" means that the duties are performed as an integral part of the work regardless of specific time periods.
  2. Sensory effort associated with regular office work is measured at degree 1.

The following examples give an indication of the intensity and frequency. Work of equivalent intensity should be rated at that degree.

Degree Sensory Effort Points BM
1 Occasionally using senses to detect easily perceived differences (e.g., detecting physical differences between documents, data or things). 2
2 Regularly using senses to detect easily perceived differences (e.g., detecting physical differences between documents, data or things). 3
3 Occasionally using senses to make fine distinctions or detect barely perceptible variations (e.g., detecting defects, deterioration, musical instruments). 5 n/a
4 Regularly using senses to make fine distinctions or detect barely perceptible variations (e.g., detecting defects, deterioration, musical instruments). 10 n/a

Specific guidelines

Degree 1 recognizes that the important aspect of the work is to occasionally detect easily perceived differences or variations without concern about their meaning. At degree 1, there does not need to be a direct link to the key activities.

Degree 2 recognizes that the important aspect of the work is to regularly detect easily perceived differences or variations without concern about their meaning. There must be a direct link to the key activities.

Degree 3 recognizes that a significant part of the work is to occasionally detect barely perceptible differences or variations without concern about their meaning. The need to focus the senses rather than understand the subject matter must be a bona fide requirement of the work. There must be a direct link to the key activities.

Degree 4 recognizes that a significant part of the work is to regularly detect barely perceptible differences or variations without concern about their meaning. The need to focus the senses rather than understand the subject matter must be a bona fide requirement of the work and there must be a direct link to the key activities.

Element 9: Working conditions (Working conditions)

This element measures the physical and psychological surroundings or conditions under which EC work must be delivered and the extent to which they make the job unpleasant.

Notes to raters

  1. When rating, assume that working conditions comply with current legislation and standards. Conditions or requirements of the work, such as overtime, that are compensated through extra pay are not measured in this element. Do not consider the inefficiencies of heating, cooling and ventilation systems. Measure only those conditions that are an integral part of the work.
  2. The examples of psychological and physical conditions found in this element are intended only as illustrations. For example, unpleasant work may include exposure to dust, dirt, noxious odours and loud noises.
  3. The terms "Somewhat Unpleasant, Unpleasant and Very Unpleasant" demonstrate the continuum and degree of unpleasantness. The degree of unpleasantness and regularity of exposure determine the rating.

Below are illustrative lists of the psychological and physical conditions, which may be found in the work environment and serve as a guide in rating the highest degree of exposure.

Somewhat Unpleasant Unpleasant Very Unpleasant

Intra-regional travel

Long-distance travel with possible jet lag

Long-distance travel with layovers and/or lengthy periods in hotel

Travel between buildings in same city

Travel to remote communities

Travel to remote communities during sustained inclement conditions

Monotony and repetition

Unrelenting monotony and repetition

n/a

Complaints / public criticism

Constant complaints / public criticism

n/a

Changing deadlines / time pressures

Constantly changing deadlines / time pressures

n/a

Lack of privacy

n/a

n/a

Exposure to office noise

n/a

n/a

Exposure to glare from computer screen

n/a

n/a

n/a

Working in confined spaces

n/a

n/a

Interactions with angry, confrontational, or uncooperative individuals

Interactions with abusive individuals

n/a

Exposure to smelly odours or fumes

Exposure to noxious odours or fumes

n/a

Exposure to dirt and dust

Exposure to filth and fungus

n/a

n/a

Separation from family for lengthy periods

n/a

n/a

Potential threat to personal security

n/a

n/a

Potential exposure to serious infectious diseases

n/a

n/a

Exposure to disturbing images or issues

Rate the highest degree of exposure
Degree Working Conditions Points BM
1

Exposure to somewhat unpleasant conditions.

5

2

Regular exposure to somewhat unpleasant conditions
and
Some exposure to unpleasant or very unpleasant conditions.

8

3

Regular exposure to unpleasant conditions.

12

4

Regular exposure to unpleasant conditions
and
Some exposure to very unpleasant conditions.

17

n/a

5

Regular exposure to very unpleasant conditions.

25

n/a

Degree 1 recognizes that the work will be exposed to "Somewhat Unpleasant" conditions at least some of the time.

Degree 2 recognizes that some work will be exposed to "Somewhat Unpleasant" conditions and sometimes be exposed to bona fide "Unpleasant" or "Very Unpleasant" conditions.

Degree 3 recognizes that some work will be exposed to "Unpleasant" conditions most of the time.

Degree 4 recognizes that some work will be regularly exposed to "Unpleasant" conditions and sometimes exposed to bona fide "Very Unpleasant" conditions.

Degree 5 recognizes that some work will be exposed to "Unpleasant" conditions on a more regular basis.

Benchmark 1: Data Production Recruit

Point rating: 1, 1, 2, 1, 2, 1, 1, 1, 1 = 75 points
Level: EC-01

Organization context and summary

Under the guidance of a development officer, unit Head or project lead, provides statistical information, products and services related to commercial, industrial, financial, social and economic conditions of Canada. This information is used by program managers, subject matter specialists and other data users in the decision-making process in support of public policies and programs development and evaluation.

Duties

  • Provides support in the editing, validation, marketing and dissemination of data and in the conduct of manual and automated operations.
  • Provides support in the review of collection results and the assessment of data quality.
  • Provides users with statistical data and tabulations.
  • Contributes to the provision of advice on collection methods and procedures and in developing reference and training materials.

Decision making

Degree: 1

Points: 5

Under guidance, the work requires assessing the capabilities of data systems to meet user requests, maintains and updates a statistical database, manipulates and processes data to generate tables, charts and data files. Creates test data, sets up testing processes, identifies and corrects errors and problems, documents the inputs and presents the results for review. Applies existing techniques and approaches to incorporate changes in subject matter content and definitions and selects the appropriate software to be used for the preparation of reports, tables and charts. Reviews specifications, identifies inconsistencies, recommends improvements and incorporates changes into procedures manuals. Provides support in the development and review of information manuals and training packages. Identifies options for improvements to processing systems and implements enhancements or modifications to systems and applications used in the editing, validation, marketing and dissemination of statistical data.

Leadership and operational management

Degree: 1

Points: 5

The work requires participation in project teams, work groups, meetings and conferences to develop and improve work methods and practices, and share knowledge. Monitors and tracks time spent on activities for the purposes of recording and recovering such costs from the client.

Communication

Degree: 2

Points: 25

Contacts are with subject matter specialists and clients on requirements for custom tabulations and with survey officers, respondents and data users to understand and obtain clarifications on concepts, data collection and processing requirements. The work requires drafting reports on survey process, data quality and reliability for review by a project leader or supervisor and drafting reference and training material for data collection operations. There is a requirement to explain procedures for obtaining the information in the appropriate format and to respond to inquiries from managers, employees and the general public on the availability, consistency and application of statistical data and on the methods and techniques used.

Knowledge of specialized fields

Degree: 1

Points: 5

The work requires knowledge of methods, techniques and practices required for the collection, capture, processing, editing, validation, marketing and dissemination of data; statistical survey concepts and quantitative analytical techniques involved in the development, conduct and monitoring of statistical programs. Knowledge of methods and practices of operating personal computers in a networked environment and of using databases and software packages (word processing, statistical analysis, graphics, spreadsheets, etc.) to prepare correspondence, reports and presentations.

Contextual knowledge

Degree: 2

Points: 20

The work requires knowledge of divisional mandates, objectives, programs, policies and activities to adhere to the various statistical and administrative practices and procedures involved in the collection, capture, processing, editing, validation, marketing and dissemination of statistical data. Knowledge is required of program context, program sponsors and participants to identify and resolve specific data production and dissemination issues. The work requires knowledge of a variety of commercial software tools and of customized production applications to regularly process data and/or to produce specified statistical outputs. Knowledge of automated collection software and data capture applications to test applications and prepare reference material and training for the applications. Knowledge of data sources and contacts within the department in order to locate, analyze and compare statistical output to ensure consistency and reliability; and external to the department to obtain statistical information and verify the accuracy of data. Knowledge of the Statistics Act and other pertinent acts and departmental policies to ensure understanding and application in the collection, capture, processing, editing, validation, marketing and dissemination of data, and an awareness of the Privacy Act with respect to the security and confidentiality of data to ensure own actions are in compliance.

Research and analysis

Degree: 1

Points: 5

The work requires skill to conduct reviews of reported data and prepare reports outlining data quality and any problems encountered in the implementation of established guidelines and results. The work requires skill for compiling data from different, but easily identifiable, sources to produce statistical tables and charts; verifying outputs with other related data sources or by making calculations to ensure accuracy and reliability of the data; and ensuring that it is in an acceptable format and that the data are reasonable in relation to similar data for other periods. The work requires skill to review user requests to determine the nature and feasibility of and options for providing the information required. It also requires analysis skill to adapt data to new definitions or presentation formats.

Physical effort

Degree: 1

Points: 3

The work requires frequent and extended periods of sitting at a workstation while keyboarding, proofreading, telephoning, reviewing data, or writing text. There are periods of physical exertion, such as bending and stretching, to retrieve, organize and distribute publications, printouts, documents or files. There may be a requirement to carry equipment, presentation material and document cases to meetings.

Sensory effort

Degree: 1

Points: 2

There is an occasional requirement for sensory observation when comparing old and new versions of data.

Working conditions

Degree: 1

Points: 5

The work is performed in an open office environment with exposure to glare from a computer screen, noise from conversations, telephones, traffic and equipment in the immediate area.

Benchmark 2: Economist/Sociologist

Point rating: 2, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 1, 1, 1, 1 = 120 points
Level: EC- 02

Organization context and summary

Under the guidance of a unit head (subject matter expert) or a senior economist/sociologist, participates in the provision of statistical services and analysis for the assigned project on data which may include commercial, industrial, financial, social and economic conditions of Canada. The information is provided to departmental staff, employees at all levels of government, industry, academia, and other special interest groups as part of the decision-making process in support of public policies and programs development and evaluation.

Duties

  • Participates in the analysis of statistical program data, the identification of statistical trends and developments and the preparation of analytical material for internal use and publication purposes.
  • Participates in the analysis of data and suggests possible feedback on collection, processing, editing, compilation and presentation methods and procedures.
  • Assists in the development of recommendations for improvements to survey methods and activities.

Decision making

Degree: 2

Points: 15

Under guidance, the work requires providing input into the modification, development and implementation of statistical methods and procedures for the collection, processing, editing, compilation and presentation of data for the assigned project. It also requires participating in the preparation of recommendations to management when subject matter and technical problems are encountered. There is a requirement to formulate specifications for system development to incorporate changes in subject matter content and definitions. There is limited risk associated with these decisions and recommendations.

Leadership and operational management

Degree: 1

Points: 5

The work requires participation in project teams, work groups, meetings and conferences to develop and improve work methods and practices and share knowledge. As the service operates on a cost recovery basis, the work requires monitoring and tracking time spent on activities and accounting for petty cash, taxi vouchers, bus passes, and other expenditures.

Communication

Degree: 2

Points: 25

The work requires establishing contacts with other subject matter specialists and users to exchange information to suggest improvements to ongoing programs and to provide input into established project plans, priorities and target dates. The work requires drafting information manuals, training packages, monitoring procedures, and management reports in order to explain and clarify divisional systems and applications for colleagues, operational staff and management.

Knowledge of specialized fields

Degree: 2

Points: 15

The work requires the knowledge of statistical methods, techniques and practices to participate in statistical studies and contribute to the development, feasibility assessment and impact analysis of new or modified statistical programs. The work requires knowledge of socio-economic concepts and principles to assess the validity of collected and processed data, the output from computer applications, the validity of database contents and results from alternative manipulations of data. The work requires knowledge of current and emerging economic and social issues relating to the program area in order to identify and assess trends and issues represented by statistical data series.

Contextual knowledge

Degree: 2

Points: 20

The work requires knowledge of divisional mandate, objectives and programs, and awareness of related legislation in order to adhere to the various statistical and administrative practices and procedures involved in the collection and production of statistical data. Knowledge of acts related to the department or subject matter is required to ensure understanding and application in the collection, processing, editing, compilation and presentation of data. Knowledge of the Privacy Act, as it pertains to the security and confidentiality of data, is required to ensure own actions are in compliance. The work requires knowledge of data sources within the department to locate, analyze and compare related statistical output to ensure consistency and reliability. Knowledge of the subject and statistical population of the survey is required to adhere to the appropriate statistical or reporting methods and techniques.

Research and analysis

Degree: 2

Points: 30

The work requires analysis of current and proposed changes to procedures, methodology, data processing, editing and compilation to determine relevancy and the effect on data output, products and services, and assessing and determining the impact and the constraints on results of the different concepts, definitions and conditions under which the data was collected, processed and stored.

Physical effort

Degree: 1

Points: 3

The work requires frequent and extended periods of sitting at a workstation while keyboarding, proofreading, telephoning, reviewing data, or writing text. There could be periods of physical exertion, such as bending and stretching to retrieve, organize and distribute publications, printouts, documents or files. There may be a requirement to carry equipment, presentation material and document cases to meetings.

Sensory effort

Degree: 1

Points: 2

There is an occasional requirement for sensory observation when comparing old and new versions of data.

Working conditions

Degree: 1

Points: 5

The work is performed in an open office environment with exposure to glare from a computer screen, noise from conversations, telephones, traffic and equipment in the immediate area. Work is performed while facing changing deadlines resulting in stress.

Benchmark 3: Junior Paralegal

Point rating: 2, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 1, 2 = 124 points
Level: EC- 02

Organization context and summary

Reporting to senior paralegals or legal counsel or manager in the host department, within a case/file/project team, provides paralegal services (advisory or litigation) for counsel and/or more senior paralegals. Under general guidance, provides legal technical support services (advisory or litigation) to counsel, and/or more senior paralegals, in low-complexity cases/files/projects, with autonomy to manage assigned activities of low-complexity cases/files/projects.

Duties

  • Conducts narrow legal research and basis analysis on legal issues where precedents are abundant. Prepares summaries.
  • Organizes sensitive and/or confidential documents, information and data under general guidance of counsel and/or senior paralegals.
  • Conducts activities of low complexity within cases/files/projects; as being responsible for own case/file/project, under general guidance administers routine low-complexity cases/files/projects where precedents are available. Represents client(s) in legal systems (e.g., small claims court, tax court, arraignment court, judgment debtor examinations and administrative tribunals) and/or assists counsel with the conduct of legal proceedings in legal systems.
  • Acts as a resource for information on various legal procedures and processes.
  • Maintains and updates legal and administrative databases, as well as management information systems.

Decision making

Degree: 2

Points: 15

The work involves providing legal support on low-complexity cases/files/projects, which requires organizing and processing cases/files/projects often under time restraints. This may include drafting legal documents, receiving witness testimony, analyzing or assessing claims, reviewing legislation or collection of fines, drafting settlement agreements and liaising between parties. Cases/files/projects are routine and precedents are available; however, the work has latitude to modify and adapt approaches. The work involves conducting research and analysis for counsel or senior paralegals

Impact risks are case-specific and minor. Performing routine legal support activities may have an impact on costs associated with the case or file and time commitments of client(s), counsel, legal service providers or investigative agencies.

Leadership and operational management

Degree: 1

Points: 5

The work requires participating as a member on a case/file/project team, acting as a resource of information for colleagues on specialized legal software applications; educating client department(s), investigative agencies and legal service providers; maintaining custody and regular upkeep of personal computer or laptop-associated peripherals, databases, large volume of documents, office furniture, equipment and materials used to perform own work.

Communication

Degree: 2

Points: 25

The work requires making contacts with departmental colleagues, client departments, police, law enforcement agencies, witnesses, non-represented parties, legal service providers, opposing counsel, other departments and agencies, international sectors, private sector entities, and the public to clarify a variety of issues, exchange specialized information and/or provide advice. Writing skill is required to prepare legal research summaries and draft legal documents.

Knowledge of specialized fields

Degree: 2

Points: 15

The work requires an understanding of legal theories and principles. The work also requires an understanding of legal methods and techniques in specialized practice areas and the related legal terminology.

Contextual knowledge

Degree: 2

Points: 20

The work requires organizational skills to organize, track and maintain documents, information and data for counsel or senior paralegals and an understanding of the Canadian legal system and an awareness of civil or criminal rules and procedures applying to a particular area of work. The work requires an understanding of the mandate of the department or client departments, and understanding of the application of the law related to the case, file or project. The work requires basic skill to prepare synthesis of legislation, jurisprudence, technical, academic and other reports from experts. The work requires knowledge of a variety of specialized legal software applications and a variety of administrative software applications to manage information and documentation related to cases, files and projects. It also requires an understanding of project management principles and techniques to lead, plan and coordinate activities in cases/files/projects.

Research and analysis

Degree: 2

Points: 30

The work requires skill to conduct research to locate applicable element(s) of legislation, jurisprudence and policy documents. The work requires analysis skills to identify data or information relating to the query and to summarize information and to prepare reports. Precedents are used as guides when conducting research and analysis. Preparation of reports or summaries requires synthesizing information. The research criterion is normally given in general terms by the counsel or senior paralegal. Often cases, files, projects or queries related to one known single area of law with no subdivision. Should subdivisions exist, counsel or senior paralegal will provide additional instructions to direct research and analysis. The work requires skill when organizing information and files, determining the best course of action and entering data in database. Case/file/project administration requires simple adjustments because of similarity from one case/file/project to another.

Physical effort

Degree: 2

Points: 4

The work requires physical effort when sitting for long periods of time attending meetings and when working in the office. This is a frequent requirement of the work and time spent may vary from one to eight hours per day. Work also requires occasional bending and stretching to move boxes of documents (up to 10 kg), to retrieve files and documents and when organizing case/file project materials.

Sensory effort

Degree: 1

Points: 2

The work requires occasionally visually scanning documents and data to detect easily perceived differences in words.

Working conditions

Degree: 2

Points: 8

The work is usually performed in an open office concept, and at times is confined within libraries, boardrooms and courtrooms where there is exposure to either noise and poor air quality, or both. Most of the time, work is routine and repetitive and there is a lack of control over pace of work. Multiple demands, numerous interruptions and conflicting work priorities are the norm. Occasionally the work involves dealing with emotional, angry, confrontational or uncooperative parties.

Benchmark 4: Cataloguing Technician

Point rating: 2, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 4, 2, 2 = 131 points
Level: EC-02

Organization context and summary

Under general guidance of a librarian or team leader, provides online descriptions and public access points to Canada's published heritage collection. Extracts and analyzes information to classify and catalogue a range of publications in different fields and various languages. Provides support on the integrated library system to government and non-government clients.

Duties

  • Analyzes, classifies and describes Canada's published materials for public access.
  • Creates or reviews standardized descriptions and authority records for distribution to and use in Canadian and foreign libraries and databases.
  • Classifies Canadian publications in international classification systems for public access.
  • Communicates with Canadian publishers to obtain or provide information.

Decision making

Degree: 2

Points: 15

The work requires decisions regarding the interpretation and application of international and national cataloguing standards, policies and practices in creating bibliographic and authority records. There is latitude to make modifications to bibliographic methods and different approaches that may be required to best describe and classify the material to be published in the national bibliography, which is the authoritative source of information on Canadian publications consulted by scholars, researchers and the general public worldwide. Accuracy of the description has a direct impact on the integrity and reliability of the information contained in the catalogue and on the accessibility of published material in the collection.

Leadership and operational management

Degree: 1

Points: 5

The work requires assisting new staff members by explaining the work and processes and by reviewing their work to ensure accuracy. There is a requirement to participate in working groups looking at process improvements.

Communication

Degree: 2

Points: 25

The work requires communication with colleagues to exchange information, explain and discuss specialized cataloguing policies, procedures and techniques defined by national and international standards. Communication with publishers and authors requires judgment and tact in obtaining the information necessary to create an accurate authority record. Writing and editing skills are required to compose succinct and clear authority and bibliographic records that identify and describe published heritage materials to facilitate access by the public and staff.

Knowledge of specialized fields

Degree: 2

Points: 15

The work requires knowledge of theories and principles of cataloguing and classification, including methods, techniques and practices to describe, organize and research bibliographic materials and propose improvements to work processes, and knowledge of cataloguing standards to catalogue selected publications according to internationally accepted standards and practices to ensure collocation of related materials in large databases and the provision of access to Canada's published heritage holdings.

Contextual knowledge

Degree: 2

Points: 20

The work requires knowledge of publishing practices in Canada, including the various forms of trade and government publishing to research and organize bibliographic materials, and knowledge of International Standard Serial Numbers (ISSN) program policies and procedures to assign such numbers to Canadian serials for registration in the international database. Knowledge of content and organization of departmental collections is required to appropriately describe the material and ensure it can easily be retrieved. Knowledge of departmental and national bibliographic products is required to ensure appropriate selection and coding of material to be processed. Knowledge of legislation and policy related to the program mandate and objectives of the department, such as legal deposit, is also required.

Research and analysis

Degree: 2

Points: 30

The work requires performing specialized research to determine the accurate description and the correct standardization form of access points. Research through reference sources or contacts with publishers and authors is required to determine authoritative forms of names for persons and corporate bodies. The work requires analysis of content and nature of a publication to determine the correct choice and form of entry, the appropriate access points and descriptive information according to international standards to facilitate access to items in the national bibliographic database and collection.

Physical effort

Degree: 4

Points: 10

The work mainly requires sitting for long period of times at a computer to search, manipulate and code data. There is an occasional requirement to lift, carry and move heavy objects, collection materials and/or boxes over 10 kg.

Sensory effort

Degree: 2

Points: 3

The work regularly requires using visual and auditory senses to obtain bibliographic data from digital and print publications to detect physical differences between publications, to detect damage and to identify the bibliographic data and subject content of publications that are not eye-readable form (i.e., video or sound recordings on DVD and CD).

Working conditions

Degree: 2

Points: 8

The work is performed in an open office environment with little privacy. There is continuous pressure to adapt to changing or conflicting work priorities, to meet turnaround times for cataloguing new publications while coping with large volumes of incoming materials and little control over the usability of working tools. Manipulation of old books, manuscripts or artifacts can result in occasional exposure to dust and mold.

Benchmark 5: Senior Research Assistant

Point rating: 3, 2, 3, 3, 3, 2, 1, 1, 1 = 220 points
Level: EC-03

Organization context and summary

Reporting directly to an economist, within a team responsible for socio-economic analysis supporting the work of regional economists, researchers and consultants of the various regional business lines and offices. The work involves the research, development, processing, organization and analysis of statistical data and socio-economic and demographic information to support the development and analysis of service delivery and the creation of knowledge and information products on the labour market.

Duties

  • Plans and organizes the collection of data and information on the economy, the labour market and target clients, as well as administrative data related to regional economists and researchers' work programs and the needs of the various business lines.
  • Manages the acquisition and processing of data from various sources and resolves problems related to data and statistics production service; creates or modifies related methods, techniques, processes and procedures.
  • Validates and controls the quality and integrity of collected data and information in computerized databases.
  • Designs, produces and ensures the maintenance of database structures and creates computerized tools that facilitates user access to databases and uses report production applications to prepare input to reports and presentations.
  • Provides functional guidance, advice and training to users and responds to requests for improved tools and information related to statistical data collection techniques.

Decision making

Degree: 3

Points: 35

The work requires identifying statistical data needs of regional economists, researchers, consultants and managers, selecting the appropriate sources of data or processing method, ensuring data validation and integrity; and adapting methods, techniques and approaches used in the collection, processing, analysis and dissemination of statistical data in a given area of specialization; identifying and resolving problems, applying precedent or proposing solutions to management to resolve technical problems, alter existing methods or techniques or adopt new approaches. There is a requirement to design interactive tools to facilitate the selection and use of socio-economic and administrative databases for clients and decide on the most suitable presentation format to meet the needs of specific audiences. Decisions can have an impact on the quality of the research and the results of study components used by economists, researchers and consultants of the region's various business lines to develop strategic options, segment strategies, service offerings or strategic directions.

Leadership and operational management

Degree: 2

Points: 20

Works within a project team of economists and researchers. The work requires coaching and training users in the selection and use of statistical and operational data, providing technical advice on methods to use to capture, retrieve and organize the information in databases and providing advice and training on the use of tools, computerized programs, data and information. There is a requirement to plan and establish acquisition needs for databases and information, to manage purchases for which there are agreements in place, and to make recommendations regarding financial forecasts required and to propose database replacement solutions to management. The work requires preserving and maintaining computerized databases, ensuring accessibility while protecting the confidentiality of personal information collected and manipulated, and making sure that directives and methodologies are followed by users when information and data are consolidated as part of forecasting exercises, surveys or information collection.

Communication

Degree: 3

Points: 50

Responds to requests for data, analyzes and interpretation and provides advice to staff, managers, agency representatives and partners; provides instruction and training to staff involved in data retrieval and analysis relating to appropriate data sources and provides instruction on the interpretation and application of input standards and on associated data extraction procedures to staff members with varying levels of knowledge of data management and use of the systems. Maintains effective working relationships with a wide range of technical specialists within the department to ensure continued access to relevant and reliable data, to share information on current studies, trends and developments in research and analysis, to resolve problems associated with data and with the adaptation of study methodologies and procedures, and to resolve technical issues.

Knowledge of specialized fields

Degree: 3

Points: 35

The work requires the knowledge of methods, techniques and practices of statistics and general knowledge of econometric calculation to manage the collection, processing, presentation and quality control of data, to identify problems related to data capture and manipulation, to create and/or adapt related methods, techniques, processes or take corrective measures to improve the efficiency and quality of the data and of the statistics production service. The work requires knowledge of national and provincial economies and labour market primary data sources, structure and conditions in order to process them in such a way that they are accessible to clients. Knowledge of basic economic concepts and principles is required to understand the links with processed data and information and thus better establish client needs and meet their requirements. Knowledge of surveys and computerized research tools and data management systems, application and software is required to design, perform upkeep on and monitor performance of databases and automated tools as well as ensure data completeness and quality.

Contextual knowledge

Degree: 3

Points: 40

The work requires the knowledge of users' work programs and subject matter areas or areas of research or study, including the labour market, industrial sectors, demographic communities and segments and service needs in order to define the scope of statistical data collection and processing methods. There is a requirement to know various data sources and resource persons among partner organizations and other external agencies to obtain the expertise required to understand the data, acquire databases, transform them and make them accessible to various users. In addition to the knowledge of the department's mandate and mission, the work requires knowledge of the clients' organizational structure, programs and objectives as well as links between work unit and program activities and those of regional and clients' and partners' business lines to ensure the appropriate collection, integrity and application of data and analysis methods. Knowledge of legislative provisions related to research studies is required to better understand study requirements and thereby ensure quality and applicability of data. Knowledge of the Privacy Act is required to prevent the dissemination of compromising information, and knowledge of the Access to Information Act and the Statistics Act under which the data is collected is also required. The work requires knowledge of private-sector computer products available in order to recommend to management innovative means of processing information and maintaining databases.

Research and analysis

Degree: 2

Points: 30

The work requires retrieving, collecting and validating data to ensure that data requested by clients is properly selected, is reliable and relevant to the area of research or socio-economic study, and that data integrity is maintained. There is a requirement to analyze current data collection, database structures, data warehouse structure and contents, as well as the methods and procedures for processing, revising, compiling and presenting data in order to formulate recommendations regarding their possible modification or replacement in support of research, studies and the production of customized statistical reports. The work involves foreseeing expected results and analyzing deviations found in trial results, determining sources of error or anomaly and designing appropriating codes to correct. The manipulation and presentation of data requires skill to select the appropriate format according to users' needs and chosen information. Skill is required to formulate electronic information products to facilitate and increase efficiency in retrieval and access to data by regional clients and in response to requests from internal and external clients.

Physical effort

Degree: 1

Points: 3

Must remain seated for very long periods of time in front of a computer to examine various documents and conduct analyses. Must also remain seated during periodic meetings, to bend and stretch to take documents and, at times, carry piles of documents, record holders, laptop computer or projector for meetings.

Sensory effort

Degree: 1

Points: 2

Sensory effort is occasionally required to detect physical differences in the contents of the data or the documents while preparing reports or examining and revising the work of team members.

Working conditions

Degree: 1

Points: 5

The work is conducted in an open-plan office where exposure to the glare of a computer screen and to ambient noise and conversations occurs. This position sometimes requires moving between different buildings to take part in meetings with colleagues and partners and sometimes travel to another region. Work requires dealing with changing deadlines and time constraints when developing special projects and preparing reports or presentation.

Benchmark 6: Program Evaluation Officer

Point rating: 3, 1, 4, 3, 3, 3, 1, 1, 1 = 275 points
Level: EC-04

Organization context and summary

Within a team under the supervision of the Senior Program Analyst within the department's Evaluation Directorate, responsible for conducting evaluations of health programs, policies and initiatives in accordance with the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat Policy on Results and related directive. The work involves providing program evaluation support for timely, strategically-focused, objective and evidence-based information on the relevance and performance of existing policies, programs and initiatives.

Duties

  • Works as part of a project team, provides recommendations related to the nature and scope of studies, evaluation study approaches, general data/information requirements, success indicators, and modifications to analytical methods and techniques used in assigned evaluation projects or initiatives.
  • Conducts literature research; identifies, gathers, analyzes and synthesizes quantitative and qualitative data; participates in the conduct of interviews and focus groups; applies analytical tools and techniques to determine implications of evaluation results and formulates conclusions; interprets and reports on trends; analyzes the effect of new or revised policies concerning program evaluation.
  • Assesses current and future requirements for statistical data; interprets and analyzes statistical information and databases to support findings and conclusions.
  • Drafts and writes reports, presentations, briefing notes and memoranda for senior evaluation staff and management on elements of evaluated health programs.
  • Monitors a portfolio of health program evaluation files to track information and the implementation of evaluation recommendations.
  • Attends departmental and interdepartmental meetings to discuss files, issues and evaluation requirements.

Decision making

Degree: 3

Points: 35

The work requires making recommendations concerning the nature, scope and objectives of studies, as well as evaluation study approaches. Recommendations are made concerning general data and information requirements for assigned studies, success indicators and changes to analytical methods and techniques used in studies. Judgment is required when collecting, analyzing and synthesizing qualitative and quantitative research data. There is some adaptation of precedents required when making recommendations concerning the modification of analytical methods and techniques used in studies. The adaptations result in improved work methods.

Leadership and operational management

Degree: 1

Points: 5

The work requires assisting new employees in adapting to the work environment and explaining work processes, and participating on project teams. There is a requirement to maintain a personal computer as well as other office equipment.

Communication

Degree: 4

Points: 75

The work requires using writing, verbal and presentation skills to synthesize, clarify, explain and interpret complex, technical and sensitive information relating to health program evaluation in the form of discussion papers, advice, reports, briefing notes and presentations. This information is adapted into formats that can be understood by government officials, members of interest groups and the public who may have a limited knowledge of the subject. The information is used by senior colleagues, senior management and departmental officials. Consultation skills are required to maintain client/stakeholder networks and foster collaborative working relationships with clients and stakeholders, and to conduct interviews with managers and staff.

Knowledge of specialized fields

Degree: 3

Points: 35

The work requires knowledge of theories and principles of statistics to participate as a team member in the analysis of programs and policies and to interpret and analyze statistical information and data. It also requires knowledge of the theories, methods and techniques related to quantitative and qualitative research including social science research and program evaluation.

Contextual knowledge

Degree: 3

Points: 40

The work requires knowledge of the structure, organization, mandate and vision of the department and/or agency. The work requires knowledge of health-related legislation and policy and the competing interests of the federal and provincial governments. The work also requires knowledge of department or agency business lines in order to provide effective input into program evaluations.

Research and analysis

Degree: 3

Points: 75

The work requires making recommendations concerning the types and forms of qualitative and quantitative information requirements for studies, including success indicators. The work also requires making recommendations on changes to analytical methods and techniques used in evaluations and studies and conducting assessments of current and future requirements for statistical data. The work involves conducting literature reviews and analytical studies to support evaluation projects, the writing of reports, briefing notes and Question Period notes.

Physical effort

Degree: 1

Points: 3

The work requires sitting at a desk for long periods to read, write or analyze data and information; keyboarding at a computer terminal for extended periods; and remaining seated for up to two hours at a time when attending meetings.

Sensory effort

Degree: 1

Points: 2

There is a requirement to concentrate while analyzing and synthesizing large amounts of information.

Working conditions

Degree: 1

Points: 5

The work is performed in an open office environment with exposure to office noise and involves tight deadlines and time constraints, conflicting priorities, while working with internal and external clients and stakeholders. Occasional travel is required.

Benchmark 7: Economist/Sociologist

Point rating: 3, 3, 4, 3, 2, 3, 1, 1, 1 = 300 points 
Level: EC-04

Organization context and summary

Under the general guidance of the Senior Economist/Sociologist or the Program Manager, provides statistical information services and products related to the commercial, industrial, financial, social and economic conditions of Canada. This information is used by departmental staff, all levels of government, industry, academia and other special interest groups in the decision-making process in support of public policies and programs development and evaluation.

Duties

  • Undertakes the analysis of statistical program data and assists in the preparation of analytical material for internal use and publication purposes.
  • Participates in the analysis of socio-economic trends and developments to assess the feasibility and impact of new or modified statistical programs.
  • Suggests feedback on collection, processing, editing, compilation and presentation methods and procedures, and assists in the development of recommendations for improvements to survey methods and activities.
  • Provides assistance and subject matter advice to data users within and outside the department.
  • Undertakes subject matter studies and reviews in support of project teams or senior officers.
  • Leads project teams involved in special studies.

Decision making

Degree: 3

Points: 35

The work requires identifying and assessing changes and developments in the subject area, determining the impact on program subject-matter content and recommending alternative statistical methods and approaches; modifying existing techniques and approaches to improve program coverage or to meet specific needs and to develop subject-matter concepts and definitions; and developing operational plans, establishing project priorities and identifying areas necessitating study at the local, regional or national levels.

The work also involves reviewing data collection and information systems to determine the usefulness of existing data sources, to propose changes to the data collection system and to assess the feasibility and impact of new or modified statistical programs; identifying and evaluating problems in the collection; processing, editing, compilation and presentation of statistical information to provide solutions or recommendations to management and to resolve subject-matter, conceptual and technical problems.

Leadership and operational management

Degree: 3

Points: 50

The work requires leading project teams involved in special studies, setting goals and objectives, establishing plans with priorities and milestones, monitoring work and preparing budgets for special projects with authority to allocate funds. There is a requirement to assess human resources needs and make recommendations on resourcing solutions, to provide feedback on employee performance and develop training plans. The work requires providing input to budgets based on operational needs and by obtaining/providing cost estimates for personnel, supplies, equipment purchases.

Communication

Degree: 4

Points: 75

Information and advice is provided to managers, data users and clients on matters related to subject-matter concepts used in the development and operation of a statistical database and to the data processing environment in general. Program subject-matter content requirements are discussed with operations managers responsible for data collection, other subject matter and systems specialists, clients or service providers to comprehend and elaborate the framework and conditions within which statistical development and operations will occur. There is a requirement to liaise with other subject matter specialists and users to develop and translate subject matter requirements into specifications for system development, to suggest improvements to ongoing programs, to negotiate procedural modifications and to establish project plans, priorities and timelines. The work requires writing and presenting detailed subject matter and technical concepts, definitions and terms in common terminology in order to explain and clarify divisional program content and applications through information manuals, training packages or monitoring procedures.

Knowledge of specialized fields

Degree: 3

Points: 35

The work requires knowledge of the concepts, methods and techniques used in the collection, processing, editing, compilation and presentation of statistical data in order to coordinate and advise on subject-matter development and resolve subject-matter concept and definition issues. There is a requirement for the knowledge of computer systems analysis and processing as well as survey software packages to manage the design, development, testing, maintenance and implementation of processing systems, to design specifications for the testing of data, and to maintain and develop databases. The work requires knowledge of the theories and principles of economics, econometric methods and techniques and of sampling theory along with a working knowledge of survey design, time series and special analysis and forecasting. The knowledge of current or emerging economic and social issues relating to the program area is also required in order to identify and resolve existing and potential subject-matter conflicts, duplication and gaps. The knowledge of management techniques and principles is required to manage financial and human resources, either directly or within a matrix management environment.

Contextual knowledge

Degree: 2

Points: 20

The work requires the knowledge of statistical programs related to the area of expertise in order to identify and select the appropriate sources of information and to identify and evaluate data conflicts. There is a requirement to understand client needs for statistical data in order to provide advice and guidance on subject-matter concepts, methods, techniques and results. Knowledge of the divisional mandate, policies, objectives, priorities, practices, standards, process and procedures is required in order to coordinate and manage ongoing operational and/or special projects. The work requires knowledge of the Statistics Act and other pertinent acts and departmental policies to explain legislative and policy requirements to data suppliers, users and others with respect to the manipulation, storage and retrieval of data. Knowledge of the Privacy Act is required as it pertains to the security and confidentiality of data to ensure their actions and those of their subordinates are in compliance.

Research and analysis

Degree: 3

Points: 75

The work requires analyzing and compiling geographic, demographic, social, economic and/or labour market characteristics to prepare forecasts; developing new subject-matter methods, concepts and definitions and conducting studies and analytical projects to improve existing surveys and data; and analyzing current collection, manipulation and presentation methods and procedures to determine their relevancy and the need for modification or replacement with alternative approaches.

The work involves interpreting program and user needs for statistical information, conducting suitability assessments of existing data products and services and to translate them into a concrete, timely and affordable product. There is a requirement to review the results of projects and surveys in order to provide interpretation and analysis on subject-matter concepts and definitions, survey methods, statistical applications and techniques used.

Physical effort

Degree: 1

Points: 3

The work requires frequent and extended periods of sitting at a workstation while keyboarding, proofreading, telephoning, reviewing data, or writing text. There are occasional periods of physical exertion, such as bending and stretching, to retrieve, organize and distribute publications, printouts, documents or files. There may be a requirement to carry equipment, presentation material and document cases to meetings.

Sensory effort

Degree: 1

Points: 2

There is an occasional requirement for sensory observation when comparing old and new versions of data.

Working conditions

Degree: 1

Points: 5

The work is performed in an open office environment with exposure to glare from a computer screen, noise from conversations, telephones, traffic and equipment in the immediate area.

Benchmark 8: Paralegal

Point rating: 3, 2, 4, 4, 3, 3, 2, 1, 2 = 314 points
Level: EC-04

Organization context and summary

Reporting to senior paralegals or legal counsel or manager in the host department, within a case/file/project team, delivers paralegal services (advisory/litigation) to counsel, senior paralegals and/or directly to the client department(s). Delivers full legal technical support services to counsel regarding cases, files or projects of low or medium complexity. Delivers legal technical support services to counsel regarding specific activities in cases, files or projects of high to mega complexity. Has the autonomy to manage assigned activities of medium complexity in cases, files or projects.

Duties

  • Conducts exhaustive research and standard analysis on a variety of legal questions for which there are a limited number of precedents that are not readily available. Precedents may have to be adapted to each case, file or project. Prepares summaries and recommendations.
  • Organizes sensitive and/or confidential documents, information, and data for case files.
  • Conducts activities of medium complexity pertaining to cases, files and projects including first draft of legal opinions.
  • Assists and co-operates with counsel in administering cases, files and projects of medium complexity and anticipates how they will unfold.  Has autonomy to administer non-routine cases, files and projects that are low in complexity for which precedents are not readily available.
  • Acts on behalf of clients and/or assists counsel during legal proceedings (e.g., small claims court, tax court, arraignment court, judgment debtor examinations and administrative tribunals).
  • Provides a wide range of technical advice for contacts regarding various legal procedures and proceedings.
  • Helps develop, maintain and update legal and administrative databases, and information management systems.
  • Supports and mentors co-workers.

Decision making

Degree: 3

Points: 35

The work requires providing legal support on cases, files and projects of medium complexity and/or for specific activities in cases, files and projects of high to mega complexity. This requires organizing a moderate volume of information and documents and determining the best course of action; acting as a contact point between parties; and preparing initial drafts of legal opinions for examination by counsel.

Makes recommendations to the legal advisor regarding the organization and general conduct of cases, files and projects and on strategies to adopt, and drafts legal documents. Autonomy to administer cases, files and projects of low complexity including identifying requirements for research and analysis, disclosure, and  organizational resources; analyzing and assessing requests; consolidating acts; developing arguments; attending meetings; negotiating settlements; and developing recommendations intended for the client, counsel, and/or investigative bodies. Acts on behalf of clients and/or assists counsel during legal proceedings (e.g., small claims court, tax court, summary trial court, judgment debt or examination and administrative tribunals). In the administration of cases, files and projects, precedents may not be readily available and there may be a requirement to adapt precedents specific to the file.

Overall, recommendations and/or decisions contribute to the outcome of the case/file/project. Provides general technical advice and opinions to co-workers, clients, legal service providers, interested parties, counsel or investigative bodies regarding law enforcement, common/civil and/or criminal law regarding the rules and procedure of the judicial system.

Leadership and operational management

Degree: 2

Points: 20

Coaching and mentoring skills are required to provide leadership and training to colleagues (counsel, legal assistants, paralegals). Informs clients, legal service providers and investigative bodies in legal procedures and processes relating to their mandate. This includes defining subject matter and coordinating training sessions for participants with varying levels of experience and knowledge. The level of difficulty varies according to individual training needs. Supporting and mentoring colleagues in online research, specialized legal software and administrative legal procedures. Organizes activities and provides the necessary legal support for the assigned case, file or project. Organizes financial resources associated with the case, file or project (e.g., collection of fines, statements of fees submitted by legal service providers and opposing counsel and contingent liability reports). Makes recommendations to counsel and/or clients regarding the amounts claimed, and, if necessary, has costs fixed by the courts. Has custody of, and is responsible for, personal computer or laptop and associated peripherals, databases, a significant volume of documents, office furniture, equipment, and materials used to perform own work.

Communication

Degree: 4

Points: 75

The work requires making contacts with departmental colleagues, client departments, police, law enforcement agencies, witnesses, non-represented parties, legal service providers, opposing counsel, other departments and agencies, international sectors, private sector entities, and the public to clarify a variety of issues, obtain information, provide advice, investigate requests, discuss legal issues and/or negotiate settlements. Communication skills are required to draft legal documents, question witnesses, take part in negotiations, develop arguments for submission to counsel or clients, negotiate settlements, present facts and arguments to the court and exchange information, explain and, if necessary, reformulate legal processes or procedures and respond to questions from others.

Knowledge of specialized fields

Degree: 4

Points: 55

The work requires in-depth understanding of legal theories and principles and in-depth knowledge and skill in using legal methods and techniques in specialized areas of practice and related legal terminology in order to conduct research and analysis on a variety of legal issues where precedents are limited.

Contextual knowledge

Degree: 3

Points: 40

The work requires knowledge of the Canadian judicial system and civil and criminal rules and procedures governing the operation of every level of court relating to the area of practice; and knowledge of the mandate, structure, policies and culture of the law enforcement agency, client department and/or other government organizations whose interests are associated with the case/file/project. Each file requires varied and sound knowledge of the case, file or project. Knowledge is required of the principles and techniques of project management to lead, plan and coordinate activities. Skill is required to anticipate possible developments and potential difficulties that could affect cases, files or projects. The work also requires knowledge of how to use specialized legal software and the ability to use a variety of administrative software programs to manage information and documentation related to cases, files and projects and to update information contained in databases and information systems.

Research and analysis

Degree: 3

Points: 75

The work requires advanced skills to conduct exhaustive research and standard analysis to find missing information or documentation as well as notice inconsistencies and erroneous information and to identify additional research and analysis that is needed. Research and analysis is particularly required when preparing documentation for cases, files or projects of medium complexity. Skill is required to summarize laws, jurisprudence, and technical, scientific and other expert reports. Research and analysis skill is required when organizing, monitoring and maintaining documents, information and data for cases, files and projects.

Working on cases, files and projects with the counsel involves conducting exhaustive research and standard analysis on a number of issues and consolidating the information in order to recommend an approach to the counsel and the client. Some precedents may exist, but every case file and project has its own research and data collection requirements. Administering cases, files and projects may require changes along the way and responding promptly by analyzing the new situation and preparing a new recommendation for the counsel, client department or investigative bodies.

The complexity of the case, file or project often increases owing to unforeseen and conflicting relationships between statutes, regulations and organizational policies.  Analyzes and interprets data and information in order to anticipate possible developments and difficulties that could affect cases, files and projects in order to manage risks. Issues that arise are submitted to the counsel with recommendations for resolving these issues. The work requires managing activities of medium complexity and/or specific activities in cases, files and projects of high to mega complexity. The work requires organizing a large volume of data from a wide variety of sources to identify the best course of action to take. The volume of information and its sensitivity adds to the difficulty in obtaining documents.

Physical effort

Degree: 2

Points: 4

The work requires physical effort when sitting for long periods to participate in meetings and when working in an office. This is a frequent requirement and time involved can range from one to eight hours per day. Work occasionally requires bending and stretching to move boxes of documents (up to 10 kg), retrieve files and documents and organize documentation for cases, files and projects.

Sensory effort

Degree: 1

Points: 2

Work requires occasionally visually scanning documents and data to detect easily perceived differences in words.

Working conditions

Degree: 2

Points: 8

The physical environment where the work is usually performed is in an open office environment, and is sometimes confined within libraries, meeting rooms and hearing rooms. There is exposure to noise and to poor air/ventilation quality.

Most of the time, there is no control over the pace of work. Multiple requests, numerous interruptions, conflicting work priorities and the need to respond to urgent requests and competing requirements from co-workers, client departments, investigative bodies and counsel are the norm. This results in workload priorities constantly having to be revised. Work occasionally involves interactions with emotional, angry, confrontational or uncooperative individuals. Long-term health problems can result from the increased stress levels.

Benchmark 9: Health Policy Analyst

Point rating: 4, 2, 4, 4, 4, 4, 1, 1, 1 = 400 points
Level: EC-05

Organization context and summary

Reporting to a managerial-level position in the host department, monitors, analyzes and synthesizes quantitative and qualitative data (economic, socio-economic, financial and statistical) to identify emerging policy issues, develop trends and statistical indicators, formulate policy recommendations and advice concerning complex health policy issues to support sound decision making for policy, project and program development and implementation of strategic initiatives of an economic/socio-economic nature.

Duties

  • Evaluates, analyzes, monitors various quantitative and qualitative data and synthesizes information relating to health policy, program and/or legislation obtained from central agencies, other federal departments and agencies, provinces and territories, international organizations, stakeholders, academics, and the general public in order to identify emerging regulatory health policy issues and trends and to assess and advise senior policy analysts and management on potential socio-economic impacts on existing short-, medium- and long-term policy, programs and projects.
  • Develops discussion papers and strategies, technical briefing notes and presentations that contribute to the development and evaluation of agreements and the preparation of Cabinet documents.
  • Manages and coordinates specific files or issues; analyzes the effect of policy strategies and formulates policy recommendations and advice for consideration by senior managers, other government organizations and private-sector officials on government and corporate policy and strategies; advises other departments and provincial territorial governments in area of expertise; analyzes broad government directions concerning health policy as well as the needs of a variety of stakeholders to determine their impact on policy development.
  • Establishes, liaises with and maintains client/stakeholder networks and expands the client base for research studies to facilitate the collection and exchange of intelligence; keeps abreast of issues and trends and assesses the impact of policy development, programs and strategies in order to mitigate potential conflict.
  • Participates in and leads components of project teams; recommends the nature, objectives, scope and terms of reference of studies, recommends data and information requirements and policy research or study approaches, analytical methods and objectives and organizes studies.
  • Attends meetings to discuss files and issues and to coordinate requirements and interpret trends; analyzes the effect of new or revised policies or programs; and supports departmental strategies to influence the adoption of policies as related to the program.

Decision making

Degree: 4

Points: 60

The work requires latitude when examining policy options and proposals, integrating concepts, and analyzing the short-, medium- and long-term impact of economic, social, political, ethical, scientific, statistical and legislative factors on policy and regulatory proposals. This includes staying abreast of emerging issues, gathering intelligence and conducting background analysis by seeking information on content, coverage, funding and probable response of other departments, provincial and territorial governments and stakeholder groups to existing policies or those policies under development; writing briefing material for project managers and senior analysts. The work involves analysis of broad government directions concerning health policy issues and policy positions advocated by stakeholders, including other federal departments and agencies, provincial and territorial governments, public and private health organizations, interest groups, and the general public. The work requires formulating policy recommendations and advice for consideration by senior policy analysts and managers and ultimately by the Minister and Deputy Minister as well as other government organizations. Provides advice to other federal officials and provincial or territorial officials in area of expertise and contributes to the development and evaluation of agreements, Treasury Board submissions and memoranda to Cabinet (MCs). Decisions and recommendations may influence the effective and comprehensive management of policy files or issues, the viability of policy proposals and strategies, the policy direction for the department relative to complex health policy issues, and the departmental position on such issues.

Leadership and operational management

Degree: 2

Points: 20

The work requires leading components of short-term project teams and working groups. Recommendations are given on project scope, priorities, objectives, milestones, schedules, analytical methods and resource requirements. Coordinates and reviews work of project teams, monitors progress, assesses performance, and provides guidance and motivation to team members. Handles sensitive materials related to health policy and conducts risk assessments of options for resolution.

Communication

Degree: 4

Points: 75

The work involves conducting briefings, providing advice on health policy issues to internal clients, senior management; adapting terminology to specific audiences and delivering presentations to management committees, colleagues and clients or stakeholders on regulatory or policy issues and strategic direction; formulating policy recommendations; and coordinating health policy development requirements. Skills are required to discuss and ensure the understanding of government health policies and strategies with senior managers, other government organizations and private-sector officials, and to lead the work of components of project teams. There is a requirement to establish and build client/stakeholder networks and foster collaborative working relationships. Writing skills are required to prepare ministerial correspondence, reports, papers, briefing notes, agreements and legislative or regulatory amendments.

Knowledge of specialized fields

Degree: 4

Points: 55

The work requires knowledge of specialized research methodologies in fields such as economics, sociology, demography, or statistics, and knowledge of policy analysis and development concepts, techniques and practices in order to monitor emerging trends and issues related to health policy. This knowledge is required in order to conduct horizontal policy analysis, public policy reviews on public health issues, and market/sector and comparative analysis; to assess the significance and impact of various policy strategies; and to integrate government, ministerial and departmental priorities within the public policy environment by formulating recommendations for management of recipient files or issues. The work requires the modification or development of health policy or programs.

Contextual knowledge

Degree: 4

Points: 60

The work requires knowledge of the mission, mandate, organization, and functioning of the federal government, the department, other federal departments and agencies, provinces and territories, and international organizations, including knowledge of business lines, relevant legislation and regulation, and policies and programs affecting health policy. Knowledge is required of key stakeholders (e.g., NGOs) to understand related business lines and assess policy and program context, analyze proposals, assess linkages and interrelationships, and provide advice to senior analysts and management. Knowledge is required of the academic community, recent trends and directions in research in order to identify and understand emerging trends and issues in the health policy sector, and factors likely to affect the development of public policies in the future.

Research and analysis

Degree: 4

Points: 120

The work requires a solid knowledge of research and analysis principles and techniques in order to conduct analytical activities, to recommend study or research approaches, to propose changes to existing or proposed policies, and to identify knowledge gaps, linkages, interrelationships and trends in policy development and research or program initiatives. The work requires solid sector-based subject matter knowledge of financial analysis for forecasting and of statistical techniques, including investment and cost-benefit analysis to evaluate programs and policy proposals. The work involves assessing the relative quality and validity of the data being evaluated, its comparability over time and its relevancy from both a policy or program perspective. The work also involves evaluating various quantitative and qualitative data, including economic, socio-economic, financial and statistical data, in order to develop trends and statistical indicators. The work involves analyzing the short-, medium- and long-term impact of economic, social, political, ethical, scientific, statistical and legislative factors on policy and regulatory proposals.

Physical effort

Degree: 1

Points: 3

The work requires sitting for prolonged periods and extended eye focus when reviewing documents or data, attending meetings or working on a computer.

Sensory effort

Degree: 1

Points: 2

The work requires occasionally visually scanning documents and data to detect easily perceived differences in words.

Working conditions

Degree: 1

Points: 5

The work is conducted in a standard office environment where there is exposure to office noise and glare from computer screen. There is exposure to stress due to changing deadlines resulting in time pressures. Occasional travel is required.

Benchmark 10: Economic Policy Analyst

Point rating: 4, 2, 4, 4, 4, 4, 1, 1, 1 = 400 points
Level: EC-05

Organization context and summary

Reporting to the manager, analyzes, evaluates and interprets socio-economic information and data, and formulates advice on industrial, sectoral and policy issues.

Duties

  • Conducts research projects and studies and provides both qualitative and quantitative analysis on complex socio-economic and industrial/sectoral development issues. Drafts and presents research papers and reports.
  • Develops policy recommendations on socio-economic and industrial/sectoral development issues and analyzes the potential impact of different policy options.
  • Advises on the development of research methodologies and plans for the conduct of socio-economic analysis and policy analysis.
  • Formulates advice on complex and sensitive issues related to industrial/sectoral policy, development, competitiveness, productivity, innovation, trade and investment.
  • Develops procedures and mechanisms for the definition, collection, verification of data and information, and for the maintenance of information inventories and data banks.
  • Monitors economic trends within Canada and internationally, policy evolution in federal, provincial, and foreign governments as it affects specific industrial sectors or policy areas, and published research and analysis bearing on government policies on industrial/sectoral development.
  • Maintains a network of peers and consults with colleagues in the federal and provincial government, industrial associations and non-governmental organizations (NGOs); represents the Branch on departmental working committees.
  • Provides guidance and instruction to junior economists and research assistants and leads short-term projects.

Decision making

Degree: 4

Points: 60

Works concurrently, under limited guidance, on a number of assigned files involving identifying, assessing and linking a variety of complex (statistical/economic) information products and submissions and determining their value to individual assignments or meetings; analyzing and interpreting data collected, and preparing recommendations to address specific issues of concern; weighing and balancing interests, and advocating positions in a constructive manner; advising on the development of research methodologies and developing procedures and mechanisms for the definition, collection, verification of data and information; and maintaining information inventories and data banks.

The assignments and objectives are usually defined in general terms. The work requires independent action and judgment, and the challenge is made more difficult by the requirement to frame specific questions and issues to address and to identify problems to be solved in a context where the relationships among issues under review are not always apparent or readily quantifiable and lack precedents.

Judgment is exercised in the application of different types of research methods and data sources, and selection and/or modification of appropriate research techniques to ensure that the outcomes are useful and meet the diverse economic data requirements. Results of studies and the preparation of background reports and briefing material on the results of analysis containing interpretations and policy implications are presented to the Senior Policy Analyst for review, prior to presentation to Branch management and senior management. Judgment and decisions have a direct impact on outcomes and consequently on the quality of advice and substance of policy options.

Leadership and operational management

Degree: 2

Points: 20

 Requires being responsible for the provision of guidance and instruction to junior economists and research assistants and for the leadership of short-term project teams composed of internal and contracted individuals; being responsible for assigning and supervising projects and establishing objectives, methodologies, developing procedures and mechanisms, performance and quality standards to achieve the assigned project results; and the revision of the work of professional contractors to ensure compliance with quality and delivery requirements, recommending necessary changes and/or acceptance of the work.

Communication

Degree: 4

Points: 75

The work requires communication skills to adapt material, explain and clarify complex issues, provide information and advice, exchange views with colleagues and other stakeholders on technical concepts, and engage effectively with colleagues as a member of various project teams and subject area teams operating under different leadership styles. Skill is also required to synthesize information and explain its potential impacts on issues, and to present the rational justification of policy and research positions to diverse audiences.

Knowledge of specialized fields

Degree: 4

Points: 55

The work requires knowledge of theories and application of economics; knowledge of the national accounting framework for Canada, industrial classification systems and industry surveys as well as international statistical databases in order to understand the provincial, national and global factors affecting the Canadian marketplace and its various industrial sectors. The work also requires knowledge of quantitative and qualitative research theories, methodologies and tools, statistical theories and techniques (sampling and surveying) and proficiency in complex analysis and problem solving techniques in order to design and lead studies; determine research methodologies; apply and/or modify methodologies for data analyses, measurement, interpretation and reporting; analyze and formulate advice on industrial, sectoral and policy issues; develop procedures and mechanisms for the definition, collection, verification of data; prepare industry -specific information products; monitor and maintain information inventories and data banks; and participate in information exchange/intelligence networks to ensure consistency and comparability of industry-based data and economic indicators.

Contextual knowledge

Degree: 4

Points: 60

The work requires knowledge of the machinery of government operations to engage effectively in the departmental policy development process and the system of interdepartmental consultation and to advance information and recommendations to the Deputy Minister, Minister and Cabinet Committees; knowledge of the roles and responsibilities of central agencies and government departments to anticipate multi-dimensional issues, participate in multi-departmental and federal/client/stakeholder project teams, and enhance knowledge sharing; knowledge of horizontal issues impacting on the development of policies and programs and the delivery of services to domain areas of specialization (e.g., technology developments, socio-economic concerns, business financing, skills development, trade and regulatory issues, political and public opinions); knowledge of domains affected by departmental decisions; knowledge of research institutes and academic associations involved in economic research to ensure that external opinions are considered when developing policy options; and knowledge of the positions, interests, priorities, structure and key officials of other organizations to develop information of interest to them and conduct studies on policy issues of mutual interest.

Research and analysis

Degree: 4

Points: 120

Conducts research and analyses to support the development of policy frameworks and positions for consideration by senior management, other departments or stakeholder organizations. Is expected to draw from a range of data and qualitative information from diverse sources, including consultation with stakeholders, to forecast or analyze the potential impacts of implementing different policy options. Formulates advice on complex and sensitive issues related to industrial, sectoral and government socio-economic policies, programs and regulations. Monitors and performs competitive analysis of industrial sectors and sub-sectors nationally and internationally. Proposes, designs, and leads short-term studies and working groups and/or participates in major project initiatives, including participation in the development of industry-specific strategies aimed at a range of business development strategies, plans and activities focused on trade, investment, and innovation. The work requires research and analysis to define economic indicators and to identify problems and gaps in the existing body of economic research.

Physical effort

Degree: 1

Points: 3

Physical effort is required to sit or stand for varying time periods during meetings, delivering presentations or using computer equipment; to operate computer equipment (keyboarding) and to travel to attend meetings outside of the office.

Sensory effort

Degree: 1

Points: 2

The work requires comparing versions of documents and reports going through iterative states of drafting to identify and assess readily evident changes in text and data.

Working conditions

Degree: 1

Points: 5

The work is carried out under pressure in a demanding environment resulting from changing demands and shifting operational priorities. There is exposure to frequent interruptions from colleagues and external parties as the work is interdependent on the co-operation of other sectors/business units.

Benchmark 11: Social Policy Researcher

Point rating: 4, 2, 5, 4, 4, 4, 1, 2, 3 = 433 points
Level: EC-05

Organization context and summary

Reporting to a senior analyst or manager, provides subject matter expertise in statistics and economics for an assigned area of specialization in the field of sociology such as community development, labour market and labour force development in support of Aboriginal or Northern policies and programs or to resolve Aboriginal claims. Services provided include research, statistical surveys and qualitative studies, analysis, reports and recommendations related to Aboriginal participation in the economy. Material is developed for the consideration of a supervising senior specialist, managers and senior managers. The position serves as a departmental expert in an area of specialization.

Duties

  • Plans and carries out complex sociological research projects and environmental scans in an assigned area of specialization to help with the resolution of Aboriginal claims or in support of Aboriginal and Northern policy and program development and management.
  • Contributes to strategic plans, policy and regulatory proposals and Memoranda to Cabinet, prepares supporting arguments for Treasury Board submissions and briefing notes, and prepares presentations to project teams, working groups and senior officials within the department or in organizations external to the department within or outside of Canada.
  • Evaluates the economic and statistical evidential basis in an assigned area of specialization to develop options for addressing weaknesses and optimizing strengths of departmental policies, programs, and legislation/regulations.
  • Represents the work unit at meetings with various stakeholders to exchange information on issues within an assigned area of specialization, to collaborate on the identification or examination of strategic data, and to coordinate statistical survey, policy or regulatory initiatives and proposals.
  • Leads (unit, sector or departmental) project teams, as required, on a short-term basis, in an assigned area of specialization.

Decision making

Degree: 4

Points: 60

There is a requirement to plan and carry out complex sociological research projects as well as to plan and conduct environmental scans to identify interrelationships between social and economic development, trends and issues in social and economic legislation and policies and to identify data requirements. Research projects also examine the impacts of departmental policies, programs and legislation/regulations or departmental accountability, to identify weaknesses in the management of issues, to recommend new approaches to resolve them, or to recommend new areas of study to gain greater insight.

The work requires making decisions on appropriate methodology to apply to research, in order to produce results that stand up to professional challenges. Owing to the complexity of the issues addressed, precedents do not generally exist and risks can only be estimated. Options under consideration generally represent new approaches or new policy or legislative/regulatory directions and typically involve risks that need to be managed.

The work requires the evaluation of economic and statistical evidential basis in an assigned area of specialization in order to develop options for addressing weaknesses, optimizing strengths and assessing initiatives touching departmental policies, programs, and legislation/regulations.

Leadership and operational management

Degree: 2

Points: 20

There is a requirement to lead project teams (unit, sector or departmental), as required and on a short-term basis, in an area of specialization. There is a responsibility for the selection and analysis of data and for the identification of trends to support policy/regulatory developments and planning options. There is a requirement for assigning tasks and explaining responsibilities to team members, for guiding, monitoring and sharing expertise with team members, and for reporting on project team progress and team member performance to a supervising senior analyst.

Communication

Degree: 5

Points: 100

The work requires participating in meetings with other federal government departments, interdepartmental organizations, Aboriginal and Northern community groups, academic institutions, provincial/territorial and other governments nationally and in specific regions to exchange information, collaborate on the identification or examination of strategic data, and coordinate statistical surveys in support of policy or regulatory initiatives and proposals. There is a requirement to gain the acceptance and co-operation of partners on modifications to statistical collection or analytical methodology, and to develop a coherent approach to resolving issues.

Reports are produced to present findings with supporting theoretical and evidential arguments for alternative courses of action in response to departmental strategic and horizontal priorities or complex strategic issues on which the department is the lead to assist departmental officials to plan and develop options.

Knowledge of specialized fields

Degree: 4

Points: 55

The work requires knowledge of the theories, principles and methodology of mathematical and statistical economics or statistical science, as applied in labour market and workforce demographics and business statistics, statistical surveys and other statistical analyses in sociology. This knowledge is applied in studies looking at the participation rates of Aboriginal people (individuals and firms) in the labour market, business development, land use and the institutional barriers and opportunities for investing in and developing Aboriginal lands, the demographic composition of Aboriginal populations and communities, educational levels, the availability of educational opportunities for Aboriginal people and the economic implications of educational levels for the economic development of the Aboriginal people and their lands, and indicators of northern development. Studies assess the effectiveness of departmental policies and practices in achieving stated priorities, strategic outcomes and program activity results.

The work requires knowledge of the theories and principles of both macro- and microeconomics and an understanding of the linkages with sociology and the area of specialization in order to plan and carry out research related to Aboriginal claims, Northern development, and labour force and labour market development. The knowledge of mathematical, quantitative and qualitative methods is required to plan, lead and conduct research projects and studies; to provide evidential data and recommendations used for departmental policy and organizational decisions; and to assess the economic merits of policy, program, legislative/regulatory or governance options.

Contextual knowledge

Degree: 4

Points: 60

The work requires knowledge of departmental business lines and organizations, its mandate, programs, policies and legislation and its role in meeting the Government of Canada's obligations and commitments to Aboriginal people and for fulfilling the federal government's constitutional responsibilities in the North. The work requires knowledge of the Department of Indigenous and Northern Affairs and governing legislation, including the Canadian Constitution, the Indian Act, territorial acts, treaties, comprehensive claims and self-government agreements as well as various other statutes affecting Aboriginal people and the North.

The work also requires knowledge of the federal organizations delivering Aboriginal and northern programs and services through partnerships with Aboriginal communities and federal-provincial or federal-territorial agreements The work requires the knowledge of the principles and practices of key institutions in the federal government and horizontal federal government plans and priorities to carry out environmental scans of activities, policy and program initiatives. This work supports Aboriginal peoples and the development of the North across all federal departments, in particular those with initiatives or issues in the assigned subject matter area.

Research and analysis

Degree: 4

Points: 120

The work requires conducting research projects, studies or statistical surveys in the field of sociology to address one or more of a broad range of topics to identify and evaluate interrelationships between economic development and community development, labour market and labour force development. Studies and surveys also address the impact of broader Canadian and regional economic, demographic and social changes on the continued effectiveness of departmental policies, programs, standards, priorities, research methodologies, or data content and structure.

The studies, surveys and evaluations are conducted to identify policy or program weaknesses and strengths, data requirements, and trends and issues arising from social and economic development policies and legislation/regulations.  Study findings contribute to the development of departmental policies, programs and legislation/regulations, the assessment of departmental accountability, and the identification of weaknesses in issue management. Studies generate recommendations for new approaches to dealing with issues or new areas of study to gain greater insight.

Physical effort

Degree: 1

Points: 3

The work requires sitting for extended periods of time, at a desk using a computer or telephone or in meetings. The work also requires bending and reaching to obtain materials and, occasionally, carrying bundles of documents or a laptop computer and projector to meetings.

Sensory effort

Degree: 2

Points: 3

The work requires reviewing presentations or draft policy documents prepared for senior management or for representatives of other organizations, to ensure that specific words or symbols are either included or excluded as appropriate, that all graphs and tables are visually positioned to achieve the desired impact, and that presentations conform to the time allotted.

Working conditions

Degree: 3

Points: 12

The work involves carrying out studies and preparing sensitive documents under constantly changing deadlines and time pressures. The work may involve travel across Canada, often to remote locations to meet with Aboriginal or Northern groups or provincial/territorial or local governments.

Benchmark 12: Regional Statistician

Point rating: 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 1, 1, 2 = 473 points
Level: EC-06

Organization context and summary

Under the general guidance of a regional director, manages the regional statistical and survey program providing services of collection, processing and retrieval of statistical data used for research, environmental assessments and policy development related to the fishery sector. Provides subject matter expertise to the Regional Director or Regional Director General and various national and international stakeholders on the interpretation of data, statistics standards and methodology.

Duties

  • Develops policies and frameworks to govern the collection, processing, analysis, storage, and distribution of statistical data by departmental sectors in the region, and occasionally conducts research and/or studies for an affiliated regional agency.
  • Manages the development and implementation of new methodologies, scientific and statistical evidential data concepts and definitions, and new and modified data sources, as well as the creation or adaptation of new criteria and techniques for improved testing, editing, and verification of collected and reported data.
  • Plans, develops, and delivers a comprehensive program of complex ongoing research in collaboration with other departmental, federal, provincial/territorial, Aboriginal community and other industry and community representatives.
  • Provides advice and consulting services on the evidential basis used to measure the impact of government (federal and provincial), domestic and international policy, program, or legislation/regulatory initiatives and developments on the region's economic and social development and resource management, as well as on the department's programs in the region.    
  • Represents the department's regional statistical office at meetings and prepares or manages the preparation of position papers, briefing notes and/or presentations to senior management and senior officials or representatives of other federal government departments, interdepartmental organizations, provincial and foreign governments, First Nations and other Aboriginal communities, academic institutions and private sector organizations.
  • Manages and directs the regional statistical and survey office through subordinate supervisors and/or team leaders and professional and support staff; provides functional supervision to off-site staff in operational area offices involved in the delivery of statistics services; and, leads departmental, interdepartmental, intergovernmental, government-industry, or other multi-stakeholder project teams or working groups.

Decision making

Degree: 4

Points: 60

The work requires providing advice and consulting services on statistical validity, use, interpretation and practical application of socio-economic, biological and commercial data for the purpose of program administration (e.g., licensing, permits, quota management) or scientific research on topics such as habitat management or sustainable development of the region's fisheries resources. Data are used as evidential basis for the development of regional policy or program options while integrating the issues and concerns of other federal departments, Aboriginal and other local communities, provincial and/or territorial governments, and others (as appropriate to the region). Advice and interpretation can affect strategic and horizontal priorities for sustainable fisheries and aquaculture, healthy and productive aquatic ecosystems, safe and accessible waters and related enabling functions (e.g., interpretation and advice on statistics might be used to defend decisions concerning the opening and closing of individual fisheries). Initiative is required in analyzing and developing data capture methodologies in situations where no precedent exists.

The work requires planning, designing and implementing statistical experiments by devising the appropriate statistical methodology including consideration for the selection of experimental subjects and the ethics of research.

Recommendations are made on the choice of variables, options to control the influence of confounding variables and the randomized assignment of treatments to subjects to allow unbiased estimates of treatment effects and experimental error. The experimental protocol is prepared in collaboration with the researcher to guide the experiment's performance and specify the primary analysis of data. Results are documented and presented to stakeholders and clients.

Leadership and operational management

Degree: 4

Points: 90

The work requires supervising and directing the regional statistical and survey work through subordinate supervisors and/or team leaders and professional and support staff (region-specific); providing functional supervision to area staff involved in the delivery of statistics services; and leading departmental, interdepartmental, intergovernmental, government-industry, or other multi-stakeholder project teams or working groups.

There is a requirement to identify and recommend adjustments to human and financial resource needs to meet statistics goals, project objectives and the unit's commitments. The work requires recruiting staff, approving training and development plans, taking necessary disciplinary action, and establishing work plans and priorities to ensure that objectives and results are achieved; monitoring the progress of work and evaluating the performance of staff and subordinate supervisors; managing an operating budget with authority to reallocate funds within authorized levels; and providing cost estimates and projections for the planning and budget process.

Communication

Degree: 4

Points: 75

The work requires consultations with other federal government departments, interdepartmental organizations, provincial governments, foreign governments, First Nations representatives, academic institutions, and private-sector for-profit and non-profit organizations to address contentious issues relating to the validity and quality of statistical data and to ensure understanding of departmental statistical standards and methodologies to be adopted to support the quality of statistical research being carried out.

The work also requires communication with Information Technology specialists to ensure that the regional statistical program receives the technical guidance on database design, management and computer programs required to deliver statistical services required to address client data needs. The work requires contacting private firms engaged under contract for data collection to advise them of future requirements, and to ensure that the terms of contracts are met.

Provides advice and interpretation on statistical data, standards and methodology to senior management in the region. Data are used as evidential basis to measure the impact of federal and provincial government domestic and international initiatives and developments on the economic and social development and resource management of the region and on departmental programs in the region.

Writing skills are required to prepare position papers, briefing notes and presentations to senior management and senior officials of external stakeholder organizations to explore and advance positions between the department and its partner organizations on complex strategic economic policy issues and developments to which the department must develop a response.

Knowledge of specialized fields

Degree: 4

Points: 55

The work requires knowledge of the theories, principles, practices, and methodology of statistical science to manage the implementation of departmental statistical and survey standards and methodologies that can meet professional review and challenge by national and international peers and stakeholders; to manage research into strategic data requirements of a region; to manage the collection, processing, analysis, interpretation, storage, and distribution of statistical data by all sectors used as the evidential basis for economic policy research and analysis to identify the future prospects of the region's fishery and aquaculture sectors on the local economy; and to develop recommendations on new policy or program initiatives based on authoritative statistical data and valid interpretations and inferences that can be drawn from those data.

The work requires knowledge of the principles and methodology of public economics, public finance, or political economy and international economics to provide advice on the validity of the methodology used in the collection, processing, and assembly of the statistical data used as the evidential basis for the development and/or provision of advice concerning the impact of government (federal and provincial), domestic and international policy, program, or legislative/regulatory initiatives and developments on the region's economic and social development and resource management, as well as on the department's programs in the region.

Contextual knowledge

Degree: 4

Points: 60

The work requires knowledge of the department's business lines and organizations, programs, policies, legislation and associated regulations. Knowledge is required of federal/provincial memoranda of understanding, international treaties and their relationship with other federal, provincial/territorial governments, and non-government organizations, First Nations and other Aboriginal and community groups, and industry associations in order to carry out interdepartmental consultations on statistical standards and methodologies; the collection, interpretation, analysis, application of data, processing, interchange and management of statistical data; the provision of advice to other departmental organizations in the region and their external partner organizations on the availability and limits of statistical data; and/or to facilitate departmental statistical initiatives that can be integrated with horizontal government statistical plans and priorities.

Research and analysis

Degree: 4

Points: 120

The work requires developing policies and frameworks to govern the collection, processing, analysis, storage and distribution of statistical data by all departmental sectors in the region. There is a requirement to develop and implement new methodologies, statistical evidential data concepts and definitions, and new and modified data sources, and to create or adapt new criteria and techniques. This results in improved testing, editing, and verification of collected and reported data in response to changing data and systems requirements and improves data collection, processing, and interpretation. Data are used by division staff, economic and policy researchers, program managers and others in provincial government, private industry and academic organizations.

The work requires planning, developing, and delivering a comprehensive program of complex ongoing research in a region by implementing the department's statistical renewal initiatives, standards and methodologies.

Physical effort

Degree: 1

Points: 3

The work requires sitting at a desk using a computer or telephone to conduct reviews of statistical research and statistics collected, preparing documents and communicating with others.

The work requires sitting in meetings for extended periods of time, bending and reaching to obtain materials, and carrying bundles of documents or a laptop computer and projector to meetings.

Sensory effort

Degree: 1

Points: 2

As necessary, the work requires reviewing presentations or draft statistical standards or methodology documents prepared for senior management or for representatives of other departments or governments to ensure that specific words or symbols are either included or excluded as appropriate under the circumstances.

Working conditions

Degree: 2

Points: 8

The work involves carrying out studies and preparing sensitive documents under constantly changing deadlines and time pressures imposed by regional, national or international priorities, undertaking travel within the region on a regular basis, and occasionally travelling between the base office and other regions across Canada. This involves long-distance travel and layovers to attend meetings and conferences.

Benchmark 13: Senior Program Evaluation Analyst

Point rating: 5, 3, 5, 4, 5, 4, 1, 1, 1 = 505 points
Level: EC-06

Organization context and summary

Reporting to the Manager of Program Evaluation within a medium/large department's Program Evaluation Directorate, coordinates multidisciplinary teams involved in the conduct of policy and program evaluations in compliance with the Treasury Board Secretariat's Policy on Results andrelated directive. Within that framework, the position is responsiblefor the provision of advice, information and recommendations to line and functional managers and other senior management of the department/agency. Recommendations and advice are used to inform decision making and to ensure timely, strategically-focused, objective, evidence-based information on the relevance and performance of departmental/agency policies, programs and initiatives.

Duties

  • Coordinates and manages the activities of multidisciplinary project teams, combining departmental/agency and external resources to evaluate the relevance and performance of existing programs, policies and initiatives and to provide advice to line and functional managers and senior management.
  • Consults with the Manager, Program Evaluation and departmental/agency program managers to discuss and recommend the project objectives, scope and approaches to be utilized, to confirm timing and resources required for studies and projects, and to negotiate and secure agreement on courses of action and activities to be undertaken.
  • Initiates and coordinates complex studies and projects involving the department/agency and other government departments (OGDs), partners and stakeholders; identifies project activities and studies techniques to be applied; estimates human and financial resource requirements and makes recommendations to the Manager Program Evaluation; schedules and assigns activities; coordinates and monitors the work to ensure project objectives are met; and manages the design and adaptation of data collection tools to meet project objectives.
  • Plans, manages and coordinates economic and socio-economic analysis of departmental/agency programs to evaluate their effectiveness against organizational strategic objectives and priorities. Manages the selection of methodologies for evaluation studies such as cost-benefit analysis, and manage the application of analytical tools, including statistical analysis and qualitative analysis of data.  
  • Leads research to assess current and future requirements for statistical data; conducts analyses of conclusions on a broad range of studies, and provides advice and recommendations to senior departmental managers and subject matter experts concerning changes or improvements to departmental/agency policies strategic plans and programs as well as redesign of programs based on the results of those studies.
  • Develops evaluation reports, briefings and presentations outlining the results of evaluation studies; develops options, strategies and recommendations and provides advice to the management team to improve the effectiveness of policies, programs and services.
  • Consults with representatives of OGDs, other levels of government, partners and stakeholders on studies and evaluation projects to be undertaken jointly. Represents the department/agency and the Evaluation Directorate at meetings, on committees and working groups to discuss approaches to discuss and share best practices, tools and approaches.

Decision making

Degree: 5

Points: 90

The work requires latitude to analyze, identify and propose project and study objectives and techniques and recommend approaches to senior program managers, participating OGDs and partners in joint evaluation projects carried out by multidisciplinary teams; to propose timelines and resources for various projects and studies; and to plan and coordinate economic and socio-economic analyses of programs to evaluate their effectiveness against organizational strategic objectives. Recommendations and options provided to senior management influence departmental policy and program development, changes and improvements to departmental/agency health strategies, and the efficiency and effectiveness of departmental policies and programs.

Leadership and operational management

Degree: 3

Points: 50

The work involves planning, managing and coordinating the work of departmental committees, project teams, and working groups on an ongoing basis including departmental employees, consultants and leading interdepartmental projects and working groups. The work involves identifying and analyzing the human and financial requirements for project teams as well as assigning tasks and monitoring progress against timelines. The work involves developing the terms of reference for contracts, recommending contract services and providing input into financial planning for the Evaluation Directorate.

Communication

Degree: 5

Points: 100

The work requires presentation and negotiation skills to obtain co-operation of departmental managers on the establishment of objectives and approaches, schedules and resource requirements for program evaluations and studies. There is a requirement to adapt complex information contained in reports when explaining the findings of studies to managers. There is a requirement to explain evaluation study conclusions to senior management, departmental decision-making committees and stakeholders to gain acceptance of recommendations concerning changes or improvements to departmental policies and programs as well as the redesign of programs based on studies conducted. The work involves consulting with officials at central agencies to exchange and negotiate the types of information required for program evaluation, resolve problems and to represent the views of the department/agency.

Knowledge of specialized fields

Degree: 4

Points: 55

Knowledge of the theories, principles and practices of economics, sociology, social science, demography and statistics to plan, direct and coordinate studies related to the evaluation of programs, policies and procedures in order to determine their effectiveness when measured against the department's strategic objectives; formulate and provide recommendations on departmental policies; and direct the application of statistical and quantitative analysis. The work requires knowledge of the theories, principles, methodologies, standards, practices and tools associated with program evaluation, definitional devices (logic models, comparative analyses, profiles and case studies) and data collection instruments (focus sessions, interviews, surveys) to plan, design and select appropriate approaches and methodologies to conduct specific evaluations. Knowledge is also required of theories, principles and techniques of research required such as hypothesis formulation and validation; model design and interpretation; experimental and comparative study designs; surveys, simulations, interviews, focus groups, file reviews and case studies; statistical sampling and cost-benefit analysis; and computer-assisted analytical packages.

Contextual knowledge

Degree: 5

Points: 80

The work requires knowledge of the department's/agency's mandate, vision, business lines, program structure, and organizational hierarchy to identify evaluation issues and manage program evaluations, direct the provision of meaningful results on individual program evaluations, and provide input into strategic and operational business plans. The work also requires knowledge of central agency policies and guidelines concerning program evaluation to recommend the objectives and approaches to program evaluations and negotiate with central agency officials concerning the information required for evaluation. The work requires knowledge of other federal department programs that are affected by, or have an impact on departmental/agency programs and policies. The work requires knowledge of the interrelationships of departmental programs with those of other government departments and interlinkages with programs of provincial and territorial governments in order to understand and evaluate the context in which the departmental/agency programs operate and to collaborate on, manage and coordinate interdepartmental evaluation studies and projects. Knowledge is required of emerging trends and developments in the Canadian private sector, academia and non-governmental organizations as well as the programs of foreign governments in order to facilitate appropriate analysis and evaluation implications. Knowledge is required of government and departmental regulations, policies and legislation as they apply to evaluation program activities, issues, processes and methods to understand the impact of legislation, regulations and interrelationships with other federal/provincial/territorial legislation as a basis to recommend changes to legislative, regulatory, program and policy instruments.

Research and analysis

Degree: 4

Points: 120

The work requires both quantitative and qualitative research and analysis skills to direct the assessment and selection of methodologies (cost-benefit, comparative analysis) and analytical tools (statistical analysis, qualitative analysis) for evaluation studies. The work involves determining the need for new analytical methodologies, systems and approaches to support program evaluation studies and designing, developing, testing, modifying and applying new data collection tools, techniques and methods to meet requirements of unique projects. The work requires managing the analysis and synthesis of information and data collected from a variety of sources and methods (surveys, interviews, literature reviews, program documentation, operational data, statistical databases and reports) and, based on analyses, formulating conclusions and options on policy/program effectiveness, and developing options and recommendations for improvement.

Physical effort

Degree: 1

Points: 3

The work requires sitting at a computer station to read, write and analyze data and information. This may cause eye strain.

Sensory effort

Degree: 1

Points: 2

The work involves using senses to identify differences in data and documents that are easy to perceive.

Working conditions

Degree: 1

Points: 5

The work is performed in an open office environment with exposure to office noise and involves tight deadlines and time constraints, multiple and concurrent client demands, conflicting priorities, involving internal and external clients and stakeholders. Occasional travel is required.

Benchmark 14: Advisor/Economist

Point rating: 6, 3, 5, 4, 4, 4, 1, 1, 2 = 523 points
Level: EC-06

Organization context and summary

The work is situated in a central agency–type organization or department with a centralized economic policy mandate. Reporting to a managerial level position, this position involves conducting complex, policy-focused economic, fiscal, tax, and socio-economic research, analysis and evaluation concerning the Canadian economy, federal government policies and legal frameworks; and analyzing significant multi-dimensional, interdepartmental, intergovernmental and international files or issues to develop policy positions, advice, recommendations and options for senior management, the Deputy Minister and the Minister.

Duties

  • Conducts economic and/or socio-economic analysis and evaluation concerning complex, multi-dimensional and interrelated economic, fiscal, tax, or socio-economic research studies and projects; identifies, situates and integrates emerging issues, discerns and projects their impact on the broader policy and legal framework of the government, and contributes to the development of horizontal policy and policy frameworks.
  • Manages specific files/issues and analyzes the effect of policy strategies and positions on files/issues and initiatives; leads and organizes studies and multi-stakeholder working groups; formulates policy positions and strategy options; develops policy proposals, recommendations and advice, situating proposals and required decisions in the appropriate economic, social, tax, and fiscal policy context to guide senior management decisions in accordance with government priorities, and policy and fiscal frameworks; provides opinions on performance of programs and services in other government departments.
  • Develops, analyzes, writes and prepares input for the federal Budget and Economic Update, policy proposals and position papers, Cabinet briefing notes, legislation and regulations, reports, presentations, speaking notes, and correspondence for senior management.
  • Advises and briefs the Minister, Deputy Minister, senior officials, other levels of government, non-governmental organizations and the private sector on national and international policy and economic positions, strategies and objectives.
  • Recommends data/information requirements and policy research/study, approaches, analytical methods and objectives; and organizes studies; develops databases, models, other analytical tools for use in policy analysis and economic and fiscal forecasting. Establishes a network of contacts and partnerships with counterparts in various central agencies, federal, provincial and international governments, domestic and international non-governmental organizations, the private sector, and other organizations and key players, to develop a broader and integrated perspective on the relevant policy framework and government priorities.
  • Supports and negotiates the implementation of agreements/mechanisms and contributes to new corporate initiatives and management reforms. Represents the department on interdepartmental, intergovernmental, international and multilateral working groups and formulates strategic policy directions, presents, negotiates and advances policy positions and initiatives.

Decision making

Degree: 6

Points: 125

The work requires latitude to develop horizontal policy options for interdepartmental, federal, intergovernmental, international policy by providing rigorously accurate and relevant data, research results, risk analysis, and expert recommendations from a technical and/or a subject matter perspective. Recommendations have an impact on Cabinet Committee deliberations, federal Budgets and Economic Updates, departments and portfolio agencies by guiding senior-level decision making in accordance with government-wide priorities and fiscal frameworks. Makes recommendations on the department's responses within a designated portfolio area for decision-making by senior management, departments and for various interdepartmental, inter-governmental, and international fora tasked with shaping legislation, regulations, policies and programs.

Decisions include interpreting and expanding from general policy direction in proposed or existing legislation and the analysis, development and implementation of strategies, policies and regulations that integrate technical and cross-sectoral policy issues and meet broad government objectives. The work involves responding to strategic issues and evaluating and conducting comparisons of economic, fiscal, tax, and social performance, which involves a high level of risk analysis.

Leadership and operational management

Degree: 3

Points: 50

Leads and organizes studies and multi-stakeholder working groups, monitors and evaluates progress, specifications and time frames of individual projects/files. Provides a corporate challenge function on the full range of program design, delivery and resourcing proposals, and develops innovative funding alternatives and revenue management options related to horizontal policy/programs and submissions to Cabinet. Determines the need for contractors and establishes terms and reference specifications and develops Requests for Proposal (RFPs). Coordinates work performed by independent contractors, monitors performance, reviews preliminary results and drafts, provides feedback; safeguards information, databases and documentation to prevent the unintended release of information.

Communication

Degree: 5

Points: 100

Communication skills are required to develop, draft and present complex, strategic documentation/information and contribute to communication strategies and/or legislation; negotiate and implement agreements/mechanisms with governmental, intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations, and collaborate with private sector representatives and technical experts; represent the federal government and broad Canadian interests in a variety of fora, such as presenting and advancing policy positions and initiatives and protecting federal interests; represent the department as a subject matter expert on interdepartmental and intergovernmental committees/working groups, and in Canadian delegations at national/international conferences, meetings and negotiations; deliver advice, briefings and recommendation to senior officials within the department and in other government departments on a wide variety of complex multi-dimensional and interrelated economic, fiscal or socio-economic research studies and projects and related programs and services. Communications skills are required to foster co-operation with and gain agreement from stakeholders. Writing skills are required to adapt highly complex material and transform technical language into comprehensive explanations stated in plain language.

Knowledge of specialized fields

Degree: 4

Points: 55

The work requires knowledge of theories, principles, concepts and techniques of economics, socio-economics and social sciences, and knowledge of international trade, intergovernmental fiscal arrangements, tax rights, public finance, analysis, and legal frameworks. The work requires knowledge of the principles, techniques and practices of policy and issues analysis, strategy development, and briefing; the methods, techniques and practices of economic, socio-economic research; and the techniques and practices of public administration and management.

This knowledge is essential in order to conduct complex economic, fiscal, tax, or socio-economic analysis, research studies and projects, including developing long-term outlook and policy, and to advise and brief the Minister, senior officials, other levels of government, non-governmental organizations, and the private sector on federal and international policy positions, strategies and objectives.

Contextual knowledge

Degree: 4

Points: 60

The work requires knowledge of relevant structural and institutional characteristics of the Canadian economy; relevant federal departmental mandates, legal frameworks, program structures, key contacts, resource profiles and the policy framework in which they operate; the particular horizontal policy/program/regulatory portfolio, operating and market environments, and knowledge of relevant social, economic and cultural issues within the area of specialization; the interests and agendas of the private sector in order to engage in consultations and provide advice to the Minister on policy responses, including legislative changes; national and international emerging trends relative to the specialization within the portfolio area, the regulatory environment and priorities of various levels of government, and federal interests and a wide variety of subject matter–related laws to conduct research and develop succinct analyses that situate proposals and required decisions in the appropriate economic/social policy and fiscal context.

Research and analysis

Degree: 4

Points: 120

The work requires skill, initiative and creativity in order to conduct multi-dimensional and interrelated studies, research and analysis related to complex issues and multi-stakeholder relations in harmony with overarching government goals and policy objectives, and broad Canadian interests.

The work involves acting as liaison with stakeholders who are in control of a broad range of data sources and integrating a wide variety of analytical work originating from across government, among academic, research and economic policy institutions, nationally and internationally, and from the private sector in to a useable data set for policy analysis. The work involves developing an integrated and expert knowledge base in order to conduct research, analysis, projects and initiatives; monitor and identify emerging trends in Canada and other jurisdictions; assess and address the effectiveness and efficiency of policies and programs consistent with government priorities, directions and environmental constraints; and develop advice and expert policy analysis to directly influence decisions by senior government officials.

The work requires intellectual insight and effort when developing innovative, tax, fiscal, economic, statistical and other research methodologies, including forecasting and modelling. Research methods are adopted depending on the unique circumstances, the research objective and the complexity of analysis required. This involves determining the relevance, relationships and validity of data, policy arguments and legal precedents from multiple, diverse sources and stakeholders. It results in the formulation of departmental and GOC negotiating positions including making recommendations on program, policy, legislative and funding issues for senior management and officials. The work involves analysis and developing options and strategies for multi-dimensional, interdepartmental, intergovernmental, national and international policy and relations, which requires skill in interpreting and evaluating intelligence gathered from a wide variety of individuals, organizations and published and unpublished sources; synthesizing and integrating information. Research is focused on identifying serious gaps in information and developing remedial measures. Risk assessments are conducted of options for new and emerging proposals, and recommendations are made on the most cost-effective course of action.

Skill is required to ensure that complex statistical findings and analysis are accurate and properly conveyed to senior decision makers in order to avoid erroneous interpretation or costly misinterpretation of critical data; and to study and report on unfavourable qualitative data and influence acceptance of conclusions drawn from that data.

Physical effort

Degree: 1

Points: 3

The work requires physical effort when sitting for prolonged periods in front of a computer monitor and working with paper documents.

Sensory effort

Degree: 1

Points: 2

The work requires eye focus when reviewing detailed information and data and visually scanning long documents. Also, the work requires concentration in order to easily detect perceived differences and anomalies in words.

Working conditions

Degree: 2

Points: 8

The work is conducted in a standard office environment. It routinely involves juggling multiple and conflicting priorities and responsibilities, unanticipated overtime and stress associated with delivery of policy options on urgent or priority basis. Errors in judgment carry potentially serious consequences (such as flawed strategic plans, policies or programs with horizontal impact across government). May undertake extended travel, including to remote locations. There are occasional challenging confrontational situations with uncooperative colleagues or stakeholders.

Benchmark 15: Expert Paralegal

Point rating: 5, 3, 6, 4, 4, 4, 2, 1, 2 = 529 points
Level: EC-06

Organization context and summary

Reporting to counsel or a team leader or senior level manager in the host department, manages a section or leads a legal support team to deliver paralegal services (advisory/litigation counsel) to the counsel, and/or directly to the client department(s). Delivers full legal technical support services to counsel regarding cases/files/projects of low to high and mega complexity; has full autonomy to manage assigned activities of high complexity in cases/files/projects. Member of management team for cases/files/projects; has full autonomy in managing administration and operational matters in cases/files/projects. At this level, the work includes national operational responsibilities.

Duties

  • Conducts expert legal research and difficult analysis on a variety of rare legal issues in numerous areas of law where precedents do not normally exist and are not readily accessible. Prepares summaries and recommendations.
  • Manages the organization of sensitive and/or confidential documents, information and data for case files.
  • Conducts activities of high complexity pertaining to cases/files/projects.
  • Supervises the administration of complex cases/files/projects and develops alternate operational strategies. Has autonomy to independently administer cases/files/projects of medium complexity for which there are no precedents. Acts on behalf of clients and/or assists counsel during legal proceedings in the judicial system.
  • Makes recommendations to senior management and counsel on national trends, legal and operational matters and the impact of new or amended legislation policy.
  • Provides authoritative technical advice and interpretation for contacts on various operational issues.
  • Provides operational advice on innovative techniques for the management of the practice of law and paralegal services nationwide.
  • Trains paralegals in service delivery at the national level; coaches and mentors co-workers.
  • Manages and/or has operational responsibility for human and financial resources and project teams.

Decision making

Degree: 5

Points: 90

Manages the administration and operational issues of a case/file/project with the assigned legal counsel; acts as contact point between parties, manages a high volume of documents and recommends the best course of action; negotiates resources; produces first draft of legal opinions for examination by the counsel; manages the team; finds expert witnesses; coordinates the preparation and handling of legal documents. Defines and develops processes, approaches and alternative strategies based on the political, social and operational implications affecting the case/file/project. Cases/files/projects of medium complexity include identifying requirements for research and analysis, disclosure, organizational resources, analyzing requests, consolidating acts, developing arguments, attending meetings, negotiating settlements and developing recommendations intended for clients, counsels, and/or investigative bodies. Acts on behalf of clients (small claims court, tax court, summary trial court, judgment debtor examination and administrative tribunals) and/or assists counsel during legal proceedings in the judicial system.

Impact of recommendations or decisions may affect policies, regulations and operations of the client department relating to socio-economic aspects of Canadian society. Cases may involve many players and complex issues which have an impact on international law and, indirectly, international relations. Overall, the recommendations/decisions contribute to the outcome. Provides authoritative technical advice and opinions and interpretation for clients, counsel, paralegals and support staff, legal service providers, interested parties, and investigative bodies on law enforcement, common/civil and/or criminal law. Applying legal methods and search techniques, management of operational matters, work processes, database development and rules and procedures of various judicial systems. Monitors and identifies emerging issues, trends and changes in policies and statutes in order to minimize the impact on cases/files/projects. Provides advice and recommendations to senior management and/or counsel on national trends, legal and operational issues, management of legal practices and the impact of new or amended laws and policies. Provides strategic and operational opinions regarding development of innovative techniques for managing information and systems.

Leadership and operational management

Degree: 3

Points: 50

Manages a section/staff or leads a legal support team established to work on a case/file/project; plans and assigns duties. Coaches and mentors co-workers in online research, specialized legal software, and administrative and legal processes. Provides nationwide training to co-workers, client departments, legal service providers and investigative bodies in the provision of activities and paralegal services and legal processes related to their mandate. This includes identifying training requirements and developing, organizing and delivering relevant and timely training, as well as professional development workshops intended to increase legal knowledge and techniques relating to the practice of law. Manages the financial resources allocated to a case/file which includes identifying resource requirements, planning spending, calculations and estimates, and overseeing and controlling expenditures. Negotiates professional fees with attorneys and witnesses and verifies, attests to and accounts for statements of professional fees and services submitted by legal service providers and opposing counsel and prepares contingent liability reports and ensures that amounts owing to the Crown in cases/files/projects are collected. Makes recommendations to counsel and/or clients regarding the amounts claimed, and, if necessary, has costs fixed by the court. Has custody of and is responsible for personal computer/laptop associated peripherals, databases, documents, office furniture, equipment and materials used to perform own work.

Communication

Degree: 6

Points: 140

The work requires that contacts are made with departmental colleagues, client departments, police, law enforcement agencies, witnesses, non-represented parties, legal service providers, opposing counsel, other departments and agencies, international sectors, private sector entities, and the public to clarify a variety of issues, obtain information, provide advice, investigate requests, discuss legal issues and/or negotiate settlements. Communication skills are required to defend positions, advance arguments and influence stakeholders in accordance with the government's mandate. This includes drafting legal documents, questioning witnesses, taking part in negotiations, developing arguments for submission to counsel or clients, negotiating settlements, presenting facts and arguments to the court and exchanging information, explaining and reformulating legal processes/procedures and responding to questions from others.

Knowledge of specialized fields

Degree: 4

Points: 55

The work requires knowledge of legal theories and principles and in-depth knowledge and strong skills in applying legal methods and techniques. Skill is required in order to summarize laws, jurisprudence, technical, scientific and other reports on a variety of rare legal issues where precedents do not normally exist.

Contextual knowledge

Degree: 4

Points: 60

The work requires knowledge of the Canadian judicial system and civil or criminal rules and procedures governing the operation of every level of court and its structure relating to the specialized area of practice; and an in-depth knowledge of the mandate, structure, policies and culture of law enforcement agency, client department, related government organizations and/or other organizations (national and international) whose interests are pertinent to the case file/project Skills are required to organize legal support teams and to monitor and keep documents, information and data for cases/files/projects. Knowledge of principles and techniques of human resources management is required to supervise staff and/or to provide leadership, and training for co-workers and various other contacts and to sit on committees and work teams. In-depth knowledge of the principles and techniques of project management is required to lead, plan and coordinate activities in cases/files/projects. Skill is required to anticipate potential developments and difficulties that could influence cases/files/projects. In-depth knowledge of specialized legal software and a variety of administrative software programs is required to manage information and documentation related to cases/files/projects, to give operational advice to others and to design databases and update information contained in databases and information systems.

Research and analysis

Degree: 4

Points: 120

The work requires research and analysis skills to conduct research and analysis, find missing documentation, inconsistencies and erroneous information, and determine what additional research is required when preparing documentation for cases of high to mega complexity. Advanced skill is required to summarize laws, jurisprudence, and technical, scientific and other expert reports as well as to organize, monitor and maintain documents, information/ data for cases/files/ projects. The work requires conducting exhaustive research and standard analysis on a number of issues and consolidation of the information in order to recommend an approach to counsel and the client. Some precedents may exist, but every case has its own research and data collection requirements. Administering cases/files/projects may require changes and responding promptly by analyzing the new situation, and preparing a new recommendation for the counsel, client department or investigative bodies. The complexity often increases owing to unforeseen and conflicting relationships between statutes, regulations and organizational policies. Analyzes and interprets data and information to anticipate possible developments and difficulties and manages related risks. Issues that arise are submitted to the counsel with recommendations for resolution. Managing activities of medium complexity and/or specific activities in cases of high to mega complexity requires organizing a large volume of data sensitive in nature, making it more difficult to obtain documents from a wide variety of sources and identify the best course of action to take. Provides input into the development of information management systems.

Physical effort

Degree: 2

Points: 4

The work requires physical effort when sitting for long periods to participate in meetings and when working in an office. This is a frequent requirement and time involved can range from 1-8 hours per day. There is a requirement to carry heavy objects on the way to meetings or to court.  Work requires bending and stretching to move boxes of documents (up to 10 kg), and retrieving files and documents and organize documentation for cases/files/ projects.

Sensory effort

Degree: 1

Points: 2

Work requires occasionally visually scanning documents and data to detect easily perceived differences in words.

Working conditions

Degree: 2

Points: 8

The physical environment where the work is usually performed is in an open office concept, where there is exposure to noise and poor air/ventilation quality. The work is occasionally conducted in libraries, board rooms and hearing rooms. Often there is no control over the pace of work with multiple requests, interruptions, conflicting work priorities and responding to urgent/competing requests from co-workers, client departments, investigative bodies and counsels. Workload priorities are constantly being revised. Work occasionally involves interactions with emotional, angry, confrontational or uncooperative individuals which can lead to long-term health problems and an increase in stress levels.

Benchmark 16: Manager, Economic or Socio-Economic Policy Research

Point rating: 6, 3, 5, 5, 5, 5, 1, 1, 2 = 613 points
Level: EC-07

Organization context and summary

Reporting to an executive, provides economic and socio-economic policy research, consultation, liaison, coordination, management and advisory services, as the senior specialist responsible for an assigned multidisciplinary policy portfolio to address the implications of national, provincial and international economic developments on the department's policy, or legislation/regulatory initiatives in specific regions or nationally. The work also provides policy, program, and legislative/regulatory or governance options for addressing these implications for the consideration of the Regional Directors, ADMs, the Deputy Minister and Minister, for Cabinet and Treasury Board.

Duties

  • Serves as senior economic policy advisor for an assigned complex economic or strategic policy area to the senior management of the department (regionally or nationally) on the economic and socio-economic impact of federal government, provincial government, and other domestic and international policy, program, or legislation/regulatory initiatives and on the current and future viability of departmental policies and programs.
  • Plans and directs a comprehensive program of complex ongoing research into sustainable socio-economic development, economic, scientific, and resource policy, and legislation and regulatory frameworks in one or more regions of Canada and internationally; identifies strategic economic, legislation/regulatory, or other trends and issues arising for departmental policies; coordinates the development of the economic and scientific evidential basis for policy, and legislative/regulatory initiatives, to address government-wide horizontal economic or socio-economic strategic policy issues that have been identified in collaboration with departmental organizations, other federal government departments, interdepartmental organizations and provincial governments.
  • Represents the department, regionally or nationally, in consultations with other federal government departments, provincial governments, foreign governments, First Nations representatives, academic institutions, and private-sector for-profit and non-profit organizations to address contentious issues and negotiate the terms for the implementation of multilateral or bilateral agreements.
  • Manages a unit of professional and support employees including both human and financial resources; plans, leads, coordinates, or manages multidisciplinary departmental, interdepartmental, or intergovernmental, and government-industry project teams or working groups.

Decision making

Degree: 6

Points: 125

The work requires making decisions on authorizing research to be undertaken to identify the implications of national, provincial and international economic developments on policy or legislation/regulatory initiatives for departmental policies and programs in specific regions, nationally, or internationally. This involves studying issues and making strategic decisions, which, when combined together, raise multiple issues that are generally interrelated, are complex in nature, and involve multiple natural and social science disciplines. Resulting insights are sensitive in nature given that policy and legislation/regulatory issues invariably involve overlapping jurisdictional issues. Owing to the complexity of the issues addressed, precedents do not generally exist, and risks can only be predicted. The decisions taken will influence the evidential basis for policy or legislation/regulatory options identified and put forward to senior management, the Deputy Minister and the Minister. The decisions on which policy or legislation/regulatory options to put forward will influence a number of interrelated areas including private industry affected and legislation/regulatory changes, First Nations, relations with provincial governments whose economies and legislation/regulations are impacted. Relations with foreign governments may also be affected by proposed changes. The decisions with respect to the research undertaken will also influence future economic and socio-economic policy research and methodology.

Leadership and operational management

Degree: 3

Points: 50

The work requires managing a unit of professional and support employees, including producing business plans and budget forecasts for the unit and its projects and managing the achievement of business objectives within the authorized budget. This includes hiring and developing staff and managing in accordance with financial and human resource management policies and directives. The work involves planning and managing departmental, interdepartmental or intergovernmental and government-industry/First Nations project teams or working groups on economic or socio-economic policy issues or initiatives covering a broad range of interrelated subject matter or inter-jurisdictional responsibilities where participants may have conflicting goals or objectives, including producing business plans and budget forecasts for such project teams or working groups, negotiating contributions to the project teams or working groups from participating organizations, and managing the achievement of business objectives within the authorized budget.

Communication

Degree: 5

Points: 100

The work requires representing the branch or the department in regional, national, or international consultations with other federal government departments, interdepartmental organizations, provincial governments, foreign governments, First Nations representatives, academic institutions, and private-sector organizations to address contentious issues and negotiate the terms for and the implementation of multilateral or bilateral agreements. Writing skills are required to distill complex research and policy issues into briefs to explore, advance and reach possible consensus on positions between the department and its partner organizations or to complex strategic economic policy issues and developments to which the department must develop a response in collaboration with other organizations.

Knowledge of specialized fields

Degree: 5

Points: 80

The work requires knowledge of the theories, principles, and methodology of both macro-economics and micro-economics and their interrelationship with a number of fields of social sciences including sociology and political science in sufficient depth to direct or carry out complex and in-depth statistical and qualitative studies. This knowledge is required to demonstrate and comprehend the micro-economic and macro-economic implications of policy approaches and options in relation to the industries, policies, programs, and legislation/regulations that form and influence the development and management of sustainable fisheries and aquaculture industries, healthy and productive aquatic systems, and safe and accessible waters as well as integrated oceans management. The work also requires knowledge of the theories, principles, practices, and methodology of statistical science as applied in business statistics, statistical surveys, and other statistical analysis of the fisheries and aquaculture industries, species at risk and fisheries habitat. The work requires knowledge of methodology of public economics, public finance, or political economy and international economics in order to enhance the future prospects of the fisheries and aquaculture and marine sectors of the Canadian economy and to develop recommendations on the need for new or restructured institutions, governance structures, and policies, or their elimination, that are based on authoritative research conclusions.

Contextual knowledge

Degree: 5

Points: 80

The work requires knowledge of the business lines/organizations, programs, policies, and legislation of the department and regulations, related legislation, Federal/Provincial Memoranda of Understanding, International Treaties (e.g., International Pacific Halibut Convention, Canada/US Salmon Treaty) as they inform departmental policies, programs, legislation/regulations. The work also requires knowledge of the activities of member organizations and business lines, their relationship with other federal departments, provincial/territorial governments, and non-government organizations, First Nations and community groups, industry associations, and their principal domestic and international economic, institutional, and policy issues, constraints, and opportunities in order to establish priorities for studies, and provide advice on the implications of studies for the department regionally or nationally, and its activities, policies, legislation/regulations, and to provide options for possible legislative or regulatory change.

The work studies the interaction of corporate goals with the Canadian economy as a whole, and measures the impact of changes in the Canadian economy on products of the fisheries and aquaculture industries, on oceans and navigable waters segments of the Canadian economy.

Research and analysis

Degree: 5

Points: 165

Undertaking unique and complex, in-depth studies or surveys in an assigned strategic policy area requiring a multidisciplinary approach to economic policy. Skill is involved in reviewing the interaction of interrelated factors incorporating a number of subject matter areas including economic, socio-economics, scientific, and resource policy, program, legislative/regulatory analysis. Research and analysis is used to refine policy objectives and establish the relevant terms of reference and to identify strategic economic, legislative/regulatory, or other trends and issues impacting on the continued effectiveness of the department's policies or its enabling legislative/regulatory regime. The work also involves developing, through sound, innovative application of recognized forms of quantitative and qualitative analysis, options that provide the evidential basis for advancing and developing policy frameworks and identifying policy or legislative/regulatory deficiencies and new and innovative policy or legislation/regulatory initiatives targeted to address these deficiencies that are closely linked to the federal government's horizontal policy agenda.

Physical effort

Degree: 1

Points: 3

The work requires sitting at a desk using a computer or telephone for conducting research, preparing documents, and communicating with others. The work requires sitting in meetings for extended periods of time, bending and reaching to obtain materials, and carrying bundles of documents or a laptop computer and projector to meetings.

Sensory effort

Degree: 1

Points: 2

The work requires reviewing all presentations or draft policy documents prepared for senior management that may be shared with stakeholders to ensure that specific words or symbols are either included or excluded, as appropriate under the circumstances.

Working conditions

Degree: 2

Points: 8

The work involves carrying out studies and preparing sensitive documents under constantly changing deadlines and time pressures imposed by regional, national or international priorities. The work involves travelling within the position's region on a regular basis, long-distance travel between the base office and other regions across Canada or internationally and on occasion involves long-distance travel requiring layovers and/or lengthy periods in a hotel during negotiations or conference deliberations.

Benchmark 17: Chief, Analytics and Data System

Point rating: 6, 4, 6, 5, 5, 5, 1, 1, 2 = 693 points
Level: EC-07

Organization context and summary

Reporting to an executive, conducts economic studies, research projects and statistical analysis of national and international patterns related to transportation, safety and security of motor vehicle use and related road-safety issues.

Duties

  • Directs economic studies, investigations and research projects for the collection and analysis of data that will contribute to improved safety in the operation of motor vehicles on Canadian road systems.
  • Studies trends in the interrelationship among economic, socio-economic, technological and psychological factors that contribute to road collisions.
  • Directs through senior statisticians the management of national and client-specific databases that record incidences of fatalities, injuries and property damage resulting from motor vehicle accidents, and promotes the development of user-friendly data access protocols.
  • Directs and coordinates the economic evaluation of new federal regulations and standards, or proposed amendments thereto, that will govern motor vehicle construction and use, following accepted Regulatory Impact Analysis (RIA) guidelines.
  • Manages the design, development and application of statistical techniques, methods and approaches for the creation of performance measurement frameworks for initiatives such as effectiveness evaluations of strategies and regulatory initiatives.
  • Manages the activities of the Analytics and Data Systems Division, including accountability for its human, financial and material resources.
  • Leads or participates in a variety of intra-group or interdepartmental committees, task forces and study groups directed towards the development of safety-related, environmental, socio-economic, technological, management and related information bases, standards and education programs.
  • Represents the department or Canada at national and international conferences as the departmental expert on the results of studies, investigations and research projects that contribute to motor vehicle safety.

Decision making

Degree: 6

Points: 125

Manages independent and collaborative economic studies, research projects and surveys on national patterns to develop new information databases related to transportation, safety and security of motor vehicle use and related road safety issues nationally and internationally; edits, critiques and provides direction to staff in the analyses of complex information, databases and project findings and approves interpretive conclusions and recommendations for the Directorate and Branch management; approves and edits discussion papers, frameworks, strategy documents, interpretive correspondence, and technical reports prepared by staff to outline, explain and defend recommendations, proposals, results of research, studies and trends analysis. The work requires identifying major shortcomings or deficiencies in existing departmental databases relating to road safety and taking appropriate action to rectify, upgrade or supplement holdings; providing information, advice and recommendations to senior management, the Minister and other government officials on economic studies, research projects and statistical analysis of national and international patterns related to safety and security of motor vehicle use and related road-safety issues in order to determine strategic directions, program implications and to defend federal directions.

Manages national and client-specific databases that record incidences of fatalities, injuries and property damage resulting from motor vehicle collisions. This information is used by provincial and territorial officials, special interest groups, industry associations, national public-safety organizations and international economic committees and organizations to identify, analyze and evaluate road safety issues of priority concern and to develop programs to address these issues. The work requires negotiating, approving and managing contracts with private-sector consultants, establishing technical specifications and study parameters, monitoring results and approving payment in accordance with departmental directives.

This information has substantial influence on the development of road safety legislation, regulations, programs, policies, and motor vehicle standards. Information is provided to senior management and external clients and is used to determine strategic directions, the need for supporting legislation or regulations and implications on existing or proposed programs.

Leadership and operational management

Degree: 4

Points: 90

Plans, directs and coordinates the work of professional staff, sets Division objectives and goals, establishes priorities, reviews work for conformity to accepted professional standards; evaluates performance and provides constructive feedback; acts as the first step in the grievance process; ensures that staff are exposed to learning opportunities to keep them relevant in their field of expertise; identifies training and development opportunities and participates as part of the management team in recruiting professional, skilled and experienced employees and establishes a human resource plan to respond to organizational change and the need for new staff competencies to ensure that the department's mandate can continue to be carried out; chairs national inter/intra-departmental committees and leads short- and long-term multidisciplinary study groups and project teams comprised of government and contract resources involved in a variety of research studies. Activities include defining and approving project plans and objectives; directing and developing methodologies to be applied; monitoring the work; and providing direction throughout the various phases. The work requires full responsibility for the management of a responsibility centre budget and involves recommending resource levels and allocating funds within approved budget; planning, monitoring and reporting on spending for program projects and operations and for the purchase of supplies, official business travel, report reproduction, and miscellaneous expenditures in accordance with the Financial Administration Act and departmental directives.

Communication

Degree: 6

Points: 140

Skills to consult and discuss with representatives of road safety and automobile organizations and other stakeholders in order to seek input into the prioritization of new statistical and socio-economic information relating to road safety. The work also requires communication skills to articulate and make economic and statistical data and analysis results short, concise and easily understood by those outside the field of expertise. There is also a need to present persuasive arguments to secure approval to undertake costly research studies and to influence policies and business directions; to defend the departmental approach to data collection and analysis to determine strategic directions that may require legislative or regulatory action and understand the implications of these studies on existing or proposed programs. Writing skills to prepare, edit and approve complex analytical reports, discussion papers, Regulatory Impact Assessment Statements, frameworks, strategy documents, interpretive correspondence, and technical reports; explain and defend recommendations, proposals, results of research, studies and trends analysis. This information is provided to senior management as well as external clients.

Knowledge of specialized fields

Degree: 5

Points: 80

The work requires knowledge of the theories and principles of statistics, economics, mathematics, and applied mathematics disciplines, such as heuristic algorithms, experimental design, time series analysis, complex survey design/sampling, etc., in order to direct research studies and statistical analyses. The work also requires knowledge of socio-economics, as well as cost benefit and risk assessment techniques to assess the feasibility of proposed studies, investigation and research project and to determine the value to the business lines of the Division. The work also requires knowledge of computers, software, information systems and related databases to oversee input to and the maintenance of data files and associated retrieval programs in microcomputer and PC systems in order to ensure that evaluation methodologies are incorporated and addressed in the design of database programs and to conduct trends analysis, forecasting and to develop reports. Must keep up with the latest developments in economic, statistical and applied mathematical methodologies, approaches, protocols and routines.

Contextual knowledge

Degree: 5

Points: 80

The work requires knowledge of the department in order to ensure that the Division's activities are in line with the department's mandate, mission, objectives and priorities; to provide advice and guidance to colleagues and senior management on the business lines of the Division; and to make recommendations on new programs, policies and legislative changes based on the results of studies undertaken by the Division.

The work also requires knowledge of other departments in order to share and exchange information or defend the department's approach and to participate in the development of safety-related, environmental, socio-economic, technological management and related information databases, standards and education programs. Knowledge of contacts in other levels of government (national and international), in the automobile industry, in national public safety organizations and other special interest groups is required in order to study trends in the interrelationships among economic, socio-economic, technological and psychological factors that contribute to road collisions.

The work requires knowledge of the Motor Vehicle Safety Act, the Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board Act and "companion" provincial legislation so that areas of shared responsibility are addressed and national standards are developed and implemented.

The work also requires knowledge of the theories and principles of Canadian public administration to work with various levels of government, at the provincial/territorial levels, where there are jurisdictional issues that must be respected and where there is a need to influence partnerships for the acceptance of the federal direction in road safety.

Research and analysis

Degree: 5

Points: 165

The work requires analytical skills to direct socio-economic studies, investigations and research projects for the collection and analysis of data that will contribute to improve safety in the operation of motor vehicles on Canadian road systems;  manage the design, development and application of techniques, methods and approaches for the creation of frameworks for initiatives such as evaluation of the effectiveness of strategies and regulatory initiatives; and determine innovative lines of economic research study or investigation into road safety and related social-behaviour patterns. The work requires conceptualizing new directions for data gathering and translating them into operational plans that enhance economic studies and research projects and statistical analyses of national and international patterns related to safety and security of motor vehicle use and road safety issues. This requires evaluating, analyzing, interpreting facts, identifying critical issues, assessing the implications on the business lines of the division, and summarizing them in reports for internal and external clients.

Physical effort

Degree: 1

Points: 3

The work requires sitting for long periods of time at a computer typing and conducting data research and while reviewing papers, carrying out analyses, verifying methodologies and attending meetings. The work also requires sitting for extended periods on aircraft flights to attend conferences and meetings.

Sensory effort

Degree: 1

Points: 2

The work requires operating a computer keyboard and requires retrieving, manipulating and examining statistical data on a computer screen where accuracy is particularly important as it affects the accuracy of the results. Also, the work requires operating an electronic calculator to perform or verify mathematical/statistical functions.

Working conditions

Degree: 2

Points: 8

The work is mainly performed in an office environment with exposure to glare from a video screen, and sometimes requires domestic and international travel. The work involves preparing high-priority and politically sensitive reports, producing briefing notes, ministerial correspondence, responses to ministerial questions and technical interpretive reports for senior management often within short time frames and competing management deadlines.

Benchmark 18: Senior Policy Manager

Point rating: 7, 4, 7, 5, 6, 6, 1, 1, 2 = 843 points
Level: EC-08

Organization context and summary

Under the general direction of a senior executive, leads the development of strategies for coordinating and managing approaches to highly complex, cross-sectoral and interdepartmental policy issues and files for the department, other government departments/agencies, industry, and international private and public sector clients and partners, including economic, financial and/or socio-economic policy analyses, studies and research; recommendations and authoritative advice; multi-stakeholder partnerships and relations; and representation of Government of Canada and broad Canadian interests.

Duties

  • Plans, determines requirements, develops, and directs a unit/division staff of professionals and multidisciplinary, departmental and interdepartmental project teams of experts and professionals in the conduct of complex, multi-dimensional and interrelated economic, socio-economic, financial, environmental and/or sustainable development research and studies on complex and technical issues to develop program frameworks and establishes parameters.
  • Directs and develops strategic policy and position papers, Memoranda to Cabinet and briefing notes to situate proposals and decisions in the appropriate economic, socio-economic, and environmental context; provides authoritative strategic advice to the Minister, senior officials, other levels of government and non-governmental organizations (NGO), the private sector and foreign interests on national and international policy positions, initiatives and objectives; and, provides technical expertise and leadership to industry and other government departments on market access, investment, legislative and regulatory reform issues and strategies, and international issues, developments and relations.
  • Leads the regulatory development process, identifying the need for policy attention, anticipating, initiating and responding to strategic policy issues, directing the analysis, development and implementation of policies and regulations to integrate technical and political issues, and the development of policy responses, approaches and options on matters that have a strategic significance from an industry, economic, financial, political, research and development, trade and foreign policy perspective.
  • Formulates departmental negotiating positions for complex issues, and develops and establishes consultative and collaborative mechanisms, key working relationships and partnerships with other government departments, other governments and international private sectors, and client organizations.
  • Represents the department and participates in interdepartmental, intergovernmental and international meetings, and on intergovernmental and multilateral working groups to formulate strategic policy directions and articulate issues, present papers, and present and advance the acceptance of policies, positions and strategies; and develops presentations, sensitive ministerial correspondence, and agreements/mechanisms.

Decision making

Degree: 7

Points: 165

The work requires leading the regulatory development process, conducting research and analysis, influencing management decisions and providing authoritative recommendations on program frameworks, policy and regulatory issues, options and policy positions for the Minister, senior officials, other levels of government, and non-governmental organizations (NGO) the private sector and foreign interests. Also, the work requires managing the development and implementation of new and complex conceptual and analytical constructs, methodologies and specifications, from a technical and a subject matter perspective, and the coordination of national, bilateral and multilateral policy and relations initiatives. Furthermore, the work requires creating, developing or modifying methodologies, strategies; initiating new approaches, and assessing, monitoring and situating trends and developments, horizontal policy analysis, public policy reviews, and impact, market, comparative, investment and cost-benefit analysis; and evaluating and conducting comparisons of performance. It involves addressing risks of different policy options in a strategic manner and understanding the broad implications of proposed courses of action, liaising with a broad range of data specialists and integrating a wide variety of analytical work originating from across government, among academic, research and economic policy institutions, nationally and internationally, and from the private sector. Decisions have an impact on the government-wide horizontal policy agenda.

Leadership and operational management

Degree: 4

Points: 90

The work requires planning and directing a unit/division, managing and providing direction to a staff of professionals, including determining resource requirements, establishing objectives and priorities, developing work plans, assigning and evaluating work, resolving performance issues, and determining training and development requirements; managing and leading the work of departmental, interdepartmental and international project teams and working groups undertaking policy research and development, on an ongoing basis: and directing the work of consultants. The work also requires planning and managing a unit's/division's budget, determining resource requirements for policy research/studies, and exercising wide latitude in reallocating funds to meet program objectives and priorities, within the parameters of overall policy objectives; conducting risk assessments of options for new and emerging proposals and business plans, making recommendations on the most cost-effective course of action; safeguarding information, databases and documentation to prevent the unintended release of information. Furthermore, the work requires formulating and negotiating policy agreements/mechanisms which can include cost-sharing arrangements, negotiating and awarding costs and professional service contracts, verifying that goods and services are received and securing external funding for activities; it requires approving the expenditure of allocated unit/division/program funds, and recommending to senior management the expenditure of additional funds for special or ad hoc initiatives to meet program objectives and priorities within the parameters of overall policy objectives.

Communication

Degree: 7

Points: 180

The work requires skills to manage negotiations, partnerships and relationships, major agreements/mechanisms and major national, bilateral and multilateral policy initiatives in partnership on behalf of the department. The work also requires advancing policy positions and initiatives, legislative/regulatory reform and protecting and defending Canadian interests, marketing and defending the policies, programs and initiatives to obtain acceptance or agreement by client organizations; expressing persuasive arguments and positions that are political, sensitive and jurisdictional; presenting recommendations with a full knowledge of the cross-jurisdictional issues involved in policy development; and, significantly adapting highly complex material, regulatory proposals, and technical language into concise and comprehensive arguments/explanations, stated in plain language. The work also requires leading the development and delivery of ministerial correspondence, reports, papers, briefing notes, memoranda to Cabinet, agreements and communication strategies, which requires accurately interpreting requirements, reviewing, analyzing and commenting on papers, economic, technical and scientific reports, studies, and proposals, reconciling differences of opinion/priorities and resolving problems; synthesizing and integrating the raw data to produce accurate conclusions and viable strategies and developing concise presentations; and adapting the presentation to suit the intended audience. The work requires engaging in extensive consultation and advocacy internally and externally, interpreting perspectives/linkages and situating them in a broader context. It also involves delivering comprehensive, strategic and integrated advice, briefings and recommendations to senior officials of the department, other levels of government and non-governmental organizations (NGOs), the private sector and foreign interests on a wide variety of complex, regulatory and international issues.

Knowledge of specialized fields (Skill)

Degree: 5

Points: 80

The work requires knowledge of a variety of theories, principles, concepts and techniques in the fields of economics, socio-economics, social sciences, financial analysis, and science and technology research and analysis and also knowledge of the communications techniques negotiation, consultation and problem-solving. The work also requires knowledge of macro- and microeconomic theories and principles, the political, economic, and social structures in Canada and the principles and rationale that underlie federal policy interests and program responsibilities, principles of sound financial management and science and technology research and analysis to advise and recommend on national and international policy positions, initiatives and objectives, and provide technical expertise and leadership on market access, investment, regulatory issues and strategies, and international issues, developments and relations. The work requires knowledge of principles, theoretical base and techniques of statistics, trends, market, impact, and data analysis, investment, cost-benefit, and risk analysis to understand and assess interrelationships.

Contextual knowledge

Degree: 6

Points: 105

The work requires knowledge of the mission, mandate, programs, objectives, organizational structure, current strategic directions, program delivery mechanisms, management philosophy, values, and culture of the department synthesized with knowledge of Government of Canada business lines, policies, processes and machinery of government, Cabinet and ministerial decision making, regulatory processes and policies, the trade and foreign policy of Canada, national and international emerging trends relative to the portfolio area and policy strategies/initiatives and objectives of industry and the private sector, provincial/territorial governments, other countries and non-governmental organizations. The work requires knowledge of horizontal issues and national and international emerging trends relative to the portfolio area, and knowledge of client organizations' policies and programs and the broader policy framework within which they operate, in order to anticipate, ascertain and interpret the intent and strategic implications of high profile client/stakeholder policy positions and strategies. The work requires knowledge of legislation, policies and programs related to policy development and implementation and the political, social and economic contexts which impact them.

Research and analysis

Degree: 6

Points: 210

The work involves leading complex, multi-dimensional and interrelated economic, socio-economic, financial, environmental and sustainable development research studies and projects to develop program frameworks, strategies, options and policy positions; and analyzing, developing and recommending market access and investment strategies. The work also requires initiative and creativity to conceptualize new horizontal approaches which are in harmony with overarching government goals and policy objectives and which comply with existing legislation, despite a lack of precedents and historical context, as well as the immediacy of the problem. The work also involves ensuring that complex statistical findings and analyses are properly conveyed and effectively used, particularly by senior decision makers, in order to avoid potentially costly or disastrous interpretation of critical data; and to study and report on unfavourable qualitative and quantitative data and influence acceptance of conclusions drawn from that data. The work also involves identifying serious gaps in information and researching and developing remedial measures; analyzing option strengths and weaknesses; and continually developing and maintaining authoritative knowledge of the vision and strategic directions of departments/agencies, national and international trends and developments across governments and mandates.

Physical effort

Degree: 1

Points: 3

The work requires sitting for prolonged periods in front of a computer when conducting research, reviewing and preparing presentations, briefing notes and memorandum to Cabinet.

Sensory effort

Degree: 1

Points: 2

The work requires extended eye focus when reviewing detailed information and data, and visually scanning long documents or draft policy documents prepared for senior management or for representatives of other departments, other governments, or private industry to ensure specific words are either included or excluded or stated in plain language to suit the intended audience.

Working conditions

Degree: 2

Points: 8

The work is conducted in an office environment, and routinely requires managing a heavy workload, multiple and conflicting priorities and responsibilities, and stress associated with the delivery of authoritative documentation, advice and options to senior management on an urgent or priority basis, and errors in judgment carry potentially serious consequences. The work also involves extended international travel.

Benchmark 19: Senior Negotiator

Point rating: 8, 4, 7, 5, 5, 5, 2, 1, 3 = 823 points
Level: EC-08

Organization context and summary

Under the general guidance of a senior executive, conducts, leads and manages, as Chief Federal Negotiator, the negotiation or addressing of matters related to constitutionally protected claims, historic treaties and self-government negotiations with recognized Aboriginal groups within a specific geographic area on behalf of the Government of Canada.

Duties

Within the specific geographic area:

  • Conducts, leads and manages, as Chief Federal Negotiator, constitutionally protected claims, treaty and self-government negotiations with recognized Aboriginal Groups.
  • Directs and manages a multidisciplinary team, which may include representatives of territorial/provincial governments in negotiations. Develops negotiating positions, drafts negotiating mandates and explains the factors that were considered and incorporated in their development (e.g., historical events, departmental policies and guidelines, linkages to other agreements and ongoing negotiations) for approval by the Minister, departmental executives and an interdepartmental caucus.
  • Leads negotiations with provincial/territorial governments in respect of all aspects of negotiations including implementation, jurisdiction, cost-sharing and other issues affecting each set of negotiations.
  • Develops and maintains leading edge management models, analytical frameworks and mandates and approaches to address the unique and specific needs of processes.
  • Manages development of efficient, effective administrative systems, which support the entire negotiation process and ensure their ongoing evaluation and enhancement with a view to their applicability in other areas of the region and across the department. Provides timely and accurate reports with respect to the status of any/all negotiation tables and for the preparation for the annual review of tables with the Minister.
  • Directs or assists multidisciplinary teams in the research of issues and development of policies affecting negotiations with Aboriginal groups and third parties. Leads the implementation and ongoing assessment of departmental policies with respect to treaties, self-government, and comprehensive claims as well as the development of issue-specific operational policies within the specified geographical context.
  • Establishes and maintains consultative frameworks and mechanisms to support negotiations through the identification and representation of third party interests (industry, special interest groups, and other aboriginal groups) in the development of negotiating positions.
  • Provides research and analysis to support development of a comprehensive planning framework, and annual update of a master plan, identifying all parties, their involvement and substantive issues such as culture and heritage, definitions, dispute resolution, environmental management and First Nations government.

Decision making

Degree: 8

Points: 210

Develops, devises, recommends and secures approval of negotiating positions, approaches, mandates and strategies; builds complex mandates and strategies with sufficient flexibility to adjust to new and emerging financial, legal, political, economic and international events which affect the First Nations/Government of Canada relationship.

Decisions and recommendations relate to the composition, direction and management of multidisciplinary negotiating teams, including members of provincial/territorial governments. Develops and maintains leading edge management models and analytical frameworks to address unique needs. Furthermore, the work identifies and resolves problems related to the negotiation of claims, treaties and self-government agreements in the geographic area and detects issues and impacts by analyzing each table/case on its own merits and assessing appropriate measures to be taken within the existing policy or legislative framework. Conducts an in-depth review of the acts, regulations and jurisprudence and policies within tight deadlines and makes determinations on the complexity of changes in policies and procedures required while working concurrently on other claims or priority issues for the Branch. Decisions and recommendations deal with unanticipated external constraints and interventions by other government departments and stakeholders that have the potential to alter the negotiating environment and context. The goal is to meet the requirement to negotiate long-term claims and agreements which are constitutionally protected, while protecting the interests of the Government of Canada.

Decisions and recommendations affect how third parties perceive the government attitude in balancing the competing interests of various groups with a direct interest in negotiations and the development of negotiating responses and positions.

Leadership and operational management

Degree: 4

Points: 90

Manages subordinate supervisors and managers, recruits and selects staff, organizes the workplace, determines work responsibilities and accountabilities, establishes work objectives and monitors their achievement; mentors and coaches staff, prepares and discusses annual performance reviews with individual staff members, takes disciplinary actions, promotes a culture of continuous learning and provides training and development opportunities and promotes and demonstrates, by own actions, the corporate values of the department.  The work also involves allocating budgets and managing and evaluating the activities of multidisciplinary negotiating teams, setting the priorities and work objectives and determining the skill sets required and for the negotiation of claims, treaties, self-government agreements in the geographic area, and related policy research. Furthermore, the work involves analyzing and controlling spending in order to ensure effective use of budgeted funds, forecasting financial problems and taking remedial action; it also involves tracking monthly expenditures against planned targets, identifying and investigating the reasons for variances, and recommending line object reallocations to correct variances, to meet unplanned expenditures, and to ensure that the work of the Unit is not impeded due to unnecessary financial constraints.

Communication

Degree: 7

Points: 180

The work also requires the development and implementation of comprehensive communications strategies, media relations approaches, and public education plans tailored for use with stakeholders (the public, industry, non-governmental organizations, other governments etc.) within the specified geographic area. Skill is needed to lead public consultations and communications including the use of various mediums; to convey and receive information in awkward, pressured and sensitive situations; to build consensus and defend the government's position on divisive issues of major importance to First Nations where there are widely diverse opinions; to persuade and influence team members, senior officials and other parties at the negotiation table; to secure views and opinions of the majority as opposed to vocal minorities; to significantly adapt messages to different audiences and present complex and persuasive arguments throughout the negotiation process; and to inform the public of the results of the negotiations, promote the legitimacy of claims negotiations and maximize public support for settlements.

Knowledge of specialized fields

Degree: 5

Points: 80

The work requires knowledge of the theories of several social science disciplines including history, sociology and political economy to research and analyze a wide range of constitutional and treaty positions of the federal, provincial and territorial governments and national Aboriginal organizations. This information is required to understand the priorities and positions of these provincial and territorial governments on a wide range of political, social and fiscal issues impacting self-government policy, and aboriginal programs subject to negotiation. Negotiations can be either broadly or narrowly focused; the subject topics could include, but are not limited to: housing, education, water supply, economic development, and cultural development, all of which can have social, financial and economic effects on First Nations organizations and the fiscal position of the Government of Canada.

The work requires knowledge of the theories and principles of negotiations including: definition and securing agreement on the issues to be negotiated and the objectives of the negotiation; identification of the primary interest of other side and closure techniques. This information is required to successfully conclude negotiations.

Contextual knowledge

Degree: 5

Points: 80

Knowledge is required of the structure of the department, its mandate, programs and policies; the history and relationship of the department and First Nations around the negotiation of claims, treaties, agreements and other contracts and obligations, their management and administration, the strengths of the relationship and areas of stress and the underlying causes to identify and use best practices in current negotiations and to recognize and avoid circumstances and conditions that constrain the negotiating process or that could result in agreements that contain the potential for abrogation or nonfulfillment; the mandate, key interests and concerns of other government departments and agencies; the current social/economic/political dynamics and circumstances of the First Nations organizations in the geographic area, with claims against the government; the approaches and policies guiding the provincial and territorial governments in the geographic area concerning provincial/territorial jurisdictions and First Nations (such as education, social services, forestry, fishing, hunting, trapping, mineral resources and land tenure); and relevant sections of acts, legislation and regulations that govern the relationship of the Government of Canada with First Nations.

This knowledge is used to develop negotiating strategies to ensure that the negotiations and agreements are consistent with the policies and priorities of the department; that the department's objectives, relevant statutes, legal principles and jurisdictional concerns are properly addressed in the negotiated claim and self-government agreements; that key interests and concerns of other government departments are addressed in negotiations; and to ensure acceptance and simplify implementation of the agreements.

Research and analysis

Degree: 5

Points: 165

The work involves researching, reviewing, analyzing and interpreting jurisprudence, claims, treaties, and self-government agreements, policies and procedures, and understanding the nature, priority, impact and validity of the claims, positions, alternatives and conclusions presented by other parties at the negotiating table within a specific geographic area. The work involves identifying and developing appropriate mandates and strategies to incorporate a balanced approach among governments', Aboriginal groups' and third parties' concerns. Moreover, the work requires significant judgment and innovation as the negotiations are extremely complex, requiring the development of arguments to be presented to the other negotiating parties. Furthermore, the work is multifaceted as the negotiations frequently change topics and priorities and are driven by financial, legal, political and international aspects, especially by everyone's perception of how government balances the competing interest in various groups.

Physical effort

Degree: 2

Points: 4

The work requires sitting for intermittent periods when reading and preparing documents and participating in negotiation sessions. The work also requires long distance travel to remote First Nations communities by small aircraft, cars, all-terrain vehicles, boats and trucks on secondary roads and bulky self-protection gear such as life jackets or heavy winter gear and to load and off-load heavy briefcases with required documentation, a personal computer and other communication equipment and personal baggage. This can also occur, on occasion, in unsteady conditions such as when off-loading from a seaplane.

Sensory effort

Degree: 1

Points: 2

The work requires extended eye focus when reviewing detailed information and data, and visually scanning long documents or draft policy documents prepared for senior management or for representatives of other departments, other governments, First Nations, community groups, associations, or private industry to ensure specific words or symbols are either included or excluded.

Working conditions

Degree: 3

Points: 12

The work requires long-distance travel to remote First Nations communities by small aircraft, cars, snowmobiles, all-terrain vehicles, boats and trucks on secondary and other poorer quality roads. There is a requirement to deal with a lack of privacy and to face difficult and confrontational negotiating parties during late night and extended negotiating sessions. There is also a need to deal with numerous interruptions, frequent time pressures, multiple and changing priorities and tight deadlines.

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