Job evaluation standard: Welfare Programs (WP)

Amendments

Amendment Number Date Description
1 April 1993 The category definition was rescinded.
2 December 1977 The job evaluation and selection standards were combined; the revision included the criteria that the Public Service Commission provided respecting the selection of employees to provide guidelines to assist raters in the allocation of positions to the group and to update the benchmark (BM) positions for better representation of the positions allocated to the group.
3 March 1999 The new occupational group definition map was established with new occupational group definitions linked to corresponding job evaluation standards; in this case, the parts of the Program Administrative Services (PA) Occupational Group evaluated using the Welfare Programs (WP) job evaluation standard.
4 October 2017

Table of Contents

Policy Context

1. Effective Date

1.1 This standard takes effect on January 1977.

2. Application

2.1 This standard applies to the core public administration as defined in section 11 of the Financial Administration Act, unless excluded through specific acts, regulations or orders-in-council.

2.2 This standard is to be used to establish the appropriate level for work allocated to the Program Administrative Services (PA) Occupational Group evaluated using the Welfare Programs (WP) Job Evaluation Standard.

3. Context

3.1 This standard is a key component of the classification system and must be read in conjunction with the Policy Framework for the Management of Compensation, the Policy on Classification, the Directive on Classification, the Directive on Classification Grievances and occupational group definitions.

3.2 The classification system is the infrastructure that is put in place to effectively manage the classification of positions within the core public administration. Classification entails allocating positions by occupational group and level using the appropriate job evaluation standard to ensure that the relative value of work is respected across the core public administration.

3.3 This standard is issued pursuant to section 7 and subsection 11.1 of the Financial Administration Act.

4. Consequences

4.1 The consequences identified in the Policy on Classification apply in cases of non-compliance with this standard.

5. Related Policies and Publications

  • Policy on Classification;
  • Directive on Classification;
  • Directive on Classification Grievances;
  • Occupational group definitions;
  • Guide to Allocating Positions Using the Occupational Group Definitions;
  • Table of Concordance;
  • Job evaluation standards; and
  • Other policy instruments and guides that may be published from time to time.

6. Inquiries

Please direct inquiries about this standard to your departmental corporate classification office. To obtain information on the application of this standard, a representative of the departmental corporate classification office should contact:

Workforce Organization and Classification
Compensation and Labour Relations Sector
Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer
Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R5
Email: publicenquiries-demandesderenseignement@tbs-sct.gc.ca

Preface

This standard describes the plans to be used in evaluating positions related in WP classification of the PA Group.

The evaluation plan provides a quantitative method for determining the relative value of positions in the WP classification. Benchmark (BM) position descriptions are provided, which serve both as a reference for position evaluation and for selection.

Analysis of the work found in the WP classification revealed that there were a number of work characteristics. These definitions are shown where required.

The standard is designed for use by classification officers and line managers who are involved in the evaluation of WP positions.

It is the responsibility of the line manager to determine and describe the duties and responsibility of a position. During the process the classification officer will provide advice and assistance to the line manager as required.

Subsequent to the development of a position description, it will be the responsibility of the classification officer to ensure that legislative and delegated authority is effectively discharged. Whenever feasible the line manager or other line officers should actively participate in the evaluation process.

Group Definition

The WP classification of the PA Group comprises positions that are primarily involved in the planning, development, delivery or management of administrative and federal government policies, programs, services or other activities directed to the public.

Inclusions

Notwithstanding the generality of the foregoing, for greater certainty, it includes positions that have, as their primary purpose, responsibility for one or more of the following activities: 

  • Inclusion 12 of the PA Group – the planning, development, delivery or management of policies, programs, services or other activities dealing with the social development, settlement, adjustment and rehabilitation of groups, communities or individuals including the planning, development and delivery of welfare services; and
  • Inclusion 15 of the PA Group – the leadership of any of the above-mentioned activities.

Exclusions

Positions excluded from the PA Group are those whose primary purpose is included in the definition of any other group.

Part I: Job Evaluation Plan

Introduction

This standard describes the point rating plan to be used to evaluate jobs allocated to the WP classification of the PA Group. It consists of an introduction, general definitions and point rating scales. The BM position descriptions are located in Part II.

Point rating is an analytical, quantitative method of determining the relative value of jobs. It is particularly suited to heterogeneous occupational groups in which jobs consist of varied combinations of tasks. Essentially, point rating plans define characteristics or factors common to the jobs being evaluated. They define degrees of each factor and allocate point values to each degree. The total value determined for each job is the sum of the point values assigned by the raters.

All methods of job evaluation require the exercise of judgment and the orderly collection and analysis of information so that consistent judgments can be made. The point rating method facilitates rational discussion and resolution of differences in determining the relative worth of jobs.

Allocation Guidelines

The Group Definition provides statements of “Inclusions” that describe the primary duties assigned to positions related to the WP classification of the PA Group. These are the principal sources of reference when allocating positions to the classification.

Consistent with these statements are the following descriptions of work assignments normally associated with WP. They are intended as a further aid to raters in determining the allocation of positions to the classification.

  • Social Development Assignments are concerned with the development, application or supervision of programs to guide, advise, stimulate and encourage the social, political, cultural and economic development of Aboriginal people living within defined geographic boundaries and individuals.

  • Veterans’ Welfare Services Assignments are concerned with the development, application, supervision and administration of a program to provide such services as social adjustment, rehabilitation, counselling, welfare or financial benefit services to meet the needs of veterans and their families.

  • Emergency Welfare Services Assignments are concerned with the planning and coordination of emergency services where adequate services are not otherwise provided and with training programs and formulation of plans with foreign, provincial and municipal governments for an emergency service including clothing, lodging, registration and enquiry services.

  • Correctional Services Assignments are concerned with the development, application and administration of programs in the parole and penitentiaries services, which include the counselling and guidance of parolees and inmates, analysis and evaluation of their rehabilitation and training needs, professional diagnostic and reporting services and the development and implementation of corrective and follow-up programs.

Factors

The combined factors do not describe all aspects of jobs. They deal only with those characteristics that can be defined and distinguished and that are useful in determining the relative value of jobs.

Four factors are used in this plan. All the factors have more than one dimension and have been defined in terms of two or three related elements. The factors and elements are:

  1. Knowledge
    1. Education
    2. Experience
    3. Continuing Study
  2. Problem Solving
    1. Scope for Problem Solving
    2. Impact of Activities
  3. Responsibility for Contacts
    1. Nature of Contacts
    2. Persons Contacted
  4. Supervision
    1. Level of Employees Supervised
    2. Numbers Supervised

Point Values

The maximum point value assigned to each factor reflects its relative importance. Similarly, point values have been assigned to the degrees of the factors.

Point values increase arithmetically as the degrees of the factor increase. The minimum point values for knowledge, problem solving and responsibility for contacts are one-fifth of the maximum value. The minimum value for supervision is one-tenth of the maximum value, although there will be positions where this factor does not apply. The ranges of point values are:

Factor Minimum Points Maximum Points

Knowledge

Education and Experience

60

300

Continuing Study

10

50

Problem Solving

70

350

Responsibility for Contacts

30

150

Supervision

N/A

150

Total

170

1,000

BM Positions

BM position descriptions are used to exemplify degrees of each factor or element. Each description consists of a brief summary, a list of the principal duties and a specification describing each of the point rating factors and elements as it appears in the job. The BM positions have been evaluated, and the degree and point values assigned to each factor are shown in the specifications.

The rating scales identify the BM position descriptions that exemplify each degree. These descriptions are an integral part of the point rating plan and are used to ensure consistency in application of the rating scales.

Use of the Standard

There are six steps in the application of this classification standard.

  1. The position description is studied to ensure understanding of the position as a whole and of each factor. The relation of the position being rated to positions above and below it in the organization is also studied.
  2. Allocation of the position to the WP classification within the PA group is confirmed by reference to the definitions and the descriptions of inclusions and exclusions.
  3. Tentative degrees of each factor in the job being rated are determined by comparison with degree definitions in the rating scales. Uniform application of degree definitions requires frequent reference to the descriptions of factors and the notes to raters.
  4. The description of the factor in each of the BM positions exemplifying the degree tentatively established is compared with the description of the factor in the position being rated. Comparisons are also made with descriptions of the factor in BM positions for the degrees above and below the one tentatively established.
  5. The point values for all factors are added to determine the tentative total point rating.
  6. The position being rated is compared as a whole to positions to which similar total point values have been assigned, as a check on the validity of the total rating.

Determination of Levels

The ultimate objective of job evaluation is to determine the relative value of jobs in each occupational group so that employees carrying out the jobs may be paid at rates consistent with the relationship indicated. Jobs that fall within a designated range of point values will be regarded as of equal difficulty and value and will be allocated to the same level.

Point Rating Scale

Factor Maximum Points

Knowledge

Education and Experience

300

Continuing Study

50

Problem Solving

350

Responsibility for Contacts

150

Supervision

150

Total

1,000

Point Boundaries

Level Points

WP 1

170–290

WP 2

291–400

WP 3

401–510

WP 4

511–620

WP 5

621–730

WP 6

731–840

WP 7

841–950

WP 8

951–1,000

Knowledge Factor

This factor is used to measure the amount of experience and education required to undertake the duties of the position and the requirement for continuing study.

Definitions

  • Education refers to the level of academic or other formal training required to provide the basis for the development of the skill and knowledge needed in the position.
  • Experience refers to the minimum length of time an employee requires, under optimum conditions, to acquire the administrative knowledge and skill needed to carry out the duties of the position.
  • Continuing study refers to the requirement for maintaining knowledge of trends and developments in one or more fields related to the duties of the position.

Notes to Raters

For purposes of this standard the time needed to acquire clerical or other skills and working knowledge of the regulations and directives and the time needed to demonstrate the capacity to perform administrative work is not to be considered in the evaluation of the experience element of the knowledge factor.

In tentatively selecting the degree of the experience element, consideration is to be given to the length of time needed to acquire specialized and general administrative knowledge required to carry out the duties. General administrative knowledge is gained through experience in such responsibilities as:

  1. formulating ideas and expressing them orally or in written form;
  2. carrying out studies and preparing reports on specific aspects of existing or proposed departmental activities;
  3. making critical analyses of methods and procedures with a view to recommending improvements;
  4. carrying out duties that require knowledge of the objectives of the organization and the plans of action developed to achieve them;
  5. making commitments of staff or material resources; and
  6. supervising and directing staff.

The degrees of the experience element assigned to the BM positions have been established by ranking on the basis of such considerations as those mentioned above. The degree of the experience element tentatively selected is to be confirmed by direct comparison of the position being rated with the duties and specifications of the BM positions.

The second degree of the Education element is to be assigned when the duties of the position require:

  1. university graduation in a specialized field;
  2. understanding and appreciation of the principles and concepts of two or more specialized fields for which the knowledge is normally acquired through university training and that are directly associated with the duties performed; or
  3. systematic study and analysis of complicated general problems and their solution by the application of specialized knowledge acquired through extensive post-secondary school study or training rather than through experience.

The positions with duties that meet conditions 2 and 3 will not necessarily require a university degree.

Knowledge Rating Scale – Education and Experience
 

Completion of Secondary School Education
Degree A

University Education
Degree B

Degree 1
up to and including two years of
experience

Degree A1
60 points

  • BM 2: Welfare Officer

Degree B1
135 points

  • No benchmark

Degree 2
up to and including four years of
experience

Degree A2
87 points

  • BM 3: Welfare Services Counsellor
  • BM 4: Agency Assistant, Indigenous and Northern Affairs, St. Regis Agency, Ontario Region

Degree B2
162 points

  • BM 5: Self-Government Advisor
  • BM 6: Inmate Classification Officer
  • BM 7: Parole Officer

Degree 3
up to and including six years of
experience

Degree A3
114 points

  • No benchmark

Degree B3
189 points

  • BM 8: Community Development Specialist, Indigenous and Northern Affairs
  • BM 9: Regional, Self-Government Administrator, Toronto, Ontario
  • BM 10: Regional Placement and Economic Development Specialist, Quebec Region, Indigenous and Northern Affairs
  • BM 11: District Representative, Small District Office

Degree 4
up to and including eight years of experience

Degree A4
141 points

  • No benchmark

Degree B4
216 points

  • BM 13: Supervisor, Placement, Ottawa

Degree 5
up to and including ten years of
experience

Degree A5
169 points

  • No benchmark

Degree B5
244 point

  • No benchmark

Degree 6
up to and including 12 years of
experience

Degree A6
197 points

  • BM 12: District Director, Veterans Welfare Services

Degree B6
272 points

  • BM 14: Manager, Social Programs Division, Ottawa

Degree 7
more than 12 years of
experience

Degree A7
225 points

  • No benchmark

Degree B7
300 points

  • No benchmark
Knowledge Rating Scale – Continuing Study
Nature of Continuing Study Points BM Position

Degree 1 – Work requires knowledge of statutes, regulations, policies, programs and procedures related to the work performed, gained by continuing study of directives and manuals issued by departments and central agencies. It also requires knowledge of employment, business and other conditions, and of services available from non-departmental sources in the area, gained by continuing study of articles in publications and of information releases.

10

  • BM 2: Welfare Officer
  • BM 3: Welfare Services Counsellor
  • BM 4: Agency Assistant, Indigenous and Northern Affairs, St. Regis Agency, Ontario Region
  • BM 5: Self-Government Advisor

Degree 2 – Work requires knowledge of trends and developments in a field of specialization directly related to the duties performed, gained by continuing study of texts, journals and periodicals.

30

  • BM 6: Inmate Classification Officer
  • BM 7: Parole Officer
  • BM 8: Community Development Specialist, Indigenous and Northern Affairs
  • BM 9: Regional, Self-Government Administrator, Toronto, Ontario
  • BM 10: Regional Placement and Economic Development Specialist, Quebec Region, Indigenous and Northern Affairs
  • BM 11: District Representative, Small District Office
  • BM 12: District Director, Veterans Welfare Services
  • BM 13: Supervisor of Placement, Ottawa

Degree 3 – Work requires development and maintenance of knowledge in depth in a field of specialization through broad-ranging, intensive study, OR knowledge of the nature and interrelationships of trends and developments in a number of fields through study of a wide variety of texts, journals and periodicals.

50

  • BM 14: Manager Social Programs Division, Ottawa

Problem Solving Factor

This factor is used to measure the difficulty of the duties of the position as indicated by the scope for problem solving and the impact of activities.

Definitions

  • Problem solving refers not only to specific actions taken to meet immediate needs of groups and individuals, but also to more general long-term activities directed towards changing attitudes when changes can only be identified over a long period of time.

  • Scope for problem solving refers to the freedom to take action. It is measured in terms of the judgment, initiative and discretion required, the availability of direction and the difficulty of determining the implications of courses of action.

  • Impact of activities refers to the importance of the activities in terms of their effect on individuals, groups and communities and on the resources committed or affected. It also refers to the effect of activities on other government or private agencies, the effect on the efficiency with which services are provided and the significance of precedents, projects and programs that are established.

  • Established methods are to be interpreted broadly to include the guidance provided by manuals, directives and by precedents.

  • Program refers to the plans of action that are developed and implemented by the organization to achieve its objectives.

Notes to Raters

The four degrees of the impact of activities element are illustrated by the BM position descriptions. The following characteristics of the work are to be considered in determining a tentative degree for this element:

  1. The effect on individuals, groups or communities, taking into account the kind and significance of the effect and the numbers of persons affected.
  2. The extent to which the position being rated is the effective recommending or implementing authority, which is usually related to the level of the position in the organization.
  3. The size, value and kind of departmental resources affected.
  4. The consequences of an error in judgment.

Any one characteristic is only an indication of the impact of the activities and the whole context within which the work is performed is to be considered. The job as a whole is then to be compared to the descriptions of the BM positions exemplifying the degree of impact that has been tentatively established.

Problem Solving Rating Scale
Impact of Activities

Scope for Problem Solving
Degree A
Problem solving requires some judgment, initiative and discretion. Individual problems are solved by the selection of a course of action indicated by established methods and instructions. The implications of possible courses actions are usually apparent from precedents. Unusual problems are referred to superiors.

Scope for Problem Solving
Degree B
Problem solving requires a moderate degree of judgment, initiative and discretion. Problems are solved by selection of courses of action that may require modification of established methods. The implications of possible courses of action may not be readily apparent. Direction is sought when the apparent solutions to problems are not within the intent of established practices.

Scope for Problem Solving
Degree C
Problem solving requires a significant degree of judgment, initiative and discretion. Problems are solved by modification of established methods or by devising courses of action within the intent of established programs. The implications of possible courses of action are often difficult to determine. Recommendations are made to effect changes in programs.

Scope for Problem Solving
Degree D
Problem solving requires a high degree of judgment, initiative and discretion.
Duties of the position require the development of solutions to diverse and interrelated problems. Substantial contributions are made to planning, developing and changing programs in responses to recommendations, in anticipation of changing conditions or to achieve objectives established by superiors. Implications of actions taken or proposed complex and often cannot be determined with certainty.

Limited Impact of Activities
Degree 1

Degree A1
70 points

  • BM 2: Welfare Officer

Degree B1
116 points

  • BM 3: Welfare Services Counsellor
  • BM 4: Agency Assistant, Indigenous and Northern Affairs, St. Regis Agency

Degree C1
162 points

  • No benchmark

Degree D1
208 points

  • No benchmark

Moderate Impact of Activities
Degree 2

Degree A2
117 points

  • No benchmark

Degree B2
163 points

  • BM 5: Self-Government Advisor
  • BM 6: Inmate Classification Officer
  • BM 7: Parole Officer

Degree C2
209 points

  • BM 8: Community Development Specialist, Indigenous and Northern Affairs
  • BM 9: Regional Self-Government Administrator
  • BM 10: Regional Placement and Economic Development Specialist
  • BM 11: District Representative, Small District Office

Degree D2
255 points

  • No benchmark

Significant Impact of Activities
Degree 3

Degree A3
164 points

  • No benchmark

Degree B3
210 points

  • No benchmark

Degree C3
256 points

  • BM 12: District Director, Veterans Welfare Services
  • BM 13: Supervisor of Placement, Ottawa

Degree D3
302 points

  • No benchmark

Major Impact of Activities
Degree 4

Degree A4
211 points

  • No benchmark

Degree B4
257 points

  • No benchmark

Degree C4
303 points

  • No benchmark

Degree D4
350 points

  • BM 14: Manager, Social Programs Division, Ottawa

Responsibility for Contacts Factor

This factor is used to measure the difficulty and importance of contacts that occur as an integral part of the work and the requirements imposed by these contacts to work and communicate with others in person, by telephone or in writing. The elements of the factor are the nature of contacts and the persons contacted.

Definitions

  • Associates refers to persons with whom contacts are customarily established over long periods of time and in circumstances that develop an awareness of each other's requirements.
  • Officials refers to administrators or other persons with some degree of executive authority who are not associates.

Notes to Raters

Only those contacts that are an integral part of the work and that result from the duties assigned or sanctioned by management are to be considered.

An officer of a department, another level of government, private organization or industry may be an associate or an official, depending on the circumstances under which the contacts occur.

If the duties of the position include contacts involving more than one combination of persons contacted and nature of contacts, the points for each degree are to be determined and the highest point value used.

Points are to be assigned for written contacts only if the duties of the position being rated include responsibility for signing letters or memoranda. Points will not be assigned if responsibility is limited to contacts by form or pattern letters.

Responsibility for Contacts Rating Scale

Persons Contacted

Nature of Contacts
Degree A
To give, obtain and exchange information requiring discussion, explanation and cooperation.

Nature of Contacts
Degree B
To persuade and obtain assistance or agreement of others.

Nature of Contacts
Degree C
To act as a representative of the department or agency at formal meetings where differences in interest may be expected, with authority to discuss problems and seek common ground on which to base solutions.

Nature of Contacts
Degree D
To act as a representative of the department or agency in negotiating agreements of considerable significance, with authority to formulate programs within established objectives.

Degree 1 Contact such persons as clients, members of the general public, employees in the same department and associates in other federal departments and agencies.

Degree A1
30 points

  • No benchmark

Degree B1
60 points

  • No benchmark

Degree C1
91 points

  • No benchmark

Degree D1
122 points

  • No benchmark

Degree 2 Contact such persons as representatives of clients, officials in other departments, agencies and associates in other levels of government, private organizations or industry.

Degree A2
44 points

  • No benchmark

Degree B2
74 points

  • BM 2: Welfare Officer
  • BM 4: Agency Assistant, Indigenous and Northern Affairs, St. Regis Agency
  • BM 5: Self-Government Advisor

Degree C2
105 points

  • No benchmark

Degree D2
136 points

  • No benchmark

Degree 3 Contact officials of other levels of government, other countries, private organizations or industry.

Degree A3
58 points

  • No benchmark

Degree B3
88 points

  • BM 3: Welfare Services Counsellor
  • BM 7: Parole Officer
  • BM 8: Community Development Specialist, Indigenous and Northern Affairs
  • BM 10: Regional Placement and Economic Development Specialist
  • BM 12: District Director, Veterans Welfare Services

Degree C3
119 points

  • BM 9: Regional Self-Government Administrator
  • BM 11: District Representative, Small District Office
  • BM 13: Supervisor of Placement, Ottawa

Degree D3
150 points

  • BM 14: Manager Social Programs Division, Ottawa

Supervision Factor

This factor is used to measure the continuing responsibility that the position assumes for the work and guidance of other employees. The two elements of the factor are the level of employees supervised and the numbers, supervised.

Definitions

  • Level of employees supervised refers to the highest level supervised.
  • Numbers supervised refers to the total number of employees for whom the position exercises supervisory responsibility directly or through subordinate supervisors.

Notes to Raters

A position that does not have a continuing and substantive responsibility for the supervision of the work of others is not to be assigned points under this factor. Characteristically, “substantive responsibility” includes allocating staff to various work projects, proposing disciplinary action, informing staff of their strengths and weaknesses, proposing changes in the numbers, the classification of positions and ensuring that work standards are maintained.

Occasional supervision, such as that performed during absences of the supervisor on annual or sick leave, is not to be rated.

For the purpose of the standard, “numbers supervised” includes the total of the following:

  1. The number of employees in the department or agency for whom the position has continuous supervisory responsibility.
  2. The number of person-years of work performed by casual, part-time and seasonal employees who are supervised by the subject position.
  3. The number of employees in the department or agency for whom the position has responsibility for functional supervision.
  4. The maximum number of employees usually supervised by the position where the work is organized on a project basis and where the number supervised varies according to the requirements of each project.

The term “functional supervision” applies to staff of units for which the position being evaluated:

  1. has authority to prescribe objectives or programs and the methods and procedures to be followed in carrying out a specialized function;
  2. has responsibility for ensuring adherence to established programs, methods and procedures; and
  3. has authority to make effective recommendations on employment, promotions or transfers.

In 3 directly above, the term “has authority” refers to established practices that require senior officials to exercise significant influence on the employment, promotion or transfer of employees who are not under their direct supervision. It does not imply, however, authority to impose their views on line officers.

Employees at all levels are to be included in the numbers subject to functional supervision, although the third criterion may not apply to those at junior levels to the same degree as to more senior employees.

Supervision Rating Scale

Number of Employees Supervised and Degree (A to G) and Level of Employees Supervised and Degree (1, 2, 3)
Degree 1
Supervises employees in the administrative support category or junior employees in other categories
Degree 2
Supervises intermediate employees in the administrative and foreign service or other categories
Degree 3
Supervises senior employees in the administrative and foreign service or other categories

Degree A1
Supervises 1–3 junior employees
15 points

Degree A2
Supervises 1–3 intermediate employees
29 points

Degree A3
Supervises 1–3 senior employees
44 points

Degree B1
Supervises 4–10 junior employees
32 points

Degree B2
Supervises 4–10 intermediate employees
46 points

Degree B3
Supervises 4–10 senior employees
61 points

Degree C1
Supervises 11–25 junior employees
49 points

Degree C2
Supervises 11–25 intermediate employees
63 points

Degree C3
Supervises 11–25 senior employees
78 points

Degree D1
Supervises 26–75 junior employees
67 points

Degree D2
Supervises 26–75 intermediate employees
81 points

Degree D3
Supervises 26–75 senior employees
96 points

Degree E1
Supervises 76–200 junior employees
85 points

Degree E2
Supervises 76–200 intermediate employees
99 points

Degree E3
Supervises 76–200 senior employees
114 points

Degree F1
Supervises 201–400 junior employees
103 points

Degree F2
Supervises 201–400 intermediate employees
117 points

Degree F3
Supervises 201–400 senior employees
132 points

Degree G1
Supervises 401 or more junior employees
121 points

Degree G2
Supervises 401 or more intermediate employees
135 points

Degree G3
Supervises 401 or more senior employees
150 points

  • BM 4: Agency Assistant, Indigenous and Northern Affairs, St. Regis Agency, Ontario Region
  • BM 8: Community Development Specialist, Indigenous and Northern Affairs
  • BM 10: Regional Placement and Economic Development Specialist, Quebec Region, Indigenous and Northern Affairs
  • BM 11: District Representative, Small District Office (page 51)
  • BM 12: District Director, Veterans Welfare Services
  • BM 13: Supervisor of Placement and, Ottawa
  • BM 14: Manager Social Programs Division, Ottawa

Part II: Benchmarks

Introduction

BM position descriptions are intended to exemplify the degrees of each factor and element in the position evaluation plan. They are based on actual positions allocated to the WP classification in the PA Group but, because they serve to exemplify degrees, their value for that purpose continues even when the actual positions undergo changes.

The contents of BM position descriptions serve to illustrate the types of information used as a basis for the evaluation of positions.

Index of Benchmark Position Descriptions

BM Number Descriptive Title Classification Level Total Points Group and Level

2

Welfare Officer

1

214

WP-01

3

Welfare Services Counsellor

2

301

WP-02

4

Agency Assistant, Indigenous and Northern Affairs, Saint Regis Agency, Ontario Region

2

336

WP-02

5

Self-Government Advisor

3

409

WP-03

6

Inmate Classification Officer

3

413

WP-03

7

Parole Officer

3

443

WP-03

8

Community Development Specialist, Indigenous and Northern Affairs

4

531

WP-04

9

Regional, Self-Government Administrator, Toronto, Ontario

4

547

WP-04

10

Regional Placement and Economic Development Specialist, Quebec Region, Indigenous and Northern Affairs

4

548

WP-04

11

District Representative, Small District Office

4

562

WP-04

12

District Director, Veterans Welfare Service

5

638

WP-05

13

Supervisor of Placement, Ottawa

5

702

WP-05

14

Manager, Social Programs Division, Ottawa

7

918

WP-07

BM 2: Welfare Officer

Point Rating
214
Level
WP-01

Summary

Under supervision of the social welfare supervisor:

  • interviews clients to ascertain the nature of their problems;
  • provides advice and information to clients and initiates measures to resolve problems through referral to departmental and non-departmental sources of assistance;
  • assists in the provision of casework and counselling services;
  • maintains cooperative working relationships with employees of the department and associates in other organizations; and
  • performs related duties.

Duties

Interviews veterans and their dependents to ascertain the nature of perceived economic, social or other problems.

Determines the applicability of benefits and services available from the department, other governments, private agencies and organizations that meet clients' needs.

Informs clients of the nature and the conditions governing the provision of benefits and services by the department and/or other organizations.

Arranges for referral of clients to departmental and non-departmental sources of assistance, in accordance with established procedures by:

  • explaining to officials or representatives the nature of clients problems;
  • assisting clients to apply for benefits and services involving the completion of forms, the assembly and verification of certificates or documents and the notarization of claims; and
  • writing reports to describe clients, problems or circumstances and to make recommendations respecting the provision of assistance.

Assists in the provision of casework and counselling services by:

  • interviewing clients receiving casework services to evaluate progress; and
  • consulting with supervisor or welfare counsellor respecting needs for continuation of casework or other services required to improve client's circumstances.

Maintains cooperative working relationships with other employees of the department and associates in public and private welfare, social or service agencies to exchange information respecting programs and clients, obtain assistance for clients and to ensure understanding and observation of respective fields of responsibility.

Performs other related duties such as conducting correspondence, obtaining data concerning social and economic conditions for inclusion in operational reports, attending workshops, seminars and conferences, assisting in the orientation of newly appointed employees and serving as required on Committees.

Knowledge: Education and Experience

Degree A1

Points 60

The work requires good knowledge of the legislation administered by the department, of the benefits and services that are available to veterans through departmental sources and from service and social organizations and of the programs and activities of public and private welfare agencies in the district. It requires experience in interviewing and advising clients who are in difficulties and in identifying cases requiring professional assistance. This knowledge is normally acquired through completion of secondary school education, completion of a departmental training course, study sessions and one year of related experience.

Knowledge: Continuing Study

Degree 1

Points 10

The work requires continuing study of departmental WP, procedures and directives, of programs and activities of other welfare service agencies in the district and of services available from service and social organizations.

Problem Solving

Degree A1

Points 70

The work is carried out in accordance with established methods and procedures; guidance from supervisors is normally readily available. Work in the field is normally under direct supervision. Judgment is required in identifying problems of clients and in making appropriate referrals. Discretion is required in interviewing clients and conducting investigations. The activities affect the well being of clients and their families.

Contacts

Degree B2

Points 74

The work requires contacts with clients and their families, landlords, employers, members of the general public and associates in public and private welfare agencies and social organizations to exchange information and to obtain their assistance or agreement in making arrangements for welfare assistance.

Supervision

Degree N/A

Points N/A

There is no requirement for supervision.

BM 3: Welfare Services Counsellor

Point Rating
301
Level
WP-02

Summary

Under general supervision: 

  • provides casework service to veterans and their dependents involving social, economic and rehabilitation problems;
  • carries a limited caseload of complex cases;
  • establishes and maintains effective working relationships with a variety of public and private health, welfare, educational and service agencies, veterans organizations and potential employers;
  • provides advice and information to clients, arranges for financial and other assistance, prepares reports and makes recommendations; and
  • performs the duties and assumes the responsibilities of an area welfare supervisor when required.

Duties

Provides veterans, including older registrants and their dependents and those in treatment institutions, with a casework service involving social, economic and rehabilitation problems by:

  • assessing clients requests, referrals for service from outside sources and establishing that eligibility exists;
  • assessing thoroughly their social and economic conditions;
  • securing information through examination of departmental records, interviews with clients, family and others to define the nature of a problem and formulate alternative plans with the client for its solution;
  • seeking professional opinion in relation to a client’s ability to function in the community, maintaining contact with clients through follow-up visits to establish a relationship of complete confidence and mutual understanding and ensure continuity of assistance and guidance;
  • providing clients with accurate information of the resources available through continuing contact, discussion and conference with collateral agencies and their staff; and
  • applying the techniques, theories and principles of social casework in order to motivate clients and ensure the best possible use of their abilities and resources.

Carries a limited caseload of complex rehabilitation cases and is charged with responsibility for motivating clients towards gainful employment by:

  • acquiring a thorough knowledge of clients’ employment history and potential, through repeated interviews, to complete as accurate an employment history as possible;
  • securing medical and psychological assessments to determine the veteran’s ability to function in the current job market;
  • discussing problems with previous employers and agencies with whom client may have had contact;
  • referring client to the responsible departments and agencies or other prospective employers to obtain employment or suggest alternatives;
  • consulting with more experienced staff members for advice and suggestions to ensure that no possible avenue of assistance is missed; and
  • offering continual support and encouragement to motivate the client to use all his or her own and all the community resources to help him or her return to work.

Establishes and maintains effective working relationships with a variety of public and private health, welfare, educational and service agencies, veterans’ organizations and potential employers to ensure that a friendly, cooperative and mutually advantageous relationship is established for the solution to client problems by:

  • contacting associates and officials frequently, in person, by e-mail, correspondence and phone;
  • acquiring a good working knowledge of the programs operated by various service agencies;
  • making accurate and adequate referrals;
  • participating in meetings and discussions in order to resolve mutual problems and gain a better understanding of the community resources available to assist clients; and
  • attending seminars and conferences.

Provides advice and information to clients and arranges for financial and other assistance by:

  • interviewing veterans and their dependents;
  • obtaining and verifying information on military service and residence through review of records and other checks;
  • assessing a client’s needs in relation to the benefits available under the veterans legislation;
  • outlining the department’s welfare and financial assistance programs and the services available from other public and private agencies;
  • determining the appropriate source of assistance and making referrals;
  • identifying cases that require professional assistance;
  • obtaining authorization for payment of emergency assistance from special funds to solve non-recurring problems;
  • contacting landlords to find suitable accommodation for clients;
  • assisting in the completion of applications for payment of benefits and assistance to ensure that the client receives under social legislation the benefits to which he or she is entitled (e.g., Mincome, GIS, Welfare);
  • recommending approval of application for benefits to adjudicating and other bodies; and
  • consulting frequently with supervisor so that, by their joint efforts, all possible sources of assistance are explored.

Performs other related duties including serving as a member of district adjudicating bodies, advisory committees and selection boards; relieving as an area welfare supervisor; assisting in servicing area welfare supervisor overload; contributing to training and development of welfare service assistance and administrative support staff members who may be assigned for guidance or supervision.

Knowledge: Education and Experience

Degree A2

Points 87

The work requires good knowledge of the legislation administered by the department, of the benefits and services that are available to veterans through the department and service and social organizations and of the programs and activities of public and private agencies in the district that provide Welfare Services. It requires some knowledge and understanding of behaviour, motivation and counselling techniques.

It requires experience in assessing clients' problems, interviewing, advising and guiding clients who are disabled by injury, physical or mental illness or age or suffering from economic hardship or social disadvantage. It also requires experience in working with professional staff and allied social welfare organizations. This knowledge is normally acquired through studies in a social science or social work field coupled with completion of secondary school and related experience.

Knowledge: Continuing Study

Degree 1

Points 10

The work requires continuing study to keep current with procedures, precedents and directives related to departmental WP and with the programs and activities of other welfare service agencies in the areas that are related to social work, gerontology, vocational adjustment, guidance and public assistance. It also requires an up to date knowledge of the services available from social and service organizations.

Problem Solving

Degree B1

Points 116

There is a requirement in the position to analyze the social, economic and vocational problems of clients in order to determine and attribute causes and develop an approach related to the client's capacities and environment that will offer the best chance of a successful resolution. The work also requires serving as a motivating and change agent. Judgment is exercised in advising and counselling the veteran and his or her dependents and in making recommendations to adjudicating bodies for payment of financial benefits. The relationship of the client and the subject position may extend over lengthy periods of time with a significant and long term effect on the restoration or maintenance of the client's well being. Guidance is normally available from superiors on complex cases. Recommendations are made to officers at the WP 03 and intermediate administrative levels.

Contacts

Degree B3

Points 88

The work requires interviewing clients and members of their families and exchanging information with treatment and welfare staff of the department, landlords, employers and associates in public and private welfare agencies and in service and social organizations. It is also necessary to obtain the cooperation and assistance of associates in public and private organizations in conducting rehabilitation measures for individuals and occasionally to persuade company officials to hire veterans with disabilities.

Supervision

Degree N/A

Points N/A

There is a requirement for supervision of 1 to 2 employees of WP 01 level on an intermittent basis.

BM 4: Agency Assistant, Indigenous and Northern Affairs, Saint Regis Agency, Ontario Region

Point Rating
336
Level
WP-02

Summary

Under general supervision of the St. Regis Agency Superintendent:

  • supervises operational staff engaged in minor new construction and maintenance and other related services;
  • fosters the improvement of the social, economic and domestic living conditions of agency Aboriginal people and encourages and supports the First Nation in assuming control and responsibilities; and
  • participates in the administration of the agency office in such matters as land and property transactions, service contracts, supervision of staff and performs other related duties.

Duties

Supervises 5–20 operational staff (nine full-time equivalents) engaged in minor new construction and maintenance of buildings (including three schools) and roads on Aboriginal community lands, as well as the maintenance and driving of two 60-passenger school buses by:

  • giving instructions to staff, scheduling work, organizing crews, controlling time, assessing performance and certifying pay lists;
  • determining work requirements for construction and maintenance, establishing priorities and estimating costs;
  • establishing routes and schedules for school buses through consultation with the federal school committee and the school superintending principal;
  • authorizing the issue of materials; and
  • inspecting work in progress and on completion.

Fosters the improvement of the social, economic and domestic living conditions of agency Aboriginal people and encourages the First Nation to assume greater control by:

  • advising individuals and families on the resolution of personal, financial, building and other problems and referring them, on major problems, to professional and technical specialists;
  • bringing to the attention of Aboriginal people their eligibility for standard welfare and social benefits and ensuring that applications are properly completed;
  • reviewing applications from Aboriginal people for repairs to houses and obtaining decisions from the First Nation administration on priorities;
  • advising and guiding the First Nation administration on the conduct of business and the management of money;
  • encouraging regular school attendance;
  • explaining the conditions under which grants and loans are made and assisting individuals and groups to complete their applications;
  • helping Aboriginal people in the organization of social clubs and community activities; and
  • maintaining good working relationships with representatives of other federal departments, provincial and municipal governments, private agencies and business and industrial firms who can contribute in the advancement of Aboriginal people.

Participates in the administration of the agency office in such matters as land and property sales, leases and transfers, service contracts, estates, wills and supervision of a support staff of five by:

  • explaining to Aboriginal people the necessary procedures in land matters and assisting them in the completion of the appropriate forms;
  • calling for tenders, recommending approval of contracts and following up with suppliers awarded contracts by the responsible departments and agencies;
  • protecting the interests of Aboriginal people in the preparation of contracts with suppliers outside of their communities;
  • authorizing routine payments out of the various trust accounts;
  • training office staff and explaining procedures and by dealing with difficult problems;
  • preparing correspondence and reports and signing routine intra-branch memoranda; and
  • replacing the superintendent during absences.

Performs other related duties, such as representing the superintendent at First Nation administration meetings and meetings of other community groups and committees, finding suitable boarding houses for students on and off the Aboriginal community, generally assisting the superintending principal and the community development specialist in the promotion and conduct of their respective programs, attending courses, seminars and conferences.

Knowledge: Education and Experience

Degree A2

Points 87

The work requires a good knowledge of the Indian Act and associated regulations and of administrative and financial regulations and directives. It also requires knowledge of the WP of the federal government and those of the provinces of Ontario and Quebec, of the services available from public and private organizations in the area, as well as of the positions of the Aboriginal population in the agency. Experience is required in general administration, including the supervision of operational and office employees, as well as in working with people of varying social and economic levels. This knowledge is normally acquired through completion of secondary school and four years of related experience.

Knowledge: Continuing Study

Degree 1

Points 10

The work requires continuing study of departmental directives concerning programs and administrative procedures and of other documents issued by the department regarding community development approaches and techniques. It also requires study of the services available to Aboriginal people from other federal departments, provincial departments of Ontario, Quebec and private agencies.

Problem Solving

Degree B1

Points 116

The work requires the resolution of a variety of problems such as estimating cost of work projects, time required to complete work projects and estimates of welfare assistance to be granted. Such problems are generally of a repetitive nature and solutions are based on precedents and established guidelines. More difficult problems such as staff disciplinary matters, the rescheduling of priorities and cases involving judicial action are referred to the superintendent. However, discretion and initiative are required in settling grievances between Aboriginal people, in promoting their participation in community activities and in providing advice to First Nations on administration matters. The activities affect maintenance of departmental property and equipment values at approximately $600,000 including three schools with a total of 16 classrooms, roads in the Aboriginal community and two 60 passenger school buses, general administration of the agency operations, as well as the achievement of branch objectives. Recommendations are made to an officer at the intermediate administrative level.

Contacts

Degree B2

Points 74

The work requires contacts with Aboriginal people, members of the general public, local businessmen and associates in public and private agencies to exchange information and obtain services. It also requires contacts with the St. Regis First Nation administration to provide information and advice, to explain accountabilities and to obtain their assistance in dealing with agency problems.

Supervision

Degree C1

Points 49

The work requires the supervision of five employees in the administrative support category and five in the operational category, as well as casual employees with service totaling four full-time equivalents.

BM 5: Self-Government Advisor

Point Rating
409
Level
WP-03

Summary

Under the direction of the self-government supervisor:

  • provides consultant services to First Nation administration, staff and members;
  • advises, guides and encourages self-determination by the Aboriginal people within the District through the establishment of self-government on Aboriginal communities;
  • participates in the community development of the District;
  • provides advice and guidance to First Nation administration staff regarding contribution agreements to First Nation and the procedures involved, and assists in their implementation;
  • acts in a liaison capacity between the department and the Aboriginal people, other local organizations, levels of government and between adjacent communities; and
  • identifies training needs and performs other duties.

Duties

Provides technical and consultative services to First Nation administration, staff and membership in respect to sound self-government procedures, principles and other related matters in order to support the First Nation to develop the most effective administrative system by:

  • advising First Nation administrative staff on the preparation of budgets for the community and reviewing budgets presented together with financial statements;
  • reviewing progress, practices and problems of First Nation administration and making recommendations to the First Nation administration on problem areas and to the District Supervisor on program responsibilities, as self-government responsibility is implemented;
  • explaining to First Nation administrative staff the regulations, directives and administrative procedures made under the Indian Act in relation to self-government and its programs;
  • performing a monitoring and advisory function in respect to the regulatory aspects of self-government and management (i.e., First Nation community elections, referenda, by-laws, etc.);
  • assisting the First Nation administrators when requested in the preparation of formal briefs, papers, resolutions or by-laws and the administration of government programs; and
  • attending First Nation administration meetings.

Advises and guides Aboriginal participation in self-government programs, activities, legislation and structures and encourages self-determination by the Aboriginal people within the District through the establishment of self-government on Aboriginal communities in order to enhance the involvement of the people in the communities in achieving objectives by:

  • applying all provincial legislation and programs that operate through or for self-government and advising on their operation for Aboriginal people;
  • reviewing all court decisions affecting self-government administration in the District – in particular their effects on First Nations administration jurisdiction – and advising the District Office of decisions, which should receive further consideration;
  • keeping informed, examining and evaluating alternative forms, methods and structures of self-government (particularly provincial structures) and establishing their adaptability to the objectives of the Aboriginal people in the District and by keeping the First Nation administration informed of the latest developments in municipal government and applicable legislation;
  • administering regional programs or national programs applicable to the District, which encourages the development of self-government administration by First Nations;
  • ensuring that branch programs related to self-government (i.e., community development, community improvement, First Nation liaison, leadership training , etc.) are effectively coordinated within the District and other branch programs;
  • discussing with all departmental field staff in the District the aims and objectives of the self-government program to ensure they understand the theories and to obtain their assistance in the encouragement of decision-making by First Nations;
  • reviewing the Indian Act, the Regulations, Departmental Directives and Administration; and applying procedures to facilitate decision-making and programming by the First Nation;
  • attending First Nation administration meetings; and
  • determining the concept of self-government of First Nations thereby enhancing understanding in the achievement of self-determination.

Works in cooperation with the community development being carried out in the District in order to provide communities, federal staff and others concerned by:

  • observing district staff communications and operations with Aboriginal people, communities, groups and associations;
  • suggesting procedural changes and other methods of improving relationships with Aboriginal communities, provincial and other federal departments in the District, other organizations, businesses and the general public;
  • assisting provincial, district councils, Aboriginal associations and other groups in the District endeavoring to operate community development or First Nations Liaison programs with advice and training when requested;
  • ensuring that community development and First Nation Liaison programs in the District effectively operate with and for the local Aboriginal community and its programs with provincial and other federal government programs involved;
  • stimulating and supporting recreational activities, various organizations and other groups, which helps develop and promote community awareness and development within a First Nation community; and
  • being aware of the modern trends and training available for Aboriginal people or staff in the community development areas.

Provides advice and guidance to First Nations administrative staff regarding the availability and utilization of contributions to First Nation and the programs involved (including administrative contributions) and assists in the implementation by:

  • studying and becoming knowledgeable about all aspects of contributions to First Nation programs and their application within the District;
  • promoting within an Aboriginal community an interest in and an understanding of the programs available under the Contributions to First Nation programs, to enhance First Nation skills and providing advice when requested;
  • determining the budget under the federal government program for the First Nation and collectively in the District and recommending approval;
  • explaining the departmental contributions to First Nations to other District branch staff, implementing the administration of the Contributions and Grants Programs with First Nation community administration staff and assisting the program staff in problems related thereto;
  • maintaining complete and accurate statistics and records of all applications in the District;
  • observing the effects and operation of the contributions to First Nation programs within the District and making suggestions and proposals for changes and improvements; and
  • stimulating and supporting recreational activities, various groups, libraries and other activities, which helps develop and promote community development within a First Nation community.

Acts in a liaison capacity between the department and the Aboriginal people, between the department and other local organizations and levels of government and between adjacent communities, local organizations and other levels to enhance the intercommunication, relationships and understanding between the department, other local communities, organizations, governments and Aboriginal communities by:

  • monitoring contractual negotiations when requested between First Nations and of adjoining municipalities;
  • keeping First Nations administrators aware that local government associations within the District are encouraged to include First Nation representation within their programs including membership, conferences, assistance and information;
  • encouraging First Nations to include local municipalities and government associations within their programs, (e.g., municipal services, roads, utilities, etc.);
  • meeting with local, provincial and other federal government or agency representatives to discuss legislation and programs that may affect the Aboriginal people within the District;
  • helping to establish a rapport and mutual understanding between First Nations and of adjacent district municipalities; and
  • attending and obtaining the advice, assistance and academic expertise from other agencies on the subject areas of Aboriginal First Nations and self-government administration, taxation, constitutional law, etc.

Identifies training needs and other professional services, to help provide training services to staff, program managers and District and Agency staff on latest trends, programs and procedures to better equip these human resources to provide the expected technical and consultant services by:

  • distributing guidelines, administrative directives, training or informational brochures and papers;
  • researching and determining in conjunction with the Aboriginal people concerned, the information and training needs of the First Nation staff in human resource and financial management, contracting , etc. in order to request appropriate training programs;
  • being aware of the needs and aspirations of staff to promote training programs or conferences when desired; and
  • fostering and encouraging local and district conferences or meetings of First Nation staff on self-government.

Provides consultative services to First Nations on housing (both within and outside of the Aboriginal community) by:

  • explaining the regulations, directives and administrative procedures in relation to housing, roads and utilities to First Nations staff and membership;
  • assisting individuals, where necessary with applications for Housing Programs within Aboriginal communities in order to ensure that the applications are within policies and procedures; and
  • assisting individuals where necessary with applications for Housing Programs outside Aboriginal communities in order to ensure that the applications fall within policies and procedures.

Occasionally is required to perform other duties such as:

  • conducting visits to local field sites to carry out surveys, studies and inspections;
  • preparing memoranda, letters, reports and forms);
  • administering estates of deceased Aboriginal people; and
  • operating a departmental motor vehicle (with authorization) after normal working hours.

Knowledge: Education and Experience

Degree B2

Points 162

The work requires thorough knowledge of the Indian Act and associated regulations and of departmental policies and the objectives that affect Aboriginal communities. It also requires knowledge of administrative, personnel and financial regulations is required as well as general knowledge of municipal affairs and of provincial legislation affecting First Nations and knowledge of socio economic conditions of Aboriginal communities and the development of self-government in adjacent communities is also a requirement.

The work requires experience in directing and coordinating activities in a wide range of specialties concerned with the provision of self-government. It involves dealing with people having varied cultural, social and economic backgrounds. This knowledge and experience is normally acquired through university graduation in one of the social sciences, business administration, or economics including general knowledge of law and specialized training in community development, in addition to four years of related experience.

Knowledge: Continuing Study

Degree 1

Points 10

The work requires continuing study of departmental directives concerning programs and administrative procedure and of documents issued by the department regarding community development approaches and techniques. It is necessary also to maintain knowledge of the WP and procedures of other federal departments, of provincial departments, local municipalities and of social agencies in order to make use of their services on behalf of the Aboriginal people.

Problem Solving

Degree B2

Points 163

The work requires the ability to make judgments tactfully and consistently in coordinating the many facets in First Nation management and develop the maximum efficiency in each while interpreting the Indian Act as well as the regulations and instructions involved in the duties. Judgment is required also in assessing the provincial or other programs that can be utilized to satisfy the requirements of the Aboriginal communities. Involvement with other representatives from federal or other government departments and agencies involves cooperation and coordination. Decisions are made in consultation with Aboriginal people concerned, the agencies or departments involved and the self-government advisor. The implementation of these decisions requires administrative skills and judgment in determining the feasibility of proposed projects in relation to their cost, chances of success and priority. Decisions, recommendations and method of project implementation can have an impact on the lives of Aboriginal and other individuals and affect large expenditures. Recommendations are made to an officer at the intermediate administrative level.

Contacts

Degree B2

Points 74

The work requires contacts with Aboriginal people, members of the general public, local businessmen and associates in public and private agencies to exchange information and obtain services. Persuasion is necessary in encouraging the First Nation to increase their areas of responsibility and in seeking the relevant agreement of municipal, provincial and other agencies. Other contacts include District and regional staff at all levels to obtain advice and guidance in assisting the Aboriginal people to achieve self determination.

Supervision

Degree N/A

Points N/A

There is no requirement for supervision of other employees.

BM 6: Inmate Classification Officer

Point Rating
413
Level
WP-03

Summary

Under the general supervision of the Head of the Living Unit:

  • provides counselling services to 40 inmates;
  • develops corrective programs for new inmates;
  • develops, in conjunction with institutional and after-care agency officers individualized plans for inmates; and
  • performs other duties.

Duties

Develops upon the inmate’s admission to a federal penal institution a corrective program according to his or her needs and personal background by:

  • conducting a series of interviews with each inmate to determine his or her past experience, training, capacities and aspirations;
  • analyzing pre-sentence, psychiatric, psychological and previous institutional reports and other available information;
  • determining security classification, work placement possibilities, available vocational or academic training and psychological or psychiatric treatment; and
  • preparing and presenting formal reports to the Case Conference and Regional Classification Board with specific recommendations as to appropriate treatment and training program, type of institution and security classification.

Provides counselling services to some 40 inmates on a regular basis to effect a desirable change in behaviour and attitudes by:

  • conducting therapeutic interviews (with individuals and groups) using established techniques, to promote a realization of individual problems and produce more socially acceptable behaviour;
  • reviewing treatment and training activities to determine the impact of institutional resources and program components in modifying behaviour and attitudes; and
  • discussing upon request of inmates, such matters as attitude, behaviour, family matters and program involvement.

With the inmate, develops institutional and appropriate after-care agency officers, as well as individualized plan for inmates, to ensure favorable adjustment of the individual upon return to free society by: 

  • evaluating with the inmate his or her response to and achievement of the treatment and training program;
  • discussing with the inmate available programs such as parole, temporary absence, transfer to a reduced security institution, community release centres and halfway houses;
  • contacting government and volunteer agencies, inmate’s relatives and former or prospective employers, in conjunction with the individual’s release plans; and
  • preparing assessments as to the feasibility of such release plans and submitting recommendations to institutional and parole service authorities.

Performs other duties such as:

  • contacting community resources (AA groups, provincial welfare agencies) to promote an awareness of mutual needs;
  • instructing staff on the role of inmate classification within the institution; and
  • representing the institution before the National Parole Board (NPB).

Knowledge: Education and Experience

Degree B2

Points 162

Working knowledge of the Corrections and Conditional Release Act (CCRA), Parole Act, Commissioner's Directives, Divisional Instructions and Standing Orders is necessary for the routine management of the job. Planning, implementing and evaluating the treatment aspects of the program requires that the position have knowledge of human behaviour, motivation, various counselling techniques and institutional and community resources. Knowledge of human behaviour is normally acquired through university training, in the social or behavioural sciences. Training in specialized counselling techniques is required. Some experience in corrections and related fields is essential to assessing and relating information on attitudes, personality, behaviour and environment to treatment planning. Knowledge and effective use of community resources comes from experience. Experience in related social work disciplines, such as marriage counselling, child-care work, mental hospital is valuable in dealing with the social problems of inmates.

Knowledge: Continuing Study

Degree 2

Points 30

In order to keep abreast of the many developments that are occurring in the field of Treatment and Corrections, the work requires continuous reading of related publications and attending lectures and workshops wherever possible. A familiarity with research methods is most desirable as there is a need, more and more, to evaluate programs.

Problem Solving

Degree B2

Points 163

Judgment is required in recommending persons for participation in temporary absences and for consideration for parole. In the course of treating inmates, decisions must be made as to how and when individual's specific problems should be approached and dealt with. Probable reactions on the part of the individual and the group must be anticipated and dealt with. Not only must good judgment be exercised in recommending inmates for temporary absences to visit families, but also for employment in the community, as well as general community activities. Release planning also involves judgment and problem solving.

Contacts

Degree A3

Points 58

The work requires contact with Institutional staff at all levels, representatives of private and public agencies concerned with the rehabilitation of offenders, perspective employers and actual employers of inmates, representatives of educational and recreational bodies in the community, friends and relatives of inmates.

Supervision

Degree N/A

Points N/A

There is no requirement for the supervision of other staff members.

BM 7: Parole Officer

Point Rating
443
Level
WP-03

Summary

Under the general supervision of the District Representative:

  • appraises the suitability of inmates in correctional institutions for release under parole;
  • supervises persons released on parole;
  • establishes and maintains working relationships with various public and private agencies, welfare organizations, and others concerned with the rehabilitation of parolees; and
  • performs other duties.

Duties

Appraises the suitability of inmates in correctional institutions for release before completion of their sentences in order to provide comprehensive information and evaluations to the NPB for decision by:

  • studying the personal history and other records of applicants for parole;
  • interviewing inmates seeking parole and determining their plans on release and their attitude towards society;
  • interviewing staff of the institution to verify the information obtained from records and the parole applicants;
  • obtaining an assessment of the home and community environment named by the applicant as his or her destination through interviews, with members of the family, friends, neighbors and prospective employers, or from another agency to determine the applicant’s environment on release;
  • arranging for and participating in case conferences with institutional and other officers to obtain information and opinions;
  • relating and assessing the information obtained from records and interviews to report and recommend on the prospects for successful rehabilitation; and
  • having re-assessment interviews with inmates whose parole has been suspended.

Supervises persons released on parole to give them guidance and assistance, to ensure that the terms and conditions of parole are followed and to recommend suspension, continuation or revocation of parole, if necessary by:

  • counselling parolees on their personal relationships with people in authority and with respect to family and employment problems;
  • recommending authorization of reprimands and issue of warrants of apprehension and suspension;
  • reviewing post-release reports from parole supervisors to assess the conduct and progress of parolees, determining the need for action, writing cumulative records of the supervision and recommending modifications of parole arrangements; and
  • having disciplinary interviews with parolees.

Establishes and maintains working relationships with other employees of the department and other departments, police officers, employees of federal and provincial correctional institutions, welfare officers of public and private agencies, as well as others interested in rehabilitation, to obtain information for appraising the suitability of applicants for parole, to assess the conduct and progress of parolees and to obtain assistance for them by:

  • visiting personally, attending meetings, observing jurisdictional responsibility and cooperating in the conduct of their programs, within the limits imposed by the nature of the work; and
  • addressing groups (such as classrooms), on the work of the parole service.

Performs other duties, such as explaining parole regulations to inmates, compiling statistics and writing reports, conducting special investigations, post-revocation interviews, post-forfeiture interviews and attending court hearings.

Knowledge: Education and Experience

Degree B2

Points 162

The work requires good knowledge of the Parole Act and Regulations and branch directives, knowledge and understanding of human behaviour and motivation and counselling techniques, and familiarity with community welfare resources and with the Criminal Code of Canada and other related statutes such as the Corrections and Conditional Release Act, Prisons and Reformatories Act and the Opium and Narcotic Drug Act. It also requires experience in assessing and relating information on attitudes, personality, behaviour and environment, as well as in counselling. This knowledge is normally acquired through university graduation in criminology, psychology, social work or sociology and a number of years of related experience.

Knowledge: Continuing Study

Degree 2

Points 30

The work requires study of legislation, regulations and procedures related to granting, denying, suspending or revoking parole. It also requires continuing study of texts, journals and periodicals related to the assessment of human behaviour and motivation in order to make evaluations of the suitability of inmates for parole.

Problem Solving

Degree B2

Points 163

The work requires judgment in making recommendations on the paroling of inmates and revoking parole privileges, based on evaluation of information in relation to legislation and directives, suitability of inmates for parole and conduct and progress of parolees. The recommendations affect decisions to release prisoners from institutions before completion of sentence and also cancellation of parole privileges. The activities affect the success of the rehabilitation of individuals and protection of the public and have a cumulative effect on the success of the parole program. Recommendations are made to an officer at the senior administrative level.

Contacts

Degree B3

Points 88

The work requires contacts with representatives, friends and relatives of inmates, members of the general public and institutional staff to obtain and provide information. It also requires contacts with employers, police officers, court officers and associates in public and private welfare agencies to obtain cooperation and assistance in the rehabilitation of parolees.

Supervision

Degree N/A

Points N/A

There is no requirement for supervision of other employees.

BM 8: Community Specialist, Indigenous and Northern Affairs

Point Rating
531
Level
WP-04

Summary

Under direction of the Regional Director, Indigenous and Northern Affairs:

  • promotes the participation of Aboriginal people in economic, social and cultural development in the interest of achieving self-government;
  • plans community development approaches and establishes priorities consistent with community needs;
  • cultivates good government relations with Aboriginal people, individually and in committees and groups;
  • evaluates the results of past activities; acts as a consultant and intermediary; and
  • performs other related duties.

Duties

Promotes the participation of Aboriginal people in economic, social and cultural development in order to encourage the Community Development Program and the principles of self-government by:

  • analyzing community issues, struggles and problems;
  • thinking objectively, through non-directive counselling techniques;
  • discussing aggravating and mitigating factors with a view to resolving grievances and controversial issues by opposing parties; and
  • working with committees and groups and utilizing general problem-solving methods, techniques and the fundamentals of organization.

Plans community development approaches and establishes priorities consistent with community needs by:

  • obtaining information from departmental files and records and from other sources such as universities, online sources and libraries;
  • studying the socio-economic impact of the struggles of the Aboriginal community and of the surrounding communities, including such aspects as their respective cultures, formal and informal social structures, history, traditions and methods of livelihood;
  • discussions with departmental officers, community leaders and residents of the area; and
  • reviewing various publications issued by federal and provincial departments, universities, colleges and other organizations.

Cultivates good government relations with Aboriginal people, individually and in councils, committees and groups, in order to develop the mutual confidence necessary for the success of the Community Development Program and self-government by:

  • meeting clients formally and informally as required;
  • participating in social, recreational and other activities in the interests of the Community Development Program; and
  • explaining the role of a community development specialist in the community.

Evaluates the results of past activities to determine the validity on which approaches were based and to determine the need for changes in approaches and priorities by:

  • examining progress made in areas where efforts have been concentrated;
  • assessing changes in views that have occurred;
  • obtaining opinions regarding developments from colleagues and superiors in the branch; and
  • relating achievements to expectations.

Acts as a consultant and intermediary for Aboriginal committees or individuals to assist and to increase cooperation between parties by: 

  • providing advice or obtaining advice from departmental or other sources when it is requested; and
  • opening channels of communication with representatives and officials of other levels of government and of other groups and agencies from other communities.

Performs other related duties, such as keeping superiors and colleagues informed of activities through discussion, e-mail and correspondence, training and supervising a junior assistant, and attending seminars and conferences.

Knowledge: Education and Experience

Degree B3

Points 189

The work requires very good knowledge of the culture, traditions, history, resources, challenges and development of the Aboriginal community and of the history and socio economic conditions of the neighboring communities, including industrial, educational, recreational and other facilities. It also requires good knowledge of the principles of individual and group motivation and behaviour, of group organization and working methods, as well as of the techniques of community development work. Experience in community development work and in working with people having different traditions, cultures and social adjustment problems is required. This knowledge is normally acquired through university graduation in one of the social sciences and six years of experience in related work.

Knowledge: Continuing Study

Degree 2

Points 189

The work requires continuing study of books, journals and periodicals in the fields of psychology, sociology and anthropology, to keep abreast of trends and innovations in community development

Problem Solving

Degree C2

Points 209

The work requires the analysis of challenges of the Aboriginal community and requires that the community development specialist identify the community perspective and to select the approach to promote the active participation of Aboriginal people in their resolution. Because there are no established guidelines other than the basic principles of human behaviour and the evolving techniques of community development, courses of action and approaches taken must meet varying situations. Implications of the course of action or approach selected are difficult to determine. The impact of the community development specialist's actions is reflected in the extent to which the Aboriginal community accepts self-government. An error in judgment can result in failure, which could jeopardize success and the intent of the community development program. Reports are made to an officer at the senior administrative level.

Contacts

Degree B3

Points 88

The work requires contact with the Aboriginal population and with their leaders to gain their confidence, to explain the role of the community development specialist and to persuade them, through non directive counselling and other techniques, to accept the merits of a community development program and the associated accountabilities. Contacts with associates in welfare agencies and officials in industrial, business and educational organizations and in other levels of government are required to exchange information, to open channels of communication, to stimulate interest, to obtain cooperation, acceptance and understanding on the merits of the program.

Supervision

Degree A1

Points 15

The work requires the supervision of one assistant at the junior level of the administrative and foreign service category.

BM 9: Regional Self-Government Administrator, Toronto, Ontario

Point Rating
947
Level
WP-04

Summary

Under the direction of the regional supervisor, self-government and First Nation management services:

  • develops formats for agreements used in negotiations with First Nations;
  • provides advice to departmental regional self-government field administrators relating to the provision of self-government in Aboriginal communities;
  • plans, develops and administers departmental policies and procedures concerned with developing First Nation self-government;
  • provides administrative, technical and consultant services to field staff, First Nation;
  • supervises the regional involvement in matters of individual or First Nations concern;
  • establishes and maintains cooperative working relationships with groups and individuals;
  • coordinates and recommends the adjustment of the self-government budget; and
  • performs other duties.

Duties

Develops formats for agreements to be utilized in negotiations with First Nations for the administration of self-government programs by:

  • reviewing existing departmental accountable contributions programs and policies to determine the terms of reference and conditions to be met by First Nations and the department in the administration of programs;
  • reviewing self-government programs of municipal and provincial governments and other federal departments to assess their relevance, general suitability and application to the needs of individual First Nations;
  • researching the availability of resource persons and funds to assist First Nations in the administration of self-government programs; and
  • reviewing First Nation requirements, needs and degrees of advancement in the areas of self-government programs.

Negotiates and provides advice to area staff relating to the agreements with First Nations for the provision of self-government programs in their communities by:

  • consulting with departmental regional self-government field administrators to identify support required of First Nations staff to administer self-government programs;
  • discussing with First Nations administration and staff concerning proposals for First Nation administration of self-government programs;
  • recommending, to the assistant regional directors, the allocation of funds to the First Nation on the costs of programs to be administered; and
  • reviewing audit and program evaluation reports from previous years to ascertain the efficiency of First Nation administration and to determine any corrective measures that require inclusion into future agreements (e.g., assistance of departmental advisors).

Plans, develops and monitors the administration of programs concerned with developing First Nation self-government (Aboriginal Community Governments) by:

  • employing criteria to evaluate the administrative and managerial potentials of First Nation to determine their readiness for the assumption of self-government responsibilities;
  • reviewing reports submitted by area staff and conducting visits to Aboriginal communities to evaluate the effectiveness of existing progress;
  • consulting with First Nation representatives to encourage their adoption of administrative procedures and regulations for self-government programs, endorsed by the Assistant Regional Director of Community Affairs;
  • consulting with departmental regional self-government field administrators to determine what modifications must be effected to the Aboriginal Community Government administrative procedures in order to ensure that the self-government program will meet the needs of individual First Nations communities;
  • formulating recommendations to the self-government and the First Nation Managerial Services Supervisor, regarding proposed infrastructures for self-government organizations, requisite administrative procedures, which should be exercised by the First Nations in administering their self-government program, as well as the anticipated requirement for federal financial resources to execute self-government programs;
  • researching alternative sources of funds under federal and provincial government programs and in private agencies, which may be utilized in achieving departmental and First Nation objectives; and
  • monitoring the administration of self-government programs through the departmental regional self-government field administrators.

Provides administrative, technical and consultative services to field staff, First Nation and other organizations, in relation to First Nation management and supervises the regional involvement in matters of individual or First Nation concern such as membership, elections and related problems by:

  • keeping field staff informed and advised of new ideas, procedures, principles and changes relating to First Nation management services and self-government (Aboriginal Community) programs;
  • reviewing progress, practices and problems of First Nation administration and making recommendations to field staff on problem areas, as well as to the self-government and First Nation management services supervisor on program responsibilities;
  • explaining the regulations, directives and administration procedures made under the Indian Act in relation to First Nations management and its programs, to the self-government administrator, self-government advisors and First Nation staff;
  • maintaining an overall monitoring function in respect to the regulatory aspects of self-government administration (i.e., First Nation elections, referenda, by-laws) in the region through self-government administrators and other field staff; and
  • assisting the First Nations administrative staff, when requested, in the preparation of formal briefs, papers, resolutions and by-laws relating to the administration of federal programs.

Promotes program objectives and interests with appropriate officials of federal and provincial departments and others by:

  • accompanying or representing the assistant regional director at interdepartmental meetings to participate in the resolution of problems of mutual interest and to coordinate departmental efforts with programs being administered by other levels of government;
  • determining required services to be provided under contract including the establishing of terms of reference and costs; and
  • formulating recommendations to the self-government and First Nation management services supervisor regarding the approval of contracts by which the department provides services to First Nations.

Establishes and maintains cooperative working relationships with groups and individuals by:

  • attending and addressing meetings and outlining the ongoing community and social programs in the Ontario Region;
  • cooperating with public and private agencies in tine conduct of their duties within the framework of First Nation and department objectives; and
  • providing, assistance to First Nation or others requesting assistance in contractual negotiations between Aboriginal groups and municipalities or other parties.

Coordinates and adjusts the self-government and First Nation management portions of the Community Affairs budget in response to changing circumstances and needs by:

  • recommending to the self-government and First Nation management services supervisor, allocations of funds and transfers between responsibility centres within activity budgets and supervising the processing and administering of change documents in accordance with established procedures;
  • recommending in the event of a shortage of funds, those activities that may be curtailed, deferred, or cancelled, to offset additional fund requirement;
  • ensuring equitable distribution and effective use of funds in self-government and First Nation management programs and by responding to changing priorities of need throughout the region; and
  • identifying possible deficit or surplus fund situations and making appropriate recommendations to the self-government and First Nation management services supervisor.

Performs other related duties, such as:

  • maintaining an up-to-date knowledge of the facilities, resources and related material applicable to maintaining and administering optimal First Nation Management programs; and
  • encouraging local and regional meetings of First Nations staff and members on the existing and anticipated problems, practices and procedures of First Nation Management and self-government.

Knowledge: Education and Experience

Degree B3

Points 189

The work requires good knowledge of the Indian Act and Regulations, of Indigenous and Northern Affairs policies and practices, of departmental programs and of administrative, personnel and financial regulations and directives. Also requires very good knowledge of municipal affairs and of the provincial legislation and programs affecting the broad field of self-government, First Nation management, (i.e., municipal legislation, recreation, community development, training, by laws and First Nation and community liaison) of the socio economic situation of Aboriginal communities, the complexities of self-government as it is being developed in Aboriginal communities and, generally, of the socio economic situation in all areas in the Region, particularly of communities adjacent to Aboriginal communities. It requires knowledge of the trends and interrelationships of the municipal and provincial programs, as well as experience in directing and coordinating the activities of many varied programs that are a part of First Nations management, or working in conjunction and cooperation with provincial authorities and leaders of Aboriginal groups in the province, of modifying and supervising programs involving over $8 million dollars and in dealing with people of varied cultural, social and economic backgrounds. This knowledge is normally acquired through university graduation and further experience in community development, supervision and municipal administration, a wide knowledge of and experience in training techniques and learning theory, as well as knowledge of trends in specializations outside of the federal government, such as self-government and recreation.

Knowledge: Continuing Study

Degree 2

Points 30

The work requires continuing study of books, periodicals and journals in many fields such as community development, recreation, sociology, management and municipal administration in order to assess the need for changes and recommend the development of programs.

The work requires continuing study of all departmental directives, circulars and guidelines relating to First Nation management services and self-government.

Problem Solving

Degree C2

Points 109

The work requires initiative and judgment in the development of improved programs in the fields of First Nation management and administration, which include the analysis of information regarding existing and proposed administrative structures and systems. The work also requires the conduct of management feasibility studies and the recommendation and establishment of priorities and preparation of detailed submissions and proposals. It requires the interpretation of policy and directives for officers in the Region and field, as well as devising of methods to resolve management problems. The development of program objectives and guidelines affect the annual expenditure of one million dollars in administration funds, eight million dollars in First Nation administered programs, funds for First Nations comprising 60 000 Aboriginal people.

The work requires making judgments fairly, considerately and with discretion, to coordinate the programs administered by the First Nations with the programs the field office continues to administer and those in neighboring jurisdictions. The work requires maximizing the efficiency of available programs within the provisions of the Indian Act and other regulations and legislation. The work also requires coordinating action with other governments, agencies and associations involved to affect the best possible solution for all concerned and must adjust programs to best meet the needs of different groups, as well as the challenges faced by Aboriginal communities. Recommendations are made to the regional supervisor, self-government and First Nation management services.

Contacts

Degree C3

Points 119

The work requires contacts with senior officials of the province engaged in municipal affairs and education, the Ontario Provincial Police and the Ontario Civilian Police Commission, other federal departments, municipal governments and other agencies public and private, to coordinate programs, to give and receive policy interpretation and guidance, to provide information and explanations and to obtain assistance and cooperation in conducting programs and activities. Also acts as a representative of the department at formal meetings with provincial government departments and with senior officials of the Ontario Provincial Police and Royal Canadian Mounted Police to resolve problems of common interest and to discuss the improvement and formulation of policies.

Supervision

No Degree

Points N/A

The work requires no continuing direct supervision of subordinate employees.

BM 10: Regional Placement and Economic Development Specialist, Quebec Region, Indigenous and Northern Affairs

Point Rating
548
Level
WP-04

Summary

Under direction of the Regional Director, Quebec Region, Indigenous and Northern Affairs Branch:

  • supervises four field officers engaged on placement and economic development work;
  • develops and directs an employment-placement program to increase employment and employment opportunities for Aboriginal people in the region;
  • conducts placement activities in areas not covered by subordinate officers and also in cases referred by subordinate and agency staffs;
  • promotes the development of economic projects in Aboriginal communities to provide sources of gainful employment for their people;
  • establishes and maintains an inventory of the human resources in Aboriginal communities; and
  • performs other related duties.

Duties

Supervises four field officers engaged on placement and economic development work, to ensure the consistency and continuity of the related regional programs in their respective areas by:

  • interpreting branch directives and procedures and establishing regional objectives and priorities;
  • training staff on work methods and evaluating their performance;
  • visiting staff in the field and guiding them in the resolution of problems; and
  • reviewing reports and recommendations from staff, approving or rejecting proposals and recommending expenditures.

Develops and directs an employment-placement program to increase employment and employment opportunities for Aboriginal people in the Quebec Region by:

  • promoting vocational training programs and courses for clients lacking the required employment qualifications, in cooperation with branch education staff and training specialists in outside organizations, education and technical training institutions;
  • arranging in-service and on-the-job training opportunities for Aboriginal workers and following up on progress of trainees;
  • discussing and recommending terms of contracts whereby employers recover the cost of training;
  • explaining to agency staffs and members and leaders of Aboriginal communities the objectives of the program, creating interest and participation and providing guidance on challenges faced in problem areas; and
  • establishing and maintaining effective working relationships with employers, placement services, trade unions and private, social and governmental organizations.

Conducts placement activities in areas not covered by subordinate officers and also in the more difficult cases referred by subordinate and agency staff, including the placement of persons with disabilities by:

  • seeking employment opportunities and obtaining the cooperation of employers, employment services and trade unions;
  • selecting and referring applicants to employment offices and employers and following up on their placement;
  • counselling clients on issues related to permanent employment in urban or industrial communities; and
  • making appropriate arrangements with employers and rehabilitation agencies for the employment of persons with disabilities.

Promotes the development of economic projects in Aboriginal communities to provide sources of gainful employment for their residents by:

  • encouraging small aboriginal business be established; as well as craftsmen to produce goods and recommending markets for products;
  • organizing meetings with clients to discuss areas of potential development and to help launch projects with the assistance of others;
  • cooperating with First Nation administration, special committees and agency staff, in planning and organizing projects;
  • advising Aboriginal people on the organization and management of handicraft cooperatives; and
  • engaging industrial firms to partner and to encourage the creation of small business industries in Aboriginal communities.

Establishes and maintains an inventory of the occupational composition and interests of the Aboriginal labour force in the region, to provide a basis for planning and conducting branch activities by:

  • consulting departmental files for information such as agency populations, age groups and educational levels;
  • obtaining, through interviews, questionnaires and a variety of tests, information on aptitudes, experience, education, health on the feasibility of regular, seasonal and part-time employment within and outside of the Aboriginal community;
  • determining the potential fields of interests, occupational group and level of competencies; and
  • preparing lists and tables of the results of the inventory for the use of agency, regional and head-office staffs.

Performs other related duties, such as preparing annual placement estimates, assisting in organizing Aboriginal displays for special occasions, participating in seminars and conferences, speaking to social and other groups, conducting correspondence and preparing reports on regional placement and other activities.

Knowledge: Education and Experience

Degree B3

Points 189

The work requires thorough knowledge of branch placement policies and objectives and good knowledge of challenges, socio economic conditions and employment opportunities in the Quebec region, as well as knowledge of vocational testing and counselling techniques, and of the services available to Aboriginal people from public and private organizations and agencies in the region. It also requires familiarity with provincial labour laws and regulations and trade union practices as they affect the employment of the clients. It also requires experience in assessing employment qualifications in relation to trade and occupational descriptions, in establishing and maintaining good working relations with a wide variety of people, organizations and in supervising a small but dispersed staff. This knowledge is normally acquired through university graduation in one of the social sciences and six years of related experience.

Knowledge: Continuing Study

Degree 2

Points 30

The work requires continuing study of a variety of articles, journals, periodicals and other publications to maintain knowledge of economic and industrial developments and labour-market conditions in the province of Quebec. It also requires continuing study of texts, journals and periodicals in order to keep up to date with developments in educational requirements, vocational testing and counselling.

Problem Solving

Degree C2

Points 209

The work requires initiative and judgment in developing, promoting and conducting regional programs for the employment, training and economic development of Aboriginal people in accordance with branch policies and administrative guidelines and on the basis of such considerations as cost, the degree of preparedness of the clients involved and the conflicting issues. Activities affect the development of employment opportunities for clients as well as their integration in the local labour market and thereby influence the socio economic benefit of a significant portion of the approximately 23,000 Aboriginal people in the region. Furthermore, the work requires the programs of four subordinate field officers and agency staffs (including education specialists) and the operations of several cooperating organizations and agencies. Recommendations are made to an officer at the senior administrative level.

Contacts

Degree B3

Points 88

The work requires contacts with officers of the branch, other departments, provincial and municipal governments, trade unions, social agencies and commercial and industrial organizations to exchange information, to explain branch objectives and programs, as well as to obtain cooperation. The work also requires the Aboriginal population and its leaders to stimulate interest in regional programs, as well as officials of other levels of government, commercial firms, industrial firms and private agencies to motivate them to employ and train Aboriginal people.

Supervision

Degree B1

Points 32

The work requires the supervision of four officers at the junior level of the administrative and foreign service category.

BM 11: District Representative, Small District Office

Point Rating
562
Level
WP-04

Summary

Under the direction of the regional director, administers, within a district, the federal parole program, including case preparation and parole supervision:

  • supervises and trains the professional and support staff of the district office;
  • establishes and maintains contacts with employees of this department and other departments, police, jail and court officials, associations of employers and after-care agencies; and
  • compiles annual and long-range forecasts of expenditures and personnel requirements;
  • handles personally a number of cases and performs other duties.

Duties

Administers, within a district, the federal parole program, including case preparation, in order to provide to the NPB for decision, adequate information on inmates and a comprehensive evaluation of their suitability for parole and parole supervision in order to ensure parolees achieve a successful re-adjustment in society and adhere to the terms and conditions of their parole by:

  • assigning to each parole officer the workload and areas for interviews with inmates and community investigations in order to assess the inmates’ release plans, their home and environmental influences;
  • making arrangements with outside agencies in order to have community investigations done by them;
  • participating in case conferences with subordinates, institutional and other officials to obtain information and opinions;
  • discussing with subordinates special cases such as those cases that have political impact, consequences on public security or special merit;
  • ensuring that all parolees are given proper guidance and assistance;
  • making arrangements with individuals and outside agencies for the supervision of parolees;
  • suspending certificates of parole, canceling suspension within prescribed regulations and recommending continuation or revocation of parole, where necessary;
  • gathering information on areas of work of officers to better plan the program of the district and evaluate its activities;
  • providing advice and counselling on local problems, procedures, directives and standards to achieve efficiency, quality and coordination of parole work;
  • making recommendations concerning parole program, regulations and procedures; and
  • approving all invoices for accommodation and services of all natures, such as services rendered by outside agencies in parolee supervision.

Supervises and trains the professional and support staff of the district office by:

  • counselling on an individual or group basis and discussing principles and techniques in case evaluation and parole supervision;
  • reviewing objectives and work done and assessing quality and efficiency;
  • ensuring the participation of all officers in the district through encouragement and support of their work;
  • evaluating employees’ performance; and
  • establishing training requirements.

Establishes and maintains working relationships with employees of this department and other departments, police, jail and court officers. As representative of the NPB, has contacts with officials of the same above organization (such as police officials and mayors of large towns and judges) in order to obtain assistance and cooperation and to discuss and resolve problems. Also contacts associations of employers to convince them to hire parolees and to make arrangements. The work requires personal visits to various officials, attending meetings and participating in community programs, serving on various committees, field trips, addressing meetings and, through press conferences, radio and TV appearances, interpreting parole policy. Contacts with after care agencies are required to make arrangements for community investigations and parole supervision undertaken by such agencies on behalf of the NPB.

Compiles annual and long-range forecasts of expenditures and personnel requirements by ensuring that estimates are complete and in approved format before being forwarded to headquarters.

Reviews and administers personally a number of special cases, including case preparation and parole supervision by:

  • studying the personal history and other records of applicants for parole;
  • interviewing applicants in order to assess their attitudes, the risk involved and to determine their release plans;
  • interviewing institutional staff to verify information obtained from records on parole applicants;
  • visiting on the spot and interviewing with members of the inmate’s family, friends and prospective employers;
  • relating and assessing the information gathered to report and recommend on the prospects for successful rehabilitation;
  • conducting re-assessment interviews with inmates whose parole has been suspended;
  • conducting disciplinary interviews with parolees whenever indicated; and
  • counselling parolees on their personal relationships with people in authority and with respect to family and employment problems.

Performs other duties such as:

  • acting as selection board member;
  • conducting special projects;
  • dealing with very special investigations;
  • participating in research projects undertaken by headquarters; and
  • organizing the training of summer students and of university students on field placement. This organization is integrated in our program, but is done somewhat differently, bearing in mind the most specific objective of teaching the application of theory in practice.

Knowledge: Education and Experience

Degree B3

Points 189

The work requires thorough knowledge of the Parole Act and Regulations and Headquarters directives, familiarity with the Criminal Code of Canada and other related statutes, such as the Corrections and Conditional Release Act, Prisons and Reformatories Act, the Opium and Narcotics Drug Act, the Handbook on Parole, Parole Certificate and Agreement, the Procedures Manual and other directives issued by headquarters.

It requires familiarity with provincial statutes and laws governing the operation of motor vehicles, sale of liquor and laws regarding probation, detention and treatment of inmates. It also requires knowledge of government financial policies and travel regulations, instrument of delegation of staffing authority, other departmental and government personnel and finance regulations.

In addition, sound knowledge of professional training practices, the ability to innovate, modify and seek new applications of treatment techniques, proven ability to provide professional leadership, to plan, organize, control and direct correction programs is required.

This knowledge and ability is usually acquired through university graduation, preferably with a post graduate degree in social work, psychology, sociology, or criminology and a certain number of years of experience in directly related work.

Knowledge: Continuing Study

Degree 2

Points 30

The work requires continuing study of existing and new legislation related to the field, continuing study of texts, journals and periodicals for knowledge of trends and developments in corrections and the ability to understand and apply new techniques and experimental programs aimed at the rehabilitation of parolees, the assessment of human behaviour and the administration of similar programs. It also requires the study of departmental directives concerning programs and administrative procedures and continuing familiarity with welfare agencies and employment resources within the district.

Problem Solving

Degree C2

Points 209

The work requires a significant degree of judgment, initiative and discretion since this person has the authority to issue warrants of suspension and apprehension to incarcerate a parolee for up to 14 days and also the authority to reinstate parole. The work also regulates and determines the frequency of reporting by parolees and has the authority to modify or discharge conditions of parole except special conditions imposed by the Board and to terminate the supervision of parolees. The work also makes loans to parolees under the Paroled Persons' Loan Fund Regulations and must ensure that these loans are repaid. The work also reviews reports from after care agencies supervising parolees, counsels them on their supervision and, if he or she feels that their work is inadequate, makes a decision to allocate the case in question to some other supervising agency. This position requires reviewing the work performed by the parole officer and administrative support staff, counselling them, directing them, appraising their performance, evaluating their effectiveness. The position also requires making recommendations regarding their promotion or dismissal.

The work requires recommending changes in procedures to the regional director. In addition, the works requires making or reviewing the recommendations on the paroling of inmates and the revoking of paroles, based on evaluation of information in relation to legislation and directives, suitability of inmate for parole and conduct and progress of parolees. Recommendations affect decisions to release prisoners from institutions before completion of sentence and revocation of parole.

The work represents the department on selection boards for parole officers and has the authority to appoint administrative support staff. Recommendations result in better efficiency in appraisals, assistance in job finding, rehabilitation of individuals and better protection to the public, success and a better understanding of an acceptance of the parole program on a district basis.

Contacts

Degree C3

Points 119

Establishes and maintains working relationships with employees of this department and other departments, police, jail and court officers. As representative of the NPB, has contacts with officials of the same organizations (such as police officials, mayors of large towns and judges) in order to get assistance and cooperation from them and to discuss and solve problems. Also contacts with representatives of associations of employers to convince them they should hire parolees and make arrangements for that. This convincing is done through personal visits to various officials, attending meetings and participating in community programs, serving on various committees, field trips, addressing meetings and through press conferences, radio and TV appearances, interpreting parole. Contacts with after care agencies to make arrangements for the number of community investigations they are going to make for the parole service and the number of parolees they are going to supervise.

Contacts

Degree A1

Points 15

The work requires the supervision of 1 Parole Officer and 1 support staff position.

BM 12: District Director, Veterans Welfare Services

Point Rating
638
Level
WP-05

Summary

Under the general direction of the Director General, Welfare Services: 

  • directs in a district the provision of social adjustment, rehabilitation and counselling services and financial benefits to veterans, their dependents and other entitled clients;
  • directs and controls the management of financial, materiel and personnel resources;
  • exercises delegated authority to achieve operational consistency in other areas that affect veterans and their dependents;
  • participates in the formulation and development of program policies as a member of the Welfare Services Management Team; and
  • performs other duties.

Duties

Directs, guides and coordinates through subordinate supervisors, in a district with a veteran population of 50,000, the financial, social and vocational rehabilitative activities, counselling services and financial assistance programs of the department by:

  • interpreting and making recommendations for changes to departmental objectives, policies, procedures, regulations and instructions;
  • establishing district objectives, goals, priorities, methods of operations, standards and procedures;
  • analyzing district operations to evaluate effectiveness of programs and to determine the need for organization changes and taking appropriate action to improve program operations; and
  • administering trust funds of public and private monies held on behalf of departmental clients.

Directs and controls the management of financial, personnel and materiel resources for a staff of 45 by:

  • exercising delegated responsibility under Sections 25, 26 and 27 of the Financial Administration Act;
  • analyzing previous expenditures, assessing present situations and future trends in social and economic conditions in the district and analyzing changing characteristics of the population served by the department, status of the local economy and the welfare situation in the district in order to forecast the financial resources required;
  • reviewing, assessing and accounting for variances in productivity reports and expenditures on a continuing basis;
  • stimulating continuous examination of an improvement in administrative methods and procedures;
  • determining staff requirements and taking action under delegated authority to recruit, select, develop, train, evaluate the performance of and promote staff and to administer the classification and staff relations programs;
  • ensuring the provision of personnel services such as documentation, pay and maintenance of related records; and
  • ensuring that district policies, practices and procedures relating to finance, personnel and materiel resources are in conformity with the policies and guidelines of the department and the various central agencies and monitoring their applications.

Exercises delegated or statutory authority to achieve operational consistency in such areas as Children of War Dead Act (Education Assistance), Veterans Land Act (Compensating Adjustments), Army Benevolent Fund Act and other acts, regulations and instructions by:

  • acting as Chair, War Veterans Allowance District Authority in making decisions such as the award, increase, decrease, suspension or cancellation of allowances and recovery of overpayments;
  • ensuring that all decisions and recommendations fall within the varied requirements established by statutory or other legislative, executive or administrative authority;
  • ensuring that decisions in areas of authority are based on relevant facts, accurate representation and assessment of conditions;
  • assigning responsibility and delegating authority to staff members; and
  • recommending, for ministerial consideration, appointment of members to Veterans Allowance District Authority.

Participates in the formulation and development of program policies as a member of the Welfare Services Management Team.

Directs the provision of services to district offices of other branches and agencies of Veterans Affairs Canada by establishing and conducting a field service such as central registries of veterans’ records.

Develops and maintains effective working relationships by personal and written contact with representatives and elected officials of foreign, federal, provincial and municipal governments, private and public social agencies, veterans and other service organizations, educational institutions and hospitals, to secure their cooperation in resolving problems related to the provision of welfare services and to maintain knowledge of developments in the social welfare field.

Acts as chair of the District Coordinating Committee to identify and resolve areas of conflicting interest and to clarify jurisdictional boundaries. Conducts special inquiries and prepares reports. Represents the Minister and Deputy Minister at various functions and arranges for visits by the Minister and Deputy Minister.

Knowledge: Education and Experience

Degree A6

Points 197

The work requires comprehensive knowledge of the objectives, philosophies and principles of departmental legislation, regulations and directives relating to the provision of assistance and benefits to veterans, dependents of veterans and other clients of the department and of the social welfare and assistance programs of other government departments at the federal, provincial and municipal levels and of public and private agencies and the social and service agencies in the district. Good knowledge of modern business practices, management by objectives, administrative and personnel procedures, budgeting, financial control and materiel management is also required. Experience is required in working with senior professional staff, coordinating departmental activities with those of district and municipal officials, training officers engaged in social welfare work and adjudicating eligibility and approving payments of statutory benefits. This knowledge is normally acquired through a work history demonstrating capability in administration of a social welfare program through progressively more responsible assignments over a ten- to twelve year period.

Knowledge: Continuing Study

Degree 2

Points 30

The work requires the continuing study of books, periodicals and journals in the fields of social welfare assistance, welfare administration and business management, as well as of federal, provincial and municipal government legislation, directives and regulations concerning social welfare administration in order to assist in the development and assessment of WP related to the clients of the department. Also required is the continuing study of departmental management material, regulations, veteran's legislation and other related matter necessary for the management and direction of a district office and of a staff engaged in social welfare administration.

Problem Solving

Degree C3

Points 256

The work requires judgment in planning and organizing the activities of the program in the district so that they may be integrated with other programs available in the community. These activities include income maintenance and supplementation, educational and vocational training assistance, placement of the physically disabled, emergency financial assistance and other assistance to enable clients to use effectively their abilities and resources. Discretion is required in encouraging municipal and provincial welfare agencies to assist with the problems of veterans and also in dealing with problems referred by local, provincial or national veterans' organizations. Activities have a significant and continuing effect on the long term social and economic conditions of clients and their families in a district with a veteran population of 50,000. Recommendations are to the director general, welfare services at headquarters.

Contacts

Degree B3

Points 88

The work requires contacts with senior officials within the department, other federal, provincial and municipal governments and agencies, veterans' organizations, private welfare agencies, universities, elected representatives including those of Cabinet rank and officials of other countries to provide information and explanation, to give and obtain assistance, as well as to cooperate in conducting programs and activities. The work also requires attending local meetings and social functions of these agencies and organizations to promote the departmental image and to keep the department apprised of any matters that may be of interest concerning welfare services.

Supervision

Degree D1

Points 67

The work requires the supervision of approximately 45 employees at the junior levels of the administrative and foreign service category and in the administrative support category.

BM 13: Supervisor of Placement, Ottawa

Point Rating
702
Level
WP-05

Summary

Under the direction of the Manager of the Resources and Industrial Development Division:

  • plans and develops programs for the employment of Aboriginal people and improvement of their occupational skills;
  • provides direction and guidance to regional placement officers;
  • plans and develops training programs for field staff;
  • coordinates placement activities requiring the participation of other sections and divisions of the branch;
  • establishes and maintains cooperative working relationships with officials of other departments and outside agencies; and
  • performs other related duties.

Duties

Plans and develops programs for the employment of Aboriginal people and for their relocation to localities offering better employment opportunities, for implementation by regional staff, to achieve a greater degree of self-sufficiency of the Aboriginal population by:

  • analyzing reports of field staff and studies of unemployment on Aboriginal communities, occupational skills of the Aboriginal labour force and the present and potential employment opportunities on Aboriginal communities and in areas adjoining Aboriginal communities;
  • analyzing information from branch reports, publications of departments or agencies and proposed federal, provincial and industrial projects from which the Aboriginal labour force could find opportunity to benefit; and
  • identifying areas where employment is available.

Plans and develops programs to improve the occupational skills and competencies of Aboriginal people for employment by:

  • determining the occupations and skills that are currently in demand and forecasting future labour needs through consultations with national and provincial personnel and training authorities;
  • analyzing from reports of field staff the existing occupational skills and competencies of the Aboriginal labour force and determining types of on-the-job and other training programs that are available or required;
  • arranging with industry and with private and government training authorities for the provision of training facilities for Aboriginal people; and
  • proposing winter works and/or community employment programs as work-training measures.

Provides direction and guidance to regional placement officers to ensure that local programs are implemented according to established policies by:

  • reviewing and commenting on reports and correspondence from regional supervisors;
  • explaining employment-placement policies and issuing memoranda, reports and directives;
  • indicating methods and procedures to be followed in solving special problems connected with regional employment programs; and
  • establishing the scope of programs for the current year and determining priorities.

Plans and develops training programs for staff engaged in employment work in the region by:

  • determining training needs through the review of performance ratings and holding consultations with supervisory personnel;
  • arranging seminars for and giving lectures to regional field staff; and
  • making arrangements with government and university officials for their participation in establishing and conducting training courses.

Coordinates placement activities requiring the participation of other sections and divisions of the branch through meetings and discussions with technical specialists in a variety of subject-matter fields related to social programs, to ensure orderly progression of programs and to resolve common problems.

Establishes and maintains cooperative working relationships with officials of other departments and outside agencies to explain the objectives of the branch and to obtain information on economic trends and developments in the area of employment placement.

Performs other related duties, such as devising methods of obtaining and analyzing information concerning the Aboriginal labour force and planning the preparation of brochures and other material on the promotion of employment of Aboriginal people and work-training measures for skills development.

Knowledge: Education and Experience

Degree B4

Points 216

The work requires thorough knowledge of employment and policies and objectives and employment-placement practices, as well as knowledge of related programs at the provincial level and in other federal departments and of economic trends and employment opportunities across Canada. It also requires knowledge of the culture, values, needs and aspirations of Aboriginal people and of counselling principles and techniques. The work requires experience in developing and evaluating programs, in conducting research and feasibility studies, in directing staff and in maintaining good government relations with a variety of people and organizations. This knowledge is normally acquired through university graduation in one of the social sciences and eight years of experience in a related field.

Knowledge: Continuing Study

Degree 2

Points 30

The work requires continuing study of a variety of journals and periodicals to keep up to date with developments and trends in labour-market conditions and the economy of localities and regions. It also requires continuing study of texts, journals and periodicals related to vocational training, counselling and staff training, as well as to plan national programs for the enhancement of employment opportunities of Aboriginal people and for the development of field staff.

Problem Solving

Degree C3

Points 256

The work requires initiative and judgment in the development of programs in the field of Aboriginal employment, which includes the analysis of information, the conduct of feasibility studies, the establishment of priorities and the preparation of cost estimates. It also requires the interpretation of policy and directives for officers at headquarters and in the field, as well as the determination of methods of resolving technical problems. The development of program objectives and guidelines affects the operations of regional placement officers, annual expenditures of $2.3 million, as well as social and economic conditions and challenges of Aboriginal people across Canada. Recommendations are made to an officer at the senior administrative level.

Contacts

Degree C3

Points 119

The work requires contacts with officials of the department, of other government departments and of various agencies to coordinate work, to give and receive policy interpretation and guidance and to provide information on the objectives of the placement of Aboriginal people. There is also a need to act as a representative of the branch or department at formal meetings with associates of provincial government departments and with officials of business, universities and employment agencies to resolve problems of common interest.

Supervision

Degree D2

Points 81

The work requires the functional direction of 38 placement and relocation officers in the field at the junior and intermediate levels of the administrative and foreign service category.

BM 14: Manager, Social Programs Division, Ottawa

Point Rating
918
Level
WP-07

Summary

Under the general direction of the Director of Development, Indigenous and Northern Affairs Branch: 

  • develops new and revised programs and procedures in the fields of welfare assistance, community development and cultural affairs;
  • supervises a staff of 18 employed in four sections at headquarters;
  • provides technical direction and assistance to field staff on matters related to WP;
  • promotes branch objectives and interests with officials of federal and provincial governments and others;
  • establishes and maintains cooperative working relationships with groups and individuals; and
  • performs other related duties.

Duties

Develops new and revised social programs and procedures to encourage First Nations in managing their programs and to extend provincial social services to Aboriginal people, as well as to respect and support their cultural integrity by:

  • evaluating the effectiveness of existing programs through review of reports, visiting field offices and holding discussions with headquarters officials;
  • reviewing social programs of other countries and assessing their relevance to branch objectives and social and economic development of Aboriginal people, as well as Canadian conditions;
  • evaluating proposals for new programs and for changes in existing programs to determine costs and other implications, as well as their feasibility;
  • determining areas where the resources of other federal departments and provincial and private agencies can be utilized to achieve branch objectives; and
  • arranging training programs for field and headquarters staff in such areas as community development.

Supervises a staff of 18 employed in four sections welfare services, community development, cultural affairs and administration engaged in planning and developing WP and procedures, analyzing reports on social program activities in the field and conducting studies by:

  • assigning objectives and providing guidance to section supervisors;
  • conducting meetings and seminars on division activities and encouraging staff to take an active interest in each other’s field of specialization;
  • evaluating work performance of staff, determining training needs and establishment requirements, as well as recommending disciplinary and other personnel action; and
  • coordinating planning activities in the fields of welfare services, cultural affairs and community development.

Provides technical direction and supervision to field staff on matters related to welfare assistance, community development and cultural affairs, to ensure that programs are being implemented in accordance with branch policies by:

  • issuing directives explaining program objectives and providing instructions on the procedures to be followed;
  • commenting on reports of social program activities to provide field staff with an assessment of their work and to suggest areas where efforts should be concentrated;
  • arranging for officers of the division to visit field offices to assist the staff in resolving special problems;
  • arranging for training courses on social program activities for field staff;
  • evaluating work performance of community development specialists to make recommendations on their suitability for promotion; and
  • recommending where specialist staff is to be located.

Promotes branch objectives and interests with officials of federal and provincial governments, as well as others on matters concerning welfare services, community development and Aboriginal and Inuit Affairs Program by:

  • representing the branch at senior interdepartmental meetings to participate in the solution to mutual problems and to coordinate efforts;
  • negotiating agreements with provincial authorities on the extension of community services to Aboriginal people and the operational terms of the agreements; and
  • arranging for special projects to be carried out under contract, including the establishment of terms of reference and costs.

Establishes and maintains cooperative working relationships with associates in the federal and provincial public service and in other countries, with social science staff at universities, representatives of Aboriginal groups and members of the press, to ensure that branch objectives are understood and to obtain cooperation and assistance by:

  • addressing meetings and explaining the social programs of the branch;
  • cooperating with other public and private agencies in the conduct of their work within the framework of branch objectives; and
  • writing articles for publication in journals and the press.

Performs other related duties, such as conducting studies on special situations, reporting to the assistant deputy minister, participating with other division managers in developing branch policies and acting as technical or branch representative on selection boards.

Knowledge: Education and Experience

Degree B6

Points 272

The work requires thorough knowledge of the Indian Act, the rules and regulations therein, branch policies, branch objectives, administrative regulations, financial regulations and directives. Also required is a very good knowledge of welfare and development programs of other departments, other agencies and of the social programs and administrative procedures of provincial governments, as well as knowledge of community development techniques, training methods and of social programs of other countries and their administration. It also requires experience in developing, administering and evaluating social programs, assessing political implications and representing the interests of an organization in negotiations. This knowledge is normally acquired through university graduation in one of the social sciences and 12 years of experience in work related to the conduct, development and administration of social programs.

Knowledge: Continuing Study

Degree 3

Points 50

The work requires continuing study of books, periodicals and international journals in the fields of welfare administration, community development, anthropology, sociology, political science, welfare economics and public administration in order to evaluate social programs, assess the need for changes and direct the development of programs.

Problem Solving

Degree D4

Points 350

The work requires initiative in developing new and revised social programs to meet branch objectives. Judgment is required in evaluating existing branch programs and the social programs of other countries in relation to the level of development of the Aboriginal population, availability of provincial services, attitudes of the Canadian people and economic conditions in the regions. Judgment is also required in representing branch interests at interdepartmental meetings and in negotiating arrangements with the provinces for the extension of social services to Aboriginal people. In view of jurisdictional problems, the strengthening of Aboriginal associations both in membership and activities, as well as the lack of acceptance by part of the Aboriginal population of the long term objectives of the branch, discretion is required in formulating and presenting program proposals. The activities affect the social services available to approximately 200,000 Aboriginal people, annual branch expenditures of $20 million on social programs, the achievement of the long term objectives of the branch, the workload of provincial social welfare departments and the policies and procedures of other departments with responsibilities for social services. Recommendations are made to an officer at the executive level.

Contacts

Degree D3

Points 150

The work requires contacts with associates in the federal and provincial public services, university teaching and research staff, representatives of Aboriginal associations and officials from other countries engaged in welfare or community development work, to exchange information and to obtain cooperation and agreement in achieving branch objectives. It also requires representing the branch at meetings with provincial officials to arrange for extension of services to Aboriginal people and to negotiate the financial and operational terms of the agreements.

Supervision

Degree D3

Points 96

The work requires the supervision of 18 headquarters employees in the administrative support and administrative and foreign service categories, including some at the senior administrative level. It also requires the functional supervision of 40 community development specialists located in the field.

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