Complete text - 2017–18 Estimates

Table of Contents

Introduction

Governments collect funds through taxes and other levies in order to provide services to their citizens. In Canada, the federal government’s primary sources of revenue are income and sales taxes.

Payments that go directly to individuals, to provincial and territorial governments, and to other organizations are called “transfers”. Transfers are the largest category of spending for the federal government. The largest transfers include elderly benefits, Employment Insurance and transfers to provinces and territories to help fund health care and other services.

Federal departments, agencies and Crown corporations also provide programs and services for Canadians. In order for federal government organizations to operate, Parliament must give these organizations authority to spend. While spending is often announced in a Federal Budget, spending authority is actually granted through legislation passed by Parliament.

Approximately one-third of federal government spending is approved by Parliament on an annual basis. These expenditures are authorized through an appropriation act and are called “voted” expenditures. Expenditures authorized through other legislation are called “statutory”.

Due to the need to table Main Estimates on or by March 1, emerging priorities and items announced in Budget 2017 will be included in future Estimates documents. Estimates publications explain how federal organizations plan to spend funds. The Main Estimates and Supplementary Estimates provide information on spending authority that Parliament will be asked to approve during the fiscal year. Individual departments and agencies also produce Departmental Plans and Departmental Results reports. The Departmental Plans are typically tabled soon after the Main Estimates and show an organization’s priorities and planned results for the next three years. Departmental Results, tabled in the fall, are accounts of results achieved during the most recent fiscal year.

Estimates documents are prepared on a near cash basis of accounting, which recognizes payments when goods or services are received. This allows Parliament to control the amounts spent during a fiscal year through the appropriation acts it passes. Forecasts in the Federal Budget and the Fiscal Update are prepared on a full accrual basis, which recognizes that the economic benefit of expenditures may last for more than a fiscal year.

The Public Accounts of Canada include financial statements for the Government of Canada as well as details of expenses and revenues for completed fiscal years. Information in Volume I corresponds to the Federal Budget. Volume II provides information on the same near cash basis as the Estimates.

This Document

Part I of this document, the Government Expenditure Plan, gives an overview of spending requirements for 2017–18 and comparisons to previous fiscal years.

Part II of this document, the Main Estimates, provides information on estimated spending by each federal organization requesting authority to spend through a 2017-18 appropriation bill.

Summary of Estimates

Voted Expenditures

These Estimates support the government’s request to Parliament for authority to expend through annual appropriations:

  • $102.1 billion for budgetary expenditures – operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations; and
  • $26.7 million for non-budgetary expenditures – net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

These voted expenditures require annual approval from Parliament which is sought through an appropriation bill. The bill provides the specific wording that governs the purpose and conditions under which expenditures can be made and the funds subject to these terms and conditions.

Statutory Expenditures

Forecasts of statutory expenditures represent payments to be made under legislation previously approved by Parliament. Forecasts of statutory spending by departments are included in these Estimates to provide a more complete picture of their total estimated expenditures. Of these forecasts, $155.8 billion is for budgetary expenditures including the cost of servicing the public debt. The $155.8 billion does not include payments from the Employment Insurance Operating Account or expenditures legislated through the Income Tax Act (such as the Canada Child Benefit).

Significant changes in statutory spending include:

  • increases in major transfer payments, most notably elderly benefits and the Canada Health Transfer;
  • the replacement of the Universal Child Care Benefit and the Canada Child Tax Benefit by the Canada Child Benefit in ;
  • a decrease in interest on unmatured debt and other interest costs; and
  • a decrease in employee benefits plan costs as the employer share of pension contributions decreases and a lower Employment Insurance Premium Rate comes into effect for 2017.

Forecast recoveries for statutory loans, investments and advances are expected to exceed cash outlays by $246.2 million.

Figure 1. Comparison of Estimates and Expenditures - Budgetary (billions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 85.17 103.18 102.14
Statutory 156.21 153.98 155.78
Figure 2. Comparison of Estimates and Expenditures - Non-budgetary (billions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 0.04 0.06 0.03
Statutory 55.55 -0.09 -0.25
Table 1. Comparison of Estimates and Expenditures (billions of dollars)
2015–16
Expenditures
2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Estimates
To Date
2017–18
Main Estimates

Note: Totals may not add and may not agree with details presented later in this document due to rounding.

Budgetary
Voted
85.17 89.85 103.18 102.14
Statutory
156.21 160.29 153.98 155.78
Total Budgetary 241.38 250.14 257.17 257.92
Non-budgetary
Voted
0.04 0.03 0.06 0.03
Statutory
55.55 0.34 (0.09) (0.25)
Total Non-budgetary 55.59 0.37 (0.03) (0.22)

The following graphs present the voted and statutory components of Main Estimates and a comparison of Main Estimates over the last ten years of Main Estimates.

Figure 3. Long-term comparison of Main Estimates - Budgetary (billions of dollars)
2008–09 2009–10 2010–11 2011–12 2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
Voted 74.90 79.00 85.60 96.20 91.80 91.95 87.06 86.28 88.18 89.95
Statutory 119.30 125.40 132.50 141.80 138.40 140.33 145.52 149.05 153.39 160.29
Figure 4. Composition of Estimates and Expenditures - Budgetary (billions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Transfer Payments 152.40 159.45 164.29
Operating and capital 66.34 75.98 72.14
Public Debt 22.64 21.74 21.49
Table 2. Composition of Estimates and Expenditures (billions of dollars)
2015–16
Expenditures
2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Estimates
To Date
2017–18
Main Estimates

Note: Totals may not add and may not agree with details presented later in this document due to rounding.

Budgetary
Transfer Payments
152.40 158.58 159.45 164.29
Operating and capital
66.34 68.77 75.98 72.14
Public Debt
22.64 22.78 21.74 21.49
Total Budgetary 241.38 250.14 257.17 257.92
Non-budgetary
Loans, Investments and Advances
55.59 0.37 (0.03) (0.22)
Total Non-budgetary 55.59 0.37 (0.03) (0.22)

Composition of Estimates

The majority of expenditures in 2017–18 Main Estimates are transfer payments – payments made to other levels of government, individuals and other organizations. Transfer payments make up approximately 63.7% of expenditures or $164.3 billion. Operating and capital expenditures account for approximately 28.0% of expenditures or $72.1 billion, while public debt charges are approximately 8.3% of expenditures or $21.5 billion.

Public Debt Charges

Total interest costs are approximately $21.5 billion, a projected decrease of $1.3 billion or 5.7% from previous Main Estimates and $1.2billion less than actual expenditures for 2015–16. The decrease largely reflects a decline in interest rates forecasted by private sector economists, consistent with the 2016 Fall Economic Statement, as well as a decrease in the average Government of Canada long-term bond rate that is used to calculate interest on the public sector pension obligations pertaining to service prior to . Public debt charges are comprised of interest on unmatured debt of $14.9 billion and other interest costs of $6.6 billion. Interest on unmatured debt represents the interest resulting from certificates of indebtedness issued by the Government of Canada that have not yet become due. Other interest costs include interest on liabilities for federal public service pension plans, deposit and trust accounts and other specified purpose accounts.

Major Transfer Payments

Figure 5. Major Transfer Payments - Top 3
Elderly Benefits Canada Health Transfer Employment Insurance Other
2015–16 Expenditures 45.48 34.02 19.42 49.56
Figure 6. Major Transfer Payments - Top 3
Elderly Benefits Canada Health Transfer Children’s Benefits Other
2016–17 Projection to Date 48.35 36.07 21.85 53.33
Figure 7. Major Transfer Payments - Top 3
Elderly Benefits Canada Health Transfer Children’s Benefits Other
2017–18 Projection for April 1 51.16 37.15 22.90 54.71
Table 3. Major Transfer Payments (billions of dollars)
2015–16
Expenditures
2016–17
Projection
for
2016–17
Projection
to Date
2017–18
Projection
for

Note: Totals may not add and may not agree with details presented later in this document due to rounding.

Transfers to other levels of government
Canada Health Transfer
34.02 36.07 36.07 37.15
Fiscal Equalization
17.34 17.88 17.88 18.25
Canada Social Transfer
12.96 13.35 13.35 13.75
Territorial Financing
3.56 3.54 3.60 3.68
Gas Tax Fund
2.00 2.10 2.10 2.10
Additional Fiscal Equalization Offset Payment to Nova Scotia
0.04 0.03 0.03 0.02
Additional Fiscal Equalization to Nova Scotia
0.09 0.02 0.01 (0.03)
Youth Allowances Recovery
(0.81) (0.89) (0.84) (0.89)
Alternative Payments for Standing Programs
(3.64) (4.04) (3.81) (4.02)
Total transfers to other levels of government 65.56 68.05 68.39 70.01
Transfers to persons
Elderly Benefits
45.48 48.41 48.35 51.16
Children’s Benefits
18.03 18.40 21.85 22.90
Employment Insurance
19.42 21.10 21.00 21.84
Total transfers to persons 82.93 87.90 91.20 95.90
Total Major Transfer Payments 148.49 155.95 159.59 165.92

Major transfer payments

Major transfer payments – significant transfers to other levels of government and transfers to persons – account for a large proportion of the government’s total expenditure framework.

Forecast expenditures for major transfer payments are included in the total budgetary Main Estimates of the responsible organization, with two exceptions. One is Employment Insurance, which is reported through the Employment Insurance Operating Account and is separate from any of the appropriated organizations listed in these Main Estimates. The other exception is Children’s Benefits, details of which are included in the Department of Finance’s Tax Expenditures and Evaluations report.

As presented in the table, major statutory transfers to other levels of government are projected to total $70.0 billion in 2017–18, an increase of $2.0 billion over the previous year’s Main Estimates.

The Canada Health Transfer (CHT) is a federal transfer provided to provinces and territories in support of health care. As of 2014–15, the CHT is distributed on an equal per capita cash basis. Starting in 2017–18, growth of the CHT is based on a 3-year moving average of nominal gross domestic product, with funding guaranteed to increase by at least 3% per year. CHT support is subject to the five conditions of The Canada Health Act: universality; comprehensiveness; portability; accessibility; and public administration, and the prohibitions against extra-billing and user fees. In 2017–18, the CHT will increase by nearly $1.1 billion from the 2016–17 amount to a total of $37.1 billion.

Fiscal Equalization refers to unconditional transfer payments to enable less prosperous provincial governments to provide their residents with public services that are reasonably comparable to those in other provinces, at reasonably comparable levels of taxation. These payments will be $18.3 billion in 2017–18, an increase of $373.2 million from the Main Estimates 2016–17, and $912.3 million more than 2015–16 actual expenditures. The growth path of Equalization is based on a three-year moving average of gross domestic product (GDP) growth. The increase of $373.2 million in 2017–18 represents the legislated annual program growth calculated by multiplying the 2016–17 level of $17.9 billion by the 2.09 per cent escalator derived using the relevant GDP data.

The Canada Social Transfer is a federal transfer to provinces and territories in support of social assistance and social services, post-secondary education and programs for children. The legislated 3% growth rate results in an increase of $400.4 million to $13.7 billion in 2017–18.

The Territorial Formula Financing Program provides unconditional federal transfers that allow territorial governments to provide their residents with public services comparable to those offered by provincial governments, at comparable levels of taxation. The transfers are based on a formula that fills the gap between a proxy of territorial expenditure requirements and a territory’s revenue-raising capacity. These payments will be $3.7 billion in 2017–18, $145.5 million more than the 2016–17 Main Estimates and $78.9 million more than the updated amount for 2016–17 shown in Supplementary Estimates (B).

The Gas Tax Fund provides predictable, long-term, stable funding for Canadian municipalities to help them build and revitalize their local public infrastructure while creating jobs and long term prosperity. Beginning in 2014–15, the Gas Tax Fund became a statutory payment. Prior to the 2014–15 fiscal year, payments were approved through Appropriation Acts (Voted).

The Additional Fiscal Equalization Offset Payment to Nova Scotia is a payment related to its 2005 Offshore Accord. This Accord guaranteed the province that its Equalization payments would not be reduced due to offshore oil and gas revenues that entered the Equalization formula. This is derived by applying the Equalization formula with and without offshore oil and gas revenues and comparing the resulting Equalization payments. The province will receive $20.0 million for 2017–18, a decrease of $13.3 million compared with the amount for 2016–17.

Additional Fiscal Equalization Payments to Nova Scotia are payments related to its 2005 Offshore Accord. Following the introduction of a new formula for Equalization in 2007, Nova Scotia was guaranteed that, on a cumulative basis beginning in 2008–09 over the lifetime of the Accord, the new formula would not reduce its Equalization payments and 2005 Offshore Accord payments when compared with what the province would have received under the formula that was in place when it signed its 2005 Offshore Accord. For 2017–18, the forecast recovery of $27.9 million is $43.9 million lower than the forecast in the 2016–17 Main Estimates and $38.5 million lower than the official determination of $10.6 million in the 2016–17 Supplementary Estimates (C) due to updated data entering the formula.

The Youth Allowance Recovery relates to tax points transferred to the province of Quebec for the Youth Allowance program, which has since expired. The equivalent value of the tax point reduction is recovered each year from the province of Quebec. The change in recoveries for the Youth Allowances Recovery Program is entirely due to year-over-year changes to the value of federal personal income taxes, the recovery being a percentage of these taxes. For 2017–18, the forecast recovery of $888.7 million is $2.0 million lower than the forecast in the 2016–17 Main Estimates and $49.6 million higher than that in the 2016–17 Supplementary Estimates (C) due to higher forecast levels of federal personal income taxes.

Alternative Payments for Standing Programs represent recoveries from Quebec of an additional tax point transfer above and beyond the tax point transfer computed under the Youth Allowances Recovery. The change in recoveries for the Alternative Payments for Standing Programs is entirely due to year-over-year changes to the value of federal personal income taxes, the recovery being a percentage of these taxes. For 2017–18, the forecast recovery of $4.0 billion is $20.5 million lower than the forecast in the 2016–17 Main Estimates and $212.2 million higher than that in 2016–17 Supplementary Estimates (C) due to higher forecast levels of federal personal income taxes.

Transfers to Persons

Elderly benefits include Old Age Security, Guaranteed Income Supplement, and Allowance payments. Elderly benefit payments are expected to be $51.2 billion in 2017–18, an increase of $2.8 billion over the 2016–17 Main Estimates and $5.7 billion more than actual expenditures in 2015–16.

The Canada Child Benefit took effect on , replacing the previous federal system of child benefits that included the Universal Child Care Benefit and the Canada Child Tax Benefit, (which included the National Child Benefit supplement, a benefit targeted to low- and modest-income families).

The Canada Child Benefit is a tax-free, income-tested benefit that provides a maximum annual benefit of $6,400 per child under the age of 6 and $5,400 per child aged 6 through 17. With the introduction of the Canada Child Benefit, the government also continues to provide an additional annual benefit of up to $2,730 per child under the age of 18 who is eligible for the disability tax credit (the Child Disability Benefit).

Under the Canada Child Benefit, low- and middle-income families receive more benefits, while those with the highest incomes (generally over $150,000) receive lower benefits than under the previous federal system of child benefits. Canada Child Benefit payments are forecasted to total $17.2 billion in 2016–17 (for the to period) and $22.9 billion in 2017–18. These amounts include the Child Disability Benefit amounts.

Payments for the Universal Child Care Benefit and “Other Children’s Benefits” (which includes the Canada Child Tax Benefit, the National Child Benefit supplement and the Child Disability Benefit) are forecast to total, in 2016–17, $2.0 billion and $2.7 billion, respectively. These measures were replaced partway through fiscal year 2016–17 (i.e. as of ). For 2017–18, the Universal Child Care Benefit and the Canada Child Tax Benefit will be fully replaced by the Canada Child Benefit.

Employment Insurance provides temporary financial assistance to unemployed Canadians who have lost their job through no fault of their own, while they look for work or upgrade their skills. Employment Insurance is reported through the Employment Insurance Operating Account and is separate from any of the appropriated organizations listed in these Main Estimates.

Estimates by Organization

One hundred twenty-one organizations are represented in the 2017–18 Estimates. More information about each organization can be found in Part II – Main Estimates.
Table 4. Estimates by Organization (dollars)
2015–16
Expenditures
2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Estimates
To Date
2017–18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Administrative Tribunals Support Service of Canada
56,851,992 58,024,536 61,767,127 61,020,149
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
301,608,968 308,197,204 335,515,951 311,544,944
Atomic Energy of Canada Limited
491,064,000 968,615,589 968,615,589 971,055,162
Canada Border Services Agency
1,796,293,231 1,673,039,553 1,873,071,807 1,761,696,236
Canada Council for the Arts
182,224,388 182,347,387 222,574,389 257,347,387
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation
2,008,369,383 2,027,901,048 3,176,101,049 2,735,001,048
Canada Post Corporation
22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000
Canada Revenue Agency
4,146,987,294 4,085,718,183 4,154,416,887 4,162,899,574
Canada School of Public Service
92,152,131 83,244,944 83,244,944 77,577,537
Canadian Air Transport Security Authority
656,747,273 624,005,722 766,278,268 584,584,214
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
1,038,023,798 1,038,023,798 1,113,023,798 1,188,023,798
Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety
9,918,117 8,952,372 8,952,372 8,877,401
Canadian Commercial Corporation
8,880,000 3,510,000 3,510,000 0
Canadian Dairy Commission
3,723,258 3,599,617 3,599,617 3,599,617
Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency
29,216,302 30,911,035 41,857,579 34,093,234
Canadian Food Inspection Agency
749,362,527 739,739,165 805,369,511 704,649,594
Canadian Grain Commission
(21,209,143) 5,381,924 5,381,924 5,299,113
Canadian High Arctic Research Station
8,286,711 19,475,274 19,475,274 21,594,231
Canadian Human Rights Commission
22,352,154 22,149,172 22,149,172 21,823,120
Canadian Institutes of Health Research
1,026,378,153 1,025,620,003 1,082,620,669 1,085,600,973
Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat
5,270,551 5,974,970 5,974,970 5,924,659
Canadian Museum for Human Rights
21,700,000 21,700,000 33,604,000 24,865,000
Canadian Museum of History
83,587,255 66,199,477 77,746,477 71,600,477
Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21
7,700,000 7,700,000 7,900,000 7,820,000
Canadian Museum of Nature
26,452,593 26,129,112 29,441,112 32,515,112
Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency
46,948,420 26,233,451 55,368,252 50,081,183
Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission
137,968,668 136,166,216 136,252,217 136,920,459
Canadian Polar Commission
1,287,927 0 0 0
Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission
10,998,417 12,123,695 12,123,695 11,486,197
Canadian Security Intelligence Service
536,563,848 572,069,066 591,800,950 577,092,059
Canadian Space Agency
412,799,058 432,394,821 442,394,822 353,809,911
Canadian Tourism Commission
62,975,770 70,475,770 95,475,770 95,475,770
Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board
30,032,490 29,788,652 29,788,652 29,416,554
Canadian Transportation Agency
28,254,232 27,792,087 27,792,087 30,914,166
Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police
9,718,063 10,028,317 10,028,317 9,935,889
Communications Security Establishment
619,548,058 583,624,818 599,833,760 595,983,723
Copyright Board
2,828,705 3,111,724 3,111,724 3,074,729
Correctional Service of Canada
2,357,784,645 2,362,592,079 2,393,067,268 2,400,709,163
Courts Administration Service
72,294,670 72,351,643 74,587,450 75,247,699
Department of Agriculture and Agri-Food
1,928,409,592 2,263,733,256 2,658,686,303 2,251,183,698
Department of Canadian Heritage
1,240,947,324 1,294,505,478 1,438,765,816 1,444,696,770
Department of Citizenship and Immigration
1,536,497,266 1,650,832,227 1,893,162,398 1,646,959,588
Department of Employment and Social Development
59,598,028,020 61,637,881,808 56,669,800,862 57,422,855,615
Department of Finance
87,007,312,159 89,463,792,510 88,770,777,432 90,143,611,301
Department of Fisheries and Oceans
2,172,797,935 2,241,049,589 2,590,355,242 2,200,956,928
Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development
5,996,852,566 5,515,540,897 6,475,378,999 6,002,126,067
Department of Health
3,881,132,152 3,756,604,937 4,187,200,422 4,268,361,008
Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development
7,955,294,666 7,505,552,140 9,448,144,605 10,056,790,513
Department of Industry
1,169,834,497 1,297,074,670 2,181,409,853 2,590,906,146
Department of Justice
683,219,807 678,860,530 702,439,529 656,159,656
Department of National Defence
18,666,073,243 18,640,268,933 18,908,344,554 18,662,067,234
Department of Natural Resources
1,335,178,669 1,592,518,753 1,715,246,121 1,339,946,450
Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness
406,782,727 1,096,958,408 1,166,257,907 1,052,593,859
Department of Public Works and Government Services
2,833,315,710 2,870,459,398 3,382,648,077 3,694,082,184
Department of the Environment
950,927,395 902,089,198 1,019,967,760 987,274,415
Department of Transport
1,569,127,062 1,265,907,597 1,438,600,718 1,302,832,549
Department of Veterans Affairs
3,595,034,204 3,628,281,702 3,893,092,359 4,691,399,582
Department of Western Economic Diversification
155,691,374 173,391,536 202,518,546 199,619,059
Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec
259,197,000 303,119,941 318,559,941 303,816,469
Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario
189,797,295 234,447,852 256,647,852 269,348,649
Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada
54,952,391 56,697,062 57,257,062 51,225,553
House of Commons
424,331,368 463,627,783 486,252,497 476,074,400
Immigration and Refugee Board
112,397,173 114,502,666 120,273,101 127,083,870
Indian Residential Schools Truth and Reconciliation Commission
5,981,933 0 0 0
International Development Research Centre
183,478,242 149,205,625 149,205,625 138,705,625
International Joint Commission (Canadian Section)
6,618,723 6,772,067 7,047,067 10,049,693
Library and Archives of Canada
91,451,612 116,858,567 118,013,156 115,219,215
Library of Parliament
41,618,624 43,071,239 43,071,239 47,757,497
Marine Atlantic Inc.
350,859,000 140,122,000 146,222,000 76,545,000
Military Grievances External Review Committee
6,251,598 6,753,945 6,753,945 6,722,826
Military Police Complaints Commission
5,407,239 4,685,311 4,685,311 4,638,300
National Arts Centre Corporation
54,897,056 79,397,056 135,309,431 140,034,681
National Capital Commission
91,009,322 88,792,180 90,127,294 91,895,250
National Energy Board
82,396,568 89,425,447 90,251,802 79,839,985
National Film Board
59,921,189 61,894,820 63,394,820 74,375,345
National Gallery of Canada
45,776,761 43,888,410 46,078,410 54,203,410
National Museum of Science and Technology
59,600,577 59,979,776 108,172,776 144,527,796
National Research Council of Canada
945,077,595 1,053,658,576 1,119,755,105 1,000,352,234
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council
1,115,653,194 1,120,184,669 1,193,339,050 1,207,030,145
Northern Pipeline Agency
456,055 751,835 751,835 494,830
Office of Infrastructure of Canada
3,190,441,756 3,869,509,257 5,313,890,780 7,011,663,801
Office of the Auditor General
77,683,076 78,533,732 78,533,732 77,501,971
Office of the Chief Electoral Officer
486,406,354 98,535,261 98,535,261 112,207,990
Office of the Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs
543,426,832 555,174,253 558,276,513 571,877,585
Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying
4,377,457 4,462,686 4,462,686 4,424,639
Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages
20,230,031 20,891,619 20,891,619 20,729,984
Office of the Communications Security Establishment Commissioner
2,034,877 2,125,377 2,125,377 2,109,216
Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner
5,758,138 6,970,653 6,970,653 6,901,551
Office of the Co-ordinator, Status of Women
29,542,401 31,736,324 35,916,924 37,977,421
Office of the Correctional Investigator of Canada
4,570,147 4,664,536 4,664,536 4,615,504
Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions
172,124,586 185,665,457 185,665,457 181,426,829
Office of the Governor General’s Secretary
22,318,092 23,145,434 23,145,434 22,744,010
Office of the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner
4,453,557 5,462,474 5,462,474 5,441,381
Office of the Senate Ethics Officer
766,289 1,171,300 1,171,300 1,232,127
Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions
144,218,577 149,703,956 149,703,956 150,160,327
Offices of the Information and Privacy Commissioners of Canada
35,019,651 35,809,330 39,161,751 35,538,976
Parks Canada Agency
1,036,130,407 1,173,538,301 1,279,714,066 1,388,903,070
Parliamentary Protective Service
50,470,931 62,115,110 71,408,562 68,262,800
Parole Board of Canada
46,330,939 46,789,956 46,789,956 46,263,971
Patented Medicine Prices Review Board
9,498,361 10,965,108 10,965,108 10,866,321
PPP Canada Inc.
11,800,000 279,500,000 279,500,000 279,500,000
Privy Council Office
123,119,021 120,684,380 160,879,376 144,874,555
Public Health Agency of Canada
573,080,141 589,737,802 584,163,196 571,934,931
Public Service Commission
72,609,706 83,603,063 83,855,064 83,510,933
Registrar of the Supreme Court of Canada
32,339,748 33,217,202 34,348,521 34,882,922
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
2,856,227,571 2,759,327,834 2,988,349,661 2,882,558,840
Royal Canadian Mounted Police External Review Committee
1,517,969 1,554,862 1,554,862 945,510
Security Intelligence Review Committee
2,869,475 2,801,996 7,146,808 5,021,346
Senate
74,572,094 90,115,308 90,115,308 103,874,365
Shared Services Canada
1,504,443,770 1,549,854,701 1,860,873,134 1,725,545,040
Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council
720,292,139 720,012,809 777,751,229 779,243,856
Standards Council of Canada
10,194,937 9,329,000 10,274,000 10,706,000
Statistics Canada
517,560,565 751,484,013 747,824,384 471,050,210
Telefilm Canada
95,453,551 95,453,551 97,453,551 100,453,551
The Federal Bridge Corporation Limited
20,119,299 31,414,312 41,781,864 22,885,386
The Jacques-Cartier and Champlain Bridges Inc.
247,328,089 351,919,000 367,525,000 331,777,000
The National Battlefields Commission
13,500,346 8,687,714 8,687,714 9,713,927
Treasury Board Secretariat
4,127,888,742 6,570,806,029 7,381,207,499 6,541,861,364
Veterans Review and Appeal Board
11,002,365 10,921,149 10,921,149 10,790,952
VIA Rail Canada Inc.
365,500,460 382,830,000 425,450,000 221,004,897
Windsor-Detroit Bridge Authority
138,500,000 215,989,827 569,181,753 258,916,050
Total Budgetary 241,379,463,237 250,136,477,494 257,166,294,490 257,917,634,586
Non-budgetary
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation
(177,166,331) (644,314,000) (644,314,000) (644,790,000)
Canadian Dairy Commission
31,338,616 0 0 0
Correctional Service of Canada
165 0 0 0
Department of Citizenship and Immigration
3,721,648 0 0 0
Department of Employment and Social Development
817,148,156 979,969,792 549,150,322 358,762,888
Department of Finance
54,811,893,118 0 0 0
Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development
51,896,413 3,098,451 3,098,451 39,860,001
Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development
37,961,677 25,903,000 56,303,000 25,903,001
Department of Industry
0 800,000 800,000 800,000
Department of National Defence
2,628,008 0 0 0
Department of Public Works and Government Services
9,721,866 0 0 0
Department of Veterans Affairs
(3,716) 0 0 0
Total Non-budgetary 55,589,139,620 365,457,243 (34,962,227) (219,464,110)

Structure of these Estimates

Votes

The basic structural units of the Estimates are the Votes. The following kinds of Votes appear in the Estimates:

A program expenditures vote is used when there is no requirement for either a separate “capital expenditures” vote or a “grants and contributions” vote because neither equals or exceeds $5 million. In this case, all expenditures are charged to the one vote.

An operating expenditures vote is used when there is also a requirement for either a “capital expenditures” vote or a “grants and contributions” vote or both; that is, when expenditures of either type equal or exceed $5 million.

A capital expenditures vote is used when the aggregate of capital expenditures equal or exceed $5 million. Capital expenditures are those made for the acquisition or development of items that are classified as tangible capital assets as defined by Government accounting policies. For example, the acquisition of real property, infrastructure, machinery or equipment, or for purposes of constructing or developing assets, where an organization expects to draw upon its own labour and materials, or employs professional services or other services or goods. Expenditure items in a Capital Expenditures Vote are for items that generally exceed $10,000; although an organization may select a reduced threshold to be applied to different capital classes.

A grants and contributions vote is used when grants and/or contributions expenditures equal or exceed $5 million. It should be noted that the inclusion of a grant, contribution or other transfer payment item in the Estimates imposes no requirement to make a payment, nor does it give a prospective recipient any right to the funds. It should also be noted that in the vote wording, the meaning of the word “contributions” is considered to include “other transfer payments” because of the similar characteristics of each.

A non-budgetary vote, identified by the letter “L”, provides authority for spending in the form of loans or advances to, and investments in, Crown corporations; and loans or advances for specific purposes to other governments, international organizations or persons or corporations in the private sector.

Where it is necessary to appropriate funds for a payment to a Crown corporation or for the expenditures of a legal entity that is part of a larger program, a separate vote is established. Where this is the case, a separate vote structure is established for each. A legal entity for these purposes is defined as a unit of government operating under an Act of Parliament and responsible directly to a Minister.

To support the Treasury Board in performing its statutory responsibilities for managing the government’s financial, human and materiel resources, a number of special authorities are required. These authorities are described in the vote wording found in the Proposed Schedules to the Appropriation Bill.

Information Presented in the 2017–18 Main Estimates

Part II – Main Estimates

Departments and agencies are presented alphabetically according to the legal name of the department or agency. For some organizations, the legal name differs from the name in common usage. In such cases, their commonly-used name is noted in their raison d’être.

Forecast statutory expenditures are summarized in this document. Details are available in the 2017–18 Statutory Forecasts online table.

Abbreviated vote wordings are used in organization summaries. Complete vote wording is shown in the Proposed Schedules to the Appropriation Bill following Part II.

Information on 2015–16 actual expenditures and 2016–17 Estimates to Date are included to provide context for the 2017–18 amounts. The 2015–16 actual expenditures are taken from the 2015–16 Public Accounts of Canada. 2016–17 Estimates to Date is the sum of the amounts presented in the 2016–17 Main Estimates and increases sought through the 2016–17 Supplementary Estimates A, B and C. Estimates to date excludes any funding deemed to have been appropriated to a department following the transfer of a portion of the federal administration. Allocations from Treasury Board Central Votes are made throughout the year and the expenditure authority provided by these allocations is also not included in Estimates to Date.

The 2017–18 Program Alignment Architecture or Departmental Results Framework is used for the tables presenting information by program or purpose. If there has been a change in the reporting structure, amounts for previous years have not been reclassified to the new structure and are reported as “Funds not allocated to the 2017–18 Program Alignment Architecture”.

If applicable, a table provides a listing of transfer payments planned for the 2017–18 fiscal year, with comparative amounts from previous fiscal years for programs with funding in 2017–18. A transfer payment is a grant, contribution or other payment made for the purpose of furthering program objectives but for which no goods or services are received. Details on transfer payments made in a previous year can be found in Volumes 2 and 3 of the Public Accounts of Canada.

Supplementary Information

Supplementary online tables for the 2017–18 Main Estimates show forecast expenditures by:

  • Standard Object: the table shows the types of goods or services to be acquired, or the transfer payments to be made and the revenues to be credited to the vote; and
  • Program or purpose: the table shows planned expenditures by program or purpose categorized by nature of expenditure.

In-year information on expenditure authorities is available in the departmental Quarterly Financial Reports, and final expenditure authority and actual expenditures for a fiscal year are reported in the Public Accounts of Canada. The Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS) InfoBase also provides financial and people management data for all organizations that receive government appropriations.

Changes to these Estimates

The purpose of this section is to provide the reconciliation of these Estimates with the previous year’s Estimates in the following areas:

  • Changes to government organization and structure;
  • Changes in authorities (Votes); and
  • Changes in organizational names used in Estimates.

Changes to Government Organization and Structure

Following the tabling of the 2016–17 Main Estimates on , the following changes were made:

  • the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls was designated as a department for the purposes of the Financial Administration Act with the Prime Minister as the appropriate Minister (Order in Council P.C. 2016-0737);
  • Schedule III of the Financial Administration Act was amended to add PPP Canada Inc. as a parent Crown corporation, and the Minister of Infrastructure, Communities and Intergovernmental Affairs was designated as the appropriate Minister (Orders in Council P.C. 2016-0678 and 2016-0679); and
  • the President of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada was designated as the appropriate Minister with respect to the Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board for the purposes of the Financial Administration Act (Order in Council P.C. 2016-0656).

Changes in Voted Authorities

This sub-section lists Votes which contain specific authorities that differ from those included in the previous year’s Estimates as well as new expenditure authorities appearing for the first time.

Department of Finance

The wording of Vote 5 sets out the maximum amount of financial assistance to the International Development Association for the 2017–18 fiscal year.

Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development

The wording of Votes 20 and L25 sets out the maximum amount of financial assistance to international financial institutions for the 2017–18 fiscal year.

Department of National Defence

The authority for total commitments is increased to $29,570,334,909.

Changes in Organizational Names Used in Estimates

Changes (shown in bold text) have been made to reflect the complete name of the following organizations as shown in the Financial Administration Act:

  • Atomic Energy of Canada Limited / Énergie atomique du Canada, Limitée
  • Office of the Correctional Investigator of Canada / Bureau de l’enquêteur correctionnel du Canada
  • The National Battlefields Commission / Commission des champs de bataille nationaux

Departmental Results Framework

Starting in 2017–18, organizations will be adopting new departmental results frameworks that describe, at a high level:

  • What the department does (core responsibilities);
  • What results the department is trying to achieve (departmental results); and
  • How progress will be assessed (departmental indicators).

The new frameworks will replace the program alignment architecture.

Administrative Tribunals Support Service of Canada

Raison d’être

The Administrative Tribunals Support Service of Canada (ATSSC) is responsible for providing the support services and the facilities that are needed by each of the administrative tribunals it serves to enable them to exercise their powers and perform their duties and functions in accordance with their legislation and rules. Additional information can be found in the ATSSC’s Departmental Plan.

The Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 1. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Administrative Tribunals Support Service of Canada (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 48.21 52.35 52.63
Total Statutory 8.64 9.41 8.39
Table 1. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Administrative Tribunals Support Service of Canada
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 48,209,042 48,879,363 52,354,017 52,628,925
Total Voted 48,209,042 48,879,363 52,354,017 52,628,925
Total Statutory 8,642,950 9,145,173 9,413,110 8,391,224
Total Budgetary 56,851,992 58,024,536 61,767,127 61,020,149

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

The ATSSC is estimating budgetary expenditures of $61 million in 2017–18. Of this amount, $52.6 million requires Parliamentary approval. The remaining $8.4 million represents the statutory funding forecast that does not require additional approval.

ATSSC’s 2017–18 Voted Main Estimates have increased by $3.7 million from2016–17. This increase is mainly due to the reprofiling of funding from 2015–16 over and above the operating budget carry-forward and will serve towards office space consolidation and modernization.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 2. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Administrative Tribunals Support Service of Canada
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Efficient and effective services which support tribunal chairs and members in exercising their statutory responsibilities and ensure that their independence is protected in a manner which promotes Canadians’ confidence in the federal tribunal system.
Tribunal Specialized and Expert Support Services 20,397,746 21,445,348 22,305,059
Payments to tribunal chairs and members 11,106,695 12,830,814 11,783,427
Registry Services 7,477,407 7,799,725 8,263,121
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 17,870,144 15,948,649 18,668,542
Total 56,851,992 58,024,536 61,020,149

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

Raison d’être

Established in 1987 (Part I of the Government Organization Act, Atlantic Canada 1987, R.S.C., 1985, c.41 [4th Supp.], also known as the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency Act), the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA) is the federal department responsible for the Government of Canada’s economic development efforts in the provinces of New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, and Newfoundland and Labrador.

ACOA works to create opportunities for economic growth in Atlantic Canada by helping businesses become more competitive, innovative and productive, by working with diverse communities to develop and diversify local economies, and by championing the strengths of the region. Together, with Atlantic Canadians, it is building a stronger economy.

The Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 2. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 293.77 326.70 303.57
Total Statutory 7.84 8.81 7.97
Table 3. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 63,025,130 64,222,120 64,222,120 63,351,960
5 Grants and contributions 230,745,966 235,160,493 262,479,240 240,222,493
Total Voted 293,771,096 299,382,613 326,701,360 303,574,453
Total Statutory 7,837,872 8,814,591 8,814,591 7,970,491
Total Budgetary 301,608,968 308,197,204 335,515,951 311,544,944

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

ACOA is estimating budgetary expenditures of $311.5 million for 2017–18. Of this amount, $303.5 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $8.0 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes only.

ACOA’s approved authorities for 2017–18 of $311.5 million represent an increase of $3.3 million when compared to the 2016–17 Main Estimates of $308.2 million.

This increase in spending of $3.3 million is due to an increase in transfer payments of $5.0 million, a decrease in operating costs of $0.9 million and a decrease in statutory costs of $0.8 million. Factors contributing to the net increase include:

Impact of temporary initiatives:

  • A $8.3 million increase in funding to support the Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program;
  • A $2.4 million increase in funding to support the spruce budworm outbreak intervention initiative – ACOA component;
  • A $0.7 million decrease related to a reduction in the amount transferred from the department of National Defence in support of a project; and
  • A $0.5 million decrease for the conclusion of operational funding for the administration of the Building Canada Fund.

Impact of other adjustments:

  • A $5.0 million decrease related to changes in collections from repayable contributions;
  • A $0.8 million decrease in statutory costs; and
  • A $0.4 million decrease for Budget 2016 reduction on professional services, travel and advertising.

In 2017-18, the Agency will invest in the innovation and growth of small and medium-sized enterprises in Atlantic Canada, accelerate clean growth, and maximize international business opportunities. ACOA will continue to develop and diversify communities, and strengthen community planning and capacity-building to stimulate transformative change. The Agency will provide evidence-based policy-making, implement the Atlantic Growth Strategy in collaboration with the four Atlantic provincial governments and other federal departments and stakeholders and support long-term growth in Atlantic Canada by facilitating a whole-of-government approach.

For further details on ACOA’s planned spending, refer to the 2017–18 Departmental Plan.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 4. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
A competitive Atlantic Canadian economy.
Enterprise Development 171,964,203 172,961,681 170,058,923
Community Development 91,402,846 97,704,593 104,552,144
Policy, Advocacy and Coordination 11,828,235 11,740,443 10,966,274
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 26,413,684 25,790,487 25,967,603
Total 301,608,968 308,197,204 311,544,944

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments

Table 5. Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments - Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Grants
Grants to organizations to promote economic cooperation and development 350,761 2,000,000 2,000,000
Contributions
Contributions under the Business Development Program 133,140,184 131,176,388 126,175,938
Contributions for the Atlantic Innovation Fund 37,241,006 42,500,000 44,900,000
Contributions for the Innovative Communities Fund 40,951,128 36,756,518 37,177,762
Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program 3,481,221 8,300,000 16,600,000
Contributions under the Community Futures Program 12,604,443 12,642,000 12,642,000
Contributions under the Atlantic Policy Research Initiatives 420,170 600,000 600,000
Contributions to promote and coordinate economic development throughout Cape Breton Island 2,557,053 1,185,587 126,793

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

Raison d’être

The mandate of Atomic Energy Canada Limited (AECL) is to deliver on Canada’s radioactive waste and decommissioning responsibilities, provide nuclear expertise to support federal responsibilities for the benefit of Canadians, and offer services to users of the nuclear laboratories on commercial terms.

The Minister of Natural Resources is responsible for AECL.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 3. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 491.06 968.62 971.06
Table 6. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Atomic Energy of Canada Limited
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the corporation for operating and capital expenditures 491,064,000 968,615,589 968,615,589 971,055,162
Total Voted 491,064,000 968,615,589 968,615,589 971,055,162
Total Budgetary 491,064,000 968,615,589 968,615,589 971,055,162

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

AECL delivers its mandate through a Government-owned, Contractor-operated model. Under this model, AECL’s sites, facilities and assets are managed and operated by Canadian Nuclear Laboratories.

Starting in 2016–17, AECL received all funding necessary to deliver on its mandate through the Main Estimates. This differs from previous years, when AECL received funding from a variety of sources, including Main and Supplementary Estimates, transfers from Natural Resources Canada and, occasionally Treasury Board Central Votes. This explains, in part, the variance between the amounts noted under 2015–16 Expenditures and 2017–18 Main Estimates presented in this document.

Funding for 2017–18 has been grouped into a single program area: Facilities and Nuclear Operations, which includes all funding to enable AECL to deliver on its mandate. As noted in its Corporate Plan Summary, AECL focusses its activities in two main areas:

Decommissioning and Waste Management $520.1 million

The objective is to safely and efficiently reduce the Government of Canada’s radioactive waste liabilities, including associated risks to health, safety, security and the environment. The focus is on enabling Canadian Nuclear Laboratories to significantly advance infrastructure decommissioning, site remediation and waste management for Canada. Funding for these activities was previously provided through Natural Resources Canada’s Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program, the Port Hope Area Initiative and the Low-level Radioactive Waste Management Office, and as such, would not have been reflected in Parliamentary Appropriations to AECL prior to 2016–17.

Starting in 2016–17, all funding for these activities is being provided directly to AECL through the Main Estimates, with increased funding to accelerate work that will reduce risks and discharge Canada’s radioactive waste liabilities faster.

Nuclear Laboratories $450.9 million

The objective is to enable the effective implementation of the Government-owned, Contractor operated model and thereby enable Canadian Nuclear Laboratories to manage and operate AECL’s sites efficiently and effectively to provide expertise, products and services, and science and technology capabilities in support of: (i) Canada’s federal roles, responsibilities and priorities; (ii) commercial services for third parties; and, (iii) capital projects and other corporate activities at the nuclear laboratories. Work in this activity includes renewal and modernization of the Chalk River site to enhance Canadian Nuclear Laboratories’ ability to provide safe and world-class science and technology and other services for Canada.

More information on AECL’s activities can be found in its Corporate Plan Summary.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 7. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Atomic Energy of Canada Limited
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Be the top worldwide nuclear products and services company. Protect the health and safety of the public, our employees and the environment. Minimize nuclear legacy obligations for future generations.
Facilities and Nuclear Operations 0 968,615,589 971,055,162
Commercial Business 0 0 0
Research and Development 0 0 0
Waste Management and Decommissioning 0 0 0
Funds not allocated to the 2017–18 Program Alignment Architecture 491,064,000 0 0
Total 491,064,000 968,615,589 971,055,162

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Canada Border Services Agency

Raison d’être

The Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness is responsible for the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA).

The CBSA provides integrated border services that support national security priorities and facilitate the flow of people and goods across the border. Responsibilities include:

  • Administering legislation that governs the admissibility of people and goods into and out of Canada;
  • Identifying, detaining, and removing people who are inadmissible to Canada;
  • Interdicting illegal goods at Canada’s border;
  • Protecting food safety, plant and animal health, and Canada’s resource base;
  • Administering trade legislation and agreements, including the enforcement of trade remedies that protect Canadian industry;
  • Administering a fair and impartial redress mechanism; and
  • Collecting duties and taxes on imported goods.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 4. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canada Border Services Agency (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 1,608.85 1,668.25 1,591.02
Total Statutory 187.44 204.82 170.67
Table 8. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canada Border Services Agency
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 1,449,717,812 1,357,329,190 1,499,254,649 1,388,555,431
5 Capital expenditures 159,136,387 130,999,015 168,998,665 202,466,241
Total Voted 1,608,854,199 1,488,328,205 1,668,253,314 1,591,021,672
Total Statutory 187,439,032 184,711,348 204,818,493 170,674,564
Total Budgetary 1,796,293,231 1,673,039,553 1,873,071,807 1,761,696,236

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

The Canada Border Services Agency is estimating budgetary expenditures of $1,761.7 million in 2017–18. Of this amount, $1,591.0 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $170.7 million represents statutory forecasts related to Employee Benefit Plans (EBP) that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

The CBSA’s increase in net spending of $88.7 million or 5.3% is due to an increase in Operating expenditures of $31.2 million, an increase in Capital expenditures of $71.5 million and a decrease of $14 million in Statutory expenditures (EBP).

Major items contributing to the year-over-year net change of $88.7 million in funding levels include:

Increases totaling $115.8 million in the 2017–18 Main Estimates are mainly due to:

  • $44.1 million in funding to maintain and upgrade federal infrastructure assets (Budget 2016- horizontal item);
  • $36.7 million in funding for Strengthening the National Immigration Detention Framework;
  • $29.1 million in funding for Delivering on Canada’s Commitment to Remove the Visa Requirement for Citizens of Mexico;
  • $3.2 million in funding to provide integrated border services at the new Canadian Port of Entry at the Gordie Howe International Bridge;
  • $1.8 million in funding for Integrity of Canada’s Border Operations; and
  • $0.9 million due to a net increase of funding for various projects.

The increases in the 2017–18 Main Estimates are offset by the following decreases totaling $27.1 million and are mainly due to:

  • $14.0 million in annual adjustment in the employee benefit plan rate set by Treasury Board Secretariat;
  • $9.2 million reduction of funding received to complete phase 2 of the CBSA Assessment and Revenue Management (CARM) project; and
  • $3.9 million for the Budget 2016 reduction in Professional Services, Advertising and Travel.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 9. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Canada Border Services Agency
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
International trade and travel is facilitated across Canada’s border and Canada’s population is protected from border-related risks.
Admissibility Determination 899,788,811 901,059,087 923,906,326
Immigration Enforcement 161,969,717 128,654,073 192,766,475
Risk Assessment Program 196,232,431 162,510,532 173,555,664
Revenue and Trade Management 84,407,179 80,336,485 50,111,199
Secure and Trusted Partnerships 32,177,618 35,243,046 37,910,170
Criminal Investigations 31,193,842 33,348,629 29,604,517
Recourse 11,322,864 11,485,183 10,432,587
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 379,200,769 320,402,518 343,409,298
Total 1,796,293,231 1,673,039,553 1,761,696,236

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Canada Council for the Arts

Raison d’être

The Canada Council for the Arts (CCA) is a Crown corporation created in 1957 “to foster and promote the study and enjoyment of, and the production of works in, the arts.” Its grants to artists and arts organizations contribute to a vibrant arts scene in Canada. Its awards celebrate creativity by recognizing exceptional Canadians in the arts, humanities and sciences. The Canada Council Art Bank is a national collection of over 17,000 Canadian contemporary artworks, accessible to the public through rental, loan and outreach programs.

The Canadian Commission for UNESCO operates under the general authority of the Canada Council.

The CCA reports to Parliament through the Minister of Canadian Heritage.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 5. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canada Council for the Arts (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 182.22 222.57 257.35
Table 10. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canada Council for the Arts
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Council 182,224,388 182,347,387 222,574,389 257,347,387
Total Voted 182,224,388 182,347,387 222,574,389 257,347,387
Total Budgetary 182,224,388 182,347,387 222,574,389 257,347,387

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

2017–18 is the second year of the Canada Council’s Strategic Plan 2016–2021, Shaping a New Future, and the second year of the new federal investment announced in Budget 2016. The new funds are being invested according to the four priorities identified in the strategic plan: a digital strategy for the arts; a new relationship with Indigenous artists; the international profile of Canadian arts; and investing in artists and the economy.

Main areas of activity include:

  • Launch of the New Funding Model in April 2017, which is a simplified, outcomes-based granting structure designed to achieve concrete results for the arts community and Canadians;
  • Launch of the Fund for the Arts in a Digital World and the Canada Council’s first digital strategy;
  • Public engagement activities marking Canada’s 150th anniversary and the Canada Council’s 60th anniversary; and
  • Other priorities include performance measurement, tracking of results and the implementation of a new framework for integrated planning and reporting.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 11. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Canada Council for the Arts
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Excellent, vibrant and diverse art that engages Canadians, enriches their communities, and reaches markets around the world.
Engage and Inspire 0 0 103,635,283
Explore and Innovate 0 0 77,900,617
Catalyze and Connect 0 0 63,547,127
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 0 10,466,471 12,264,360
Funds not allocated to the 2017–18 Program Alignment Architecture 182,224,388 171,880,916 0
Total 182,224,388 182,347,387 257,347,387

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation

Raison d’être

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) is Canada’s national housing agency. Established as a federal Crown corporation in 1946 to help address post-war housing shortages, its role has evolved as Canadians’ needs have changed. Today, CMHC’s mandate is to facilitate access to housing and contribute to financial stability in order to help Canadians meet their housing needs.

CMHC receives Parliamentary appropriations to fund housing programs on and off reserve. Working with provinces, territories, First Nations, and the private and not-for-profit sectors, CMHC helps Canadians in housing need by improving access to affordable housing.

CMHC’s role in housing finance (providing mortgage loan insurance and securitization guarantee products) contributes to the health and stability of Canada’s housing finance system and facilitates access to financing for housing across the country.

CMHC’s Market Analysis and Research Activity supports informed decision making through the creation, interpretation and sharing of housing-related data and information.

CMHC is accountable to Parliament through the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development.

Once tabled in the House of Commons, additional information will be available in CMHC’s Summary of the Corporate Plan, available on its website.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 6. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 2,008.37 3,176.10 2,735.00
Figure 7. organizational estimates - non-budgetary - canada mortgage and housing corporation (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Total Statutory -177.17 -644.31 -644.79
Table 12. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Reimbursement under the provisions of the National Housing Act and the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation Act 2,008,369,383 2,027,901,048 3,176,101,049 2,735,001,048
Total Voted 2,008,369,383 2,027,901,048 3,176,101,049 2,735,001,048
Total Budgetary 2,008,369,383 2,027,901,048 3,176,101,049 2,735,001,048
Non-budgetary
Total Statutory (177,166,331) (644,314,000) (644,314,000) (644,790,000)
Total non-budgetary (177,166,331) (644,314,000) (644,314,000) (644,790,000)

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

CMHC is estimating budgetary expenditures of $2,735.0 million in 2017–18. Included in the budgetary expenditures is $253.1 million related to the fourth year of the five-year extension of funding under the Investment in Affordable Housing.

A total budgetary increase of $707.1 million from the 2016–17 Main Estimates is due to the following:

  • An increase of $576.5 million for social infrastructure investments as announced in Budget 2016;
  • An increase of $72.6 million for the new Affordable Rental Housing Innovation Fund as announced in Budget 2016;
  • An increase of $50 million for the prepayment flexibility for long-term, non-renewable CMHC mortgages held by co-operative and non-profit social housing providers as announced in Budget 2015;
  • An increase of $10 million to support homeowners affected by pyrrhotite as announced in Budget 2016;
  • An increase of $4 million for additional housing construction and rehabilitation on-reserve; and
  • A decrease of $6 million related to the interest and inflation reserve.

CMHC is estimating non-budgetary net repayments of $644.8 million in 2017–18 which is in line with net repayments of $644.3 million projected in the 2016–17 Main Estimates.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 13. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Canadians in need have access to affordable housing.
Funding Under Long-Term Commitments for Existing Social Housing 1,670,346,270 1,674,922,048 1,721,941,048
Funding for New Commitments of Affordable Housing 282,953,018 285,866,000 865,393,000
Housing Support 12,150,674 16,025,000 89,774,000
Canada has a stable, competitive and innovative housing system.
Market Analysis Information 19,468,999 27,419,000 30,149,000
Housing Policy, Research and Information Transfer 23,450,422 23,669,000 27,744,000
Insured Mortgage Purchase Program 0 0 0
Total 2,008,369,383 2,027,901,048 2,735,001,048

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Table 14. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Non-budgetary - Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Canadians in need have access to affordable housing.
Funding Under Long-Term Commitments for Existing Social Housing (43,503,144) (508,422,000) (514,179,000)
Funding for New Commitments of Affordable Housing 45,000 500,000 500,000
Housing Support (133,708,187) (136,392,000) (131,111,000)
Total (177,166,331) (644,314,000) (644,790,000)

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Canada Post Corporation

Raison d’être

Canada Post Corporation has a mandate to provide an efficient, effective and quality-driven postal service to Canadians, to be profitable, and to maintain and increase the value of the Corporation for Canadians.

Under the terms of the Canada Post Corporation Act, the Corporation is mandated to operate the postal service on a financially self-sustaining basis. In addition to core postal service, Canada Post also delivers certain public policy programs for the Government.

The Minister of Public Services and Procurement is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 8. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canada Post Corporation (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 22.21 22.21 22.21
Table 15. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canada Post Corporation
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Corporation for special purposes 22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000
Total Voted 22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000
Total Budgetary 22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

Canada Post Corporation receives an annual appropriation of $22.21 million from the Government for the delivery of Parliamentary mail and materials for the use of the blind, which are sent free of postage under the Act. This appropriation helps to offset the financial impact of these programs on the Corporation.

Parliamentary Mail

The Canada Post Corporation Act allows for the free mailing of letters between Canadians and the Governor General, the Speaker or Clerk of the Senate or house of Commons, a member of the Senate or House of Commons, the Parliamentary Librarian, the Associate Parliamentary Librarian, the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, the Senate Ethics officer, and the Director of the Parliamentary Protective Service. Under the Act members of the House of Commons are also allowed up to four free householder mailings to their constituents in any calendar year.

Materials for the Use of the Blind

The Canada Post Corporation Act provides for free mailing of materials for the blind. Today, thousands of visually impaired Canadians and many libraries across the country, including that of the Canadian National Institute for the Blind, send talking books and other materials free of charge.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 16. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Canada Post Corporation
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Compensation for the provision of Parliamentary mail and Materials for the use of the blind services, which are sent free of postage under the Canada Post Corporation Act.
Concessionary Governmental Services 0 22,210,000 22,210,000
Funds not allocated to the 2017–18 Program Alignment Architecture 22,210,000 0 0
Total 22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Canada Revenue Agency

Raison d’être

The Minister of National Revenue is responsible for the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). The CRA administers tax, benefits, and related programs for governments across Canada. In carrying out its role, the CRA contributes to the economic and social well-being of Canadians by promoting voluntary participation in our tax system.

The CRA makes sure:

  • Canadians comply with their tax obligations;
  • Canadians receive the benefits to which they are entitled;
  • Non-compliance is addressed; and
  • Canadians have access to appropriate mechanisms for resolving disputes.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 9. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canada Revenue Agency (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 3,112.84 3,244.06 3,232.75
Total Statutory 1,034.15 910.35 930.15
Table 17. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canada Revenue Agency
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures, contributions and recoverable expenditures in relation to the application of the Canada Pension Plan and the Employment Insurance Act 3,034,034,552 3,032,118,914 3,197,643,765 3,173,383,552
5 Capital expenditures and recoverable expenditures in relation to the application of the Canada Pension Plan and the Employment Insurance Act 78,803,100 37,066,000 46,420,829 59,363,678
Total Voted 3,112,837,652 3,069,184,914 3,244,064,594 3,232,747,230
Total Statutory 1,034,149,642 1,016,533,269 910,352,293 930,152,344
Total Budgetary 4,146,987,294 4,085,718,183 4,154,416,887 4,162,899,574

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

The Canada Revenue Agency is estimating budgetary expenditures of $4.2 billion in 2017–18. Of this amount, $3,232.7 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $930.2 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

In total the Agency is displaying an increase of $77.2 million or 1.9% from previous Main Estimates, which is the net result of various increases offset by certain planned decreases.

The CRA budgets will be increasing by $292.1 million due to the following:

  • $113.0 million for the implementation and administration of various measures to crack down on tax evasion, combat tax avoidance and enhance tax collections announced in the 2016 Federal Budget;
  • $51.0 million in payments under the Children’s Special Allowance Act for eligible children in the care of agencies and foster parents;
  • $43.0 million for the implementation and administration of various measures to enhance the Canada Revenue Agency’s capacity to deliver client-focused services announced in the 2016 Federal Budget;
  • $36.3 million for collective bargaining increases;
  • $30.0 million for the administration of the goods and services tax;
  • $9.9 million for the implementation and administration of enhanced compliance measures; and
  • $8.9 million for the implementation and administration of various tax measures announced in the 2016 Federal Budget.

The above-mentioned increases are offset by the following decreases totalling $214.9 million due to the following:

  • $128.0 million reduction related to statutory disbursements to provinces under the Softwood Lumber Products Export Charge Act, 2006;
  • $41.1 million in contributions to employee benefit plans;
  • $24.4 million adjustment to accommodation and real property services provided by Public Services and Procurement Canada;
  • $9.5 million reduction in professional services, advertising, and travel announced in the 2016 Federal Budget;
  • $7.5 million planned decrease in funding for the upgrade of the individual income tax processing system;
  • $3.5 million for various initiatives announced in the 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015 Federal Budgets; and
  • $0.9 million in the spending of revenues received through the conduct of its operations primarily attributable to initiatives administered on behalf of the Canada Border Services Agency.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 18. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Canada Revenue Agency
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
This organization has implemented the Policy on Results, therefore reporting in the Estimates by Core Responsibility.
Tax 0 0 2,737,078,407
Benefits 0 0 487,819,400
Taxpayers’ Ombudsman 0 0 3,183,760
To support all responsibilities of the organization.
Internal Services 0 0 934,818,007
Funds not allocated to the 2017–18 Program Alignment Architecture 4,146,987,294 4,085,718,183 0
Total 4,146,987,294 4,085,718,183 4,162,899,574

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Canada School of Public Service

Raison d’être

The Canada School of Public Service (the School) is the common learning service provider for the Public Service of Canada. The School has a legislative mandate to provide a range of learning activities to build individual and organizational capacity and management excellence within the public service. The School has one strategic outcome: Federal public service employees have the common knowledge, skills and competencies to fulfill their responsibilities in serving Canadians.

The President of the Treasury Board is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 10. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canada School of Public Service (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 50.82 69.22 63.42
Total Statutory 41.33 14.03 14.16
Table 19. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canada School of Public Service
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 50,823,726 69,217,505 69,217,505 63,416,105
Total Voted 50,823,726 69,217,505 69,217,505 63,416,105
Total Statutory 41,328,405 14,027,439 14,027,439 14,161,432
Total Budgetary 92,152,131 83,244,944 83,244,944 77,577,537

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

The School is estimating budgetary expenditures of $77.6 million in 2017–18. Of this amount, $63.4 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining amount of $14.2 million represents statutory authority that does not require additional approval and is provided for information.

In comparison with 2016–17, the 2017–18 Main Estimates are decreasing by $5.6 million. This decrease is due to the completion in 2016–17 of the transformational initiatives undertaken by the School to make learning more accessible to public servants across all regions.

Additional information is available in the 2017–18 Departmental Plan.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 20. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Canada School of Public Service
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Federal public service employees have the common knowledge, skills and competencies to fulfill their responsibilities in serving Canadians.
Learning Services 59,000,898 62,098,772 58,009,726
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 33,151,233 21,146,172 19,567,811
Total 92,152,131 83,244,944 77,577,537

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Canadian Air Transport Security Authority

Raison d’être

The Canadian Air Transport Security Authority (CATSA) is an agent Crown corporation with the mandate to protect the public by securing critical elements of the air transportation system as assigned by the Government of Canada. CATSA’s goal is to provide a professional, effective, efficient and consistent level of security screening services, at or above the standards set by Transport Canada, its regulator. Funded by parliamentary appropriations, CATSA is accountable to Parliament through the Minister of Transport. CATSA’s vision is to excel in air transportation security through its service to passengers, its people and its partnerships.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 11. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Air Transport Security Authority (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 656.75 766.28 584.58
Table 21. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Air Transport Security Authority
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Authority for operating and capital expenditures 656,747,273 624,005,722 766,278,268 584,584,214
Total Voted 656,747,273 624,005,722 766,278,268 584,584,214
Total Budgetary 656,747,273 624,005,722 766,278,268 584,584,214

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

CATSA’s 2017–18 Main Estimates of $584.6 million, which require approval from Parliament, are $39.4 million or approximately 6% lower than its 2016–17 Main Estimates of $624.0 millionFootnote 1. The Main Estimates consist of $471.4 million for operating expenditures and $113.2 million for capital expenditures.

CATSA’s 2017–18 Main Estimates for operating expenditures of $471.4 million are equivalent to its 2016–17 Main Estimates and represent CATSA’s A-Base funding.

CATSA’s 2017–18 Main Estimates for capital expenditures of $113.2 million are $39.4 million or approximately 26% lower than its 2016–17 Main Estimates of $152.6 million. The year-over-year variance in CATSA’s capital budget envelope reflects lower cash flow requirements for 2017–18 to support the deployment of its new Hold Baggage Screening system as part of a 10-year capital life-cycle management plan. The variance is also attributable to a decrease in planned capital spending for Pre-Board Screening associated with the deployment of advanced technology and CATSA’s life-cycle management plan.

As set out in its 2016–17 to 2020–21 Corporate Plan, CATSA’s funding priorities for the 2017–18 fiscal year will continue to focus on the delivery of its core mandated activities. This includes the ongoing deployment of CATSA’s new Hold Baggage Screening system at airports across Canada as part of its capital life-cycle management plan and enhancement of select Pre-Board Screening checkpoints to improve the passenger experience.

Footnotes

Footnote 1

The incremental funding received from the Government of Canada of $29.0 million for Pre-Board Screening and $113.3 million for enhanced Non-Passenger Screening for 2016–17 was not reflected in CATSA’s 2016–17 Main Estimates of $624.0 million, as provided by Treasury Board Secretariat, as this funding was obtained through the 2016–17 Supplementary Estimates (A) approval process. CATSA is working with Transport Canada on an operationally effective long-term funding strategy for Pre-Board Screening and Non-Passenger Screening for 2017–18 and beyond.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 22. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Canadian Air Transport Security Authority
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Screening programs at designated Canadian airports protect the travelling public.
Pre-Board Screening 0 351,245,332 324,766,300
Hold Baggage Screening 0 210,862,820 193,987,914
Non-Passenger Screening 0 18,722,126 19,634,000
Restricted Area Identity Card 0 2,177,019 2,477,000
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 0 40,998,425 43,719,000
Funds not allocated to the 2017–18 Program Alignment Architecture 656,747,273 0 0
Total 656,747,273 624,005,722 584,584,214

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Raison d’être

As defined by the 1991 Broadcasting Act, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (the Corporation), as the national public broadcaster, should provide radio and television services incorporating a wide range of programming that informs, enlightens and entertains.

The programming provided by the Corporation should:

  • Be predominantly and distinctively Canadian;
  • Reflect Canada and its regions to national and regional audiences, while serving the special needs of those regions;
  • Actively contribute to the flow and exchange of cultural expression;
  • Be in English and in French, reflecting the different needs and circumstances of each official language community, including the particular needs and circumstances of English and French linguistic minorities;
  • Strive to be of equivalent quality in English and French;
  • Contribute to shared national consciousness and identity;
  • Be made available throughout Canada by the most appropriate and efficient means and as resources become available for the purpose; and
  • Reflect the multicultural and multiracial nature of Canada.

The Corporation reports to Parliament through the Minister of Canadian Heritage.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 12. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 1,038.02 1,113.02 1,188.02
Table 23. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Corporation for operating expenditures 928,331,798 927,306,798 1,002,306,798 1,076,202,798
5 Payments to the Corporation for working capital 4,000,000 4,000,000 4,000,000 4,000,000
10 Payments to the Corporation for capital expenditures 105,692,000 106,717,000 106,717,000 107,821,000
Total Voted 1,038,023,798 1,038,023,798 1,113,023,798 1,188,023,798
Total Budgetary 1,038,023,798 1,038,023,798 1,113,023,798 1,188,023,798

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

2017–18 will be the third year of the Corporation’s 5-year strategy, Strategy 2020. The strategy aims to better position the broadcaster to meet the fundamental shifts that are transforming the media universe, and consequently how it connects with Canadians. Strategy 2020 is a promise by CBC/Radio-Canada to intensify and deepen its one-on-one relationship with individual Canadians; work in partnership with the creative community to communicate the breadth and depth of Canada’s reality; and set the Corporation on a clear course to long-term financial sustainability. The vision is that by 2020, CBC/Radio-Canada will be the public space at the heart of our conversations and experiences as Canadians.

The Corporation’s appropriations for 2017–18 include the government’s reinvestment of $150 million announced in Budget 2016.

The reinvestment ensures transformation of the public broadcaster into the digital public space that will allow Canadians to engage with each other, and their world. The reinvestment would also counter existing financial pressures, strengthen the Corporation’s transformation by investing in new content and programming, and allow for enhanced services.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 24. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
A national public broadcasting service exists that is primarily Canadian in content and connects citizens to the Canadian experience.
Television, Radio and Digital Services 0 985,915,196 1,134,536,219
Transmission and Distribution of Programs 0 46,764,284 47,656,331
Specialty Channels for Specific Audiences 0 0 0
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 0 5,344,318 5,831,248
Funds not allocated to the 2017–18 Program Alignment Architecture 1,038,023,798 0 0
Total 1,038,023,798 1,038,023,798 1,188,023,798

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety

Raison d’être

The Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS) was founded by an Act of Parliament in 1978 with a mandate to promote health and safety in the workplace and to enhance the physical and mental health of working Canadians. CCOHS operates under the legislative authority of the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety Act (S.C., 1977–78, c. 29) which was passed by unanimous vote in the Canadian Parliament. The purpose of this Act is to promote the fundamental right of Canadians to a healthy and safe working environment by creating a national institute (CCOHS) concerned with the study, encouragement and co-operative advancement of occupational health and safety. CCOHS functions as an independent departmental corporation under Schedule II of the Financial Administration Act and is accountable to Parliament through the Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour.

Its funding is derived from a combination of appropriations, cost recoveries and collaboration with the provinces. It is expected that a portion of the budget will be funded through cost recoveries from the creation, production, and worldwide sales of fee-for-service and revenue generating occupational health and safety products and services.

Additional information can be found in CCOHS’ Departmental Plan.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 13. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 4.30 3.97 3.96
Total Statutory 5.61 4.98 4.92
Table 25. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 4,304,184 3,969,600 3,969,600 3,956,267
Total Voted 4,304,184 3,969,600 3,969,600 3,956,267
Total Statutory 5,613,933 4,982,772 4,982,772 4,921,134
Total Budgetary 9,918,117 8,952,372 8,952,372 8,877,401

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

The Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety’s planned expenditures remain generally the same as last year. CCOHS will focus its efforts on providing a wide range of needed, relevant and practical information, resources and training that assist Canadians to improve health and safety. CCOHS will work with Canadian and global partners to develop the resources and tools that will improve health and safety and contribute to making Canada’s workplaces safe and more productive.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 26. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Improved workplace conditions and practices that enhance the health, safety, and well-being of working Canadians.
Occupational health and safety information development, delivery services and tripartite collaboration 6,728,530 6,141,291 6,036,633
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 3,189,587 2,811,081 2,840,768
Total 9,918,117 8,952,372 8,877,401

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Canadian Commercial Corporation

Raison d’être

The Canadian Commercial Corporation (CCC) is governed by its enacting legislation, the 1946 Canadian Commercial Corporation Act. The Act outlines CCC’s broad mandate, which is to assist in the development of trade by helping Canadian exporters access markets abroad and by helping foreign buyers obtain goods from Canada. The legislation also provides CCC with a range of powers, including the ability to export goods from Canada either as principal or as agent in such a manner and to such an extent as it deems appropriate. As a result, CCC negotiates and executes bilateral government-to-government procurement arrangements, facilitating export transactions on behalf of Canadian exporters.

CCC reports to Parliament through the Minister of International Trade.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 14. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Commercial Corporation (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 8.88 3.51 0.00
Table 27. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Commercial Corporation
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Corporation 8,880,000 3,510,000 3,510,000 0
Total Voted 8,880,000 3,510,000 3,510,000 0
Total Budgetary 8,880,000 3,510,000 3,510,000 0

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

This organization is not receiving voted appropriations in the 2017–18 Main Estimates.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 28. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Canadian Commercial Corporation
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Enhanced market access for Canadian exporters to complex international public sector markets.
Defence 0 3,510,000 0
Emerging and Developing Markets 0 0 0
Funds not allocated to the 2017–18 Program Alignment Architecture 8,880,000 0 0
Total 8,880,000 3,510,000 0

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Canadian Dairy Commission

Raison d’être

The Canadian Dairy Commission (CDC) is a federal Crown corporation created in 1966 through the Canadian Dairy Commission Act.

It reports to Parliament through the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food. Its legislated objectives are twofold: to provide efficient producers of milk and cream with the opportunity of obtaining a fair return for their labour and investment; and to provide consumers of dairy products with a continuous and adequate supply of dairy products of high quality.

The CDC plays a central facilitating role for the multi-billion dollar Canadian dairy industry. Federal-provincial agreements now provide the authority for many of the programs and activities that the CDC employees administer and facilitate on a day-to-day basis. The CDC strives to balance and serve the interests of all dairy stakeholders — producers, processors, further processors, exporters, consumers and governments.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 15. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Dairy Commission (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 3.72 3.60 3.60
Figure 16. organizational estimates - non-budgetary - canadian dairy commission (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Total Statutory 31.34 0.00 0.00
Table 29. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Dairy Commission
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 3,723,258 3,599,617 3,599,617 3,599,617
Total Voted 3,723,258 3,599,617 3,599,617 3,599,617
Total Budgetary 3,723,258 3,599,617 3,599,617 3,599,617
Non-budgetary
Total Statutory 31,338,616 0 0 0
Total non-budgetary 31,338,616 0 0 0

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

The Canadian milk supply management system rests on three pillars: production management, price setting and import controls. The CDC is directly involved in the administration of two of the three pillars (production management and price setting) via the establishment of industrial milk quota and support price.

The CDC administers the three revenue pooling and market sharing pools that exist among milk producers. Monthly, the CDC receives data from provincial milk marketing boards and calculates the payment transfers between provinces to equalize returns and adjusts quota allocations to provinces to account for the sharing of markets.

The CDC operates several programs for the benefit of the dairy industry. The Domestic Seasonality Programs ensure a steady supply of dairy products on the Canadian market. The Surplus Removal Programs ensure that milk components for which there is no outlet on the domestic market are removed in a timely fashion. Finally, the Matching Investment Fund and the Dairy Innovation program promote growth and innovation in the manufacture and use of dairy products and components. In addition, the CDC, on behalf of the industry, administers the Special Milk Class Permit Program (SMCPP) and the Dairy Export Program (DEP). The parameters of these programs are decided by the industry.

The CDC imports the tariff rate quota of butter and sells this butter to participants in the SMCPP through butter manufacturers. Profits that the CDC generates by this activity are used to finance initiatives that provide benefits to the industry. An example of these initiatives is the Dairy Research Cluster.

The CDC also controls the subsidized exports of Canadian dairy products through the issuance of export permits. This permit system has been put in place to ensure that Canadian exports of dairy products do not exceed the limits imposed on Canada by the World Trade Organization (WTO) for subsidized exports.

To stimulate investments and growth in the use of Canadian milk and dairy ingredients, the CDC created the program Milk Access for Growth.

Producers and processors announced in July 2016 the successful conclusion of negotiations to evolve the Canadian dairy system for the future. The CDC is currently evaluating the impact of the implementation of this strategy on the programs it administers.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 30. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Canadian Dairy Commission
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
To enhance the vitality of the Canadian dairy industry for the benefit of all stakeholders.
Administer milk supply management system 3,723,258 3,599,617 3,599,617
Total 3,723,258 3,599,617 3,599,617

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Table 31. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Non-budgetary - Canadian Dairy Commission
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
To enhance the vitality of the Canadian dairy industry for the benefit of all stakeholders.
Administer milk supply management system 31,338,616 0 0
Total 31,338,616 0 0

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency

Raison d’être

The Minister of Environment and Climate Change is responsible for this organization.

Environmental assessment contributes to informed decision making in support of sustainable development.

The Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency delivers high-quality environmental assessments in support of government decisions about major projects.

Additional information can be found in the Agency’s Departmental Plan.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 17. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 27.58 37.70 30.64
Total Statutory 1.64 4.16 3.45
Table 32. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 27,579,392 27,512,578 37,696,083 30,640,824
Total Voted 27,579,392 27,512,578 37,696,083 30,640,824
Total Statutory 1,636,910 3,398,457 4,161,496 3,452,410
Total Budgetary 29,216,302 30,911,035 41,857,579 34,093,234

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

In support of its strategic outcome: high-quality and timely environmental assessments of major projects to protect the environment and support economic growth, the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency works towards achieving the following organizational priorities:

  • Delivering high-quality environmental assessments of major projects;
  • Building effective relationships with Aboriginal Peoples; and
  • Playing a lead role in shaping the future of federal environmental assessment.

The Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency’s 2017–18 Main Estimates will total $30.6 million in voted authorities. This amount represents a net increase of $3.1 million compared to the 2016–17 Main Estimates. This difference is mainly attributable to the following:

  • An increase of $2.6 million for ensuring robust environmental assessments and to ensure the Agency is adequately resourced to fulfill legislative obligations;
  • An increase of $0.5 million for the review of environmental assessment processes;
  • An increase of $0.2 million for a transfer from the Department of Natural Resources to support the administration of their participant funding for consultations with Indigenous groups; and
  • A decrease of $0.2 million for the Budget 2016 reduction on professional services, travel and advertising.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 33. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
High quality and timely environmental assessments of major projects to protect the environment and support economic growth.
Environmental Assessment Delivery Program 17,913,607 21,729,743 24,159,057
Environmental Assessment Policy Program 5,134,147 3,932,432 4,500,940
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 6,168,548 5,248,860 5,433,237
Total 29,216,302 30,911,035 34,093,234

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments

Table 34. Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments - Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Contributions
Contributions to support the participation of the public and Indigenous groups in the environmental assessment and associated review processes – Participant Funding Program 1,438,974 4,469,000 4,719,500
Contribution to the Province of Quebec – James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement 245,500 246,000 245,500

Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Raison d’être

The Minister of Health is responsible for this organization.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is a science-based regulatory agency, with employees working across Canada, in the National Capital Region (NCR) and in four operational areas (Atlantic, Quebec, Ontario and Western).

The CFIA is dedicated to safeguarding food, animal, and plant health, which enhances the health and well-being of Canada’s people, environment, and economy.

The CFIA develops and delivers inspection and other services to:

  • Prevent and manage food safety risks;
  • Protect plant resources from pests, diseases and invasive species;
  • Prevent and manage animal and zoonotic diseases;
  • Contribute to consumer protection; and
  • Contribute to market access for Canada’s food, plants, and animals.

The CFIA bases its activities on science, effective management of risk, commitment to service and efficiency, and collaboration with domestic and international organizations that share its objectives.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 18. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Food Inspection Agency (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 595.13 664.17 575.00
Total Statutory 154.23 141.20 129.65
Table 35. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Food Inspection Agency
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures and contributions 560,358,513 512,042,839 565,912,124 525,744,799
5 Capital expenditures 34,773,727 93,074,099 98,261,849 49,256,401
Total Voted 595,132,240 605,116,938 664,173,973 575,001,200
Total Statutory 154,230,287 134,622,227 141,195,538 129,648,394
Total Budgetary 749,362,527 739,739,165 805,369,511 704,649,594

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

With the authorities of $704.6 million, the CFIA will continuously modernize itself as an organization in order to better meet the needs of consumers, industry and international trading partners. Every day, more than six thousand CFIA professionals work to protect Canadians across the country and instill confidence in our food safety system and agriculture products. They help protect plant and animal health, prevent food safety hazards, manage food safety investigations and recalls, and help protect the marketplace from unfair practices.

Recent investments which support the Agency’s activities include:

  • Funding to improve food safety for Canadians (Budget 2016) by implementing activities to improve food safety risk intelligence and oversight, enhance food safety through offshore preventive activities, and improve stakeholder compliance in protecting Canada’s food supply;
  • Funding to support the Canadian agriculture and agri-food sector in seizing market opportunities and securing agriculture market access;
  • Resources to enable the CFIA to accelerate the required renewal and upgrade of its critical infrastructure assets;
  • Funding to support the implementation of the Electronic Service Delivery Platform project, to deliver technologies and tools for industry, international trading partners and CFIA inspectors to more efficiently carry out their respective roles and conduct regular business transactions electronically; and
  • Funding to support the implementation of the Canadian Food Safety Information Network which aims to strengthen the ability of federal, provincial, and territorial food safety authorities to better anticipate, detect, and respond to food-borne hazards minimizing the impact of food safety events on Canadians.

Further information on the CFIA’s planning highlights can be found in the 2017–18 Departmental Plan.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 36. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Canadian Food Inspection Agency
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.
Food Safety Program 376,113,531 364,582,938 348,722,065
Animal Health and Zoonotics Program 141,043,127 137,163,044 124,518,784
Plant Resources Program 79,807,062 93,368,850 78,138,366
International Collaboration and Technical Agreements 32,552,166 31,045,476 31,736,983
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 119,846,641 113,578,857 121,533,396
Total 749,362,527 739,739,165 704,649,594

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments

Table 37. Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments - Canadian Food Inspection Agency
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Contributions
Contributions in support of the Federal Assistance Program 1,802,426 819,000 819,000
Total Statutory 17,131,017 3,500,000 3,500,000

Canadian Grain Commission

Raison d’être

The Canadian Grain Commission (CGC) is a federal government department that administers the provisions of the Canada Grain Act (CGA). The CGC’s mandate as set out in the CGA is to, in the interests of the grain producers, establish and maintain standards of quality for Canadian grain and regulate grain handling in Canada, to ensure a dependable commodity for domestic and export markets.

CGC’s vision is “To be a world class science-based quality assurance provider”. The Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food is responsible for the CGC.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 19. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Grain Commission (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 5.02 4.78 4.75
Total Statutory -26.23 0.61 0.55
Table 38. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Grain Commission
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 5,021,047 4,776,362 4,776,362 4,746,362
Total Voted 5,021,047 4,776,362 4,776,362 4,746,362
Total Statutory (26,230,190) 605,562 605,562 552,751
Total Budgetary (21,209,143) 5,381,924 5,381,924 5,299,113

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

The CGC is estimating budgetary expenditures of $5.3 million in 2017–18. Of this amount, $4.7 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $0.6 million is to support employee benefit plan obligations.

The authority requested for 2017–18 Main Estimates is consistent with authority provided in 2016–17 Main Estimates.

The current CGC funding structure is based on budgetary authorities that are comprised of both statutory and voted authorities. The statutory authorities include employee benefit plan authority for appropriation funded positions and the CGC revolving fund authority which allows the CGC to re-spend fees that it has collected. The voted authority is Vote 1 – Program Expenditures which includes annual appropriation authority and any ad-hoc appropriation authority for the fiscal year.

A revolving fund was set up for the CGC in 1995 with the expectation that the CGC would be largely self-funded through fees for service. The CGC transitioned to a new fee structure in 2013–14. Updated user fees came into effect on August 1, 2013. The new fee structure has eliminated the requirement for annual ad-hoc funding. Revenues credited to the revolving fund are expected to be $57.0 million in 2017–18.

Additional information can be found in the CGC’s Departmental Plan.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 39. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Canadian Grain Commission
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Canada’s grain is safe, reliable and marketable and Canadian grain producers are properly compensated for grain deliveries to licensed grain companies.
Grain Quality Research Program 7,795,591 5,136,924 5,054,113
Quality Assurance Program (41,890,675) 0 0
Quantity Assurance Program (4,388,290) 0 0
Producer Protection Program 1,275,020 0 0
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 15,999,211 245,000 245,000
Total (21,209,143) 5,381,924 5,299,113

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Canadian High Arctic Research Station

Raison d’être

Canadian High Arctic Research Station has been created to:

  • Advance knowledge of the Canadian Arctic in order to improve economic opportunities; environmental stewardship and the quality of life of its residents and all other Canadians;
  • Promote the development and dissemination of knowledge of the other circumpolar regions, including the Antarctic;
  • Strengthen Canada’s leadership on Arctic issues; and
  • Establish a hub for scientific research in the Canadian Arctic.

The Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 20. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian High Arctic Research Station (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 7.90 18.85 20.96
Total Statutory 0.39 0.62 0.63
Table 40. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian High Arctic Research Station
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 7,896,157 18,853,197 18,853,197 20,963,206
Total Voted 7,896,157 18,853,197 18,853,197 20,963,206
Total Statutory 390,554 622,077 622,077 631,025
Total Budgetary 8,286,711 19,475,274 19,475,274 21,594,231

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

The Canadian High Arctic Research Station is estimating budgetary expenditures of $21.6 million in 2017–18. Of this amount, $21 million requires parliamentary approval. The remaining $631,025 represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information.

The net increase in the 2017–18 budgetary expenditures compared with the 2016–17 Main Estimates is mainly due to the carry forward of $2.5 million to meet the commitments related to requests for contributions.

Additional details about the priorities of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station will be available in the 2017–18 Departmental Plan.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 41. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Canadian High Arctic Research Station
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Canada has world-class Arctic science and technology to support the development and stewardship of Canada’s North and is recognized as a leader on circumpolar research issues.
Science and Technology for the North 5,391,920 13,679,282 13,599,331
Polar Knowledge Application 1,088,049 2,993,760 3,106,557
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 1,806,742 2,802,232 4,888,343
Total 8,286,711 19,475,274 21,594,231

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments

Table 42. Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments - Canadian High Arctic Research Station
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Grants
Grants to individuals, organizations, associations and institutions to support research and activities relating to the polar regions 156,000 1,086,000 1,286,000
Grants to support the advancement of Northern Science and Technology 10,000 470,000 270,000
Contributions
Contributions to support the advancement of Northern Science and Technology 1,726,972 8,175,000 8,427,518

Canadian Human Rights Commission

Raison d’être

The Canadian Human Rights Commission (the Commission) was established in 1977 under Schedule I.1 of the Financial Administration Act in accordance with the Canadian Human Rights Act (CHRA). The Commission leads the administration of the CHRA and ensures compliance with the Employment Equity Act (EEA). The CHRA prohibits discrimination and the EEA promotes equality in the workplace. Both laws apply the principles of equal opportunity and non-discrimination to federal government departments and agencies, Crown corporations, and federally regulated private sector organizations.

The Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 21. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Human Rights Commission (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 19.74 19.31 19.22
Total Statutory 2.62 2.84 2.60
Table 43. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Human Rights Commission
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 19,737,003 19,307,335 19,307,335 19,222,932
Total Voted 19,737,003 19,307,335 19,307,335 19,222,932
Total Statutory 2,615,151 2,841,837 2,841,837 2,600,188
Total Budgetary 22,352,154 22,149,172 22,149,172 21,823,120

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

The Canadian Human Rights Commission is estimating budgetary expenditures of $21.82 million in 2017–18. Of this amount, $19.22 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $2.6 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

The variance of $326,000 between 2016–17 and 2017–18 Main Estimates is mostly due to the decrease of the Employee Benefit Plan rate. In 2017–18 there is also a decrease of $123,000 for the Budget 2016 reduction on professional services, travel and advertising.

The Commission’s planned spending will remain stable in 2016-17 and 2017–18.

Over the next year, the Commission will focus on :

  • Raising awareness and mobilizing stakeholders around human rights issues to positively influence opinions and actions;
  • Assessing ways to create a more user-friendly complaint process that people can easily access and fully participate in; and
  • Shifting the way services are designed, managed and delivered by putting people at the centre of the Commission’s processes.

Further details can be found in the Commission’s Departmental Plan.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 44. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Canadian Human Rights Commission
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
This organization has implemented the Policy on Results, therefore reporting in the Estimates by Core Responsibility.
Human Rights Complaints 0 0 9,297,057
Engagement and Advocacy 0 0 4,737,991
Employment Equity Audits 0 0 1,159,629
To support all responsibilities of the organization.
Internal Services 0 0 6,628,443
Funds not allocated to the 2017–18 Program Alignment Architecture 22,352,154 22,149,172 0
Total 22,352,154 22,149,172 21,823,120

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Raison d’être

The Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) is the Government of Canada’s health research funding agency. The Minister of Health is responsible for this organization. It was created in June 2000 by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research Act with a mandate “to excel, according to internationally accepted standards of scientific excellence, in the creation of new knowledge and its translation into improved health for Canadians, more effective health services and products and a strengthened Canadian health care system.”

CIHR’s mandate seeks to transform health research in Canada in an ethically sound manner by:

  • Funding both investigator initiated and priority driven research;
  • Building research capacity in under-developed areas and training the next generation of health researchers; and
  • Focusing on knowledge translation that facilitates the application of the results of research and their transformation into new policies, practices, procedures, products and services.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 22. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Institutes of Health Research (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 1,020.81 1,076.30 1,079.78
Total Statutory 5.57 6.33 5.82
Table 45. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Institutes of Health Research
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 47,989,555 47,308,587 51,508,102 52,633,510
5 Grants 972,822,921 972,339,220 1,024,787,143 1,027,148,842
Total Voted 1,020,812,476 1,019,647,807 1,076,295,245 1,079,782,352
Total Statutory 5,565,677 5,972,196 6,325,424 5,818,621
Total Budgetary 1,026,378,153 1,025,620,003 1,082,620,669 1,085,600,973

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

CIHR is anticipating planned expenditures of $1,085.6 million in 2017–18. Of this amount, $1,079.8 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $5.8 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

The planned expenditures of $1,085.6 million in 2017–18 represents an increase of $60 million, or 5.8%, from the 2016–17 Main Estimates.

This increase is mainly due to the allocation of new ongoing funding through Budget 2015 and Budget 2016. Budget 2015 allocated $15 million to CIHR beginning in 2016–17 to expand the Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research as well as address antimicrobial resistance through health research. Budget 2016 allocated $30 million to CIHR beginning in 2016–17 to maintain and reinforce Canada’s position as a leading-edge, global knowledge economy by increasing CIHR’s support for early career investigators.

The remaining $15 million increase is the result of CIHR’s participation in tri-agency programs in collaboration with the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC). Funding for these programs varies by fiscal year as CIHR is allocated funding following each distinct competition depending on the successful applicants’ alignment with CIHR’s health-related mandate.

For example, beginning in 2016–17, CIHR has been allocated funding as a result of the second competition for the Canada First Research Excellence Fund, a program that helps post-secondary institutions to excel globally in research areas that create long-term economic advantages for Canada. Over 7 fiscal years, CIHR will be partially funding 8 of the 13 recipients for a total of $164.8 million of the $900 million awarded.

CIHR has also been allocated funding to begin in 2017–18 as a result of the third cohort of the Canada Excellence Research Chair program, a program that seeks to position Canada at the leading-edge of breakthroughs in priority research areas expected to generate economic and social benefits to Canadians. Over 7 fiscal years, CIHR will be funding 1 of the 3 new Chairs for a total of $12 million of the $24 million awarded.

Further details on CIHR’s 2017–18 planned expenditures are available in CIHR’s 2017–18 Departmental Plan.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 46. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Canadian Institutes of Health Research
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Canada is a world leader in the creation, dissemination and application of health research knowledge.
Investigator Initiated Health Research 705,412,045 692,439,221 729,420,974
Priority Driven Health Research 308,482,516 304,974,917 328,536,075
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 12,483,592 28,205,865 27,643,924
Total 1,026,378,153 1,025,620,003 1,085,600,973

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments

Table 47. Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments - Canadian Institutes of Health Research
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Grants
Grants for research projects and personnel support 867,669,698 866,871,648 907,125,027
Canada First Research Excellence Fund 16,246,614 16,440,279 34,646,332
Networks of Centres of Excellence 22,589,000 22,589,400 21,740,400
Canada Graduate Scholarships 21,216,528 21,250,000 21,250,000
Institute support grants 12,916,667 13,000,000 13,000,000
Centres of Excellence for Commercialization and Research 11,116,947 10,771,143 9,679,500
Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarships 8,284,309 8,350,000 8,350,000
Canada Excellence Research Chairs 9,800,000 9,800,000 7,933,333
Business–Led Networks of Centres of Excellence 2,798,750 3,106,750 3,344,250
Industrial Research Chairs for Colleges 160,000 160,000 80,000

Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat

Raison d’être

The President of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada is responsible for this organization. The Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat (CICS), established pursuant to an agreement reached at the May 1973 First Ministers’ Conference, is an agency of the federal, provincial and territorial governments. Its mandate is to provide administrative support and planning services for intergovernmental conferences of First Ministers, Ministers and Deputy Ministers.

These intergovernmental conferences are a key instrument for consultation and negotiation among the different orders of governments and assist in the development of national and/or provincial/territorial policies. They are a critical component of the workings of the Canadian federation and represent a core principle of our democratic society.

By skilfully executing the logistical planning and delivery of these meetings, CICS not only relieves governments of the administrative process burden but also allows them to greatly benefit from significant cost efficiencies and economies of scale.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 23. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 4.96 5.55 5.53
Total Statutory 0.31 0.43 0.39
Table 48. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 4,955,984 5,547,133 5,547,133 5,534,133
Total Voted 4,955,984 5,547,133 5,547,133 5,534,133
Total Statutory 314,567 427,837 427,837 390,526
Total Budgetary 5,270,551 5,974,970 5,974,970 5,924,659

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

The Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat’s 2017–18 expenditures remain approximately the same as the previous year.

The 2017–18 funding will be utilized to address the following priorities:

  • Implement the necessary initiatives to enhance and expand strategic partnerships;
  • Ensure relevant and responsible service delivery;
  • Implement initiatives to ensure effective and efficient use of resources; and
  • Cultivate a continuous learning environment.

Our departmental plan will contain more details regarding our priorities.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 49. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Senior-level intergovernmental conference services are professionally and successfully delivered.
Conference Services 3,561,128 4,163,437 4,504,460
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 1,709,423 1,811,533 1,420,199
Total 5,270,551 5,974,970 5,924,659

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Canadian Museum for Human Rights

Raison d’être

The Canadian Museum for Human Rights (CMHR) was created in 2008 through an amendment to the Museums Act, which established the Museum as the first national museum to be created since 1967 and the first to be located outside of the National Capital Region.

The Museum’s mandate is “to explore the subject of human rights, with special but not exclusive reference to Canada, in order to enhance the public’s understanding of human rights, to promote respect for others and to encourage reflection and dialogue.”

The Minister of Canadian Heritage is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 24. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Museum for Human Rights (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 21.70 33.60 24.86
Table 50. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Museum for Human Rights
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Museum for operating and capital expenditures 21,700,000 21,700,000 33,604,000 24,865,000
Total Voted 21,700,000 21,700,000 33,604,000 24,865,000
Total Budgetary 21,700,000 21,700,000 33,604,000 24,865,000

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

The Museum’s reference levels in Vote 1 for operating and capital expenditures in 2017–18 are $24.865 million.

The Board of Trustees updated the Museum’s goals based on the lessons learned in the first two years of operations. The updated goals will guide Museum operations and activities through the CMHR’s upcoming five years of operations. These goals will serve as a roadmap in five strategic areas – visitor experience, audience reach, recognized leader, financial sustainability and people.

The Board and Executive of the CMHR are committed to building on the Museum’s considerable successes. A defining hallmark of the Canadian Museum for Human Rights is its ability to inspire future generations. The Museum plans to expand its reach across Canada and the world, and to continually refresh and evolve exhibits, content and programming to ensure offerings remain impactful and relevant.

The Museum will continue in its efforts to maximize the net income from admissions, membership, programs, retail, facility rentals and commissions from the bistro and catering. Working with the Friends of CMHR, the Museum plans to develop and implement a sponsorship strategy to supplement appropriations and earned revenue.

Using business improvement methodologies, the Museum will review work processes to identify any overlap or redundancy in current processes and implement opportunities for continuous improvements.

Depending on long-term funding, the Museum plans to expand its remote and web based offerings; ensure the exhibits remain current and relevant to visitors; launch a travelling exhibits program; bring temporary exhibits from other institutions to CMHR, tailoring them to align with the CMHR mandate; continue to be innovative; expand linkages nationally and internationally to continue to contribute to increased economic benefits for Winnipeg, Manitoba and Canada; develop new and nationally relevant learning resources; and launch the National Student Program. Funding to CMHR was increased through federal Budget 2016, including ongoing funding for Payments in lieu of Taxes (PILT) and funding for priority capital requirements largely related to health and safety and the recapitalization of digital hardware and software.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 51. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Canadian Museum for Human Rights
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Enhanced knowledge of human rights, with special but not exclusive reference to Canada, in order to enhance the public’s understanding of human rights, to promote respect for others and to encourage reflection and dialogue.
Museum Content and Program 0 10,200,000 12,360,000
Accommodation 0 5,250,000 7,281,000
Stewardship and Corporate Management 0 6,250,000 5,224,000
Funds not allocated to the 2017–18 Program Alignment Architecture 21,700,000 0 0
Total 21,700,000 21,700,000 24,865,000

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Canadian Museum of History

Raison d’être

The Canadian Museum of History is a Crown corporation established by the Museums Act (Statutes of Canada 2013, Chapter 38) which came into force on December 12, 2013. The Act states that the role of the corporation is “to enhance Canadians’ knowledge, understanding and appreciation of events, experiences, people and objects that reflect and have shaped Canada’s history and identity, and also to enhance their awareness of world history and cultures.”

The Minister of Canadian Heritage is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 25. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Museum of History (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 83.59 77.75 71.60
Table 52. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Museum of History
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Museum for operating and capital expenditures 83,587,255 66,199,477 77,746,477 71,600,477
Total Voted 83,587,255 66,199,477 77,746,477 71,600,477
Total Budgetary 83,587,255 66,199,477 77,746,477 71,600,477

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

The Canadian Museum of History is creating an entirely new exhibition on Canadian history. This new exhibition, which represents the largest and most ambitious exhibition project that the Museum has ever undertaken, is called the Canadian History Hall and is due to open on July 1, 2017, the 150th anniversary of Confederation.

The hall’s purpose is to tell the story of Canada and its people from the dawn of human habitation to the present day. The new gallery will help the Museum fulfill its mandate.

The appropriation request for 2017–18 is $71.6 million, an increase of $5.4 million from the previous year’s approval. The increase is due to:

  • An increase of $3.1 million for payments in lieu of taxes; and
  • An increase of $2.3 million in funding for health and safety capital projects.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 53. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Canadian Museum of History
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Interest in, knowledge of and appreciation and respect for human cultural achievements and human behaviour through collections of historical and cultural objects, exhibitions, programs and research reflecting a Canadian perspective.
Accommodation 0 27,470,000 31,155,000
Exhibit, Educate and Communicate 0 24,764,000 25,643,000
Collect and Research 0 12,650,000 13,175,000
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 0 1,315,477 1,627,477
Funds not allocated to the 2017–18 Program Alignment Architecture 83,587,255 0 0
Total 83,587,255 66,199,477 71,600,477

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21

Raison d’être

The Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21 was established in 2010 through an amendment to the Museums Act.

The mandate of the Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21 is “to explore the theme of immigration to Canada in order to enhance public understanding of the experiences of immigrants as they arrived in Canada, of the vital role immigration has played in the building of Canada and of the contributions of immigrants to Canada’s culture, economy and way of life.”

The Minister of Canadian Heritage is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 26. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21 (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 7.70 7.90 7.82
Table 54. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Museum for operating and capital expenditures 7,700,000 7,700,000 7,900,000 7,820,000
Total Voted 7,700,000 7,700,000 7,900,000 7,820,000
Total Budgetary 7,700,000 7,700,000 7,900,000 7,820,000

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

The Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21 (Museum) is estimating budgetary expenditures, in 2017–18, of $7.8 million which require parliamentary approval.

The planned expenditures of the Museum remain approximately the same as the previous year.

Please refer to the Museum’s Corporate Plan for further detail.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 55. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Canadians are engaged in building and exploring the stories, themes and history of Canadian immigration as it continues to unfold.
Accommodations 0 2,700,000 2,831,500
Visitor Experience and Connections 0 2,509,700 2,512,700
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 0 2,490,300 2,475,800
Funds not allocated to the 2017–18 Program Alignment Architecture 7,700,000 0 0
Total 7,700,000 7,700,000 7,820,000

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Canadian Museum of Nature

Raison d’être

The Minister of Canadian Heritage is responsible for this organization.

The Canadian Museum of Nature (the Museum) became a Crown corporation on July 1, 1990 through the Museums Act with the mandate to increase, throughout Canada and internationally, interest in, knowledge of and appreciation and respect for the natural world by establishing, maintaining and developing for research and posterity, a collection of natural history objects, with special but not exclusive reference to Canada, and by demonstrating the natural world, the knowledge derived from it and the understanding it represents.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 27. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Museum of Nature (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 26.45 29.44 32.52
Table 56. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Museum of Nature
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Museum for operating and capital expenditures 26,452,593 26,129,112 29,441,112 32,515,112
Total Voted 26,452,593 26,129,112 29,441,112 32,515,112
Total Budgetary 26,452,593 26,129,112 29,441,112 32,515,112

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

In 2017–18, the Museum will advance year four of a new strategic plan that leverages its research and collections strengths in Arctic Knowledge and Species Discovery. Key Objectives are:

  • Create a Centre for Arctic Knowledge and Exploration that transforms people’s understanding of Canada’s Arctic and its relationship with Canada as a country in a 21st century global context.
  • Create a Centre for Species Discovery and Change that transforms people’s understanding of the relevance of species diversity to their lives now and in the future.
  • Create a Centre for Nature Inspiration and Engagement that transforms people’s expectations of the Canadian Museum of Nature as a destination for discussion, connection and exploration with nature’s past, present and future that advances understanding and respect for Canada’s natural world.
  • Position the Natural Heritage Campus as a centre of excellence in collections management and knowledge creation, advancement and sharing by becoming a collections collaborator with institutions around the world seeking to collect, preserve, digitize and disseminate specimens that document the nature of Canada.
  • Create a sustainable business enterprise model of operation that leverages the Museum’s strategic imperatives: knowledge and discovery, inspiration and engagement, presence, performance and advancement.

The 2017–18 Main Estimates represent an increase of $6.4 million from the previous year due to Budget 2016 funding covering health and safety and special consideration projects such as the completion of the Canada Goose Arctic Gallery and the acquisition of scientific equipment essential to program integrity.

Additional information can be found in the Museums Corporate Plan.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 57. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Canadian Museum of Nature
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Interest in, knowledge of and appreciation and respect for the natural world through collections of natural history objects, public education programmes and research reflecting a special but not exclusive perspective on Canada.
Buildings and grounds 0 10,620,872 12,278,511
Inspiration and engagement 0 6,097,324 8,564,185
Research and discovery 0 3,429,884 4,827,823
Collections care and access 0 1,803,938 1,812,121
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 0 4,177,094 5,032,472
Funds not allocated to the 2017–18 Program Alignment Architecture 26,452,593 0 0
Total 26,452,593 26,129,112 32,515,112

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency

Raison d’être

Contributing to jobs and growth in Canada, the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency (CanNor) works to develop a diversified, sustainable and dynamic economy across Canada’s three territories. It does this by delivering funding programs to Northerners and Aboriginal people, guiding resource development and major projects across the North through the Northern Projects Management Office, undertaking research to support the development of evidence-based policies, advocating for Northern economic prosperity and diversification, and collaborating with and aligning the efforts of other federal departments, territorial governments, Aboriginal organizations, and industry.

The Minister Innovation, Science and Economic Development is responsible for CanNor.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 28. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 45.61 53.73 48.70
Total Statutory 1.34 1.64 1.38
Table 58. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 13,317,446 8,874,718 13,543,277 13,199,586
5 Contributions 32,291,373 16,423,487 40,187,121 35,500,000
Total Voted 45,608,819 25,298,205 53,730,398 48,699,586
Total Statutory 1,339,601 935,246 1,637,854 1,381,597
Total Budgetary 46,948,420 26,233,451 55,368,252 50,081,183

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

The Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency (CanNor) is estimating budgetary expenditures of $50.1 million in 2017–18.

Of this amount $48.7 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $1.4 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approvals and are provided for information purposes.

Significant Funding Changes:

Almost 50% of CanNor’s total 2016–17 funding was for program renewals and was provided through Supplementary Estimates.

The total net increase of $23.8 million in 2017–18 Main Estimates budgetary expenditures is a result of:

  • Increase of $19.8 million in renewed funding for the Strategic Investments in Northern Economic Development Program;
  • Increase of $2.3 million for the Northern Projects Management Office;
  • Increase of $3.2 million for the Canada 150 Infrastructure Program; and
  • A reduction of $1.3 million in funding for the Centre for Northern Innovation in Mining.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 59. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Developed and diversified territorial economies that support prosperity for all Northerners.
Economic Development 36,670,762 18,108,174 39,880,184
Policy and Alignment 3,949,912 2,013,466 4,222,127
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 6,327,746 6,111,811 5,978,872
Total 46,948,420 26,233,451 50,081,183

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments

Table 60. Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments - Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Contributions
Contributions to support Aboriginal participation in the northern economy 8,809,125 10,800,000 18,300,000
Contributions for promoting regional development in Canada’s three territories 19,856,423 2,360,487 10,800,000
Contributions to support the Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program 0 3,200,000 6,400,000

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission

Raison d’être

The Minister of Natural Resources is responsible for this organization.

In 1946, Parliament passed the Atomic Energy Control Act and established the Atomic Energy Control Board, providing it with the power to regulate all nuclear activities related to the development and use of atomic energy in Canada.

More than half a century later, in May 2000, the Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA) came into effect and established the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) as the successor to the Atomic Energy Control Board, with responsibilities and authorities to regulate an industry that spans all segments of the nuclear fuel cycle and a wide range of industrial, medical and academic uses of nuclear substances.

Additional information can be found in the CNSC’s Departmental Plan.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 29. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 39.84 38.77 37.94
Total Statutory 98.13 97.48 98.98
Table 61. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 39,835,227 38,686,934 38,772,935 37,939,524
Total Voted 39,835,227 38,686,934 38,772,935 37,939,524
Total Statutory 98,133,441 97,479,282 97,479,282 98,980,935
Total Budgetary 137,968,668 136,166,216 136,252,217 136,920,459

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission is estimating budgetary expenditures of $136.9 million in 2017–18. Of this amount, $37.9 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $99.0 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for informational purposes.

The CNSC has statutory authority – pursuant to paragraph 21(3) of the Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA) – to spend during a fiscal year any revenues that it receives in the current or previous fiscal year through the conduct of its operations. The CNSC receives its revenues from regulatory fees for licenses and applications charged in accordance with the CNSC Cost Recovery Fees Regulations.

In addition to the statutory authority, the CNSC is also funded through the voted budgetary authority from Parliament – Vote 1 – Program expenditures. Voted authority provides funding for activities exempt from paying fees under the CNSC Cost Recovery Fees Regulations (i.e., hospitals and universities), as these entities exist for the public good. Additionally, fees are not charged for activities that result from Canada’s obligations that do not provide a direct benefit to identifiable licensees. These include activities with respect to Canada’s international obligations (including non-proliferation activities), public responsibilities such as emergency management and public information programs, and the updating of the NSCA and its associated regulations.

In 2017-18, the CNSC’s Main Estimates have increased by $0.7 million or 0.6% when compared to the 2016-17 Main Estimates. The increase is due to a $1.5 million increase in Statutory expenditures resulting from an overall increase in projected expenditures due to salary increases. It is also attributable to an increase in revenues earned from formula fees, as a result of a phased-in review of formulas used with the CNSC Cost Recovery Fees Regulations, to align costs with regulatory activities for the various licence types. The increase in Statutory expenditures is partially offset by a decrease in Program expenditures of $0.8 million; of which $0.5 million is attributable to the sunset of funding associated with the single window horizontal initiative outlined in Beyond the Border: A Shared Vision for Perimeter Security and Economic Competitiveness (also known as the Beyond the Border Action Plan). The balance of $0.3 million is a result of Budget 2016 reductions related to professional services, travel and advertising.

Additional information can be found in the CNSC’s Departmental Plan.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 62. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Safe and secure nuclear installations and processes used solely for peaceful purposes and an informed public on the effectiveness of Canada’s nuclear regulatory regime.
Nuclear Reactors 40,002,299 39,242,207 39,698,384
Scientific, Technical, Regulatory and Public Information 26,696,945 26,840,929 26,494,116
Nuclear Substances and Prescribed Equipment 13,930,082 12,161,854 13,824,249
Nuclear Fuel Cycle 10,173,578 11,784,983 10,096,285
Nuclear Non-Proliferation 5,982,791 6,442,749 5,937,337
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 41,182,973 39,693,494 40,870,088
Total 137,968,668 136,166,216 136,920,459

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments

Table 63. Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments - Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Grants
Grants to enable the research, development and management of activities that contribute to the objectives of the Research and Support Program 74,655 75,000 75,000
Contributions
Participant Funding Program 170,760 925,000 925,000
Contributions to enable the research, development and management of activities that contribute to the objectives of the Research and Support Program, and the Canadian Safeguards Support Program 1,391,382 770,000 770,000

Canadian Polar Commission

Raison d’être

Pursuant to the Economic Action Plan 2014 Act, No. 2. the Canadian Polar Commission Act was repealed as of June 1st, 2015. All rights, personal property or movables and real property or immovables and all obligations of the Canadian Polar Commission were transferred to the Canadian High Arctic Research Station

Organizational Estimates

Figure 30. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Polar Commission (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 1.26 0.00 0.00
Total Statutory 0.02 0.00 0.00
Table 64. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Polar Commission
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 1,264,603 0 0 0
Total Voted 1,264,603 0 0 0
Total Statutory 23,324 0 0 0
Total Budgetary 1,287,927 0 0 0

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

Not applicable

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 65. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Canadian Polar Commission
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Increased Canadian polar knowledge.
Research Facilitation and Communication 1,186,672 0 0
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 101,255 0 0
Total 1,287,927 0 0

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

Raison d’être

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) is an administrative tribunal that regulates and supervises Canadian broadcasting, and telecommunications in the public interest, as well as contributes to protecting Canadians from unsolicited communications.

The CRTC reports to Parliament through the Minister of Canadian Heritage.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 31. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 4.58 5.07 5.04
Total Statutory 6.42 7.05 6.45
Table 66. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 4,582,800 5,072,595 5,072,595 5,040,595
Total Voted 4,582,800 5,072,595 5,072,595 5,040,595
Total Statutory 6,415,617 7,051,100 7,051,100 6,445,602
Total Budgetary 10,998,417 12,123,695 12,123,695 11,486,197

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) is estimating net budgetary expenditures of $11.5 million in 2017–18. Of this amount, $5 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $6.5 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

This is a decrease of $0.6 million when compared to the 2016–17 Main Estimates. This difference is attributable to a decrease in statutory budget expenditures related to employee benefits plans.

Once tabled in the House of Commons, additional information will be available in the Departmental Plan.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 67. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Canadians have access to a world-class communication system.
Protection within the Communication System 4,730,514 5,152,005 5,038,233
Connection to the Communication System 2,163,097 2,542,213 2,327,711
Canadian Content Creation 1,148,085 1,986,234 1,822,198
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 2,956,721 2,443,243 2,298,055
Total 10,998,417 12,123,695 11,486,197

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Canadian Security Intelligence Service

Raison d’être

As per the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) Act, the mandate of CSIS is to collect, analyze and retain information and intelligence on activities suspected of constituting threats to the security of Canada, and to report to and advise the government. CSIS is responsible for the collection of national security intelligence inside and outside Canada; the collection of foreign intelligence within Canada; and for security screening assessments for federal government employees, refugees, immigration and citizenship applicants, and some other sectors such as the Canadian nuclear industry.

The Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness is responsible for CSIS.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 32. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Security Intelligence Service (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 489.57 537.81 526.62
Total Statutory 47.00 53.99 50.48
Table 68. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Security Intelligence Service
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 489,566,324 518,483,607 537,807,157 526,615,028
Total Voted 489,566,324 518,483,607 537,807,157 526,615,028
Total Statutory 46,997,524 53,585,459 53,993,793 50,477,031
Total Budgetary 536,563,848 572,069,066 591,800,950 577,092,059

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

The Main Estimates for the department are $577.1 million, which represents a $5 million increase over the previous year.

The major changes are as follows:

  • An increase of $8.6 million in support of Canada’s national security and the safety of Canadians; and
  • A decrease of $3.6 million due to a Budget 2016 government-wide initiative.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 69. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Canadian Security Intelligence Service
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Intelligence is used to protect the security and safety of Canada and its citizens.
Intelligence Program 495,644,733 524,459,826 528,939,177
Security Screening Program 40,919,115 47,609,240 48,152,882
Total 536,563,848 572,069,066 577,092,059

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Canadian Space Agency

Raison d’être

The mandate of the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) is “to promote the peaceful use and development of space, to advance the knowledge of space through science and to ensure that space science and technology provide social and economic benefits for Canadians”.

The CSA is delivering on its mandate in collaboration with Canadian industry, academia, Government of Canada organizations, and other international space agencies or organizations.

The founding legislation that received Royal Assent in 1990 attributed four main functions to the CSA:

  • Assist the Minister to coordinate the space policies and programs of the Government of Canada;
  • Plan, direct, manage and implement programs and projects relating to scientific or industrial space research and development, and the application of space technology;
  • Promote the transfer and diffusion of space technology to and throughout Canadian industry; and
  • Encourage commercial exploitation of space capabilities, technology, facilities and systems.

The Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 33. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Space Agency (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 404.15 432.36 344.65
Total Statutory 8.65 10.04 9.16
Table 70. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Space Agency
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 180,370,115 184,497,707 184,497,707 161,268,874
5 Capital expenditures 179,207,386 192,112,456 191,918,956 122,419,635
10 Grants and contributions 44,567,709 45,748,000 55,941,501 60,966,000
Total Voted 404,145,210 422,358,163 432,358,164 344,654,509
Total Statutory 8,653,848 10,036,658 10,036,658 9,155,402
Total Budgetary 412,799,058 432,394,821 442,394,822 353,809,911

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

The Canadian Space Agency (CSA) is estimating budgetary expenditures of $353.8 million in 2017-18. Of this amount, $344.6 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $9.2 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

Main Estimates planned budgetary expenditures were $432.4 million in 2016–17 representing a net decrease of $78.6 million between fiscal years 2016–17 and 2017–18. This corresponds to a decrease in Operating expenditures of $23.2 million, a decrease in Capital expenditures of $69.7 million and an increase in Grants and Contributions of $15.2 million. These fluctuations are mainly due to the fact that CSA’s projects and missions funding profile vary from year to year and require funding from different Votes depending on their development phases. As a result, pre and post-project expenditures are Operating expenditures whereas the design and build phases call for Capital expenditures. In addition, the science support associated with some projects may necessitate funds either in Operating expenditures or in Grants and Contributions.

The variation between fiscal years 2016–17 and 2017–18 is composed of:

  • An increase of $10.3 million for activities related to the space station. The current year-over-year increase reflects different cash flow requirements;
  • An increase of $10.0 million from the 2015 Budget for the Contribution Program under the Canada-European Space Agency Cooperation Agreement for the Advanced Research in Telecommunications Systems (ARTES) program. (Budget 2015 provides the CSA with $30 million over four years, from 2016–17 to 2019–20);
  • An increase of $7.5 million for items in Budget 2016 related to safety increase at John H. Chapman Space Centre as well as the purchase and installation of absorber material for the David Florida Laboratory (DFL) Bay 2 Anechoic Chamber;
  • A net increase of $0.9 million due to additional funding received for the Canadian Space Agency’s David Florida Laboratory infrastructure and corresponding equipment to maintain its space capabilities and improve compliance with applicable building codes and standards;
  • A $90.7 million decrease related to the RADARSAT Constellation Mission (RCM). The current year-over-year decrease is due to different requirements in cash flow, of which $55.5 million is due to the effect of cumulative amounts carried forward and $35.2 million is due to the funding profile requested at the time of the implementation phase approval by Treasury Board;
  • A decrease of $9.5 million due to funding received in 2016–17 for the provision of value-added satellite reports/images for humanitarian needs;
  • A decrease of $4.8 million due to additional funding received in 2016–17 for the Maritime Monitoring and Messaging Micro-Satellite (M3MSat) project; and
  • A decrease of $1.4 million related to Budget 2016 reduction on professional services, travel and advertising.

Once tabled in the House of Commons, additional information will be available in the Department Plan of the Canadian Space Agency at the following address: http://asc-csa.gc.ca/eng/publications/rp.asp.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 71. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Canadian Space Agency
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Canada’s exploration of space, provision of space services and development of its space capacity meet the nation’s needs for scientific knowledge, innovation and information.
Space Data, Information and Services 209,187,061 215,085,716 115,240,643
Space Exploration 96,419,798 99,437,817 96,455,420
Future Canadian Space Capacity 61,804,033 66,094,200 87,170,086
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 45,388,166 51,777,088 54,943,762
Total 412,799,058 432,394,821 353,809,911

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments

Table 72. Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments - Canadian Space Agency
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Grants
Class Grant Program to Support Research, Awareness and Learning in Space Science and Technology 6,263,510 8,860,000 11,317,000
Contributions
Contributions to the Canada/European Space Agency Cooperation Agreement 27,802,596 27,031,000 36,648,000
Class Contribution Program to Support Research, Awareness and Learning in Space Science and Technology 10,501,603 9,857,000 13,001,000

Canadian Tourism Commission

Raison d’être

The Canadian Tourism Commission operating as Destination Canada (DC), is Canada’s national tourism marketing organization. A Crown corporation wholly owned by the Government of Canada, DC’s purpose is to sustain a vibrant and profitable tourism industry by marketing Canada as an internationally competitive, premier four-season tourism destination where travelers can indulge in extraordinary experiences. Reporting to Parliament through the Minister of Industry, DC’s legislative requirements are outlined in the Canadian Tourism Commission Act. Through collaboration and partnerships with the private sector, as well as with the governments of Canada, the provinces and territories, DC works with the tourism sector to maintain Canada’s competitiveness and generate wealth for Canadians by stimulating demand for Canada’s visitor economy. Additional information can be found in DC’s 2016–20 Corporate Plan.

The Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 34. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Tourism Commission (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 62.98 95.48 95.48
Table 73. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Tourism Commission
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Commission 62,975,770 70,475,770 95,475,770 95,475,770
Total Voted 62,975,770 70,475,770 95,475,770 95,475,770
Total Budgetary 62,975,770 70,475,770 95,475,770 95,475,770

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

DC was created in 1995, as a Special Operating Agency within Industry Canada, and in 2001, became a Crown corporation pursuant to the Canadian Tourism Commission Act.

Starting in 2013–14, DC’s core appropriations (i.e. excluding one-time funding for special programs) have been $58.0 million. In 2015–16, DC was awarded an additional $30.0 million in special program funding relating to the Connecting America marketing initiative spread out over three years: $5.0 million for 2015–16, $12.5 million for 2016–17 and $12.5 million for 2017-18.

Through Budget 2016, DC received additional one-time funding to market Canada as a premier tourism destination. Starting in 2016, the two-year, $50.0 million Government of Canada investment for international tourism marketing is being used to augment existing leisure marketing initiatives in our important markets, such as the US and China.

DC’s activities are aligned to focus resources on markets of strategic importance to Canada’s tourism industry.

DC’s 2016–20 Corporate Plan identifies its goal to support the industry as it grows the number of arrivals to 20 million international visitors per year with tourism export revenue of $20 billion.

DC’s objectives are to:

  • Increase demand for Canada with innovative marketing;
  • Advance the commercial competitiveness of the tourism sector; and
  • Increase corporate efficiency and effectiveness.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 74. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Canadian Tourism Commission
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Canadian economy benefits from strong tourism demand from Canadian Tourism Commission’s (CTC) markets.
Marketing and Sales 0 60,680,457 84,443,025
Tourism Research and Communications 0 2,238,243 1,961,000
Experiential Product Development 0 952,008 952,008
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 0 6,605,062 8,119,737
Funds not allocated to the 2017–18 Program Alignment Architecture 62,975,770 0 0
Total 62,975,770 70,475,770 95,475,770

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board

Raison d’être

The Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board is referred to as the Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) in its day-to-day activities. The TSB is an independent agency created in 1990 by an Act of Parliament. It operates at arm’s length from other government departments and agencies to ensure that there are no real or perceived conflicts of interest. The TSB’s sole objective is to advance air, marine, rail and pipeline transportation safety. This mandate is fulfilled by conducting independent investigations into selected transportation occurrences to identify the causes and contributing factors, and the safety deficiencies evidenced by these occurrences.

The TSB makes recommendations to reduce or eliminate any such safety deficiencies and reports publicly on its investigations. The TSB then follows up with stakeholders to ensure that safety actions are taken to reduce risks and improve safety.

The TSB may also represent Canadian interests in foreign investigations of transportation accidents involving Canadian registered, licensed or manufactured aircraft, ships or railway rolling stock. In addition, the TSB carries out some of Canada’s obligations related to transportation safety at the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) and the International Maritime Organization (IMO).

The TSB is part of the Privy Council portfolio of departments and agencies. The Minister of Democratic Institutions and President of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada is responsible for tabling the TSB’s administrative reports in Parliament. Additional information can be found on the TSB’s departmental website.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 35. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 26.57 26.27 26.20
Total Statutory 3.46 3.52 3.21
Table 75. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 26,574,772 26,267,261 26,267,261 26,202,261
Total Voted 26,574,772 26,267,261 26,267,261 26,202,261
Total Statutory 3,457,718 3,521,391 3,521,391 3,214,293
Total Budgetary 30,032,490 29,788,652 29,788,652 29,416,554

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

The TSB is estimating budgetary expenditures of $29.4 million in 2017–18. Of this amount, $26.2 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $3.2 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes. The organization’s funding through Main Estimates has decreased from 2016–17 by $0.4 million due mainly to a decrease in the Employee Benefit Plan percentage as determined by Treasury Board Secretariat as part of the Annual Reference Level Update.

In 2017–18, the TSB will continue to strive to be a modern world-class organization that evolves and adapts as it strives to influence changes that advance transportation safety. This vision statement will be achieved by focusing on the strategic objectives of serving, improving, modernizing and updating, as outlined in the TSB’s five-year Strategic Plan. Further details regarding plans and priorities can be found in the TSB’s Departmental Plan and Strategic Plan.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 76. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
This organization has implemented the Policy on Results, therefore reporting in the Estimates by Core Responsibility.
Independent safety investigations and communication of risks in the transportation system 0 0 23,827,409
To support all responsibilities of the organization.
Internal Services 0 0 5,589,145
Funds not allocated to the 2017–18 Program Alignment Architecture 30,032,490 29,788,652 0
Total 30,032,490 29,788,652 29,416,554

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Canadian Transportation Agency

Raison d’être

The Canadian Transportation Agency (the Agency) is an independent, quasi-judicial tribunal and regulator with the powers of a superior court. The Agency is an arm’s length organization that reports to Parliament through the Minister of Transport.

The Agency has three mandates:

  • The Agency helps ensure that the national transportation system runs efficiently and smoothly in the economic and social interests of all Canadians; including those who work and invest in it; the producers, shippers, travellers and businesses who rely on it; and the communities where it operates.
  • The Agency protects the human right of persons with disabilities to an accessible transportation network.
  • The Agency provides consumer protection for air passengers.

To help advance these mandates, the Agency has three tools at its disposal:

  • Rule-making: The Agency develops and applies ground rules that establish the rights and responsibilities of transportation service providers and users and that level the playing field among competitors. These rules can take the form of binding regulations or less formal guidelines, codes of practice or interpretation notes.
  • Dispute resolution: The Agency resolves disputes that arise between transportation providers on the one hand, and their clients and neighbours on the other, using a range of tools from facilitation and mediation to arbitration and adjudication.
  • Information provision: The Agency provides information on the transportation system, the rights and responsibilities of transportation providers and users, and its legislation and services.

More information on the Agency’s role, mission and mandate is available on the Agency website.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 36. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Transportation Agency (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 25.02 24.29 27.71
Total Statutory 3.23 3.50 3.20
Table 77. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Transportation Agency
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 25,022,975 24,290,330 24,290,330 27,714,765
Total Voted 25,022,975 24,290,330 24,290,330 27,714,765
Total Statutory 3,231,257 3,501,757 3,501,757 3,199,401
Total Budgetary 28,254,232 27,792,087 27,792,087 30,914,166

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

The Canadian Transportation Agency (the Agency) is estimating budgetary expenditures of $30.9 million in 2017–2018. Of this amount, $27.7 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $3.2 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes. Compared to 2016–17, the Main Estimates for 2017–18 have increased as a result of an amount that has been approved via a reverse reprofile requested by the Agency and will be used to pay for the costs related to

The Government of Canada Workplace 2.0 Fit-up Standards. This amount is reflected under the Agency’s Internal Services Program and will be reimbursed over a period of 15 years starting in 2018–19;

Looking forward, the Agency has established its strategic priorities for the 2017–20 period:

A modern framework: Legislation and regulations that reflect current and emerging business models, travellers’ and shippers’ needs, and best practices in the adjudicative and regulatory fields.

Excellence in service delivery: Timely, fair, and effective services in the areas of regulatory determination, dispute resolution, and compliance monitoring and enforcement, based on the letter and purpose of the legislation and regulations, relevant jurisprudence, and the evidence.

Stakeholder and public awareness: Clear, relevant information for stakeholders and the general public on the national transportation system, the rights and responsibilities of transportation providers and users, and Agency services.

A healthy, high-performing organization: An organization that is independent, expert, impartial, engaged, agile and innovative.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 78. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Canadian Transportation Agency
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Transparent, fair and timely dispute resolution and economic regulation of the national transportation system.
Economic Regulation 11,099,602 11,315,866 11,532,859
Adjudication and Alternative Dispute Resolution 10,334,836 9,253,556 8,703,153
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 6,819,794 7,222,665 10,678,154
Total 28,254,232 27,792,087 30,914,166

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Raison d’être

The Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (the Commission) is an independent agency created by Parliament and is not part of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP). The Commission’s fundamental role is to provide civilian review of the conduct of the RCMP members in carrying out their policing duties, thereby holding the RCMP accountable to the public. The Commission ensures that complaints about the conduct of RCMP members are examined fairly and impartially. Its findings and recommendations help identify and remedy policing problems which stem from the conduct of individual RCMP members or from deficiencies in RCMP policies or practices. The Commission also conducts reviews of specified RCMP activities, reports to provinces which contract RCMP services, conducts research, program outreach and public education, and provides independent observers to investigations of serious incidents involving RCMP members.

The Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 37. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 8.74 9.03 9.02
Total Statutory 0.98 1.00 0.92
Table 79. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 8,736,312 9,025,809 9,025,809 9,020,809
Total Voted 8,736,312 9,025,809 9,025,809 9,020,809
Total Statutory 981,751 1,002,508 1,002,508 915,080
Total Budgetary 9,718,063 10,028,317 10,028,317 9,935,889

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

The Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police is estimating budgetary expenditures of $9.9 million in 2017–18. Of this amount, $9 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $0.9 million represents statutory authorities that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

Planned expenditures decrease by $0.1 million from 2016–17 to 2017–18 mainly attributable to decreases related to contributions to employee benefit plans statutory authorities.

In 2017–18, the Commission will continue to identify and address the policing issues of daily concern to Canadians. The Commission will examine the conduct of RCMP members in relation to specific complaints and monitor wider trends and developments in RCMP policy and practices. The Commission will provide recommendations that enhance the accountability of the RCMP and contribute to the public’s trust and confidence in the RCMP and its members. The Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police has assumed its new responsibilities as outlined in the Enhancing Royal Canadian Mounted Police Accountability Act, which include conducting reviews of specified RCMP activities, providing enhanced reporting to provinces which contract for RCMP services and conducting research and outreach.

Additional information and details on the Commission’s priorities can be found in its 2017–18 Departmental Plan.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 80. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Public Confidence in the RCMP.
Civilian review of RCMP members’ conduct in the performance of their duties 6,529,281 6,317,800 7,333,382
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 3,188,782 3,710,517 2,602,507
Total 9,718,063 10,028,317 9,935,889

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Communications Security Establishment

Raison d’être

As mandated by the National Defence Act, the Communications Security Establishment’s (CSE) Signals Intelligence program provides foreign intelligence that addresses the Government of Canada’s vital interests in defence, security, and international affairs through the collection, processing, analysis and reporting of intelligence. The Signals Intelligence program also helps protect the electronic information and information infrastructures of importance to the Government of Canada, and provides technical and operational assistance to federal law enforcement and security agencies.

CSE’s Information Technology Security program provides advice, guidance, and services to help ensure the protection of electronic information and information systems of importance to the Government of Canada.

The Minister of National Defence is responsible for CSE.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 38. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Communications Security Establishment (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 580.52 562.06 560.51
Total Statutory 39.03 37.78 35.48
Table 81. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Communications Security Establishment
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 580,515,741 546,109,459 562,055,934 560,506,384
Total Voted 580,515,741 546,109,459 562,055,934 560,506,384
Total Statutory 39,032,317 37,515,359 37,777,826 35,477,339
Total Budgetary 619,548,058 583,624,818 599,833,760 595,983,723

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

The Communications Security Establishment is estimating budgetary expenditures of $596.0 million in 2017–18. Of this amount, $560.5 million requires approval of Parliament. The remaining $35.5 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

The Main Estimates for the department are $596.0 million, a net increase of $12.4 million. The major changes are as follows:

  • A decrease of $1.4 million related to Budget 2016 reductions to professional services, travel, and advertising;
  • A decrease of $3.5 million related to changes in the statutory forecasts;
  • A net increase of $3.6 million related to CSE’s accommodations mainly due to a transfer from Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC) in the last phase of CSE’s move to the new facility; and
  • A net increase of $13.7 million in support of CSE’s mandate.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 82. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Communications Security Establishment
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Foreign signals intelligence and technical security capabilities advance and protect Canada’s vital interests.
Signals Intelligence 438,406,622 420,929,869 429,828,281
Information Technology (IT) Security 181,141,436 162,694,949 166,155,442
Total 619,548,058 583,624,818 595,983,723

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Copyright Board

Raison d’être

The Copyright Board is an economic regulatory body empowered to establish, either mandatorily or at the request of an interested party, the royalties to be paid for the use of copyrighted works, when the administration of such copyright is entrusted to a collective-administration society. The Board also has the right to supervise agreements between users and licensing bodies and issues licences when the copyright owner cannot be located.

The Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 39. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Copyright Board (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 2.57 2.81 2.80
Total Statutory 0.26 0.30 0.27
Table 83. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Copyright Board
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 2,573,491 2,813,641 2,813,641 2,802,641
Total Voted 2,573,491 2,813,641 2,813,641 2,802,641
Total Statutory 255,214 298,083 298,083 272,088
Total Budgetary 2,828,705 3,111,724 3,111,724 3,074,729

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

The Copyright Board of Canada is estimating budgetary expenditures of $3.1 million in 2017–18. Of this amount, $2.8 million requires approval by Parliament and the remaining $272 thousand represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

The Copyright Board of Canada will continue to ensure balanced decision-making as incentive for the creation and use of copyrighted works. The Board will also examine possible avenues to improve existing practices and procedures, with the aim of streamlining them and reduce uncertainty, while safeguarding fairness of process.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 84. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Copyright Board
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Fair decision-making to provide proper incentives for the creation and use of copyrighted works.
Copyright Tariff Setting and Issuance of Licences 2,285,991 2,520,496 2,490,530
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 542,714 591,228 584,199
Total 2,828,705 3,111,724 3,074,729

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Correctional Service of Canada

Raison d’être

The Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness is responsible for the Correctional Service of Canada.

The purpose of the federal correctional system, as defined in law, is to contribute to the maintenance of a just, peaceful and safe society by carrying out sentences imposed by courts through the safe and humane custody and supervision of offenders; and by assisting the rehabilitation of offenders and their reintegration into the community as law-abiding citizens through the provision of programs in penitentiaries and in the community (Corrections and Conditional Release Act, s. 3).

The Correctional Service of Canada, as part of the criminal justice system and respecting the rule of law, contributes to public safety by actively encouraging and assisting offenders to become law-abiding citizens, while exercising reasonable, safe, secure and humane control.

Additional information can be found in the organization’s Departmental Plan.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 40. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Correctional Service of Canada (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 2,138.03 2,141.72 2,171.28
Total Statutory 219.75 251.35 229.42
Figure 41. organizational estimates - non-budgetary - correctional service of canada (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 0.00 0.00 0.00
Table 85. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Correctional Service of Canada
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures, grants and contributions 1,969,350,061 1,925,556,005 1,957,146,969 1,962,343,216
5 Capital expenditures 168,684,074 185,711,724 184,573,409 208,941,724
Total Voted 2,138,034,135 2,111,267,729 2,141,720,378 2,171,284,940
Total Statutory 219,750,510 251,324,350 251,346,890 229,424,223
Total Budgetary 2,357,784,645 2,362,592,079 2,393,067,268 2,400,709,163
Non-budgetary
Voted
Loans to individuals under mandatory supervision and parolees through the Parolees’ Loan Account 165 0 0 0
Total Voted 165 0 0 0
Total non-budgetary 165 0 0 0

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

The Correctional Service of Canada is estimating budgetary expenditures of $2,400.71 million in 2017–18. Of this amount, $2,171.29 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $229.42 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes. This represents a net increase of $38.12 million from 2016–17 Main Estimates.

The major changes are as follows:

  • An increase of $40.95 million related to funding received to cover expenditures due to changes in offender population volumes and price fluctuations;
  • An increase of $0.24 million related to Federal Infrastructure Initiative;
  • An increase of $0.43 million related to 2017–18 Funding of Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP – Phase III);
  • An increase of $27.50 million in capital investments mainly due to reprofiling of funds from previous years;
  • A decrease of $4.86 million related to the Budget 2016 reduction for professional services, travel, advertising;
  • A decrease of $4.27 million due to the cessation of funding for the Accelerated Infrastructure Program in 2017–18;
  • A decrease of $21.90 million related to the department’s allocation of the employer’s share of the employee benefit plan; and
  • An increase of $0.03 million for miscellaneous items.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 86. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Correctional Service of Canada
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
The custody, correctional interventions, and supervision of offenders in communities and in institutions, contribute to public safety.
Custody 1,519,751,744 1,512,168,537 1,528,166,844
Correctional Interventions 398,165,375 408,423,801 407,357,544
Community Supervision 141,891,344 137,257,516 157,830,355
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 297,976,182 304,742,225 307,354,420
Total 2,357,784,645 2,362,592,079 2,400,709,163

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Table 87. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Non-budgetary - Correctional Service of Canada
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
The custody, correctional interventions, and supervision of offenders in communities and in institutions, contribute to public safety.
Correctional Interventions 165 0 0
Total 165 0 0

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments

Table 88. Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments - Correctional Service of Canada
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Grants
Grant to the University of Saskatchewan for Forensic Research Centre 120,000 120,000 120,000

Courts Administration Service

Raison d’être

The Courts Administration Service (CAS) was established in 2003 with the coming into force of the Courts Administration Service Act. The role of CAS is to provide effective and efficient judicial, registry and corporate services to four superior courts of record – the Federal Court of Appeal, the Federal Court, the Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada and the Tax Court of Canada. The Act enhances judicial independence by placing administrative services at arm’s length from the Government of Canada and enhances accountability for the use of public money.

The Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 42. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Courts Administration Service (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 65.60 67.40 68.59
Total Statutory 6.70 7.18 6.66
Table 89. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Courts Administration Service
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 65,598,166 65,199,516 67,404,941 68,590,696
Total Voted 65,598,166 65,199,516 67,404,941 68,590,696
Total Statutory 6,696,504 7,152,127 7,182,509 6,657,003
Total Budgetary 72,294,670 72,351,643 74,587,450 75,247,699

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

The Courts Administration Service (CAS) is estimating budgetary expenditures of $75.25 million in 2017–18. Of this amount, $68.59 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $6.66 million represents the statutory funding forecast that does not require additional approval and is provided for information purposes.

The core programs of the CAS have remained relatively constant over the years. Nevertheless, CAS’ reference levels have been impacted by legislative changes affecting the workload of the federal courts as well as various government initiatives. The activities that have caused the majority of the variations in reference levels include:

  • Renewal of funding for Division 9 proceedings of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act aimed at addressing challenges in the management of security inadmissibility cases, protecting classified information in immigration proceedings, and obtaining diplomatic assurances of safety for inadmissible individuals facing a risk of torture;
  • Funding to remove the visa requirement for citizens of Mexico;
  • Budget 2015 funding for investment in physical security enhancements such as additional cameras, security personnel and screening tools that will help ensure the federal courts remain secure and function properly. In addition, it will enable IT security enhancements to further protect judicial and CAS information;
  • Budget 2016 funding to invest in information technology infrastructure upgrades to safeguard the efficiency of the federal court system; and
  • Budget 2016 funding to help relocate the Quebec City federal courts facility, thereby ensuring continued federal courts presence in Quebec City.

More details on important trends and variances can be found in the CAS 2017–18 Departmental Plan, as well as the Financial Statements Discussion and Analysis and the Quarterly Financial Reports.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 90. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Courts Administration Service
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
The public has timely and fair access to the litigation processes of the Federal Court of Appeal, the Federal Court, the Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada and the Tax Court of Canada.
Registry Services 23,639,751 24,278,931 27,475,819
Judicial Services 27,134,101 27,994,392 24,689,653
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 21,520,818 20,078,320 23,082,227
Total 72,294,670 72,351,643 75,247,699

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Department of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Raison d’être

The Department of Agriculture and Agri-Food (AAFC) was created in 1868 — one year after Confederation — because of the importance of agriculture to the economic, social and cultural development of Canada. Today, the Department helps create the conditions for the long-term profitability, sustainability and adaptability of the Canadian agricultural sector. AAFC supports the sector through initiatives that promote innovation and competitiveness, and that proactively manage risk. The Department’s goal is to position agriculture, agri-food and agri-based product industries to realize their full potential by seizing new opportunities in the growing domestic and global marketplace.

The Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 43. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Department of Agriculture and Agri-Food (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 978.12 1,347.68 945.90
Total Statutory 950.29 1,311.01 1,305.29
Table 91. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Department of Agriculture and Agri-Food
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 546,207,488 534,827,658 883,056,701 535,624,241
5 Capital expenditures 49,307,846 74,750,000 91,297,489 74,339,571
10 Grants and contributions 382,607,834 343,252,000 373,326,850 335,932,000
Total Voted 978,123,168 952,829,658 1,347,681,040 945,895,812
Total Statutory 950,286,424 1,310,903,598 1,311,005,263 1,305,287,886
Total Budgetary 1,928,409,592 2,263,733,256 2,658,686,303 2,251,183,698

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada is estimating budgetary expenditures of $2.25 billion in 2017-18. Of this amount, $945.9 million is voted funding which requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $1.3 billion represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information only.

Most of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s funding supports programs under Growing Forward 2, a five-year (2013-18) policy framework by federal, provincial and territorial governments for Canada’s agricultural and agri-food sector. Growing Forward 2 supports strategic investments that promote innovation, competitiveness and market development initiatives to help producers meet rising demand, both in Canada and internationally, while continuing to proactively manage risk. A significant portion of this $3 billion dollar investment is in the form of grants and contributions.

Compared to 2016-17, the Main Estimates have decreased by $12.5 million. Notable changes include:

  • A decrease of $6.0 million in contributions to employee benefits plans as a result of a change in the established rate for 2017-18;
  • A planned decrease of $4.6 million due to the sunsetting of the Churchill Port Utilization Program;
  • $4.5 million transfer to Western Economic Diversification in support of the Saskatchewan Canadian Cattlemen’s Association project under the Western Diversification Program;
  • A decrease of $3.9 million related to planned government wide spending reductions, as announced in Budget 2016;
  • A decrease of $1.7 million for the Federal Infrastructure Initiative;
  • An increase of $4.6 million to support genomics, digitization and data mobilization of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada biological collections, as announced in Budget 2016; and
  • An increase of $2.6 million to improve access to international markets for Agricultural products as announced in Budget 2015.

For additional information, please refer to Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s Departmental Plan.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 92. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Department of Agriculture and Agri-Food
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
A competitive and market-oriented agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk.
Business Risk Management 923,685,461 1,305,927,027 1,306,311,287
Market Access, Negotiations, Sector Competitiveness, and Assurance Systems 198,590,662 171,704,257 173,414,582
Farm Products Council of Canada 3,087,351 3,036,170 3,008,456
An innovative and sustainable agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector.
Science, Innovation, Adoption and Sustainability 600,370,331 560,789,990 563,745,548
Industry Capacity 50,436,622 73,027,026 61,514,447
Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency (962,575) 0 0
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 153,201,740 149,248,786 143,189,378
Total 1,928,409,592 2,263,733,256 2,251,183,698

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments

Table 93. Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments - Department of Agriculture and Agri-Food
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Grants
Grants to foreign recipients for participation in international organizations supporting agriculture 847,849 883,000 1,883,000
Grant payments for the AgriRisk Initiatives program 100,000 100,000 100,000
Total Statutory 140,911,335 167,300,000 167,300,000
Contributions
Contributions for Cost-Shared Strategic Initiatives programming in Innovation under Growing Forward 2 110,033,641 100,179,252 100,179,252
Contributions for Cost-Shared Strategic Initiatives programming in Competitiveness and Market Development under Growing Forward 2 78,772,226 60,869,892 60,869,892
Contribution payments for the AgriInnovation program under Growing Forward 2 62,908,011 60,455,000 60,455,000
Contributions for Cost-Shared Strategic Initiatives programming in Adaptability and Industry Capacity under Growing Forward 2 28,955,199 44,830,856 44,830,856
Contribution payments for the AgriMarketing program under Growing Forward 2 28,867,797 35,500,000 35,500,000
Contributions for the AgriRisk Initiatives program 5,270,710 16,400,000 17,150,000
Contributions to support the Canadian Agricultural Adaptation program 2,667,292 10,061,000 5,591,000
Contributions in support of the Agricultural Greenhouse Gases program 3,008,614 5,382,000 5,382,000
Contribution payments for the AgriCompetitiveness program under Growing Forward 2 2,858,375 3,127,000 3,127,000
Contributions under the Career Focus program – Youth Employment Strategy 800,921 864,000 864,000
Total Statutory 746,388,995 1,075,124,348 1,075,124,348

Department of Canadian Heritage

Raison d’être

The Minister of Canadian Heritage is responsible for this organization.

The Department of Canadian Heritage and Canada’s major national cultural institutions play a vital role in the cultural, civic and economic life of Canadians. We work together to support culture, arts, heritage, official languages, community participation, as well as initiatives tied to Indigenous languages and cultures, youth, and sport.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 44. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Department of Canadian Heritage (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 1,216.05 1,411.89 1,418.88
Total Statutory 24.90 26.87 25.82
Table 94. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Department of Canadian Heritage
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 178,864,610 183,944,057 206,922,600 208,821,920
5 Grants and contributions 1,037,186,919 1,084,961,970 1,204,970,171 1,210,058,005
Total Voted 1,216,051,529 1,268,906,027 1,411,892,771 1,418,879,925
Total Statutory 24,895,795 25,599,451 26,873,045 25,816,845
Total Budgetary 1,240,947,324 1,294,505,478 1,438,765,816 1,444,696,770

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

The Department of Canadian Heritage is estimating budgetary expenditures of $1.44 billion in 2017–18. Of this amount, $1.41 billion requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $25.8 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and that are provided for information purposes. This is an increase of $150.2 million when compared with the 2016–17 Main Estimates.

The overall increase is explained by an increase of $24.9 million in Vote 1 (Operating Expenditures), $125.1 million in Vote 5 (Grants and Contributions) and $0.2 million in statutory forecasts.

The increase of $24.9 million in Vote 1 is mainly due mainly to:

  • An increase of $10.5 million for the Grants and Contributions Modernization Initiative (including repairs to the roof of the Canadian Conservation Institute (CCI));
  • An increase of $6.3 million for the celebrations of the 150th anniversary of Confederation, including a reprofile of $0.5 million;
  • An increase of $4.8 million for the transfer of funds and responsibilities for the Multiculturalism Program;
  • An increase of $2.4 million to support the promotion of Canadian artists and cultural industries on the world stage;
  • An increase of $1.3 million for social infrastructure – Canada Cultural Spaces Fund; and
  • A decrease of $0.9 million for the Budget 2016 reductions.

The increase of $125.1 million in Vote 5 is mainly due to:

  • An increase of $82.8 million for Social Infrastructure – Canada Cultural Spaces Fund;
  • An increase of $17.6 million to preserve Indigenous languages in the Northwest Territories, Yukon and Nunavut;
  • An increase of $8.6 million for the transfer of funds and responsibilities for the Multiculturalism Program;
  • An increase of $6.4 million to support the celebrations of Montreal’s 375th anniversary;
  • An increase of $5.0 million for the Harbourfront Centre Funding Program;
  • An increase of $2.6 million to support the promotion of Canadian artists and cultural industries on the world stage; and
  • An increase of $1.9 million to support the Court Challenges Program.

For further details regarding Canadian Heritage, its operations and its use of funds, please refer to the 2017–18 Departmental Plan.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 95. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Department of Canadian Heritage
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Canadians share, express and appreciate their Canadian identity.
Official Languages 358,867,075 353,724,557 363,467,127
Attachment to Canada 96,962,680 150,174,516 159,884,857
Engagement and Community Participation 45,728,308 60,446,783 92,288,905
Multiculturalism 3,684,723 0 0
Canadian artistic expressions and cultural contentare created and accessible at home and abroad.
Cultural Industries 298,962,377 302,463,015 307,637,660
Arts 110,935,368 116,651,447 206,997,272
Heritage 28,745,475 32,530,362 33,412,967
Canadians participate and excel in sport.
Sport 219,676,973 206,246,850 206,380,884
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 77,384,345 72,267,948 74,627,098
Total 1,240,947,324 1,294,505,478 1,444,696,770

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments

Table 96. Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments - Department of Canadian Heritage
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Grants
Grants to the Canada Periodical Fund 69,803,639 72,775,054 72,775,054
Grants in support of the Celebration and Commemoration Program 7,910,072 47,520,000 44,480,000
Grants in support of the Development of Official-Language Communities Program 6,556,111 33,322,973 33,322,973
Grants to the Athlete Assistance Program 27,680,000 28,000,000 28,000,000
Grants to the Canada Cultural Investment Fund 17,729,525 20,000,000 20,000,000
Grants to the Canada Arts Presentation Fund 9,516,354 13,500,000 16,500,000
Grants in support of the Building Communities through Arts and Heritage Program 8,387,986 14,355,000 14,355,000
Grants to the Canada Book Fund 1,686,995 8,300,000 8,300,000
Grant to TV5 Monde 7,922,730 8,000,000 8,000,000
Grants to the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund 2,371,893 5,000,000 7,000,000
Grants in support of the Enhancement of Official Languages Program 676,060 5,599,842 5,599,842
Grants under the Museums Assistance Program 2,565,649 4,663,680 4,663,680
Grants in support of the Multiculturalism Program 653,971 0 3,000,000
Grants to the Canada Music Fund 0 2,000,000 2,000,000
Grants in support of the Canada History Fund 1,000 1,150,060 1,150,060
Grants to the Lieutenant-Governors of the provinces of Canada toward defraying the costs incurred in the exercise of their duties:
Quebec 147,372 147,372 147,372
Ontario 105,627 105,627 105,627
British Columbia 97,814 97,814 97,814
Newfoundland and Labrador 77,590 77,590 77,590
Alberta 75,940 75,940 75,940
Manitoba 73,762 73,762 73,762
Saskatchewan 73,758 73,758 73,758
Nova Scotia 64,199 64,199 64,199
New Brunswick 62,947 62,947 62,947
Prince Edward Island 57,071 57,071 57,071
Grants in support of Innovative Youth Exchange Projects 20,000 100,000 100,000
Grants to support the Youth Take Charge Program 0 100,000 100,000
Total Statutory 1,163,827 819,000 819,000
Contributions
Contributions in support of the Development of Official-Language Communities Program 217,629,716 192,349,017 201,849,017
Contributions for the Sport Support Program 148,895,558 146,315,064 146,615,064
Contributions to support the Canada Media Fund 134,149,077 134,146,077 134,146,077
Contributions in support of the Enhancement of Official Languages Program 117,791,291 105,923,289 105,923,289
Contributions to the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund 21,813,455 20,358,613 101,158,613
Contributions in support of the Celebration and Commemoration Program 27,918,034 52,703,767 62,370,962
Contributions to the Canada Book Fund 34,865,958 28,366,301 28,866,301
Contributions to the Canada Music Fund 23,684,854 22,299,231 24,374,231
Contributions to the Canada Arts Training Fund 22,719,000 22,779,440 22,779,440
Contributions for the Hosting Program 30,549,231 19,865,000 19,865,000
Contributions to support the Aboriginal Peoples’ Program 15,561,315 11,514,078 19,156,935
Contributions in support of the Exchanges Canada Initiative 17,882,378 17,686,359 17,686,359
Contributions to the Canada Arts Presentation Fund 23,373,182 18,477,742 15,477,742
Contributions under the Museums Assistance Program 12,165,510 11,076,284 11,076,284
Contributions in support of the Multiculturalism Program 1,917,127 0 5,521,316
Contribution to the Harbourfront Centre 0 0 5,000,000
Contributions in support of the Building Communities through Arts and Heritage Program 8,287,687 3,300,000 3,300,000
Contributions in support of the Court Challenges Program 284,576 1,406,017 3,291,234
Contributions in support of the Canada History Fund 4,202,342 2,887,330 3,087,330
Contributions to TV5 2,745,200 2,960,900 2,960,900
Contributions to the Canada Periodical Fund 3,208,165 1,999,544 1,999,544
Contributions to the Canada Cultural Investment Fund 1,195,605 1,972,205 1,972,205
Contributions to support the Youth Take Charge Program 1,659,410 1,353,023 1,353,023
Contributions to the Task Force for International Cooperation on Holocaust Education, Remembrance, and Research 44,250 0 44,450

Department of Citizenship and Immigration

Raison d’être

It is often said that Canada is a country of immigrants. And the numbers bear this out: 15 million immigrants have arrived since Confederation (over 6 million new immigrants since 1990); 1 in 5 Canadians were born outside Canada; 86% of eligible immigrants have obtained Canadian citizenship; and Canada is home to over 200 ethnic communities.

Managing the selection and settlement of newcomers – providing them pathways to citizenship – has shaped a nation, rich in diversity and brimming with the skills and innovative energy that have contributed to Canadian society and the economy generation after generation.

Looking forward, managing migration to Canada stands to be equally fundamental to Canada’s future social cohesion and prosperity. Demographic trends and labour force projections attest to the central role immigration will play in fuelling economic growth in a world of increased mobility and interdependence. As a welcoming society, with a successful track record of managing pathways to citizenship, Canada is well-positioned to:

  • Attract global talent;
  • Reunite families;
  • Respond to crises and offer protection;
  • Facilitate travel, study, and temporary work;
  • Maintain world-leading rates of naturalization; and
  • Offer service excellence to clients.

The Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship is responsible for this organization.

Note: Until the establishing legislation is amended, the legal name of the department for the purposes of Appropriation Acts remains Department of Citizenship and Immigration.

Additional information can be found in the Departmental Plan at: http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/resources/publications/rpp/index.asp.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 45. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Department of Citizenship and Immigration (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 1,709.73 2,007.14 1,739.22
Total Statutory -173.23 -113.98 -92.26
Figure 46. organizational estimates - non-budgetary - department of citizenship and immigration (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Total Statutory 3.72 0.00 0.00
Table 97. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Department of Citizenship and Immigration
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 619,503,316 604,119,156 679,139,112 545,294,901
5 Capital expenditures 6,776,691 13,706,741 24,875,413 23,756,038
10 Grants and contributions 1,083,445,380 1,152,355,205 1,301,132,271 1,170,171,545
Debt write-off – immigration loans 0 0 1,991,528 0
Total Voted 1,709,725,387 1,770,181,102 2,007,138,324 1,739,222,484
Total Statutory (173,228,121) (119,348,875) (113,975,926) (92,262,896)
Total Budgetary 1,536,497,266 1,650,832,227 1,893,162,398 1,646,959,588
Non-budgetary
Total Statutory 3,721,648 0 0 0
Total non-budgetary 3,721,648 0 0 0

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada’s budgetary Main Estimates for 2017–18 is $1,647.0 million, which represents a net decrease of $3.9 million from the previous year.

Of this amount, $1,739.2 million requires approval from Parliament. The remaining negative $92.3 million represents statutory forecasts (mostly made of Employee Benefit Plans combined with the surplus from Passport program) that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes only.

Items contributing to the year-over-year decrease of $3.9 million are as follows:

  • An increase of $33.3 million to resettle 10,000 additional government-assisted refugees in 2016;
  • An increase of $33.2 million due to statutory adjustments related to the Passport Canada revolving fund;
  • An increase of $33.2 million to the grant for the Canada-Quebec Accord on immigration;
  • An increase of $18.1 million to reduce application processing times and achieve higher admission levels for permanent residents;
  • An increase of $15.4 million to continue the expansion of biometric screening in Canada’s immigration system;
  • An increase of $4.1 million related to the removal of visa requirement for Mexico;
  • A decrease of $80.1 million related to the resettlement of 25,000 Syrian refugees resulting from funding realignment to next years to continue the resettlement of these refugees;
  • A decrease of $29.3 million resulting from the sunsetting of funds related to the implementation and administration of the reforms related to the Temporary Foreign Worker program and the International Mobility program;
  • A decrease of $14.2 million to transfer the budget to Canadian Heritage as a result of the transfer of the responsibilities of the Multiculturalism Program; and
  • A decrease of $8.7 million related to the main components of the Electronic Travel Authorization initiative as its implementation is completed and is now on a steady state.

Further information can be found in the Departmental Plan at: http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/resources/publications/rpp/index.asp.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 98. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Department of Citizenship and Immigration
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Newcomers and citizens participate in fostering an integrated society.
Newcomer Settlement and Integration 1,107,030,857 1,174,026,452 1,201,496,174
Citizenship for Newcomers and All Canadians 77,993,946 62,018,218 61,730,209
Migration of permanent and temporary residents that strengthens Canada’s economy.
Permanent Economic Residents 58,368,375 44,243,952 41,914,494
Temporary Economic Residents 29,371,737 53,069,957 24,549,632
Family and humanitarian migration that reunites families and offers protection to the displaced and persecuted.
Family and Discretionary Immigration 33,620,196 36,932,907 34,139,406
Refugee Protection 104,261,333 28,013,358 31,211,048
Managed migration and facilitated travel that promote Canadian interests and protect the health, safety and security of Canadians.
Migration Control and Security Management 108,005,276 154,340,892 130,472,436
Health Protection 41,760,082 75,135,278 63,786,532
Canadian Influence in International Migration and Integration Agenda 6,480,611 5,908,956 6,113,693
Passport (252,405,048) (184,207,868) (151,037,689)
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 217,846,347 189,249,864 202,583,653
Funds not allocated to the 2017–18 Program Alignment Architecture 4,163,554 12,100,261 0
Total 1,536,497,266 1,650,832,227 1,646,959,588

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Table 99. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Non-budgetary - Department of Citizenship and Immigration
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Newcomers and citizens participate in fostering an integrated society.
Newcomer Settlement and Integration 3,721,648 0 0
Total 3,721,648 0 0

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments

Table 100. Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments - Department of Citizenship and Immigration
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Grants
Grant for the Canada-Quebec Accord on Immigration 345,059,000 345,059,000 378,213,000
Grant for Migration Policy Development 348,114 350,000 350,000
Contributions
Settlement Program 578,437,254 631,057,002 701,528,602
Resettlement Assistance 154,790,378 162,869,437 85,625,943
Global Assistance to Irregular Migrants 670,000 3,000,000 3,000,000
International Organization for Migration 2,002,843 1,454,000 1,454,000

Department of Employment and Social Development

Raison d’être

The‎ Minister of Families, Children and Social Development, the Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour, and the Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities‎ are responsible for this organization.

The mission of Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC), including the Labour Program and Service Canada, is to build a stronger and more competitive Canada, to support Canadians in making choices that help them live productive and rewarding lives, and to improve Canadians’ quality of life.

ESDC delivers a range of programs and services that affect Canadians throughout their lives. The Department provides seniors with basic income security, supports unemployed workers, helps students finance their post-secondary education and assists parents who are raising young children. The Labour Program is responsible for labour laws and policies in federally regulated workplaces. Service Canada helps citizens access ESDC’s programs, as well as other Government of Canada programs and services. Additional information can be found in the organization’s Departmental Plan.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 47. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Department of Employment and Social Development (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 2,360.50 2,849.89 2,423.34
Total Statutory 57,237.53 53,819.91 54,999.51
Figure 48. organizational estimates - non-budgetary - department of employment and social development (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Total Statutory 817.15 549.15 358.76
Table 101. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Department of Employment and Social Development
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 628,710,808 607,999,524 647,951,504 576,846,158
5 Grants and contributions 1,559,677,506 1,692,443,880 2,023,568,756 1,846,494,791
Debt write-off – Government Annuities Account 62,290 0 0 0
Debt write-off – Canada Student Loans 172,045,002 0 178,370,098 0
Total Voted 2,360,495,606 2,300,443,404 2,849,890,358 2,423,340,949
Total Statutory 57,237,532,414 59,337,438,404 53,819,910,504 54,999,514,666
Total Budgetary 59,598,028,020 61,637,881,808 56,669,800,862 57,422,855,615
Non-budgetary
Total Statutory 817,148,156 979,969,792 549,150,322 358,762,888
Total non-budgetary 817,148,156 979,969,792 549,150,322 358,762,888

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

ESDC is planning budgetary expenditures on programs and services totaling $57.4 billion in 2017–18. More than 96% of planned budgetary expenditures will directly benefit Canadians through the Old Age Security Program and other statutory transfer payment programs.

Of the total amount of planned expenditures, $2.4 billion requires approval from Parliament. The remaining $55.0 billion represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

The 2017–18 planned expenditures represent a decrease of $2.2 billion, or approximately 4%, when compared to the 2015–16 actual budgetary expenditures of $59.6 billion. The decrease is partly explained by a decrease in Universal Child Care Benefit, replaced by the new Canada Child Benefit. The decrease is offset by an increase to Old Age Security Pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement payments resulting from the aging population and the planned increase in the average monthly benefit amount.

When compared to the 2016–17 budgetary Main Estimates of $61.6 billion, the 2017–18 planned expenditures represent a decrease of $4.2 billion, primarily associated with statutory items. In particular, Universal Child Care Benefit represents a decrease of $7.7 billion. This significant decrease is offset by increases to the following items:

  • An increase of $2.8 billion to Old Age Security Pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement payments explained by changes in the average monthly rate and in the number of beneficiaries;
  • An increase of $461.5 million to the Canada Student Loans and Grants for Students and Apprentices Program, mostly explained by an increase to Canada Student Grants as a result of Budget 2016 measures to make post-secondary education more affordable for low- and middle-income families; and
  • A $107.0 million increase to the Canada Disability Savings Grants and Bonds, which is due to a steady increase in total registered Canada Disability Savings Plans and participation in the program.

The Department plans to spend $576.8 million in 2017–18 in net operating expenditures (Vote 1), representing a decrease of $31.2 million from the 2016–17 Main Estimates of $608.0 million. The net decrease is mainly related to a reduction in resources for the Temporary Foreign Worker Program.

Voted grants and contributions (Vote 5) are expected to reach $1.8 billion in 2017–18, an increase of $154.1 million from the 2016–17 Main Estimates. The increase is mainly attributable to investments announced in Budget 2016 to the Canada Summer Jobs and the Homelessness Partnering Strategy.

In relation to non-budgetary loans, there is a net decrease in authorities of $621.2 million from the 2016–17 Main Estimates, mainly as a result of Budget 2016 measures which increase grants and reduce the disbursement of loans as more borrowers will have their financial needs met by the increase in grants.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 102. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Department of Employment and Social Development
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities.
Income Security 46,108,407,989 49,042,853,716 51,916,187,629
Social Development 8,961,100,867 7,933,212,853 311,001,403
A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market.
Learning 2,489,519,002 2,479,065,886 2,969,076,593
Skills and Employment 1,587,159,057 1,693,306,935 1,783,515,753
Safe, fair and productive workplaces and cooperative workplace relations.
Labour 123,719,176 161,240,615 160,249,779
Government-wide service excellence.
Service Network Supporting Government Departments 49,259,236 51,132,597 56,037,812
Delivery of Services for Other Government of Canada Programs 17,442,316 23,418,496 20,654,469
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 261,420,377 253,650,710 206,132,177
Total 59,598,028,020 61,637,881,808 57,422,855,615

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Table 103. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Non-budgetary - Department of Employment and Social Development
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market.
Learning 817,148,156 979,969,792 358,762,888
Total 817,148,156 979,969,792 358,762,888

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments

Table 104. Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments - Department of Employment and Social Development
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Grants
Apprenticeship Grants 100,928,500 114,552,200 114,552,200
New Horizons for Seniors Program 34,836,993 41,340,000 41,340,000
Enabling Accessibility Fund Small Projects Grant 13,531,118 13,650,000 15,650,000
Grants to not-for-profit, for-profit, and aboriginal organizations, municipal, provincial and territorial governments for adult learning, literacy and essential skills 0 14,800,000 14,800,000
Grants to non-profit organizations for activities eligible for support through the Social Development Partnerships Program 7,798,333 14,775,000 14,275,000
Federal Income Support for Parents of Murdered or Missing Children 52,780 10,000,000 10,000,000
Pathways to Education Canada Grant 9,500,000 9,500,000 9,500,000
Labour Funding Program 1,203,000 1,703,000 1,703,000
Grants to not-for-profit organizations, individuals, municipal governments, Band/tribal councils and other Aboriginal organizations, public health and educational institutions, Régies régionales, for-profit enterprises, research organizations and research institutes to carry out research on homelessness to help communities better understand and more effectively address homelessness issues 0 250,000 500,000
Named grants for the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development 81,005 100,000 100,000
Total Statutory 56,353,817,132 58,339,214,355 53,921,370,909
Contributions
Payments to provinces, territories, municipalities, other public bodies, organizations, groups, communities, employers and individuals for the provision of training and/or work experience, the mobilization of community resources, and human resource planning and adjustment measures necessary for the efficient functioning of the Canadian labour market 497,729,310 563,032,566 677,223,000
Contributions to not-for-profit organizations, individuals, municipal governments, Band/tribal councils and other Aboriginal organizations, public health and educational institutions, Régies régionales, for-profit enterprises, research organizations and research institutes to support activities to help alleviate and prevent homelessness across Canada and to carry out research on homelessness to help communities better understand and more effectively address homelessness issues 104,249,179 111,494,275 158,762,578
Contributions to provincial/territorial governments, band councils, tribal councils, Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy agreement holders, municipal governments, not-for-profit organizations, professional associations, business and private sector organizations, consortia, industry groups, unions, regulatory bodies, ad-hoc associations, public health institutions, school boards, universities, colleges, CEGEPs, sector councils, and cross-sectoral councils to support enhanced productivity and competitiveness of Canadian workplaces by supporting investment in and recognition and utilization of skills 16,576,408 27,144,123 43,240,013
Contributions to organizations to support the development of human resources, economic growth, job creation and retention in official language minority communities 11,980,750 12,000,000 12,000,000
Payments to provinces, territories, municipalities, other public bodies, organizations, groups, communities, employers and individuals for the provision of training and/or work or business experience, the mobilization of community resources and human resource planning and adjustment measures necessary for the social development of Canadians and other participants in Canadian life 6,271,827 5,840,000 5,840,000
Contributions to not-for-profit, for-profit, and aboriginal organizations, municipal, provincial and territorial governments for adult learning, literacy and essential skills 8,375,806 3,209,000 3,209,000
Payments to non-profit organizations to develop national or provincial/territorial/regional educational and awareness activities to help reduce the incidence of elder abuse and fraud 2,438,380 1,800,000 1,800,000
Total Statutory 518,565,138 593,556,097 684,843,230
Other Transfer Payments
Payments to provinces and territories to deliver employment programs and services under the Canada Job Fund and under the Labour Market Agreements 500,000,000 500,000,000 500,000,000
Payments to provinces and territories under the Multilateral Framework for Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities 222,000,000 222,000,000 222,000,000

Department of Finance

Raison d’être

The Department of Finance Canada (Department) contributes to a strong economy and sound public finances for Canadians. It does so by monitoring developments in Canada and around the world to provide first-rate analysis and advice to the Government of Canada and by developing and implementing fiscal and economic policies that support the economic and social goals of Canada and its people.

The Department also plays a central role in ensuring that government spending is focused on results and delivers value for taxpayer dollars. The Department interacts extensively with other federal organizations and acts as an effective conduit for the views of participants in the economy from all parts of Canada.

The Minister of Finance is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 49. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Department of Finance (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 100.50 98.06 89.28
Total Statutory 86,906.81 88,672.72 90,054.33
Figure 50. organizational estimates - non-budgetary - department of finance (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Total Statutory 54,811.89 0.00 0.00
Table 105. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Department of Finance
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 100,498,865 90,740,545 98,060,618 89,280,597
5 Authority for amount by way of direct payments to the International Development Association pursuant to Bretton Woods and Related Agreements Act 0 1 1 1
Authority to increase the limit of insured loans under the Protection of Residential Mortgage or Hypothecary Insurance Act 0 0 1 0
Total Voted 100,498,865 90,740,546 98,060,620 89,280,598
Total Statutory 86,906,813,294 89,373,051,964 88,672,716,812 90,054,330,703
Total Budgetary 87,007,312,159 89,463,792,510 88,770,777,432 90,143,611,301
Non-budgetary
Total Statutory 54,811,893,118 0 0 0
Total non-budgetary 54,811,893,118 0 0 0

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

Finance is estimating budgetary expenditures of $90.1 billion in 2017–18. Of this amount $90.0 billion or 99% represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information only. The remaining $89.3 million require approval by Parliament.

The 2017–18 Main Estimates of $90.1 billion is $679.8 million higher compared to the 2016–17 Main Estimates of $89.5 billion, and is due to an increase of $681.3 million in statutory votes offset by a $1.5 million decrease in voted amounts.

The increase of $681.3 million in statutory votes is mainly due to:

  • Canada Health Transfer – An increase of $1.1 billion reflecting the annual increased funding commitment in the Jobs, Growth and Long-term Prosperity Act, 2012. Starting in 2017–18, the CHT grows based on a three-year moving average of nominal gross domestic product growth, with funding guaranteed to increase by at least 3 per cent per year. From 2006–07 to 2016–17, the CHT grew 6 per cent per year;
  • Canada Social Transfer – An increase of $400.4 million reflecting the 3% annual increased funding commitment that commenced in 2009–10 and which was continued in the Jobs, Growth and Long-term Prosperity Act, 2012 for 2014–15 and subsequent years;
  • Fiscal Equalization – An increase of $373.2 million reflecting the 2.09% gross domestic product-based escalator being applied to the 2016–17 level;
  • Territorial Financing – An increase of $145.5 million as a result of new and updated data used to calculate territorial expenditure requirements and revenue capacities entering the formula for Territorial Formula Financing;
  • Alternative Payments for Standing Programs – A decrease in recoveries in the amount of $20.5 million as a result of a decrease in the value of personal income tax points that were transferred to Quebec;
  • Purchase of Domestic Coinage – An increase of $8.0 million due to proposed amendments to the Royal Canadian Mint Act, which repealed the stipulation that the Mint cannot anticipate profit with respect to the provision of circulation coins;
  • Youth Allowance Recovery – A decreased recovery of $2.0 million as a result of a decrease in the estimated value of personal income tax points that were transferred to Quebec;
  • Additional Fiscal Equalization Offset Payment to Nova Scotia – A decrease of $13.3 million due to the decline in offshore oil and gas revenues received by Nova Scotia. The Nova Scotia 2005 offshore arrangement guarantees that the province’s offshore oil and gas revenues that enter the Equalization formula do not impact Equalization payments. Consequently, the province receives payments equal to the decline in Equalization due to these revenues;
  • Additional Fiscal Equalization to Nova Scotia – A decrease of $43.9 million due to new data entering the formula, which is an average of data for three fiscal years. This program ensures that there is no reduction in combined Equalization and 2005 Offshore Accord Offset Payments relative to the previous Equalization formula (pre-2007);
  • Other Interest Costs – A decrease of $528.0 million reflecting forecasted long-term bond rates by private sector economists in the 2016 Fall Economic Statement, which affects the average long-term bond rate that is used to calculate interest on the public sector pension obligations pertaining to services pre-April 1, 2000; and
  • Interest on Unmatured Debt – A decrease of $764.0 million due to a downward revision of interest rates by private sector economists for 2017–18, consistent with the 2016 Fall Economic Statement.

The decrease of $1.5 million in Vote 1, Program expenditures is mainly due to a decrease in funding for:

  • Budget 2015 initiatives ($1.0 million): G-20 Framework Working Group ($0.6 million); Corporate Asset Management Review ($0.4 million); and
  • Budget 2016 reductions to professional services, advertising and travel ($0.5 million).

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 106. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Department of Finance
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
A strong economy and sound public finances for Canadians.
Transfer and Taxation Payment Programs 64,106,557,531 66,484,237,172 68,450,488,707
Treasury and Financial Affairs 22,793,429,403 22,878,000,000 21,594,000,000
Economic and Fiscal Policy Framework 63,516,872 60,440,111 60,243,914
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 43,808,353 41,115,227 38,878,680
Total 87,007,312,159 89,463,792,510 90,143,611,301

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Table 107. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Non-budgetary - Department of Finance
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
A strong economy and sound public finances for Canadians.
Transfer and Taxation Payment Programs 168,760,887 0 0
Treasury and Financial Affairs 54,643,132,231 0 0
Total 54,811,893,118 0 0

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments

Table 108. Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments - Department of Finance
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Contributions
Research and Policy Initiatives Assistance 27,500 35,000 35,000
Other Transfer Payments
Total Statutory 64,102,274,400 66,482,746,634 68,449,209,566

Department of Fisheries and Oceans

Raison d’être

Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) supports strong and sustainable economic growth in our marine and fisheries sectors and contributes to a prosperous economy through global commerce by supporting exports and advancing safe maritime trade. The Department supports the innovation needed for a knowledge-based economy through research in expanding sectors such as aquaculture and biotechnology.

The Department contributes to a clean and healthy environment and sustainable aquatic ecosystems for Canadians through habitat protection, oceans management and ecosystems research.

The Canadian Coast Guard (CCG), as a Special Operating Agency within DFO, is responsible for services and programs that contribute to all three of the Department’s strategic outcomes while also contributing significantly to the safety, security, and accessibility of Canada’s waterways. The CCG also supports other government organizations by providing a civilian fleet and a broadly distributed shore-based infrastructure. The Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 51. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Department of Fisheries and Oceans (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 2,053.40 2,457.04 2,081.15
Total Statutory 119.40 133.32 119.81
Table 109. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Department of Fisheries and Oceans
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 1,253,876,670 1,238,519,588 1,396,910,931 1,258,375,596
5 Capital expenditures 705,255,421 809,655,097 958,127,130 751,805,774
10 Grants and contributions 94,266,293 65,510,981 101,998,451 70,969,884
Total Voted 2,053,398,384 2,113,685,666 2,457,036,512 2,081,151,254
Total Statutory 119,399,551 127,363,923 133,318,730 119,805,674
Total Budgetary 2,172,797,935 2,241,049,589 2,590,355,242 2,200,956,928

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

Fisheries and Oceans has three mandated strategic outcomes, which are:

  • Economically prosperous maritime sectors and fisheries;
  • Sustainable aquatic ecosystems; and
  • Safe and secure waters.

Fisheries and Oceans is estimating budgetary expenditures of $2.2 billion in 2017–18. Compared to 2016–17, Main Estimates have decreased by $40.1 million. Significant changes include:

  • An increase of $41.2 million related to investing in ocean and freshwater research in Canada;
  • An increase of $20.0 million related to addressing the threat of pollutants from the M/V Kathryn Spirit;
  • An increase of $15.7 million related to protecting marine coastal areas;
  • A decrease of $43.6 million related to Canadian Coast Guard offshore fisheries science vessels;
  • A decrease of $39.9 million related to the Federal Infrastructure Initiative; and
  • A decrease of $16.0 million related to vessel fuel for the Canadian Coast Guard.

For additional information, please see the Departmental Plan.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 110. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Department of Fisheries and Oceans
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Safe and Secure Waters.
Fleet Operational Readiness 778,918,291 863,517,816 730,802,589
Shore-Based Asset Readiness 103,264,378 101,167,711 121,188,483
Hydrographic Products and Services 28,200,785 29,428,016 34,556,501
Search and Rescue Services 31,104,607 31,613,840 33,890,834
Marine Communications and Traffic Services 42,256,838 34,101,584 33,679,329
Ocean Forecasting 15,077,397 8,463,792 16,390,301
Canadian Coast Guard College 15,612,170 13,096,266 12,946,128
Maritime Security 7,111,947 8,491,010 8,415,573
Economically Prosperous Maritime Sectors and Fisheries.
Small Craft Harbours 217,947,740 277,650,414 213,252,617
Integrated Fisheries Management 131,253,481 128,176,269 147,811,981
Aboriginal Strategies and Governance 86,077,797 56,234,640 55,786,486
Marine Navigation 43,632,492 46,288,327 46,011,571
Sustainable Aquaculture Program 23,961,078 27,951,814 30,475,056
Salmonid Enhancement Program 29,496,542 29,458,464 29,195,310
International Engagement 14,210,564 14,010,930 13,127,462
Aquatic Animal Health 5,764,048 5,515,751 6,114,231
Biotechnology and Genomics 3,778,332 3,382,084 3,192,457
Climate Change Adaptation Program 2,208,729 0 2,385,497
Territorial Delineation 1,329,507 1,625,067 1,182,400
Sustainable Aquatic Ecosystems.
Compliance and Enforcement 99,549,696 103,320,201 102,351,038
Fisheries Protection 61,653,577 63,121,302 71,359,349
Oceans Management 47,134,443 40,202,708 54,268,898
Environmental Response Services 17,819,882 17,926,048 34,918,463
Species at Risk 21,092,704 22,534,830 22,354,201
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 344,340,910 313,770,705 375,300,173
Total 2,172,797,935 2,241,049,589 2,200,956,928

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments

Table 111. Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments - Department of Fisheries and Oceans
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Grants
Grant Program for the disposal of small craft harbours 1,600,000 500,000 500,000
Grants for the Disposal of Surplus Lighthouses 1,480,000 500,000 500,000
Grants to support organizations associated with research, development, management, and promotion of fisheries and oceans-related issues 139,944 238,000 245,500
Grant to Support Indigenous Groups in Negotiations of Conservation Measures 0 0 100,000
Contributions
Contributions to support increased Native participation in commercial fisheries, cooperative fisheries management arrangements and consultations respecting Aboriginal fisheries agreements 45,585,599 27,002,530 27,002,530
Contributions under the Aboriginal Aquatic Resource and Oceans Management Program 20,679,290 16,435,706 15,882,140
Contributions to support the Recreational Fisheries Conservation Partnerships Program 11,277,179 10,000,000 10,000,000
Contribution agreements to permit the Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary (CCGA) Associations to carry out authorized activities related to maritime Search and Rescue (SAR) operations, SAR prevention and other safety related activities 5,533,536 5,521,000 6,021,000
Ocean and Freshwater Science Contribution Program 0 0 5,220,000
Contributions to support the Academic Research Contribution Program for the support of academic research and development related to science priorities 2,310,415 2,839,228 1,544,728
Contribution to the Pacific Salmon Foundation 1,497,513 962,000 962,000
Indigenous Community-Boat Volunteer Program 0 0 750,000
Contributions to support the Small Craft Harbours Class Contribution Program 698,887 500,000 500,000
Participant Funding Program for Reviews Related to Fish, Fish Habitat and Navigation 0 0 500,000
Contribution to Support Establishment and Management of Conservation Measures 0 0 495,000
Contributions to support organizations associated with research, development, management, and promotion of fisheries and oceans-related issues 3,215,830 758,217 485,486
Contribution to the Salmon Sub-Committee of the Yukon Fish and Wildlife Management Board for implementing responsibilities pursuant to comprehensive land claim settlements 248,100 254,300 261,500

Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development

Raison d’être

Under the leadership of the Minister of Foreign Affairs, the Minister of International Trade and the Minister of International Development and La Francophonie, Global Affairs Canada is responsible for conducting Canada’s international relations, including foreign affairs, international trade and commerce, international development, consular services for Canadians, and the Government of Canada’s global network of missions abroad.

Note: Until the establishing legislation is amended, the legal name of the department for the purposes of Appropriation Acts remains Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 52. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 5,564.63 6,115.45 5,633.73
Total Statutory 432.22 359.93 368.39
Figure 53. organizational estimates - non-budgetary - department of foreign affairs, trade and development (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted -1.59 0.00 0.00
Total Statutory 53.48 3.10 39.86
Table 112. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 1,529,980,770 1,458,048,856 1,602,891,841 1,557,659,937
5 Capital expenditures 135,740,375 124,444,220 177,876,478 106,313,014
10 Grants and contributions 3,834,875,859 3,529,676,551 4,251,965,821 3,903,486,753
15 Payments, in respect of pension, insurance and social security programs or other arrangements for employees locally engaged outside of Canada, or in respect of the administration of such programs or arrangements 64,032,147 50,779,000 64,706,000 66,273,000
20 Pursuant to subsection 12(2) of the International Development (Financial Institutions) Assistance Act, payments to international financial institutions – Direct payments 0 1 1 1
Debt forgiveness – Loans to the government of the Republic of Cuba 0 0 18,009,733 0
Total Voted 5,564,629,151 5,162,948,628 6,115,449,874 5,633,732,705
Total Statutory 432,223,415 352,592,269 359,929,125 368,393,362
Total Budgetary 5,996,852,566 5,515,540,897 6,475,378,999 6,002,126,067
Non-budgetary
Voted
L25 Pursuant to subsection 12(2) of the International Development (Financial Institutions) Assistance Act, payments to international financial institutions – Capital subscriptions 0 1 1 1
Working capital advance – Loans and advances 1,864,632 0 0 0
Working capital advance – Advances to posts abroad (3,449,639) 0 0 0
Total Voted (1,585,007) 1 1 1
Total Statutory 53,481,420 3,098,450 3,098,450 39,860,000
Total non-budgetary 51,896,413 3,098,451 3,098,451 39,860,001

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development is estimating budgetary expenditures of $6.0 billion in 2017–18. Of this amount, $5.6 billion requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $368.4 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

Significant items contributing to the net increase of $486.6 million from the 2016–17 Main Estimates include:

  • An increase of $239.6 million to address the crises in Iraq and Syria and their impact on the region. This funding will support Canada’s response to the Middle East crises and the needs of conflict-affected people in Iraq, Syria, Jordan and Lebanon. This includes military resources to train, advise and assist Iraqi security forces in their efforts to degrade and defeat Daesh; stabilization, humanitarian and development assistance in Iraq and the region to address short-term needs and support resiliency, stability and prosperity over the long term; as well as diplomatic engagement;
  • An increase of $213.9 million for the Peace and Stabilization Operations Program. Through the program, Canada works with its allies, partners and the UN to help stop violence, foster stability and create the necessary conditions for dialogue and conflict resolution.

The Program funds projects to advance key peace and security priorities, including support for peacebuilding efforts in the Middle East, as well as for the deployment of civilian experts to work in areas of fragility;

  • An increase of $41.3 million to help developing countries in Asia and the Pacific address impact of climate change through the Climate Fund for the Private Sector;
  • An increase of $31.1 million to support the management of the Canada-U.S. Softwood Lumber initiative, including negotiations towards a new agreement, ongoing monitoring of exports, and legal preparations for possible trade remedies action;
  • A decrease of $25.3 million in the cost of assessed contributions, due to changes in the international organizations’ budgets and the impact of currency fluctuations resulting from the payment in the prescribed foreign currency of these contributions which represent Canada’s treaty obligations and legal commitments to international organizations such as United Nations and World Health Organization; and
  • A decrease of $11.9 million relating to the impact of foreign currency fluctuations incurred on expenditures at missions abroad.

For additional information, please refer to the 2017–18 Departmental Plan.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 113. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
International Assistance and Poverty Alleviation - Poverty is reduced, and security and democracy are increased for those living in countries where Canada engages.
International Development 2,480,948,658 2,332,030,755 2,337,159,353
International Humanitarian Assistance 700,103,212 561,725,322 726,422,468
International Security and Democratic Development 364,417,410 237,453,939 475,406,438
Canada’s International Agenda - The international agenda is shaped to advance Canadian security, prosperity, interests and values.
Diplomacy, Advocacy, and International Agreements 954,956,846 949,769,188 975,067,088
Integrated Foreign Affairs, Trade, and Development Policy 76,209,297 80,118,760 82,495,830
Canada’s Network Abroad - The Department maintains a mission network of infrastructure and services to enable the Government of Canada to achieve its international priorities.
Mission Network Governance, Strategic Direction and Common Services 693,665,951 667,852,766 673,226,550
Management of Government of Canada Terms and Conditions of Employment Abroad 234,377,684 203,620,216 234,213,875
International Commercial and Consular Services for Canadians - Canadians are satisfied with commercial and consular services.
International Commerce 164,459,301 194,782,982 199,530,308
Consular Services and Emergency Management 48,404,466 52,012,000 54,513,189
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 279,309,741 236,174,969 244,090,968
Total 5,996,852,566 5,515,540,897 6,002,126,067

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Table 114. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Non-budgetary - Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Canada’s Network Abroad - The Department maintains a mission network of infrastructure and services to enable the Government of Canada to achieve its international priorities.
Mission Network Governance, Strategic Direction and Common Services (1,585,007) 0 0
International Assistance and Poverty Alleviation - Poverty is reduced, and security and democracy are increased for those living in countries where Canada engages.
International Development 53,481,420 3,098,451 39,860,001
Total 51,896,413 3,098,451 39,860,001

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments

Table 115. Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments - Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Grants
Grants for Multilateral Programming: Grants in support of development assistance, humanitarian assistance or disaster preparedness, for global operations, programs, projects, activities and appeals for the benefit of developing countries or territories or countries in transition 1,940,967,993 1,962,345,854 2,107,623,251
Grants in support of the Peace and Stabilization Operations Program 0 0 140,000,000
Grants for Partnerships with Canadians Programming: Grants for development assistance programs, projects and activities intended to support development for the benefit of developing countries or territories or countries in transition or to enhance the awareness, understanding, and engagement of Canadians with respect to development 22,397,552 38,900,000 38,900,001
Global Partnership Program for the destruction, disposal and securing of weapons and materials of mass destruction and related expertise 18,286,083 20,550,000 20,550,000
Grants in lieu of taxes on diplomatic, consular and international organizations’ property in Canada in accordance with terms and conditions approved by the Governor in Council 13,804,944 15,854,000 15,854,000
Grants for Counter-Terrorism Capacity Building Program 8,642,706 5,470,000 13,970,000
Grants for the Anti-Crime Capacity Building Program 7,683,323 9,500,000 9,500,000
Grants for Bilateral Programming: Grants for cooperation with other donor countries for the benefit of developing countries or territories or countries in transition 0 9,900,000 7,832,776
Grants in aid of academic relations 1,185,825 2,530,000 2,530,000
Annual host-country financial support for the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity 1,182,489 1,188,519 1,195,243
United Nations Voluntary Fund for Victims of Torture 60,000 60,000 60,000
United Nations Trust Fund on Indigenous Issues 0 30,000 30,000
Total Statutory 241,205 250,000 250,000
Contributions
Payments of Assessed Contributions to International Organizations:
United Nations peacekeeping operations (US$229,451,187) 323,932,304 313,561,622 289,915,299
United Nations Organization (US$93,973,191) 107,815,896 126,614,400 123,405,594
North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) – civil administration (17,163,217 Euro) 36,637,479 25,577,573 25,156,127
World Health Organization (US$7,709,632) (7,160,240 Swiss Francs) 17,853,723 18,607,036 19,678,197
Food and Agriculture Organization (US$8,149,050) (5,921,037 Euro) 19,022,922 19,605,874 19,379,796
Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (12,070,516 Euro) 17,792,563 19,938,878 17,691,755
International Atomic Energy Agency (9,998,948 Euro)(US$1,502,661) 14,706,139 16,589,976 16,628,752
International Labour Organization (11,705,612 Swiss Francs) 14,827,277 16,068,293 15,618,798
International Organization of La Francophonie (10,264,401 Euro) 15,742,901 15,073,146 15,044,532
Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (9,939,954 Euro) 14,503,008 14,807,287 14,568,991
Pan-American Health Organization (US$10,198,573) 0 0 13,392,766
United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (4,247,352 Euro) (US$5,421,164) 13,182,412 14,098,608 13,344,417
International Criminal Court (8,466,000 Euro) 10,078,233 10,822,827 12,408,616
Organization of American States (US$9,025,311) 11,959,822 11,556,780 11,852,039
World Trade Organization (5,434,900 Swiss Francs) 7,198,867 7,460,488 7,251,787
Commonwealth Secretariat (3,972,109 Pounds Sterling) 6,839,170 6,971,361 6,927,756
Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (2,384,640 Euro) (US$1,224,721) 4,726,264 5,082,252 5,103,470
Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on Agriculture (US$3,101,792) 4,062,234 4,091,903 4,073,273
Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (2,186,090 Euro) 2,953,326 3,253,769 3,204,152
Roosevelt Campobello International Park Commission (US$1,842,899) 1,903,942 2,145,719 2,420,095
International Civil Aviation Organization 2,701,997 2,382,785 2,410,492
International Energy Agency (975,978 Euro) 1,433,818 1,425,988 1,430,491
International Agency for Research on Cancer (882,900 Euro) 0 0 1,294,067
Commonwealth Foundation (690,365 Pounds Sterling) 1,347,689 1,401,020 1,204,066
Commonwealth Youth Program (640,561 Pounds Sterling) 1,533,759 1,602,711 1,117,202
United Nations framework Convention on Climate Change (596,234 Euro) 788,984 411,710 873,900
Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (563,750 Euro) 737,474 788,102 826,289
Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Secretariat (US$122,800) (574,400 SGD) 724,237 706,327 716,878
Convention on Biological Diversity (US$512,259) 633,014 637,140 672,698
World Intellectual Property Organization (454,867 Swiss Francs) 617,292 625,663 606,929
International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea (411,393 Euro) 546,789 565,813 602,978
World Customs Organization (402,551 Euro) 558,292 570,393 590,019
International Maritime Organization (211,453 Pounds Sterling) 398,376 429,121 368,796
International Seabed Authority (US$257,760) 301,219 338,122 338,490
Non-proliferation, Arms Control and Disarmament (US$231,092) 172,230 241,006 303,470
The Vienna Convention and its Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer (US$206,730) 202,212 205,958 271,478
Peace Implementation Council (181,799 Euro) 270,442 283,393 266,463
Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (US$199,165) 281,959 252,702 261,543
Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal (US$182,668) 238,563 231,655 239,880
Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Centre for Education and Research (145,769 Euro) 214,151 213,015 213,654
Rotterdam Convention on the Prior Informed Consent Procedure for Certain Hazardous Chemicals and Pesticides in International Trade (US$103,782) 129,457 131,614 136,287
Wassenaar Arrangement (75,767 Euro) 95,297 107,885 111,051
Secrétariat technique permanent des conférences ministérielles de l’éducation, de la jeunesse et des sports des pays d’expression française (21,364,157 CFA) (26,273 Euro) 85,897 86,698 87,026
Permanent Court of Arbitration (49,813 Euro) 65,566 72,436 73,011
International Commodity Organizations (28,551 Euro) 47,440 42,595 41,847
International Fact Finding Commission (11,481 Swiss Francs) 15,068 15,376 15,319
Contributions for Bilateral Programming: Contributions in support of development assistance, contributions for cooperation with countries in transition and contributions in support of regional or country specific development assistance programs, projects and activities for the benefit of developing countries or territories or countries in transition 704,536,880 440,728,986 444,827,759
Contributions for Partnerships with Canadians Programming: Contributions for development assistance programs, projects and activities intended to support development for the benefit of developing countries or territories or countries in transition or to enhance the awareness, understanding, and engagement of Canadians with respect to development 238,795,161 218,292,015 218,292,015
Contributions for Multilateral Programming: Contributions in support of development assistance, humanitarian assistance or disaster preparedness, for global operations, programs, projects, activities and appeals for the benefit of developing countries or territories or countries in transition 17,072,872 9,051,550 53,480,000
Contributions in support of the Peace and Stabilization Operations Program 0 0 43,800,000
Contributions under the Global Partnership Program for the destruction, disposal and securing of weapons and materials of mass destruction and related expertise 29,968,958 42,940,000 42,940,000
Canada Fund for Local Initiatives 13,859,610 34,100,000 34,100,000
Global Commerce Support Program 6,256,127 17,955,855 17,955,855
Contribution for Counter-Terrorism Capacity Building Program 16,700,522 4,900,000 8,222,565
Projects and development activities resulting from Summits of La Francophonie 8,300,000 8,000,000 8,000,000
Contributions for the Anti-Crime Capacity Building Program 6,682,940 7,092,625 7,092,625
Canadian International Innovation Program 327,614 5,852,500 5,852,500
Contributions in Aid of Academic Relations 6,110,096 4,587,627 4,587,627
Annual Voluntary Contributions 3,242,770 3,450,000 3,450,000
Northern Dimension of Canada’s Foreign Policy 576,487 700,000 700,000
Other Transfer Payments
Total Statutory 287,539,955 245,000,000 227,048,000

Department of Health

Raison d’être

Health Canada regulates specific products and controlled substances, works with partners to support improved health outcomes for First Nations and Inuit, supports innovation and information sharing in Canada’s health system to help Canadians maintain and improve their health, and contributes to strengthening Canada’s record as a country with one of the healthiest populations in the world.

The Minister of Health is responsible for this organization.

Additional information can be found in Health Canada’s 2017–18 Departmental Plan.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 54. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Department of Health (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 3,627.47 4,005.44 4,097.37
Total Statutory 253.66 181.76 170.99
Table 116. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Department of Health
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 1,804,922,604 1,768,947,706 1,933,822,900 1,943,584,804
5 Capital expenditures 30,601,816 25,407,249 32,249,195 37,230,214
10 Contributions 1,791,950,569 1,785,339,382 2,039,368,714 2,116,553,920
Total Voted 3,627,474,989 3,579,694,337 4,005,440,809 4,097,368,938
Total Statutory 253,657,163 176,910,600 181,759,613 170,992,070
Total Budgetary 3,881,132,152 3,756,604,937 4,187,200,422 4,268,361,008

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

With authorities of $4.3 billion anticipated through the Main Estimates, Health Canada will continue improving the lives of all Canadians making this country’s population among the healthiest in the world as measured by longevity, lifestyle and effective use of the public health care system. Health Canada’s total authorities for 2017–18 have a net increase of $511.8 million from the previous year’s Main Estimates.

This increase in funding will support Health Canada’s goals and the Government of Canada priorities in the following areas:

Improving health outcomes for First Nations and Inuit:

  • Funding to implement interim federal policy reforms related to Jordan’s Principle to improve access to health and social services for First Nations children living on reserve;
  • Funding to continue to fulfill Canada’s obligations under the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement; and
  • Funding to provide immediate and targeted mental wellness support to First Nations and Inuit.

Supporting innovation in health care and health research:

  • Funding for Canada Health Infoway for the implementation of e-prescribing Technology and Telehomecare;
  • Funding for the Brain Canada Foundation; and
  • Funding for the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Innovation.

Assessing and addressing environmental health impacts:

  • Funding to support scientific research on the health impacts of air pollution; and
  • Funding to support adaptation to climate change programs to mitigate health risks.

Supporting Infrastructure investments:

  • Funding to undertake capital repairs, expansions and new builds to community health and social facilities on reserves;
  • Funding to renew and enhance public health services related to water and wastewater on reserve; and
  • Funding to maintain and upgrade federal infrastructure assets.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 117. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Department of Health
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals receive health services and benefits that are responsive to their needs so as to improve their health status.
Supplementary Health Benefits for First Nations and Inuit 1,138,729,982 1,180,001,880 1,238,036,465
First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care 888,041,558 843,780,295 1,099,570,276
Health Infrastructure Support for First Nations and Inuit 672,276,324 683,792,972 796,373,302
Health risks and benefits associated with food, products, substances, and environmental factors are appropriately managed and communicated to Canadians.
Health Products 145,641,623 146,005,296 147,322,313
Environmental Risks to Health 87,559,410 72,844,578 96,356,868
Substance Use and Misuse 84,450,294 87,797,766 88,941,061
Food Safety and Nutrition 63,941,395 68,562,778 67,881,855
Pesticides 41,360,034 40,238,976 39,983,502
Consumer Product and Workplace Hazardous Materials 34,513,091 37,562,015 38,015,185
Radiation Protection 20,871,026 13,148,978 18,294,915
A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians.
Canadian Health System Policy 329,580,184 260,866,701 297,012,268
Official Language Minority Community Development 37,221,431 38,093,638 35,328,730
Specialized Health Services 15,260,199 18,685,517 18,326,068
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 321,685,601 265,223,547 286,918,200
Total 3,881,132,152 3,756,604,937 4,268,361,008

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments

Table 118. Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments - Department of Health
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Grants
Total Statutory 82,700,467 0 0
Contributions
Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care 659,852,641 621,858,728 802,295,540
Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Infrastructure Support 637,662,686 645,276,337 752,465,894
Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Supplementary Health Benefits 200,370,251 210,928,523 220,707,524
Contribution to the Canadian Institute for Health Information 78,508,979 78,748,979 78,748,979
Contribution to the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer 47,296,994 47,500,000 47,500,000
Official Languages Health Contribution Program 36,399,999 36,400,000 33,800,000
Contribution to Canada Health Infoway 0 0 29,000,000
Canada Brain Research Fund Program 6,180,793 5,794,032 27,000,000
Health Care Policy Contribution Program 17,839,928 25,509,000 26,874,000
Substance Use and Addictions Program 25,467,729 26,350,014 26,350,014
Contribution to the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement 2,000,000 12,000,000 17,000,000
Contribution to the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health 16,058,769 16,058,769 16,058,769
Mental Health Commission of Canada Contribution Program 0 0 14,250,000
Thalidomide Survivors Contribution Program 8,000,000 8,160,000 8,323,200
Contribution to the Canadian Patient Safety Institute 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000
Canadian Blood Services: Blood Research and Development Program 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000
Contribution to strengthen Canada’s organs and tissues donation and transplantation system 3,580,000 3,580,000 3,580,000
Total Statutory 960,441 0 0

Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Raison d’être

Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) supports Indigenous peoples (First Nations, Inuit and Métis) and Northerners in their efforts to:

  • improve social well-being and economic prosperity;
  • develop healthier, more sustainable communities; and
  • participate more fully in Canada’s political, social and economic development – to the benefit of all Canadians.

The Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs is responsible for this organization.

Note: Until the establishing legislation is amended, the legal name of the department for Appropriation Acts remains Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 55. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 7,807.65 9,282.56 9,903.53
Total Statutory 147.64 165.58 153.26
Figure 56. organizational estimates - non-budgetary - department of indian affairs and northern development (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 37.96 56.30 25.90
Table 119. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 1,264,223,992 658,200,538 967,190,737 892,342,724
5 Capital expenditures 57,134,402 41,432,179 55,098,478 44,496,010
10 Grants and contributions 6,486,296,604 6,652,765,968 8,260,274,763 8,966,692,676
Total Voted 7,807,654,998 7,352,398,685 9,282,563,978 9,903,531,410
Total Statutory 147,639,668 153,153,455 165,580,627 153,259,103
Total Budgetary 7,955,294,666 7,505,552,140 9,448,144,605 10,056,790,513
Non-budgetary
Voted
L15 Loans to native claimants 19,232,247 25,903,000 25,903,000 25,903,000
L20 Loans to First Nations in British Columbia 18,729,430 0 30,400,000 1
Total Voted 37,961,677 25,903,000 56,303,000 25,903,001
Total non-budgetary 37,961,677 25,903,000 56,303,000 25,903,001

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

INAC is estimating budgetary and non-budgetary expenditures of $10.1 billion in 2017–18. Of this amount, $9.9 billion requires approval by Parliament and the remainder represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information.

The net increase in budgetary and non-budgetary spending of approximately $2.6 billion or 34% over the 2016–17 Main Estimates, primarily reflects the historic investments provided by Budget 2016 and changes in the resource profile for targeted initiatives:

  • An increase of $540.2 million in the cash flow for the negotiation, settlement and implementation of specific and comprehensive claims (primarily an increase in funding for specific claims reflecting the anticipated settlement level);
  • An increase of $416.4 million to support the delivery of water and wastewater servicing on First Nation reserves as well as on-reserve waste management infrastructure (Budget 2016);
  • An increase of $320.4 million for additional investments in First Nations elementary and secondary education (Budget 2016);
  • An increase of $304.2 million for affordable housing and social infrastructure projects (Budget 2016);
  • An increase of $282.5 million to support the Enhanced First Nations Education Infrastructure Fund (Budget 2016);
  • An increase of $273.3 million for the assessment, management and remediation of federal contaminated sites;
  • An increase of $149.4 million to support First Nation communities in the construction of public infrastructure on reserve through the First Nations Infrastructure Fund (Budget 2016); and
  • An increase of $98.5 million to support urgent investments in the First Nations Child and Family Services Program (Budget 2016).

For further details on the department’s plans and priorities, please see the 2017–18 Departmental Plan.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 120. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
The People – Individual, family and community well-being for First Nations and Inuit.
Education 1,805,134,484 1,855,472,918 2,203,184,787
Social Development 1,767,363,171 1,764,360,798 1,876,199,107
Residential Schools Resolution 316,813,828 165,991,965 196,289,577
First Nations Individual Affairs 29,564,330 28,911,620 28,961,879
The Land and Economy – Full participation of First Nations, Métis, Non-Status Indians and Inuit individuals and communities in the economy.
Infrastructure and Capacity 1,294,213,707 1,212,699,364 2,223,946,873
Community Economic Development 293,179,002 209,574,311 373,226,056
Indigenous Entrepreneurship 40,562,630 42,636,070 47,280,254
Strategic Partnerships 39,648,489 39,583,926 32,407,433
Urban Indigenous Participation 50,336,798 29,645,997 29,582,303
The Government – Support good governance, rights and interests of Indigenous peoples.
Rights and Interests of Indigenous Peoples 176,996,399 487,447,240 1,035,735,011
Management and Implementation of Agreements and Treaties 1,058,167,714 806,628,418 873,311,740
Governance and Institutions of Government 422,158,084 397,170,892 413,808,860
Other Claims 0 0 0
The North – Self-reliance, prosperity and well-being for the people and communities of the North.
Northern Land, Resources and Environmental Management 180,587,234 58,614,753 264,322,708
Northern Governance and People 147,466,620 134,894,297 176,213,122
Northern Science and Technology 64,447,283 47,822,067 47,546,846
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 268,654,893 224,097,504 234,773,957
Total 7,955,294,666 7,505,552,140 10,056,790,513

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Table 121. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Non-budgetary - Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
The Government – Support good governance, rights and interests of Indigenous peoples.
Rights and Interests of Indigenous Peoples 37,961,677 25,903,000 25,903,001
Total 37,961,677 25,903,000 25,903,001

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments

Table 122. Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments - Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Grants
Grants to First Nations to settle specific and special claims negotiated by Canada and/or awarded by the Specific Claims Tribunal 29,213,199 377,608,693 920,692,361
Grants to implement comprehensive land claims and self-government agreements 436,540,831 470,925,141 498,302,311
Grant for Band Support Funding 157,748,998 229,300,671 229,274,186
Grants to the Government of the Northwest Territories and the Government of Nunavut for health care of Indians and Inuit 53,301,000 54,367,000 55,454,000
Grant to the Miawpukek Indian Band to support designated programs 10,633,304 10,845,970 11,062,889
Grants to provide income support to on-reserve residents 7,323,654 10,000,000 10,000,000
Grants for the Political Evolution of the Territories, particularly as it pertains to Devolution 7,356,558 8,250,036 8,250,036
Grants to support First Nations and Inuit Post-Secondary Educational Advancement 994,120 1,500,000 1,500,000
Grants to participating First Nations and the First Nation Education Authority pursuant to the First Nations Jurisdiction over Education in British Columbia Act 0 600,000 600,000
Grant to the First Nations Finance Authority pursuant to the First Nations Fiscal and Statistical Management Act 500,000 500,000 500,000
Grants to British Columbia Indian bands in lieu of a per capita annuity 300,000 300,000 300,000
Grants to support First Nations Elementary and Secondary Educational Advancement 9,258 150,000 150,000
Grants to increase First Nations and Inuit Youth Participation in Education and Labour Market Opportunities 45,000 45,000 45,000
Total Statutory 59,265,776 67,717,287 63,489,036
Contributions
Contributions to support the construction and maintenance of community infrastructure 1,124,511,157 1,091,038,543 2,149,035,493
Contributions to support First Nations Elementary and Secondary Educational Advancement 1,399,815,020 1,435,744,670 1,769,322,759
Contributions to provide income support to on-reserve residents 1,032,502,927 1,034,663,082 1,031,377,987
Contributions to provide women, children and families with Protection and Prevention Services 708,789,784 704,594,372 818,270,358
Contributions to support First Nations and Inuit Post-Secondary Educational Advancement 335,101,393 349,306,107 358,918,206
Contributions to support the negotiation and implementation of Treaties, Claims and self-government agreements or initiatives 338,726,631 262,724,157 306,779,080
Contributions to support Land Management and Economic Development 180,935,241 178,933,159 202,237,355
Contributions to supply public services in Indian Government Support and to build strong governance, administrative and accountability systems 222,925,961 125,837,198 134,211,324
Contributions to support access to healthy foods in isolated northern communities 68,498,325 53,930,000 84,641,748
Contributions for emergency management assistance for activities on reserves 111,982,318 64,977,822 64,977,822
Contributions to First Nations for the management of contaminated sites 22,882,344 3,287,071 63,874,716
Transfer Payments to the Government of Yukon for the care and maintenance, remediation and management of the closure of contaminated sites in Yukon 42,852,121 0 56,068,435
Contributions to increase First Nations and Inuit Youth Participation in Education and Labour Market Opportunities 36,390,789 41,376,000 41,376,000
Contributions for the purpose of consultation and policy development 16,074,751 28,795,000 31,011,532
Contributions to support the Urban Aboriginal Strategy 48,999,433 27,313,051 27,363,051
Contributions to support the basic organizational capacity of Indigenous representative organizations 21,172,161 10,940,796 25,285,531
Contributions to support the Aboriginal Economic Development Strategic Partnerships Initiative 30,652,147 31,700,000 24,750,000
Contributions for promoting the safe use, development, conservation and protection of the North’s natural resources, and promoting scientific development 11,378,185 16,243,003 24,209,640
Contributions to Indian bands for registration administration 4,522,379 8,066,674 8,110,515
Federal Interlocutor’s Contribution Program 14,901,192 14,943,588 3,943,588
Contributions to promote social and political development in the North and for Northerners 3,477,265 1,907,111 3,901,053
Contributions for Groups of Indian Residential School survivors who wish to resolve their claim as a group under the Independent Assessment Process 654,500 0 750,000
Transfer payments to the Government of Yukon for the remediation of the Marwell Tar Pit Site to support the Contaminated Sites Program 1,717,900 1,979,970 145,700
Total Statutory 26,730,568 28,067,096 28,067,096

Department of Industry

Raison d’être

Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada helps Canadian businesses grow, innovate and export so that they can create good quality jobs and wealth for Canadians. The Department works with provinces, territories, municipalities, the post-secondary education system, employers and labour to improve the quality and impact of its programs that support innovation, scientific research and entrepreneurship, in order to build a prosperous and innovative Canada.

The Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development is responsible for this organization.

Note: Until the establishing legislation is amended, the legal name of the department for the purposes of Appropriation Acts remains the Department of Industry.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 57. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Department of Industry (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 997.83 1,958.06 2,406.05
Total Statutory 172.00 223.35 184.85
Figure 58. organizational estimates - non-budgetary - department of industry (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 0.00 0.80 0.80
Table 123. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Department of Industry
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 340,146,745 342,868,928 355,437,770 356,511,722
5 Capital expenditures 22,532,288 7,833,000 19,699,408 11,234,609
10 Grants and contributions 635,155,778 723,984,677 1,582,925,423 2,038,304,873
Total Voted 997,834,811 1,074,686,605 1,958,062,601 2,406,051,204
Total Statutory 171,999,686 222,388,065 223,347,252 184,854,942
Total Budgetary 1,169,834,497 1,297,074,670 2,181,409,853 2,590,906,146
Non-budgetary
Voted
L15 Payments pursuant to subsection 14(2) of the Department of Industry Act 0 300,000 300,000 300,000
L20 Loans pursuant to paragraph 14(1)(a) of the Department of Industry Act 0 500,000 500,000 500,000
Total Voted 0 800,000 800,000 800,000
Total non-budgetary 0 800,000 800,000 800,000

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

Department of Industry styled Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada has three mandated strategic outcomes:

  • The Canadian marketplace is efficient and competitive;
  • Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian Economy; and
  • Canadian businesses and communities are competitive.

For additional information on key priorities in support of the outcomes noted above, please refer to the 2017–18 Departmental Plan.

The Department is estimating budgetary expenditures of $2,590.9 million in 2017–18. Of this amount, $2,406.1 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $184.9 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes only.

The 2017–18 Main Estimates present an overall increase of $1,293.8 million compared to 2016–17. Major changes are new funding stemming from Budget 2016 for the following programs:

  • Post-Secondary Institutions Strategic Investment Fund ($1,000.3 million);
  • Connect to Innovate Program ($69.6 million);
  • Sustainable Development Technology Fund ($102.3 million), which includes $800 thousand in statutory funding for the Next Generation Bio Fuels;
  • Centre for Drug Research and Development ($16.0 million); and
  • Stem Cell Network ($6.0 million).

Also reflected in these Main Estimates are increases under the following programs:

  • Mitacs Inc. ($27.6 million);
  • Automotive Innovation Fund ($36.0 million) and the Automotive Supplier Innovation Program ($7.9 million);
  • Improving Support for Entrepreneurs Program ($2.5 million);
  • Defence Procurement Strategy ($6.0 million);
  • Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program ($2.6 million);
  • Canada Foundation for Innovation ($52.4 million) and Technology Demonstration Program ($2.1 million); and
  • An increase in the Canadian Intellectual Property Office’s requirements due primarily to planned investments to modernize its IT infrastructure as well as to develop a suite of business services to meet clients’ needs ($9.1 million).

These increases are partially offset by the following decreases:

  • The sunsetting of funding under the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research ($5.0 million), the Institute for Quantum Computing ($5.0 million) and Futurpreneur Canada ($7.0 million);
  • A decrease to projected claims by lenders for loans made under the Canada Small Business Financing Act ($8.9 million);
  • A reduction in the grants and contributions to Genome Canada ($4.5 million) as a result of changes in the approved cash flow requirement of that program;
  • A decrease under the Strategic Aerospace Defence Initiative as per the approved funding profile of that program ($10.4 million);
  • A Budget 2016 reduction on professional services, travel and advertising expenditures ($2.6 million); and
  • A reduction to adjust the contributions to Employee Benefit Plan ($3.6 million).

To obtain additional information regarding the Estimates, please refer to the applicable Estimates documents. For further details on trends, please refer to the 2017–18 Departmental Plan.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 124. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Department of Industry
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy.
Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity 311,415,582 342,834,370 1,531,761,184
Industrial Research and Development Financing 244,450,613 326,898,851 359,430,758
Canadian businesses and communities are competitive.
Community Economic Development 156,421,933 142,379,294 213,105,186
Small Business Research, Financing and Services 85,392,842 97,653,630 84,501,977
Industrial Competitiveness and Capacity 33,947,200 34,316,964 35,618,706
The Canadian marketplace is efficient and competitive.
Spectrum, Telecommunications, and the Digital Economy 117,906,335 106,285,898 98,327,554
Marketplace Frameworks and Regulation 42,207,492 66,943,247 73,477,129
Marketplace Competition and Investments 46,107,684 46,563,535 41,903,401
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 131,984,816 133,198,881 152,780,251
Total 1,169,834,497 1,297,074,670 2,590,906,146

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Table 125. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Non-budgetary - Department of Industry
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Canadian businesses and communities are competitive.
Industrial Competitiveness and Capacity 0 800,000 800,000
Total 0 800,000 800,000

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments

Table 126. Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments - Department of Industry
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Grants
Grant to the Radio Advisory Board of Canada 85,000 85,000 4,808,000
Grant to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development 300,000 300,000 550,000
Grant to the International Telecommunication Union, Geneva, Switzerland 5,725,000 4,808,000 300,000
Grant to the Internal Trade Secretariat Corporation 337,500 550,000 85,000
Total Statutory 7,400,000 6,200,000 2,500,000
Contributions
Contributions under the Post-Secondary Institutions Strategic Investment Fund 0 0 995,423,553
Contributions under the Canada Foundation for Innovation 177,100,000 198,550,000 250,900,000
Contributions under the Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative 122,576,689 188,349,000 177,912,000
Contributions to the Canada Foundation for Sustainable Development Technology 0 0 101,540,514
Contributions under the Automotive Innovation Fund 92,266,600 64,700,099 98,566,809
Contributions under the Connecting Canadians Program 66,980,458 76,000,000 76,000,000
Contributions under the Connect to Innovate Program 0 0 65,874,564
Contributions under the Technology Demonstration Program 15,067,258 46,882,120 49,025,560
Contributions to Mitacs Inc. 19,000,000 11,900,000 39,500,000
Contributions to Genome Canada 7,500,000 5,000,000 35,400,000
Contributions under the Northern Ontario Development Program 35,279,600 31,840,000 31,840,000
Contributions under the Automotive Supplier Innovation Program 4,031,418 16,545,128 24,484,628
Contributions to CANARIE Inc. 15,000,000 23,500,000 23,800,000
Contributions to the Centre for Drug Research and Development 0 0 16,000,000
Contributions to the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics 10,000,000 10,000,000 10,000,000
Contributions under the Community Futures Program 8,360,008 8,360,008 8,360,008
Contributions to the Stem Cell Network 0 0 6,000,000
Contributions under the Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program 0 2,600,000 5,200,000
Contributions under the Computers for Schools program 5,523,922 5,250,000 5,000,000
Contributions under the Youth Employment Strategy – Computers for Schools Program 3,625,485 3,200,242 3,200,242
Contributions to the Council of Canadian Academies 2,000,000 3,000,000 3,000,000
Contributions to Let’s Talk Science 2,000,000 2,700,000 2,600,000
Contributions under the Program for Non-Profit Consumer and Voluntary Organizations 1,025,158 1,690,000 1,690,000
Contributions under the Economic Development Initiative 1,335,400 925,000 1,000,000
Contributions under the Strategic Activities Program 769,782 250,080 243,995
Total Statutory 115,199,806 139,708,000 100,429,621

Department of Justice

Raison d’être

The Department of Justice has the mandate to support the dual roles of the Minister of Justice and the Attorney General of Canada.

Under Canada’s federal system, the administration of justice is an area of shared jurisdiction between the federal government and the provinces and territories. The Department supports the Minister of Justice who is responsible for 53 statutes and areas of federal law by ensuring a bilingual and bijural national legal framework, principally within the following domains: criminal justice (including justice for victims of crime and youth criminal justice), family justice, access to justice, Aboriginal justice, public law and private international law.

The Department also supports the Attorney General as the chief law officer of the Crown, both in terms of the ongoing operations of government and of the development of new policies, programs and services for Canadians.

The Department provides legal advice to the Government and federal government departments and agencies, represents the Crown in civil litigation and before administrative tribunals, and drafts legislation.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 59. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Department of Justice (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 610.10 623.18 584.62
Total Statutory 73.12 79.26 71.54
Table 127. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Department of Justice
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 260,403,258 234,999,799 239,366,714 234,300,919
5 Grants and contributions 349,694,923 365,233,777 383,816,278 350,315,319
Total Voted 610,098,181 600,233,576 623,182,992 584,616,238
Total Statutory 73,121,626 78,626,954 79,256,537 71,543,418
Total Budgetary 683,219,807 678,860,530 702,439,529 656,159,656

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

The Department of Justice is estimating net budgetary expenditures of $656.16 million in 2017–18 of which $350.32 million is for expenditures linked to grants and contributions; $234.3 million is for the departmental operating expenditures; and $71.54 million is associated with statutory expenditures. As the primary legal services provider to other government departments and agencies, the Department of Justice collects fees for services rendered. An additional $296.2 million is planned to be collected and expended in 2017–18 under the department’s Vote-netted Revenue authority.

With the funds presented in these Main Estimates, the Department of Justice will fulfill three distinctive roles within the Government of Canada. It acts as:

  • A policy department with broad responsibilities for overseeing all matters relating to the administration of justice that fall within the federal domain and, in this capacity, it strives to ensure a fair, relevant and accessible Canadian justice system for all Canadians;
  • A provider of a range of legal advisory, litigation and legislative services to government departments and agencies; and
  • A central agency responsible for supporting the Minister in advising Cabinet on all legal matters.

For more detailed information consult the Department of Justice 2017–18 Departmental Plan.

The Department of Justice’s total authority will decrease by $22.7 million from the 2016–17 Main Estimates. The primary changes include:

  • An increase of $12.0 million in contribution funding for Legal Aid Systems and Access to Justice Services;
  • An increase of $6.17 million in funding to support culturally-responsive victim services as well as Family Information Liaison Units for families of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls, and families participating in the Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls;
  • An increase of $4.0 million in contribution funding in support of the Indigenous Courtwork Program (formerly known as the Aboriginal Courtwork Program);
  • An increase of $2.55 million related to a compensation adjustment for the Law Management Occupational Group;
  • A decrease of $16.60 million due to the sunsetting of the funding for the Supporting Families Experiencing Separation and Divorce Initiative;
  • A decrease of $11.5 million related to the sunsetting of the funding for the delivery of immigration and refugee legal aid in provinces and territories;
  • A decrease of $11.0 million due to the sunsetting of the funding for the Indigenous Justice Program (formerly known as the Aboriginal Justice Strategy);
  • A decrease of $6.8 million to reflect a decrease in the employee benefit plan rate; and
  • A decrease of $1.78 million due to a Budget 2016 reduction related to professional services, advertising and travel.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 128. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Department of Justice
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
A Fair, Relevant and Accessible Canadian Justice System.
Stewardship of the Canadian Legal Framework 384,331,448 400,491,696 385,118,141
Office of the Federal Ombudsman for Victims of Crime 1,115,554 1,324,227 1,312,105
A Federal Government that is Supported by High Quality Legal Services.
Legal Services to Government Program 194,449,097 199,619,747 195,920,770
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 103,323,708 77,424,860 73,808,640
Total 683,219,807 678,860,530 656,159,656

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments

Table 129. Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments - Department of Justice
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Grants
Grants from the Victims Fund 1,432,852 3,250,000 3,250,000
Grant under the Justice Partnership and Innovation Program 1,564,610 1,749,158 1,749,158
Grants under the Access to Justice in both Official Languages Support Fund 197,275 600,000 600,000
Grants in support of the Youth Justice Fund 69,823 79,655 79,655
Contributions
Contributions to the provinces and territories in support of the youth justice services 141,692,415 141,692,415 141,692,415
Contributions to the provinces to assist in the operation of legal aid systems 120,327,507 119,827,507 119,727,507
Contributions from the Victims Fund 12,434,287 18,255,723 24,537,265
Contributions to the provinces and territories in support of the youth justice services – Intensive Rehabilitative Custody and Supervision Program 11,003,383 11,048,000 11,048,000
Contributions to support the implementation of official languages requirements under the Contraventions Act 3,363,960 9,094,900 9,094,900
Contributions to the provinces under the Indigenous Courtwork Program 5,259,779 4,911,363 7,961,363
Contributions for Access to Justice Services to the Territories (being Legal Aid, Indigenous Courtwork and Public Legal Education and Information Services) 4,856,593 4,856,593 6,406,593
Contributions under the Access to Justice in Both Official Languages Support Fund 6,268,735 5,892,845 5,892,845
Contributions in support of the Youth Justice Fund 3,854,957 4,425,345 4,425,345
Contributions under the State-Funded Counsel Component of the Legal Aid Program 0 0 4,150,000
Drug Treatment Court Funding Program 3,579,700 3,631,276 3,631,276
Contributions under the Indigenous Justice Program Fund 12,900,000 12,650,000 2,900,000
Contributions under the Justice Partnership and Innovation Program 1,046,170 1,188,997 1,288,997
Contributions under the Special Advocates Program 153,405 1,000,000 1,000,000
Integrated Market Enforcement Teams Reserve Fund 0 550,000 550,000
Contributions to the Hague Conference on Private International Law 295,090 250,000 250,000
Contributions to the International Institute for the Unification of Private Law (UNIDROIT) 193,925 80,000 80,000

Department of National Defence

Raison d’être

On behalf of the people of Canada, the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) and the Department of National Defence (DND) stand ready to perform three key roles:

  • Defend Canada – by delivering excellence at home;
  • Defend North America – by being a strong and reliable partner with the United States in the defence of the continent; and
  • Contribute to International Peace and Security – by projecting leadership abroad.

The National Defence Act establishes DND and the CAF as separate entities, operating within an integrated National Defence Headquarters, as they pursue their primary responsibility of providing defence for Canada and Canadians.

The Minister of National Defence is responsible for DND.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 60. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Department of National Defence (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 17,108.50 17,588.64 17,469.02
Total Statutory 1,557.58 1,319.71 1,193.05
Figure 61. organizational estimates - non-budgetary - department of national defence (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 2.63 0.00 0.00
Table 130. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Department of National Defence
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 13,775,156,234 13,765,146,779 14,021,406,376 14,201,614,868
5 Capital expenditures 3,182,342,740 3,395,930,409 3,404,237,773 3,102,710,864
10 Grants and contributions 150,998,684 164,592,820 162,992,820 164,695,408
Total Voted 17,108,497,658 17,325,670,008 17,588,636,969 17,469,021,140
Total Statutory 1,557,575,585 1,314,598,925 1,319,707,585 1,193,046,094
Total Budgetary 18,666,073,243 18,640,268,933 18,908,344,554 18,662,067,234
Non-budgetary
Voted
Working capital advance account 2,628,008 0 0 0
Total Voted 2,628,008 0 0 0
Total non-budgetary 2,628,008 0 0 0

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

National Defence is estimating budgetary expenditures of $18.7 billion in 2017–18.

Of this amount, $17.5 billion requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $1.2 billion represents statutory forecasts that do not require approval, but are listed for information.

National Defence’s increase in net authority of $21.8 million, or approximately 0.1%, from the 2016–17 Main Estimates to the 2017–18 Main Estimates, is due to an increase in operating costs of $436.5 million, a decrease in capital costs of $293.2 million, an increase in grants and contributions of $0.1 million and a decrease in statutory payments of $121.6 million.

Major factors contributing to the net decrease in authorities include:

  • A decrease in spending on major capital equipment and infrastructure projects to align financial resources with current project acquisition timelines. This funding includes investments in major capital projects such as Arctic Offshore Patrol Ships, and the Halifax Class Modernization and Frigate Life Extension; and
  • A decrease in incremental funding related to fleet maintenance. The fleet maintenance of major equipment has been maintained or increased using the annual escalator on defence spending; and
  • A decrease in funding to build and renew infrastructure at Canadian Armed Forces and other defence properties as announced in Budget 2014 as part of Federal Infrastructure Investment Plan due to project completion.

These decreases are offset by the following net increase in authorities:

  • An increase in the annual escalator on defence spending as announced in Budget 2015 to provide long-term and predictable funding.

In 2017–18, National Defence will continue to ensure sound financial management of the Defence budget and deliver on the three enduring roles of the Canadian Armed Forces: defend Canada; defend North America; and contribute to international peace and security.

More information can be found in the department’s 2017–18 Departmental Plan.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 131. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Department of National Defence
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Defence Remains Continually Prepared to Deliver National Defence and Defence Services in Alignment with Canadian Interests and Values.
Defence Capability Element Production 12,577,878,081 12,775,597,776 12,805,778,436
Defence Ready Force Element Production 3,401,386,557 3,469,027,157 3,366,635,148
Defence Capability Development and Research 424,789,408 397,614,790 395,158,296
Defence Operations and Services Improve Stability and Security, and Promote Canadian Interests and Values.
Defence Combat and Support Operations 1,360,079,139 1,235,618,328 1,204,608,692
Defence Services and Contributions to Government 453,694,400 323,558,922 431,792,517
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 448,245,658 438,851,960 458,094,145
Total 18,666,073,243 18,640,268,933 18,662,067,234

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Table 132. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Non-budgetary - Department of National Defence
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Defence Operations and Services Improve Stability and Security, and Promote Canadian Interests and Values.
Defence Combat and Support Operations 1,997,472 0 0
Defence Remains Continually Prepared to Deliver National Defence and Defence Services in Alignment with Canadian Interests and Values.
Defence Ready Force Element Production 950,473 0 0
Defence Capability Element Production (319,937) 0 0
Total 2,628,008 0 0

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments

Table 133. Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments - Department of National Defence
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Grants
Grants in support of the Compensation for Employers of Reservists Program 0 2,350,000 2,400,000
Grants in support of the Defence Engagement Program 496,644 500,000 500,000
Grant Program to the National Offices of the Cadet Leagues of Canada: Navy League of Canada 450,000 458,000 467,000
Grant Program to the National Offices of the Cadet Leagues of Canada: Army Cadet League of Canada 450,000 458,000 467,000
Grant Program to the National Offices of the Cadet Leagues of Canada: Air Cadet League of Canada 450,000 458,000 467,000
Total Statutory 24,046 25,700 26,000
Contributions
North Atlantic Treaty Organization Contribution Program: NATO Military Budget (NATO Programs) 82,591,502 92,495,731 77,992,408
North Atlantic Treaty Organization Contribution Program: NATO Security Investment Program (NATO Programs) 45,922,989 45,755,000 60,100,000
Contributions in Support of the Military Training and Cooperation Program 10,360,427 11,389,000 11,389,000
Contributions in support of the Capital Assistance Program 3,307,738 5,450,000 5,500,000
Contribution to the Civil Air Search and Rescue Association 2,818,087 3,100,000 3,100,000
North Atlantic Treaty Organization Contribution Program: NATO Other Activities 2,254,358 2,050,000 2,182,000
Contribution to the Biological and Chemical Defence Review Committee 126,682 129,089 131,000
Total Statutory 2,553,041 3,300,000 2,600,000

Department of Natural Resources

Raison d’être

The Minister of Natural Resources is responsible for this organization.

Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) works to improve the quality of life of Canadians by ensuring that our natural resources are developed sustainably, providing a source of jobs, prosperity, and opportunity, while preserving our environment and respecting our communities and Indigenous peoples.

Additional information can be found in the organization’s Departmental Plan.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 62. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Department of Natural Resources (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 933.66 912.00 877.46
Total Statutory 401.52 803.25 462.48
Table 134. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Department of Natural Resources
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 630,741,319 450,234,684 541,604,315 496,759,758
5 Capital expenditures 49,589,000 53,318,447 82,818,947 55,781,300
10 Grants and contributions 253,327,009 292,249,050 287,577,468 324,921,046
Total Voted 933,657,328 795,802,181 912,000,730 877,462,104
Total Statutory 401,521,341 796,716,572 803,245,391 462,484,346
Total Budgetary 1,335,178,669 1,592,518,753 1,715,246,121 1,339,946,450

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

The decrease in Main Estimates of $252.6 million (or 15.9%) from $1,592.5 million in fiscal year 2016–17 to $1,339.9 million in fiscal year2017–18 is due to a net effect of $46.6 million in increases in operating, $2.5 million in increases in capital, and $301.7 million in decreases in transfer payments. Major factors contributing to the net decrease include:

  • A decrease of $334.7 million for the Statutory Atlantic Offshore Accords;
  • A decrease of $46.2 million for Sustainable Development Technology Canada for the Sustainable Development Technology Fund;
  • A decrease of $27.9 million for the ecoENERGY for Biofuels – Producer Incentive;
  • A decrease of $23.9 million for defining the outer limits of Canada’s continental shelf in the Arctic Ocean;
  • A decrease of $18.4 million for the ecoENERGY for Renewable Power program;
  • A decrease of $7.4 million for Enhancing National Earthquake Monitoring;
  • A decrease of $4.8 million for professional services and travel reductions;
  • A decrease of $4.0 million for the Wind Power Production Incentive program; and
  • A net decrease of $1.1 million for a combination of other programs.

These decreases are offset by:

  • An increase of $145.5 million for the Clean Growth and Climate Change envelope;
  • An increase of $50.1 million for the Green Infrastructure envelope;
  • An increase of $14.3 million for the contaminated sites and investments in laboratory and facility infrastructure modernization (Federal Infrastructure Initiative);
  • An increase of $3.2 million for Marine Conservation Targets; and
  • An increase of $2.7 million for interim measures as part of the review of the federal environmental assessment process.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 135. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Department of Natural Resources
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Canada’s natural resource sectors are globally competitive.
Statutory Programs – Atlantic Offshore 347,989,273 743,336,158 408,998,253
Innovation for New Products and Processes 93,375,233 96,074,981 109,154,844
Investment in Natural Resource Sectors 68,270,162 62,900,219 73,163,653
Market Access and Diversification 75,927,073 43,993,476 60,190,597
Natural resource sectors and consumers are environmentally responsible.
Technology Innovation 143,620,407 115,838,434 219,965,182
Energy-efficient Practices and Lower-carbon Energy Sources 211,012,423 183,336,817 183,461,546
Responsible Natural Resource Management 121,598,627 29,619,508 27,437,623
Canadians have information to manage their lands and natural resources, and are protected from related risks.
Protection for Canadians and Natural Resources 73,709,947 57,808,743 70,418,079
Landmass Information 74,110,670 75,092,662 49,150,177
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 125,564,854 184,517,755 138,006,496
Total 1,335,178,669 1,592,518,753 1,339,946,450

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments

Table 136. Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments - Department of Natural Resources
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Grants
Grants in support of organizations associated with the research, development and promotion of activities that contribute to departmental objectives 1,504,948 1,628,000 1,823,000
Grants in support of the Geo-mapping for Energy and Minerals program 789,652 800,000 800,000
Grants in support of the Targeted Geoscience Initiative 0 600,000 600,000
Total Statutory 337,616 0 0
Contributions
Contributions in support of ecoENERGY for Renewable Power 125,428,503 137,939,000 119,553,000
Contributions in support of the Energy Innovation Program 20,749,145 0 106,059,835
Contributions in support of Investments in the Forest Industry Transformation Program 20,950,000 34,800,000 35,020,728
Contributions in support of the Forest Innovation program 21,592,945 19,600,000 19,600,000
Contribution Program for expanding market opportunities 11,508,776 11,600,000 11,600,000
Contributions in support of Transportation and Alternative Fuels 180,000 0 10,909,883
Contribution in support of the clean-up of the Gunnar uranium mining facilities 0 3,111,670 4,667,500
Contributions in support of the Energy Efficiency Program 1,599,525 0 3,630,100
Renewal and Enhancement of Funding for the Forest Research Institute 2,368,000 2,368,000 2,368,000
Contributions in support of organizations associated with the research, development and promotion of activities that contribute to departmental objectives 2,633,529 1,498,000 1,505,000
Contributions in support of the Indigenous Consultations Participant Funding Program 0 0 1,476,000
Oil Spill Response Science Program 0 1,250,000 1,250,000
Contributions in support of Climate Change Adaptation 2,488,106 0 1,000,000
Contributions in Support of Indigenous Economic Development 902,054 1,000,000 1,000,000
Contributions in support of Indigenous Participation in Policy Dialogues 0 0 1,000,000
Youth Employment Strategy 551,349 558,000 558,000
GeoConnections Program 500,253 500,000 500,000
Total Statutory 347,989,273 743,336,158 408,998,253

Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Raison d’être

The Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness (PSEP) plays a key role in discharging the Government’s fundamental responsibility for the safety and security of its citizens. The Minister of PSEP is responsible for the Department. Legislation governing the Department sets out three essential roles: (i) support the Minister’s responsibility for all matters related to public safety and emergency management not assigned to another federal organization; (ii) exercise leadership at the national level for national security and emergency preparedness; and (iii) support the Minister’s responsibility for the coordination of Public Safety’s Portfolio entities.

The Department provides strategic policy advice and support to the Minister of PSEP on a range of issues including: national security, border strategies, countering crime, and emergency management. The Department also delivers a number of grant and contribution programs related to emergency management, national security and community safety.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 63. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 392.75 1,150.03 1,037.77
Total Statutory 14.03 16.22 14.82
Table 137. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 120,889,337 128,080,019 130,085,340 123,231,161
5 Grants and contributions 271,862,285 952,867,801 1,019,949,158 914,540,358
Total Voted 392,751,622 1,080,947,820 1,150,034,498 1,037,771,519
Total Statutory 14,031,105 16,010,588 16,223,409 14,822,340
Total Budgetary 406,782,727 1,096,958,408 1,166,257,907 1,052,593,859

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

PSEP is estimating budgetary expenditures of $1,052.6 million in 2017–18 which includes $14.8 million in statutory forecasts.

There is a net spending decrease of $44.4 million or 4.0% from previous Main Estimates.

Major factors contributing to the net decrease of $44.4 million include the following decreases:

  • $38.3 million associated with the completion of financial assistance to the Province of Quebec for decontamination costs following the train derailment and explosion in Lac-Mégantic, Quebec;
  • $10.5 million for non-discretionary requirements to address existing and future obligations under the Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangements program;
  • $2.2 million for the completion of a Beyond the Border time-limited program, which sought to strengthen the security of the Canada and the United States shared perimeter and facilitate secure trade and travel across borders;
  • $2.1 million of reduced funding to advance Phase II of Canada’s Cyber Security Strategy, which will introduce actions to secure cyber systems outside of the Government of Canada;
  • $1.2 million for statutory items related to a decrease in the rate of Employee Benefit Plans from 17.2% to 15.7% as a result of an increase in the employee contributions portion; and
  • $0.4 million for other initiatives.

These decreases are offset by the following increases:

  • $4.6 million for the creation of the office for community outreach and countering radicalization to violence;
  • $3.1 million for the creation of the Heavy Urban Search and Rescue Program; and
  • $2.7 million for the National Disaster Mitigation Program, aimed at reducing the impacts of natural disasters on Canadians.

National Security

PSEP will continue to advance key national security policy issues such as countering radicalization to violence, counter-terrorism, cyber security and cybercrime. The Department will continue to play a leadership role in enhancing the resilience of Canada’s critical infrastructure from cyber threats as well as engaging with key multilateral bodies.

Border Services

PSEP will continue to work with the United States and partners to ensure the legitimate flow of trade and travel. The Department will continue to modernize and strengthen its approach to border management as well as critical and interconnected infrastructure.

Countering Crime

PSEP will continue to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of crime prevention by supporting research and policy development in the areas of policing, corrections and community safety. The Department will also continue to advance the crime and safety agenda with a focus on at-risk and vulnerable populations including Indigenous peoples as well as those with mental illness throughout the criminal justice system.

Emergency Management

PSEP will continue to lead the modernization of emergency management by strengthening its community resilience to emergencies in collaboration with key stakeholders, and its capacity to provide strategic-level response on behalf of the Government of Canada. The Department will invest in research and innovation through the National Disaster Mitigation Program and by providing support, as needed, through the Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangements.

Internal Services

PSEP will continue to ensure sound stewardship of public funds and implement management practices based on organizational values with an emphasis on mental health in the workplace.

Additional information can be found in the Department’s Departmental Plan.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 138. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
A safe and resilient Canada.
Emergency Management 175,134,875 801,835,100 757,517,869
Countering Crime 148,943,506 210,453,512 213,711,559
National Security 24,346,071 30,655,523 29,645,423
Border Strategies 3,902,107 3,730,870 2,338,110
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 54,456,168 50,283,403 49,380,898
Total 406,782,727 1,096,958,408 1,052,593,859

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments

Table 139. Listing of the 2017–18 Transfer Payments - Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Grants
Heavy Urban Search and Rescue Program 0 0 3,100,000
Grants in support of the Safer Communities Initiative 191,185 1,758,500 2,460,000
Other National Voluntary Organizations active in the criminal justice sector 1,796,143 1,796,144 1,796,144
Community Resilience Fund 0 0 400,000
Cyber Security Cooperation Program 64,334 150,000 150,000
Contributions
Contributions to the provinces for assistance related to natural disasters 139,348,326 689,825,000 679,300,000
Payments to the provinces, territories, municipalities, Indian band councils and recognized authorities representing Indians on reserve, Indian communities on Crown land and Inuit communities, for the First Nations Policing Program 81,281,859 123,821,662 125,081,662
Contributions in support of the Safer Communities Initiative 26,093,038 41,167,893 41,167,892
National Disaster Mitigation Program 0 32,725,000 36,897,000
Biology Casework Analysis Contribution Program 6,900,000 6,900,000 6,900,000
Contribution Program in support of the Search and Rescue New Initiatives Fund 4,808,820 6,733,502 6,818,554
Contribution Program to Combat Serious and Organized Crime 1,950,345 2,551,000 2,281,000
Contribution Program to Combat Child Sexual Exploitation and Human Trafficking 2,629,650 2,035,600 2,035,600
Contribution in support of the Nation’s Capital Extraordinary Policing Costs Program 2,000,000 2,000,000 2,000,000
Community Resilience Fund 0 0 2,000,000
Aboriginal Community Safety Development Contribution Program 700,319 700,000 700,000
International Association of Fire Fighters, Canada 500,000 500,000 500,000
Payments to the provinces, territories, and public and private bodies in support of activities complementary to those of the Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness 356,878 362,000 362,000
Search and Rescue Volunteer Association of Canada Contribution Program 375,000 500,000 250,506
COSPAS-SARSAT Secretariat Contribution Program 142,500 190,000 190,000
Cyber Security Cooperation Program 272,671 150,000 150,000

Department of Public Works and Government Services

Raison d’être

Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) plays an important role in the daily operations of the Government of Canada. It supports federal departments and agencies in the achievement of their mandated objectives as their central purchasing agent, real property manager, linguistic authority, treasurer, accountant, pay and pension administrator, and common service provider. The Department’s vision is to excel in government operations, and our strategic outcome and mission is to deliver high-quality, central programs and services that ensure sound stewardship on behalf of Canadians and meet the program needs of federal institutions.

The Minister of Public Services and Procurement is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 64. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Department of Public Works and Government Services (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 2,742.30 3,255.65 3,576.09
Total Statutory 91.01 126.99 117.99
Figure 65. organizational estimates - non-budgetary - department of public works and government services (millions of dollars)
2015–16 Expenditures 2016–17 Estimates To Date 2017–18 Main Estimates
Voted 0.26 0.00 0.00
Total Statutory 9.46 0.00 0.00
Table 140. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Department of Public Works and Government Services
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2016‑17
Estimates
To Date
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 1,684,654,681 1,563,893,483 1,947,236,828 2,134,161,650
5 Capital expenditures 1,057,647,220 1,183,196,646 1,308,417,771 1,441,927,728
Total Voted 2,742,301,901 2,747,090,129 3,255,654,599 3,576,089,378
Total Statutory 91,013,809 123,369,269 126,993,478 117,992,806
Total Budgetary 2,833,315,710 2,870,459,398 3,382,648,077 3,694,082,184
Non-budgetary
Voted
Imprest funds, accountable advances and recoverable advances. Limit $22,000,000 (Net) 264,736 0 0 0
Total Voted 264,736 0 0 0
Total Statutory 9,457,130 0 0 0
Total non-budgetary 9,721,866 0 0 0

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Highlights

Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) is estimating budgetary expenditures of $3,694.1 million in 2017–18. Of this amount, $3,576.1 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $118 million represents statutory authorities that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

An increase in net spending of $823.6 million from $2,870.5 million in 2016–17 to $3,694.1 million in 2017-18 is primarily because of the following:

  • $365.4 million for Real Property Program Integrity for repairs and maintenance of Federal buildings to provide a safe, healthy, and secure workplace;
  • $105.5 million for Parliamentary Precinct Rehabilitation to continue the implementation of the Parliamentary Precinct Rehabilitation, which will preserve Parliament buildings as heritage assets and national symbols;
  • $75.2 million for Engineering Assets for the rehabilitation of major public infrastructure, to reduce risks related to health and safety, and to ensure long-term stewardship of these assets;
  • $68.4 million for the Energy Services Acquisition Project to undertake a modernization of the district energy system serving federal buildings in the National Capital Region;
  • $35.7 million for Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan to renew support for remediation activities at various federal contaminated sites in order to reduce associated liabilities and mitigate human health and environmental risks; and
  • $21.9 million for Card Acceptance and Postage Fees to provide federal organizations with the ability to accept electronic payments from Canadians and sustain the increase in postage fees caused by fluctuations in price and transaction volume.

Accommodation and Real Property Services program administers the statutory grant, “Payments in lieu of taxes to municipalities and other taxing authorities”, which amounts to $594.6 million and is recovered by PWGSC from custodian departments.

Expenditures by Program or Purpose

Table 141. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Budgetary - Department of Public Works and Government Services
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
High quality, central programs and services that ensure sound stewardship on behalf of Canadians and meet the program needs of federal institutions.
Accommodation Management and Real Property Services 2,112,305,111 2,192,828,508 2,994,281,728
Acquisitions 151,557,532 148,255,037 153,731,765
Receiver General for Canada 109,908,581 106,647,604 128,471,892
Federal Pay and Pension Administration 128,954,893 81,761,681 80,895,164
Linguistic Management and Services 51,299,267 60,707,474 64,762,500
Specialized Programs and Services 24,537,710 29,454,041 27,562,369
Integrity Programs and Services 20,273,364 15,184,073 18,651,926
Procurement Ombudsman 3,830,009 4,118,152 4,080,925
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 230,649,243 231,502,828 221,643,915
Total 2,833,315,710 2,870,459,398 3,694,082,184

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website

Table 142. Expenditures by Program or Purpose - Non-budgetary - Department of Public Works and Government Services
  2015‑16
Expenditures
2016‑17
Main Estimates
2017‑18
Main Estimates
Funds not allocated to the 2017–18 Program Alignment Architecture 9,721,866 0 0
Total 9,721,866 0 0

Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website<