Annual Report on Official Languages 2017–2018

The Official Languages Act requires that the Minister Responsible for Official Languages report to Parliament, after each fiscal year, on the activities and accomplishments of federal institutions subject to Part VII of the Act.

This report presents a sample of the various measures taken by federal institutions between April 1, 2017, and March 31, 2018, to:

The information presented in this report was compiled mainly from the reviews provided by federal institutions to the Official Languages Branch of Canadian Heritage to deliver on their responsibilities under Part VII of the Act during fiscal year 2017–2018.

Note: The online version of the Annual Report on Official Languages 2017–2018 has been adapted for the web and therefore differs slightly from the printed version that was tabled in Parliament in 2019.

For additional information, please contact the Official Languages Branch.

On this page

Note: Appendix 5 presents data for 2016–2017 because the data for 2017–2018 were not available at the time of this report.

List of figures

List of tables

List of acronyms and abbreviations

Note: We have tried to limit the number of acronyms and abbreviations. However, we have used some for ease of reading or when the acronym is more familiar than the long version. This is the case for those listed below.

This report also contains several names of organizations and associations. Although these organizations and associations are sometimes better known by their acronym or abbreviation to their clients or members, we have chosen the long form (followed by the acronym in brackets) in order to situate the majority of readers.

Action Plan for Official Languages 2018–2023
Action Plan for Official Languages 2018–2023: Investing in Our Future
CanNor
Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency
CBC
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
CBDC
Community Business Development Corporations
CLIC
Cours de langue pour les immigrants du Canada
CRTC
Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission
FedDev Ontario
Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario
FedNor
Federal Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario
LINC
Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada
Km
Kilometres
M
Millions of dollars
MBA
Master of Business Administration
Protocol for Agreements
Protocol for Agreements on Minority Language Education and Second Language Instruction
Roadmap for Official Languages 2013–2018
Roadmap for Canada’s Official Languages 2013–2018: Education, Immigration, Communities
RCM
Regional county municipality
RCMP
Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Message from the Minister

The Honourable Mélanie Joly

In 2017–2018, as we mark the 50th anniversary of the Official Languages Act, our Government is reaffirming the importance of our linguistic duality. English and French are integral parts of the Canadian identity. These are the languages of the society in which we live together, and our Government’s commitment to protect and promote them is stronger than ever.

After meeting with thousands of Canadians at cross-Canada consultations, I presented the Action Plan for Official Languages 2018–2023: Investing in Our Future in March 2018. This plan reflects the realities expressed by Canadians. It represents an unprecedented investment of $2.7 billion over 5 years, in addition to presenting concrete measures and a vision for the future. Its implementation now allows us to work closely with all our partners who, like us, are committed to promoting bilingualism and enhancing the vitality of official language minority communities.

In 2017–2018, I was also pleased to welcome my provincial and territorial counterparts to Gatineau for the 22nd Ministerial Conference on the Canadian Francophonie. This gathering allowed us to highlight the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation, while also engaging in dialogue on a range of issues affecting Francophone and Acadian communities.

Since then, much progress has been made. In particular, we can think about the reinstatement of the Court Challenges Program, the launch of programs to strengthen the development of official language minority communities, or the celebrations surrounding the 50th anniversary of the Official Languages Act.

As Minister of Tourism, Official Languages and La Francophonie, I invite you to take a look at the Annual Report on Official Languages 2017–2018 to learn more about the measures taken by Canadian Heritage through the Official Languages Support Programs. You will also find out how federal institutions are working together to promote bilingualism and English- and French-speaking minority communities in every region of Canada.

The Honourable Mélanie Joly

1. Circle of support for community vitality

The circle of support for community vitality represents the support provided by federal institutions to official language minority communities at various stages of a community’s life.

In the centre of the circle are the citizens. Around them is “Government collaboration and coordination,” which illustrates the importance for the Government of Canada to put in place mechanisms to work closely with provincial and territorial governments and to properly coordinate efforts among federal institutions to implement initiatives that will support community vitality.

The first section, “Development: Renewal and mobilization,” illustrates some of the elements that contribute to the development of official language minority communities, including:

The second section, “Vitality: Achievements and outreach,” illustrates some of the elements that contribute to the vitality of these communities, namely, initiatives that affect:

The third section, “Promotion of official languages: Enhancement and rapprochement,” illustrates the elements that contribute to the full recognition and use of English and French in Canadian society, as well as connections between Anglophones and Francophones.

The fourth section, “Listening to Canadians: Ongoing dialogue,” illustrates the various means federal institutions can use to identify the priorities and needs of communities.

Each of these dimensions is discussed in this report in order to present various initiatives that were carried out by federal institutions in 2017–2018.

Figure 1: Circle of support for community vitality

Circle of support for community vitality infographic. Text version precedes.

2. Update on the Government of Canada’s official languages mechanisms in 2017–2018

The following is an update on some of the Government of Canada’s major actions and mechanisms that illustrate its commitment to the development and vitality of English and French linguistic minority communities in Canada, and to fostering the full recognition and use of English and French in Canadian society.

In this section

Note: Section 7 of this report also presents other mechanisms that illustrate the importance of government collaboration and coordination.

2.1 Announcement of the new Action Plan for Official Languages 2018–2023

In 2017–2018, the Official Languages Branch (Canadian Heritage) continued development of the new Action Plan for Official Languages 2018–2023: Investing in our Future.

This new horizontal federal official languages strategy is the result of an extensive analysis of the cross-Canada official languages consultations in which 6,500 Canadians and organizations took part between June and December 2016, and on which a report was published in June 2017.

Announced on March 28, 2018, the Action Plan 2018–2023 came into effect on April 1, 2018. Reflecting Canadians’ realities and experiences, it proposes a vision for the future, new financial assistance and specific initiatives to enhance the vitality of official language minority communities and promote English and French from coast to coast. It includes some 30 new initiatives based on the following 3 pillars:

An investment of $499.2 million was provided in addition to the current investments of $2.2 billion (from the former Roadmap) to bring the Government of Canada’s support to a total of nearly $2.7 billion over 5 years.

In new investments only, the Action Plan 2018–2023 provides for:

The new Action Plan initiatives will be implemented by the following 7 federal institution partners:

More details on the implementation of this new action plan will be provided in future annual reports.

2.2 Final year of the Roadmap for Official Languages 2013–2018

The Roadmap for Canada’s Official Languages 2013–2018: Education, Immigration, Communities, which presented the Government of Canada’s former strategy to protect and promote Canada’s both official languages, ended on March 31, 2018.

The Roadmap for Official Languages 2013–2018 contained 28 initiatives to strengthen and promote official languages in Canada. Implemented by 14 federal institutions, these initiatives were grouped under 3 main pillars:

Figure 2: Planned spending and actual spending in 2017–2018 of the Roadmap for Official Languages (in dollars)

Comparison of planned spending and actual spending for education, immigration and communities in 2017-2018. Text version follows.
Description of figure 2
Pillar Planned spending Actual spending
Education 131,634,247 131,569,257
Immigration 29,911,638 29,911,638
Communities 64,699,374 57,625,133
Total 226,245,259 219,106,028

Note: The difference between planned and actual spending for the Communities pillar is explained by the fact that the Contraventions Act Fund is dependent on agreements with the provinces and territories. In the absence of an agreement, funds cannot be spent. The surpluses were redirected as provided for in the Financial Administration Act and Treasury Board policies.

Furthermore, the implementation of some initiatives was delayed. An agreement signed in 2016 between the Government of Canada and intermediary organizations working with official language minority communities resulted in the funding of projects that improve the lives of people with disabilities, women, youth, seniors and families living in minority communities.

For more details on annual spending from 2013 to 2018 or by pillar, please refer to Appendix 1: Actual annual spending on the initiatives of the Roadmap for Official Languages 2013–2018.

2.3 Ministerial Conference on the Canadian Francophonie 2017

The 22nd Ministerial Conference on the Canadian Francophonie was held in June 2017 in Gatineau. For the first time since its creation in 1994, this annual meeting, co-chaired by the Honourable Mélanie Joly and the Honourable John Streicker, Minister responsible for the French Language Services Directorate for the Government of Yukon, was organized by the Government of Canada as part of Canada 150.

Federal, provincial and territorial ministers responsible for Francophone affairs in their respective jurisdictions discussed a wide range of topics affecting Francophone communities, including:

The ministers in attendance also agreed to:

2.4 Second Joint Federal/Provincial/Territorial Ministerial Forum on Francophone Immigration

Building on the momentum of the first Forum on Francophone Immigration held in New Brunswick in 2017, federal, provincial and territorial ministers responsible for immigration and the Canadian Francophonie participated in the second Forum on Francophone Immigration organized by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada and its Ontario government counterparts in March 2018 in Toronto.

In particular, they discussed concrete measures to be taken to increase Francophone immigration outside Quebec. They also announced the new Federal/Provincial/Territorial Action Plan for Increasing Francophone Immigration Outside of Quebec.

This action plan sets out concrete measures that governments can take, individually or collectively, to increase Francophone immigration. Concrete measures include:

Ministers also committed to developing appropriate indicators and fostering the ongoing sharing of best practices for reporting on progress.

This forum was followed by the Symposium on Francophone Immigration held in Calgary in March 2018. Organized by the Ministerial Conference on the Canadian Francophonie, this very first symposium laid the foundation for new collaboration between federal, provincial and territorial governments and Francophone minority communities. At the symposium, representatives from Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada presented the Federal/Provincial/Territorial Action Plan for Increasing Francophone Immigration Outside of Quebec.

2.5 Update on education agreements

The year 2017–2018 marked the end of the 5-year cycle of agreements on minority language education and second language instruction between the Government of Canada and the provinces and territories represented by the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada.

The Official Languages Branch (Canadian Heritage) continued the negotiations initiated in July 2017 with the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada, to establish the next Protocol for Agreements on Minority Language Education and Second Language Instruction 2018–2023. Pending the conclusion of the next protocol, interim measures have been negotiated to extend the agreements for an additional 2 years (2018–2019 and 2019–2020).

In reading this report, you will learn of concrete examples of the contributions that federal institutions have made in the field of education.

2.6 Update on agreements regarding access to services in French

The year 2017–2018 also marked the end of the 5-year cycle for agreements regarding French language services, other than education, between the Government of Canada and the provinces. The Official Languages Branch (Canadian Heritage) began negotiations in December 2017 with all provincial governments to renew the agreements for the next 5 years (2018–2019 to 2022–2023).

Once again this year, the federal government’s contribution made it possible to maintain or increase the delivery of French language services and to include French language service delivery in the development of new programs and services, while ensuring that third parties providing services on behalf of the Government also offer them in French.

In reading this report, you will learn of concrete examples of the contributions that federal institutions have made regarding access to services.

2.7 Increased support for French language services in the North

The Government of Canada has supported French language services in the North since 1984 through an agreement with the Northwest Territories, which was used for Yukon in 1988 and Nunavut in 1999.

In May 2017, Canadian Heritage announced the agreements signed with each of the territorial partners (in late 2016–2017) that significantly expand federal financial support for French language services delivered by the territories. These agreements will allow the territories to more fully meet their obligations with respect to French language services in the North.

Figure 3: Financial federal support by territory from 2016–2017 to 2019–2020 (in dollars)

Federal financial support for French language services delivered by the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut from 2016-2017 to 2019-2020. Text version follows.
Description of figure 3
Fiscal year Yukon Northwest Territories Nunavut
Baseline 1,750,000 1,900,000 1,450,000
2016–2017 -- 5,702,000 1,910,824
2017–2018 3,996,288 5,800,000 3,672,758
2018–2019 4,756,211 5,500,000 4,185,236
2019–2020 5,246,746 5,500,000 4,483,044
Total 13,999,245 22,502,000 14,251,862

2.8 New step toward reinstating the Court Challenges Program

In late 2016–2017, Canadian Heritage and Justice Canada announced a process to select an independent body that would be mandated to implement and manage the reinstatement and modernization of the Court Challenges Program. The University of Ottawa was then chosen.

In September 2017, the federal government announced the 5 people appointed to form the committee responsible for recommending the selection criteria for candidates to fill the 14 positions on the new program’s 2 independent expert panels. These 2 expert panels, one responsible for official languages rights and the other responsible for human rights, are tasked with assessing funding applications for cases of national importance and allocating resources accordingly. The appointment of members to these expert panels was announced in November 2018.

The objective of the renewed Court Challenges Program is to provide financial support to individuals and groups in Canada to bring before the courts test cases of national significance that aim to clarify and assert certain constitutional and quasi-constitutional official language rights and human rights.

2.9 Financial support for Acadians and Francophones in Nova Scotia

In June 2017, Canadian Heritage announced a contribution of $1.8 million over 5 years (2017–2018 to 2021–2022) to the Fédération acadienne de la Nouvelle-Écosse. This funding will enable the Fédération to enhance the vitality and the global development of the province’s Acadian and Francophone community. Some of the initiatives made possible through this funding include cultural tourism and the Rendez-vous de la Francophonie in Nova Scotia’s Acadian community.

2.10 Canada 150

In 2017, the Government of Canada marked the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation. Federal institutions organized a variety of activities across the country under 4 themes (diversity and inclusion, engaging and inspiring youth, Indigenous reconciliation and the environment) to give Canadians an opportunity to celebrate throughout the year.

Canada 150 provided Canadians with great opportunities to promote the country’s bilingual character, at home and abroad. Several of the initiatives funded by federal institutions had a positive effect on official language minority communities and the promotion of English and French in Canadian society. In reading this report, you will learn of some of these initiatives.

3. Community development: Renewal and mobilization

Under section 41 of Part VII of the Official Languages Act, federal institutions must take positive measures to support the development of Canada’s English and French linguistic minorities.

The initiatives presented in this section demonstrate how some federal institutions contributed to this obligation in 2017–2018 in the following areas:

3.1 Education and youth

In this section

3.1.1 Early childhood

Improving bilingual access to children’s programs

The Public Health Agency of Canada renewed funding provided to Pluri-Elles in Manitoba until 2020 under the Community Action Program for Children, to improve bilingual access to children’s programs across the province.

Purchase of French resources for early childhood

Also with funding from the Public Health Agency of Canada, the Association régionale de la côte Ouest (ARCO) of Newfoundland and Labrador purchased resources (books, audio tools, etc.) on language development and learning French in early childhood. These resources are available to children, educators and families in the 2 Francophone communities in the Port-au-Port Peninsula.

3.1.2 Investment in education

Support for minority language education

As previously stated, the Official Languages Branch (Canadian Heritage) continued to manage 13 bilateral education agreements with provincial and territorial governments to support education in the minority language and second language instruction.

In 2017–2018, these agreements helped close to 244,578 young Canadians living in minority communities study in their language in more than 923 schools across the country. They also supported the work of close to 40 school boards and 39 minority language post-secondary institutions in all regions of Canada.

Through these agreements, the Official Languages Branch (Canadian Heritage) has contributed to the funding of complementary projects intended to support minority language education. In 2017–2018, it provided:

Figure 4: Implementation expenditures for the "minority language education" component (Protocol for Agreements) (in dollars)

Funding of projects intended to support minority language education. Text version follows.
Description of figure 4
2017–2018 Total since 2013
148,178,357 740,691,785

Note: For more details on support for minority language education, please consult:

Support for educational infrastructure

In 2017–2018, Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada supported 30 projects to improve or modernize the facilities of 16 of the 28 post-secondary institutions that provide services to official language minority communities, for a total financial contribution of more than $232 million.

3.1.3 Education programs and youth civic engagement

Destination Clic program

The Destination Clic program, an initiative funded by Canadian Heritage, enabled 270 young Francophones from minority communities to improve their first official language, by means of summer language bursaries, while discovering different communities across Canada.

Note: For more details, please refer to Table 16: Breakdown of education expenditures – National programs in Appendix 4: 2017–2018 education expenditures.

The Leadership Discovery Program offered in French

Funded by Canadian Heritage, Girls Inc. of Halton in Ontario offered a French version of its Leadership Discovery program in 4 French language schools. Typically offered only in English, this program has enabled over 200 Francophone girls in the Halton community to develop leadership skills.

Jeunes leaders d’ICI

Through its initiative Jeunes leaders d’ICI, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC)/Société Radio-Canada enabled listeners to discover the leadership, personality and commitment of 40 young Francophone and Francophile leaders. Following a vote, 8 winners were chosen to attend the Sommet des jeunes leaders d’ICI, a leadership summit held in Winnipeg in June 2017, where they had an opportunity to share their cause and thoughts.

Succession planning

The Association canadienne-française de l’Ontario (ACFO) of the Temiskaming region hired a project authority to provide practical knowledge on community engagement, the operation of a board of directors and the creation of a youth cooperative for young Francophones in the region. Funded by the Federal Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario (FedNor), this measure has enabled some 60 young people from 4 French language elementary schools in Temiskaming to better understand project management, governance, cooperative models, the use of social media and creation of websites to post and promote their activities in French. It also provided the young people with an opportunity to network with young people from other participating schools and community organizations. The leaders who mentored these young people have extensive knowledge of the Franco-Ontarian community, which contributed to the success of the initiative.

3.1.4 Training for health professionals

Health Canada supported the training and retention of health professionals in official language minority communities, which strengthened the capacities of health networks in these communities. The following are examples illustrating this support in 2017–2018:

In Quebec
Outside Quebec

3.1.5 Training for legal professionals

As shown by the following 2 examples, Justice Canada provided stakeholders of Canada’s justice system with access to language training in order to facilitate access to justice for Canadians in the official language of their choice in all provinces and territories.

Language training for judges

In 2017–2018, 43 provincially appointed English-speaking judges who wanted to improve their ability to hear cases in French participated in one of 2 week-long language training sessions offered in New Brunswick. Workshops to improve oral expression and various simulations, such as a police officer’s testimony, an appearance and trial, as well as cultural visits promoting communication in French, were included in the program. Participants were able to attend appearances before the New Brunswick Provincial Court in Caraquet. Twelve (12) French-speaking judges of the Court of Quebec also participated in similar English language training sessions in St. Andrews, New Brunswick.

PratiquO and Juriblogue

With support from Justice Canada and the Government of Ontario, the Common Law Section of the Faculty of Law at the University of Ottawa created pratiquO (in French only) in June 2017. This professional development centre offers live conferences and workshops as well as online training to Francophone and Francophile legal professionals in Ontario, with a view to improving access to justice in French. In collaboration with the Association des juristes d’expression française de l’Ontario, pratiquO also hosts the blog Juriblogue (in French only), which provides access to the latest news in the legal world and enables users to participate in virtual discussions on current topics in French.

3.2 Immigration

In this section

3.2.1 Engagement with partners and stakeholders

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada carried out various initiatives in 2017–2018 that engaged partners and stakeholders on immigration and official languages issues, including:

3.2.2 Promotion and recruitment

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada also continued to carry out activities to encourage newcomers to settle in Francophone minority communities. The following are examples of initiatives carried out in 2017–2018:

Third Provincial Forum of Francophone Immigration Support Networks

In addition to the initiatives of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada, we also want to mention the support from FedNor, which made it possible for the Northern Network to organize the Third Provincial Forum of Francophone Immigration Support Networks in November 2017 in Timmins, Ontario. Under the theme of “the regionalization of Francophone immigration,” representatives of Francophone organizations across Ontario reflected on and discussed efforts needed to ensure the success of Francophone immigration in rural and remote Francophone communities.

3.2.3 Settlement and integration

Citizenship ceremonies in French

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada also organized citizenship ceremonies in French in predominantly English-speaking regions of the country, including:

In addition to celebrating and promoting the bilingual nature of Canadian society, these ceremonies demonstrated that a Francophone minority group can retain its identity, even in a minority setting.

Language training for economic immigrants

The Government of Canada recognizes that the acquisition of skills in either official language is a key driver of economic immigration and social integration. With support from Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada, economic immigrants across the country (except Quebec) had the opportunity to learn English or French by participating in one of the following language training programs free of charge:

These courses, from beginner to advanced, cover the following 4 competencies: reading, writing, listening and speaking. It should be noted that, in 2017–2018, 21% of economic immigrants enrolled in language training progressed in at least 3 of the 4 competencies.

It should also be noted that, since April 2017, the New Brunswick Community College (NBCC)/Collège Communautaire du Nouveau-Brunswick (CCNB) has been the only service provider that administers language testing in English and French for the province. It is also responsible for all French language testing for the 4 Atlantic provinces, and LINC/CLIC training for all of New Brunswick. By using a single service provider, the department strives to improve efficiency and facilitate the labour market integration of immigrants more quickly.

The department has also explored new ways to promote language training. In particular, it broadcast the promotional video “Language Training for Canada” on its YouTube channel. Initially offered in English and French, then dubbed in Arabic, this video was dubbed in Mandarin, Spanish, Hindi and Farsi in 2017–2018.

Supporting the integration of Francophone immigrants

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada continued to invest in 2017–2018 to support the integration of Francophone immigrants, including $1 million in New Brunswick alone.

Note: The data in Figures 5 and 6 are based on the new definition of a French-speaking immigrant; namely, those who indicated that French is their first official language spoken, plus 50% of those who chose English and French. All these data have also been rounded to a multiple of 5.

In addition, the “cumulative total of unique clients” in these figures represents all clients who received at least one settlement service over the period from 2015–2016 to 2017–2018. If a single client received a settlement service in more than one fiscal year, that client is counted in each of those years; however, the client is counted only once in the cumulative total of the 3 years.

Figure 5: Number of French-speaking unique clients who have received at least one settlement service in Canada

Number of French speaking immigrants who received at least one settlement service over the period from 2015–2016 to 2017–2018. Text version follows.
Description of figure 5
Fiscal year Number of unique clients
2015–2016 14,990
2016–2017 14,900
2017–2018 15,820
Cumulative total of unique clients since 2015–2016 28,800

Source: Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada, February 28, 2019

Figure 6: Number of French-speaking unique clients who have received at least one settlement service in New Brunswick

Number of French speaking immigrants who received at least one settlement service in New Brunswick from 2015 to 2018. Text version follows.
Description of figure 6
Fiscal year Number of unique clients
2015–2016 350
2016–2017 390
2017–2018 550
Cumulative total of unique clients since 2015–2016 840

Source: Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada, February 28, 2019

Employability programs for French-speaking newcomers

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada also promoted the expansion of employability programs for French-speaking newcomers. The following are some initiatives that were launched in 2017–2018:

Employment and Social Development Canada also supported the employability of immigrants by funding the Société économique de l’Ontario (SÉO) to test the impact of a mentoring program on the labour market integration of highly skilled newcomers, particularly in Ontario’s Francophone communities. Thanks to this new employment assistance measure, 20 highly skilled Francophone newcomers gained their first Canadian work experience in their field of study in a Francophone minority community.

Reducing barriers

In 2017–2018, the University of Alberta received funding from Canadian Heritage (Multiculturalism Funding Program) to develop the projectContrer l'homo/transphobie parmi les immigrants francophones des minorités visibles” at Campus Saint-Jean in Edmonton. The project was designed to help immigrants to Alberta better understand the reality of sexual minorities and provide young people with a safe place to learn about the realities of sexual minorities who have experienced discrimination and exclusion in their cultural community.

4. Community vitality: Achievements and outreach

According to section 41 of Part VII of the Official Languages Act, in addition to taking positive measures to support the development of Canada’s English and French linguistic minority communities, federal institutions must also take positive measures to enhance their vitality.

The initiatives presented in this section demonstrate how some federal institutions contributed to this obligation in 2017–2018 in the following areas of activity:

Highlights

Intergovernmental cooperation on minority language services

In 2017–2018, the Government of Canada had 13 bilateral agreements with provincial and territorial governments to provide direct services to the population in sectors other than minority language education, including justice, health, culture, economic development and municipal services.

Canadian Heritage continued to support the delivery of services provided by provincial and territorial governments in 2017–2018, including measures taken to implement acts, regulations or policies on French language services outside Quebec and English language services in Quebec.

Support for minority communities

Canadian Heritage also provided financial support to nearly 400 local, provincial and national community organizations that worked directly to ensure the vitality of official language minority communities in 2017–2018. This support made it possible to:

  • provide cultural or educational services to specific groups, such as parents or youth
  • support more than 30 school community centres, which are often the main or the only gathering place for over 172,000 Francophones living in areas where access to services or activities in French would otherwise be very limited
  • create activities in dozens of other cultural or community centres
  • organize large cultural gatherings and activities at the regional or local level
  • help organizations that support the work of more than 100 community media (radio stations and newspapers), such as the Association de la presse francophone and the Alliance des radios communautaires

4.1 Social life

In this section

4.1.1 Health services

Strengthening the capacity of health networks

Health Canada continued to make significant efforts across the country in 2017–2018 to strengthen the capacity of the 36 community health networks that work closely with various health stakeholders to improve access to health services for English- and French-speaking minorities.

Community Health Social Services Network
Société Santé en français networks
Increased access to health services and retention of professionals
Strategy to address gender-based violence

In June 2017, the Government of Canada launched It’s Time: Canada’s Strategy to Prevent and Address Gender-Based Violence to be implemented by Status of Women Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada, Public Safety Canada, the Department of National Defence, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), and Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada.

As part of this strategy, Status of Women Canada is responsible for the Gender-Based Violence Program. The purpose of this program is to assist organizations working in the gender-based violence sector in designing and implementing promising practices to address gaps in support for Indigenous people and underserved populations across the country. During the call for project concepts in winter 2018, Status of Women Canada targeted women in official language minority communities. About a quarter of the proposals received targeted this particular group.

4.1.2 Justice services

Access to legal information in the official language of choice

Justice Canada supported or promoted various initiatives in 2017–2018 that provided Canadians with access to legal information about their rights and responsibilities in the official language of their choice.

Information for justice system stakeholders

Justice Canada also continued to support various resources for justice system stakeholders in 2017–2018, including:

Videos to help victims in Whitehorse

As part of the “Together for Safety” protocol, which aims to increase the safety of women in Yukon, the RCMP and 6 women’s groups in Whitehorse produced a series of 3 videos in both official languages in 2017–2018. The videos provide information about the reporting process and the criminal justice system to women who are victims of sexual assault or domestic violence, as well as information about the health and social services that are available to them. These videos were posted on the social media accounts of the organization Les Essentielles, one of the signatories to the protocol which represents the interests of Francophone women in Yukon, as well as on the website of Yukon RCMP.

4.1.3 Social development and community partnership

Social partnership

Employment and Social Development Canada supported the following 2 intermediary organizations:

In 2017–2018, the Quebec Community Groups Network:

In 2017–2018, the Fédération des aînées et aînés francophones du Canada continued to coordinate and evaluate the 29 projects of the national initiative “Ensemble pour le développement social des communautés francophones et acadienne du Canada”. This initiative involves 4 organizations that work together to help minority communities develop and strengthen their capacities in the following areas:

To receive funding, projects must promote approaches that focus on social innovation, partnership creation and citizen service. To date, these 29 projects have reached over 113,915 Francophones and Francophiles across the country by providing direct service to over 11,359 citizens in more than 80 Francophone minority communities.

Combatting the rape culture on campuses

With support from Status of Women Canada, the Atwater Library and Computer Centre is conducting a major 36-month (2017–2020) project on rape culture on English college and university campuses in the Montreal area. Since the project started, various community groups, public agencies and educational institutions have been working together to:

Before the funding ends in 2020, best practices will be tested in 3 English colleges in the Montreal area. Recommendations will then be developed and shared with the English and French academic communities, as well as with stakeholders in the media, technology and video game industry, to support similar systemic changes in their own networks.

Preferred hotel rates

Public Services and Procurement Canada’s Hotel Card Program allows official language minority community organizations to benefit from the Government of Canada’s preferred rates for accommodations in participating hotels in Canada. In 2017–2018, participating organizations were able to benefit from preferred rates for a total of 987 nights of accommodation during business travel. The program was renewed in January 2018 for a period of 2 years. In total, 155 organizations joined the program, representing 56 new memberships and 99 renewals.

Maintaining forest health

In order to help New Brunswick’s official language minority communities maintain the health of their forests, researchers and representatives of Natural Resources Canada’s Atlantic Forestry Centre carried out various outreach activities with these communities.

4.1.4 Innovation and technology

Hackathon

In March 2018, the Official Languages Branch (Canadian Heritage) organized, with various partners, the very first official languages programming marathon (Hackathon Accès Franco 2018) in Moncton, New Brunswick.

Using open data provided by the Government of Canada, the Government of New Brunswick, the City of Moncton and the private sector, 35 students or recent graduates of computer science programs or other fields of interest were engaged to collaboratively develop mobile or web application prototypes to address various local issues in official language minority communities. After 35 hours, the participants presented their prototypes (16 in all) to a jury.

Following the success of this innovative formula, other hackathons are planned in 2018–2019 and 2019–2020 in official language minority communities elsewhere in Canada.

Online or distance courses

Support from Canada’s regional economic development agencies has made it possible to develop various online or distance courses that have benefited Francophones in minority communities. For example:

Strengthening the language industry and technologies

In 2017–2018, the National Research Council of Canada continued its work to strengthen the country’s language industry and technologies, including the following:

Efficiency and accuracy of machine translation

In addition to the work on language technologies being done by the National Research Council of Canada, the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency provided support to the Université de Moncton (Shippagan campus) to develop technologies that increase the efficiency and accuracy of machine translation. In particular, the university established a partnership with Campbellton-based company Centre Transmed, which works in the field of translation, to establish a series of innovative translation systems integrating new vocal and statistical techniques. Using these techniques, users will, for example, be able to dictate their translation orally and the translation software will accommodate for background noise and user accent.

4.1.5 Support for recreational and community infrastructure

Highlights

As part of the Investing in Canada Plan announced in the 2017 Federal Budget, the Government of Canada committed to invest $80 million over 10 years to support the construction of educational infrastructure in official language minority communities. In collaboration with the provinces and territories, the federal government will be able to support the construction of daycare centres, community centres and cultural centres. This commitment will contribute to enhancing the vitality of these communities by making them stronger while protecting their language and culture.

In April 2017, the Government of Canada announced that it was joining forces with the Government of Nova Scotia, through Canadian Heritage, to fund the modernization of the Louis R. Comeau Library at Université Sainte-Anne. The refurbishment of the library’s existing spaces to add a digitization laboratory, a study support centre and a video-conference room will enable the institution to offer cutting-edge technology services to the French-speaking university community it serves.

In November 2017, the Government of Canada also announced that Canadian Heritage would contribute to the construction of community spaces in Yukon’s first French language high school (funded by the provincial government). The community spaces will include a performance space. The combined efforts of the 2 governments will contribute to the development of the French-speaking community in Yukon.

Canadian Heritage supported Dawson College in Montreal in the purchase, installation and development of a new virtual data storage network to meet the growing needs of the community, and to provide users with greater flexibility and mobility. The migration to this new network has increased the stability of the existing computer system and has allowed the College to accommodate its growing student population. The increased capacity of the system has allowed access to a greater number of users among the students, faculty and College staff.

Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program

As part of the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation, the Government of Canada launched the Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program to provide financial support for rehabilitation and improvement projects and for the expansion of community and recreational infrastructure, including in official language minority communities.

Canada’s regional economic development agencies have been tasked with implementing this program:

4.2 Cultural life

Highlights

Canadian Heritage’s Community Cultural Action Fund has been used to support and enhance cultural, artistic and heritage actions of official language minority communities, and ensure outreach of the wealth and the diverse cultural, artistic and heritage expressions of these communities.

In 2017–2018, more than $1.7 million enabled Canadian non-profit organizations and provincial and territorial governments to implement various initiatives to support the development of English and French linguistic minority communities in all regions of the country.

In this section

4.2.1 Support for cultural infrastructure

Autonomy of local English language stations in Quebec

In 2017–2018, CBC/Radio-Canada announced the creation of a new department called “Local Services” to give local stations more autonomy and independence over local operations and programming. The purpose of this new department is to build stronger communities by helping Canadians connect with one another and be more informed and more curious about their country and the world.

CBC Quebec allocated additional resources to the production of its daily news and current affairs programming, including:

It also broadcast Absolutely Quebec, a summer series of 6 documentaries featuring unique perspectives on English language culture in Quebec, and launched 3 new podcasts and a digital series with local flair.

Construction of La Place des Arts du Grand Sudbury

In October 2017, the Government of Canada announced a historic investment to help build La Place des Arts du Grand Sudbury, through the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund (Canadian Heritage), in collaboration with the Government of Ontario, the City of Greater Sudbury and other arts stakeholders. Construction of this first-ever multidisciplinary arts centre in northeastern Ontario began in October 2018.

This new innovative gathering place for the Franco-Ontarian community will bring together 7 major Francophone cultural organizations and will house:

Quartier culturel” in the Acadian community of Chéticamp

In April and November 2017, the Government of Canada announced funding for the Conseil des arts de Chéticamp, through the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund (Canadian Heritage), to create a new “quartier culturel” in the Acadian community of Chéticamp, Nova Scotia. The funding will be used to create a new art gallery, an exterior theatre and a water puppet theatre, which will be incorporated into a new multifunctional cultural space in partnership with the adjacent NDA School in Chéticamp. The “quartier culturel” is expected to open before summer 2019.

Creation of additional spaces for exhibits

Artist Jean-Denis Boudreau received a grant from the Canada Council for the Arts to carry out a project involving the use of modular structures (prefabricated containers) as additional spaces for exhibits, artist residencies and live arts. In summer 2018, these containers were placed throughout the cities of Moncton, Shediac and Dieppe to serve artists, special events and festivals. This innovative project is a collaboration with multiple partners and is expected to be repeated in summer 2019.

Partnerships that go a long way

Through partnerships, VIA Rail has contributed to the success of multiple activities and events for official language minority communities across the country, by offering transportation services and travel certificates. In 2017–2018, as part of the celebrations of the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation, VIA Rail renewed its partnerships with the Cercle Molière theatre, the Festival du voyageur and Francofonds. Its contribution therefore facilitated the travel of artists from across the country who travelled to Manitoba to participate in the activities of these organizations, and attracted visitors by offering them discounts.

4.2.2 Support to artists and creators

Music showcases

Through the Canada Music Fund, Canadian Heritage contributed to the organization of music showcases for artists from official language minority communities. In 2017–2018, more than 425 artists performed in over 910 music showcases presented at regional, national and international events, in addition to taking part in several touring opportunities. Many music showcases had a digital promotion component as well.

Market Access Strategy

Between April 2017 and June 2018, the Canada Council for the Arts funded 36 distinct projects by 32 artists and arts organizations from official language minority communities, with a view to increasing their access to national and international markets.

Commercialization of Francophone projects in Canada and abroad

On Screen Manitoba Inc. received support from Western Economic Diversification Canada over a 3-year period to support Francophone small and medium-sized cultural businesses to help them commercialize their projects in Canada and abroad. On Screen Manitoba implemented various measures such as:

These measures are expected to generate $4 million in economic benefits on the international market and benefit 6 Francophone small and medium-sized businesses in the West.

Artistic development

Through the Official Languages Fund, the Canada Council for the Arts also provided financial support to 35 artists and organizations in official language minority communities in 2017–2018 to help them foster individual artistic development or organizational development.

Tremplin competition: emerging filmmakers

In collaboration with CBC/Radio-Canada, the National Film Board of Canada launched the 10th edition of the Tremplin competition in November 2017. This competition is open to emerging Francophone filmmakers outside Quebec who wish to produce a first or second short documentary. In March 2018, the finalists were able to participate in various development workshops. The winners were announced in May 2018 and their films were broadcast on ICI Radio-Canada Télé in 2018–2019.

Payments to authors of works borrowed from public libraries

In 2017–2018, the Canada Council for the Arts made a significant change to the sampling methodology of the Public Lending Right Program, which makes annual payments to authors whose works are in public libraries across the country.

Previously, sampling was based on language. For example, titles of French language works were held only in Quebec, New Brunswick and the Ottawa Public Library system, while English language titles were held across the country, with the exception of Quebec.

In order to provide better regional coverage and better representation of official languages in all provinces and territories, the Council decided in June 2017 that library catalogue searches would be conducted in all locations across the country. This means that, for example, a Franco-Ontarian writer or an Anglo-Quebec writer whose works are not in libraries outside their province will now be taken into account and paid through the program.

4.2.3 Promotion of artists

Zones Théâtrales

In September 2017, nearly 200 artists and performers from Francophone communities across Canada and the regions of Quebec participated in Zones Théâtrales in the nation’s capital. In total, there were:

The Fondation pour l’avancement du théâtre francophone au Canada also handed out 9 awards of excellence with scholarships.

This flagship initiative, the result of a partnership between Canadian Heritage, the Canada Council for the Arts and the National Arts Centre, contributes greatly to the vitality of the Francophone theatre community across Canada and gives national, and even international, visibility to the artists taking part in the initiative.

Chœurs d’ici, chansons d’ici

Ici Musique (Radio-Canada) launched a major competition for the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation, which enabled 20 choirs from all regions of the country to sing on the album “Chœurs d’ici, chansons d’ici”. This unique album includes traditional songs, but most of all popular French Canadian classics from the past 50 years, in very beautiful choral arrangements.

Cinema

In 2017–2018, various federal institutions supported organizations and initiatives that promoted the discovery of Canadian cinema across the country and internationally, including productions by artists from official language minority communities.

4.2.4 Showcasing heritage

The Canadian History Hall

As part of the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation, on July 1, 2017, the Canadian History Museum opened the Canadian History Hall, which showcases Canadian history from the time of the earliest settlements to the present day. The hall features:

Acadian tourism heritage
Tourism heritage of Quebec’s English-speaking communities

Funding provided by Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions helped 21 English-speaking communities in Quebec showcase their tourism heritage in 2017–2018.

The following are examples:

Historic sites in the Prairies

In May 2017, Western Economic Diversification Canada announced its support for the Trails of 1885 Association Inc. to launch a new website to raise awareness of Francophone and Indigenous cultural centres and historic sites in Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Alberta. The Trails of 1885 Association was created to celebrate the 125th anniversary of the Northwest Rebellion and has over 60 member organizations.

4.3 Economic life

In this section

4.3.1 Entrepreneurship, job creation and economic development

Highlights

Through the Enabling Fund for Official Language Minority Communities, Employment and Social Development Canada strives to enhance the development and vitality of these communities by strengthening their capacities in human resources and community economic development and by fostering partnerships. In 2017–2018, the Enabling Fund made it possible to:

  • create 728 jobs
  • maintain 1,505 jobs
  • assist more than 44,929 clients (young people, women, recent immigrants, job seekers and workers seeking to upgrade their skills) in 31 communities and over 545 organizations
  • carry out more than 102 initiatives (in project, research or skills development, and support for job seekers or small and medium-sized businesses) in official language minority communities across Canada
  • establish more than 2,002 partnership projects with the community or private sector, including federal, provincial, territorial or municipal governments
The electronic newsletter Express

Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada continued to publish Express, an electronic newsletter for economic development stakeholders in official language minority communities, 3 times a year. Express has more than 200 subscribers and 23 content contributors from federal institutions, such as the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages and Statistics Canada, and community organizations, such as the Réseau de développement économique et d’employabilité (RDÉE) Canada, the Fédération des communautés francophones et acadienne, the Community Economic Development and Employability Corporation (CEDEC) and the Quebec Community Groups Network.

Economic development initiatives in the Atlantic region

In 2017–2018, the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency approved 15 new projects. The following are examples:

Economic development initiatives in Quebec

In 2017–2018, Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions continued to support the regional development project of the Youth Employment Strategy (YES), which aims to maintain and increase the offering of entrepreneurship services to English-speaking communities in the region. The target clients are future entrepreneurs of all ages whose projects may be at different stages of development. The online service offering includes business coaching, workshops, webinars and networking services, as well as specialized interactive workshops and access to experts. In-person services are currently offered in 6 regions (Gaspésie/Îles-de-la-Madeleine, Québec, Estrie, Côte-Nord, Outaouais and Montérégie) and will be deployed in 2 additional regions (Laval and Abitibi-Témiscamingue), for a total of 8 regions.

Economic development initiatives in Ontario

FedDev Ontario supported projects that contributed to enhancing the vitality of Francophone communities in southern Ontario:

In 2017–2018, FedNor also supported 15 projects aimed at strengthening or developing the capacity of the Francophone community or businesses in the Northern Ontario region. The projects enabled the:

The federal institution supported the Northern Ontario Farm Innovation Alliance (NOFIA) to help agriculture and agri-food producers in the region increase their sales and access new bilingual markets. This investment made it possible, among other things, to:

Economic development initiatives in western Canada

Western Economic Diversification Canada contributed to strengthening innovation, entrepreneurship and diversification in Francophone communities in western Canada by making it possible to:

Economic development initiatives in northern Canada

In 2017–2018, the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency (CanNor) continued to support the 3-year pan-territorial project of the Association franco-yukonnaise designed to define intervention strategies to improve the recruitment and retention of a bilingual workforce in the North, thereby filling gaps in sectors facing labour shortages. The project included the development of recruitment tools that were used to promote employment in the North at job fairs in Canada and abroad. It also helped recruit 5 bilingual employees in the tourism, construction and services sectors.

The Agency also contributed for the second year to the project of the Conseil de développement économique des Territoires du Nord-Ouest (CDÉTNO) to promote business development opportunities in key sectors of the economy (resource development, tourism, renewable energy and technology) in the Northwest Territories. In 2017–2018, this support made it possible to create training materials and programs in French on entrepreneurship.

4.3.2 Services to business people

AgriDiversity Program

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada created the AgriDiversity Program to help under-represented groups in agriculture (such as youth, women, Indigenous people, people with disabilities and members of official language minority communities) fully participate in the sector by helping them:

Financial access for Atlantic entrepreneurs

The Business Development Bank of Canada developed strategies and established new partnerships with organizations such as UNI Coopération financière, a Francophone Acadian financial institution present in the regional communities of New Brunswick, to provide better support to entrepreneurs in the French and Acadian communities of Atlantic Canada in terms of advisory services and access to financing.

Translation and printing of the book A Practical Guide to Angel Investing

The National Angel Capital Organization (NACO) received support from the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency for the French translation and printing of A Practical Guide to Angel Investing in order to increase the organization’s engagement and its reach among Francophone communities in Atlantic Canada. A total of 1,000 copies of A Practical Guide to Angel Investing were distributed to partners and stakeholders in the Atlantic region.

Support for Francophone entrepreneurs in northern Ontario

FedNor supported the North Claybelt Community Futures Development Corporation to help Francophone entrepreneurs in northern Ontario develop new markets, products and services. Through the “Vision +” component of the Entrepreneurs Francophones PLUS program, entrepreneurs could apply for a contribution of 75% of their costs in marketing consultation, web visibility, translation or advertising, up to a maximum of $5,000. This program therefore enabled them to enhance their business opportunities.

Fosse aux lions” contest for Francophone entrepreneurs in Manitoba

With support from Western Economic Diversification Canada, the Economic Development Council for Manitoba Bilingual Municipalities (CDEM) and its partners organized the sixth edition of the “Fosse aux lions” contest, based on the Dragons Den program.

The 4 young entrepreneurs took turns pitching their company, their business plan, as well as the projects they could accomplish with the $15,000 prize to a panel of judges. In addition to receiving that amount, the overall winner had the opportunity to receive mentoring and join the Chambre de commerce francophone de Saint-Boniface for one year.

Femmes d’affaires en mouvement network

The Femmes d’affaires en mouvement network of the Société de développement économique (SDE) de la Colombie-Britannique received support from Western Economic Diversification Canada and Employment and Social Development Canada. With more than 280 members, this network builds connections between women entrepreneurs while contributing to British Columbia’s economic development. Each month, under the guidance of experts, the women participate in learning workshops and mentoring sessions in an environment conducive to dialogue, which not only encourages the sharing of personal experiences and development of skills, but also promotes business connections, networking and new business opportunities.

4.3.3 Internships and vocational training

Literacy and essential skills development

Employment and Social Development Canada helps adults improve their literacy and essential skills to better prepare for, find or keep a job. In particular, the department supported the following initiatives in 2017–2018:

Programs for Francophone businesses in northern Ontario

FedNor supported various initiatives including:

Young Canada Works program

Canadian Heritage’s Young Canada Works (YCW) program provides young Canadians with an opportunity to gain skills and work experience through summer jobs (for students) and internships (for recent graduates) in the heritage, arts, culture and official languages sectors. In 2017–2018, the program provided an opportunity to:

4.3.4 Tourism

Destination Canada

Formerly known as the Canadian Tourism Commission, Destination Canada promotes Canada internationally. In 2017–2018, Destination Canada supported various tourism initiatives that contributed to the vitality of official language minority communities, including the following 4 initiatives:

The 150 travel card

As part of the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation, VIA Rail also made available for sale a 150 travel card for young Canadians aged 12 to 25. Sold for a symbolic price of $150, it provided unlimited train travel from coast to coast during the month of July 2017. More than 4,000 young Canadians travelled by train to discover the country, meet other travellers and connect with communities across Canada, including official language minority communities.

Increasing tourism in Atlantic Canada

The Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency supported the following initiatives:

Forum on tourism in the municipalities of the Gulf of Saint Lawrence RCM

The Coasters Association of the Lower North Shore Inc. organized the Tourism Forum in the municipalities of the Gulf of Saint Lawrence RCM in fall 2017, with support from Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions. This RCM has 14 isolated communities and 2 Indigenous communities, with a population that is 80% English-speaking.

During the forum, more than 45 participants working in the tourism industry identified the following regional priorities:

These priorities were then presented and discussed in a teleconference with various government authorities and a tourism organization. Participants also suggested creating a “Lower North Shore tourism network”. This initiative created significant networking opportunities and increased efforts to attract tourists to the region’s English-speaking communities.

Promotion of Francophone and Métis tourism in Manitoba

With support from Western Economic Diversification Canada, economic development and tourism marketing agency Entreprises Riel developed a promotional film on Francophone and Métis tourism in Manitoba. The unique history of the Red River Métis, Louis Riel and the Francophone community will be the basis for this promotional tool and the other complementary products that will be produced.

5. Promotion of official languages: Enhancement and rapprochement

According to section 41 of Part VII of the Official Languages Act, in addition to taking positive measures to support the development and enhance the vitality of the English and French linguistic minority communities in Canada, federal institutions must also take positive measures to foster the full recognition and use of both English and French in Canadian society.

The initiatives presented in this section demonstrate how some federal institutions contributed to this obligation in 2017–2018 in the following areas of activity:

5.1 Enhancement of official languages

In this section

5.1.1 Addition of language clauses

Several federal institutions put in place various mechanisms to maximize best practices in official languages when funding projects. The following are examples:

5.1.2 Major events and celebrations

Constellation francophone: Ouvrons les portes

With financial support from Canadian Heritage as part of Canada 150, the Centre de la francophonie des Amériques organized “Constellation francophone: Ouvrons les portes” to celebrate the vitality of the Canadian Francophonie in all its uniqueness and diversity.

On June 24, 2017, more than 400 artists from Canada’s Francophone music scene participated in a major show from 6 different concert stages in 6 different cities (Dieppe, Quebec City, Ottawa, Toronto, Winnipeg and Whitehorse) to mark Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day, a national holiday for Quebec and the Canadian Francophonie. A total of 200,000 Francophones and Francophiles participated in the celebrations across the country. Canadians also had an opportunity to view the celebrations live on several online platforms, thanks to a partnership with Télévision francophone de l’Ontario (TFO) and Unis TV.

Also as part of this event, 12 interactive doors were installed in Victoria, Edmonton, Saskatoon, Winnipeg, Whitehorse, Ottawa, Toronto, Quebec City (2), Montreal, Dieppe and Dartmouth on June 23 and 24 to give festival goers the opportunity to chat virtually with people across the country.

Jeux de la Francophonie canadienne 2017

With support from Canadian Heritage, the Fédération de la Jeunesse canadienne-française organized the Jeux de la Francophonie canadienne 2017. This national event was held in July 2017 in Moncton-Dieppe, New Brunswick. The games brought together more than 1,000 young people aged 13 to 18 from Francophone communities across the country to enjoy an enriching experience in French and showcase their sports, artistic and leadership talents.

Rendez-vous de la Francophonie 2018

For several years, Canadian Heritage, the National Film Board, the Language Portal of Canada (Translation Bureau, Public Services and Procurement Canada), Parks Canada, Canada Post and VIA Rail have been proud partners of the Rendez-vous de la Francophonie.

The following are examples of the contributions made by some federal institutions to the 20th Rendez-vous de la Francophonie in March 2018:

5.1.3 New media and traditional media

New media (social media, blogs, mobile applications and websites) and traditional media (television, radio, print newspapers) are excellent vehicles for promoting Canada’s official languages. Some federal institutions have used them. The following are some noteworthy initiatives:

Language Portal of Canada

The Language Portal of Canada is an initiative of the Translation Bureau (Public Services and Procurement Canada). In 2017–2018, the Portal team developed 3,466 new linguistic content items to help Canadians communicate better in both official languages. It is estimated that 4.3 million pages were viewed on the Portal and its writing tools this year.

In September 2017, the Portal team launched the Our Languages blog, which contains content from external contributors, including official language minority communities. By late March 2018, 31 posts had been published. The Portal team also increased its social media presence by creating a Twitter account and a Facebook page, and continued to recruit ambassadors who play an important role in promoting the Portal in their respective communities. In late March 2018, the Portal had 413 ambassadors (representing a 60% increase over 2016–2017).

GeoSearch: Interactive mapping application

In 2017–2018, Statistics Canada launched GeoSearch, an interactive mapping application that highlights data from the 2016 Census, including data on official languages. The application allows users to select geographic areas and language indicators (such as French-English bilingualism, knowledge of official languages, official languages spoken at home and at work, etc.) in order to obtain relevant data in the form of charts and maps. Users can also compare various geographic areas.

À fond de train” series

VIA Rail trains became the stage for “À fond de train,” a huge rally on the rails featuring pairs of Francophone parents and children tackling challenges in 10 Canadian cities served by VIA Rail, from the Maritimes to the Rockies. The first 2 seasons of the show, which is produced by Blimp Télé, have been broadcast on TV5/Unis TV since December 2017. This initiative is an excellent way to promote French across the country and showcase Canada’s youth and smaller communities.

Renewal of licences for French language stations

In 2017–2018, the CRTC reviewed the applications from TV5/Unis TV, AMI-télé and Canal M (Vues et Voix) to renew their licences in order to be included on a mandatory basis in the basic digital package available to all Canadians. By renewing their licences until 2023, the Commission ensures that Francophones in minority communities have access to quality programming that reflects their reality, in their own language.

5.1.4 Promotion of linguistic duality abroad

Global Affairs Canada is committed to promoting Canada’s linguistic duality abroad. Various Canadian missions have carried out initiatives abroad that have made it possible to present the bilingual face of Canada, showcase official language minority communities and promote linguistic duality. Among these activities, it is worth mentioning those that helped promote the Francophonie:

5.2 Rapprochement between Anglophones and Francophones

Various factors may contribute to the rapprochement between the linguistic majority and minority cultures in Canada.

In this section

5.2.1 Second language instruction at school

Investments made by Canadian Heritage to support second language instruction programs offered by provincial and territorial governments have contributed to 2.4 million young Canadians learning English or French as a second official language in majority schools, including 449,769 young Anglophones who learned French in immersion programs.

Figure 7: Implementation expenditures for the "second language instruction" component (Protocol for Agreements) (in dollars)

Investments made by Canadian Heritage to support second language instruction programs. Text version follows.
Description of figure 7
2017–2018 Total since 2013
89,342,115 431,910,575

Figure 8: Increase in the number of enrolments in French immersion programs offered outside Quebec since 2003

Increase in the number of enrolments in French immersion programs between 2003 and 2017. Text version follows.
Description of figure 8
Year Number of enrolments
2003–2004 282,837
2004–2005 288,970
2005–2006 295,197
2006–2007 300,464
2007–2008 311,115
2008–2009 317,662
2009–2010 328,716
2010–2011 341,694
2011–2012 356,580
2012–2013 372,879
2013–2014 392,430
2014–2015 409,899
2015–2016 428,619
2016–2017 449,769

There has been a 59% increase in enrolments since 2003–2004.

Note: For more details, please consult:

Through intergovernmental cooperation agreements on education, the Government of Canada contributed to the funding of complementary projects supporting second language instruction. In 2017–2018, it provided:

Also with financial support from Canadian Heritage, the Canadian Association of Second Language Teachers produced and distributed a new educational resource for immersion teachers to promote inclusion in the classroom. This resource provides them with tools and strategies to aid in the integration of newcomers who need to learn English or French as second languages. It also brings attention to the needs of Indigenous youth, and youth who have special educational needs, such as those who have cognitive delays or learning disabilities and those living with an autism spectrum disorder.

5.2.2 Language exchange programs

School programs
Vive les voyageurs school program: In the boots of the voyageurs

Through this school program, Parks Canada provided multiple students in the Vancouver area with a French Canadian immersion cultural experience (Métis dance, French lessons and traditional music) at Fort Langley National Historic Site in British Columbia, a former 19th century Hudson’s Bay Company trading post.

Project “Sécure dans ma langue : un dialogue entre les jeunes francophones et anglophones du Nouveau-Brunswick

The Fédération des jeunes francophones du Nouveau-Brunswick received financial support from Canadian Heritage to carry out this project—a provincial tour of immersion and high schools bringing attention to the issue of linguistic security and linguistic duality. The tour was delivered in both official language communities, representing approximately 3,000 high school students. A 3-day gathering was also held during which young Francophones and young Anglophones in French immersion were able to get to know and interact with one another, as well as take part in interactive thematic workshops.

Youth programs

Canadian Heritage supported several language exchange initiatives for young people, including the following 3 programs:

Figure 9: Participation rate in Canadian Heritage’s programs for youth

Number of youth who particpated in Canadian Heritage's Explore, Odyssey and Exchanges Canada programs. Text version follows.
Description of figure 9
Program 2017–2018 Total since 2013
Explore 6,071 34,299
Odyssey 301 1,504
Exchanges Canada 13,900 65,250

Note: For more details, please refer to Table 16: Breakdown of education expenditures – National programs in Appendix 4: 2017–2018 education expenditures.

Language retention programs for workers

5.2.3 Celebratory and unifying events

The following are examples of celebratory and unifying events that contributed to building bridges and fostering connections between Canada’s linguistic majority and minority cultures throughout 2017–2018.

Canada Day across Canada

With financial support from Canadian Heritage, 19 cities across Canada celebrated Canada Day as part of the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation, such as St. John’s, Charlottetown, Halifax, Fredericton, Moncton, Quebec City, Montreal, Ottawa-Gatineau, Toronto, Winnipeg, Regina, Saskatoon, Edmonton, Calgary, Vancouver, Victoria, Whitehorse, Yellowknife and Iqaluit.

CBC/Radio-Canada also offered multi-platform programming on July 1. The airing of special segment “Canada Day 150! From Coast to Coast to Coast” was a huge success, with 10.9 million viewers (31% of the population), not to mention all those who listened on the Crown Corporation’s radio station or digital platforms.

2017 Canada Summer Games in Winnipeg

Over 4,000 athletes from across Canada participated in the 2017 Canada Summer Games in Winnipeg in summer 2017. Sport Canada (Canadian Heritage) made multiple contributions to this edition of the Games. Manitoba’s Francophone community was also involved in all the steps leading to the largest national multi-sport event for athletes. Various measures were taken to engage Francophones and promote official languages, including:

Games of La Francophonie — Abidjan 2017

With support from Sport Canada (Canadian Heritage) and the Canada Council for the Arts, 116 young Canadian athletes and artists participated in the VIII Games of la Francophonie in July 2017, in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire. Every 4 years, the Games of La Francophonie, a major gathering of young people, bring together close to 3,000 athletes and artists between ages 18 and 35 from the member countries and governments of the International Organization of La Francophonie. These games are the only international games to offer both sport competitions and cultural events, with a view to celebrating both the French language and excellence in sport and the arts. The Canadian athletes and artists who participated in the games were selected based on their performance excellence, not their linguistic affiliation. Team Canada therefore had athletes and artists whose first language is other than French who were able to celebrate cultural diversity and discover the many facets of the international Francophonie.

National Acadian Day

As part of the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation, 59 projects to celebrate Acadian culture and National Acadian Day were implemented in 56 official language minority communities in the Atlantic provinces. These include the following 2 major projects:

Foire gourmande de l'Abitibi-Témiscamingue et du Nord-Est ontarien

By funding the Foire gourmande de l’Abitibi-Témiscamingue et du Nord-Est de l’Ontario, Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions supported the agriculture and tourism sectors in these regions and fostered collaboration between Ontario’s and Quebec’s official language minority communities. This fair encouraged volunteerism, partnerships and networking between Anglophones and Francophones. The federal agency’s support also made it possible to deploy a marketing strategy outside Quebec in new markets and to develop new products.

Gabriel Dumont’s Wild West Show

As part of Canada 150, the National Arts Centre partnered with 3 French Canadian theatre companies to create Gabriel Dumont’s Wild West Show. A co-production between the National Arts Centre’s French Theatre, the Nouveau Théâtre Expérimental (Montreal), Théâtre Cercle Molière (Winnipeg) and La Troupe du jour (Saskatoon), the show was put on 32 times in these cities in 2017–2018, and twice more in Quebec City at the Carrefour international de théâtre. An epic tale of the struggle of the Métis People of Western Canada, this co-creation is the work of 10 authors led by Jean Marc Dalpé, Alexis Martin and Yvette Nolan, performers and designers from across the country representing diverse Anglophone, Francophone, Indigenous and Métis communities.

Grosses têtes

The Centre d’arts visuels de l’Alberta received support from the Canada 150 Fund (administered by Canadian Heritage) to make large carnival heads that were worn at various Canada 150 celebratory events, including Canada Day in Edmonton. The large heads are playful works of art made of paper maché illustrating Alberta’s Francophone multiculturalism. Designed by artists and members of the Francophone community with various backgrounds (African, Arabic, Métis, European, Franco-Albertan), the heads were a fun way for people to rediscover the contribution of various cultures to the construction of Alberta’s Francophonie. Building on its success, the workshop project to produce more “Grosses têtes” was then offered in the region’s elementary and high schools, which were able to use them during community or school celebrations and contribute to visually represent Alberta’s Francophonie in all its diversity.

Canada 150: Cap sur le Pacifique

With financial support from the Canada 150 Fund (administered by Canadian Heritage), the Centre culturel francophone de Vancouver offered 3 days of celebrations in French under the theme “Canada 150: Cap sur le Pacifique” in July 2017 on Granville Island. The program included concerts, theatre, dance, performances and multidisciplinary workshops. About 40 artists from several disciplines offered some 30 shows highlighting the importance of French and Francophone heritage in the Asia-Pacific region.

5.2.4 Linguistic duality: Reaching out to others

National Translation Program for Book Publishing

Canadian Heritage’s National Translation Program for Book Publishing provided funding for 68 translations of Canadian-authored books from one official language to the other.

This program also funds an annual translation rights fair organized by the Canada Council for the Arts, which provides Canadian publishers with a unique opportunity to sell and acquire official language translation rights. In 2017–2018, 76 representatives of publishing houses (35 Anglophones and 41 Francophones) participated in the fair.

Canada 2017 memory book: What’s Your Story

As part of the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation, CBC/Radio-Canada created a digital memory book representing our country in 2017 by appealing to Canadians from diverse backgrounds to tell their stories.

Roots of Montreal and Montreapolis

Also as part of the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation, CBC Quebec produced Roots of Montreal, a digital series that studies the cultural communities that have contributed to transforming Montreal’s urban landscape up to the present day, and CBC Montreal produced Montreapolis, a podcast that profiles 8 innovative people who give Montreal its aura of modernity.

Lastly, CBC Quebec journalist Julia Page travelled throughout the province of Quebec to gather input from English-speaking communities across the province. Presented on CBC Montreal’s website and on the Facebook pages of CBC Quebec and CBC Montreal, this portrait captured the vitality of English-speaking communities and their members’ vision for the future.

Surtitle service at the Théâtre du Nouvel-Ontario in Sudbury

FedNor supported the Théâtre du Nouvel-Ontario in Sudbury to enable it to provide a surtitle service.

This new service enables the theatre, the only French language theatre in the region, to reach and attract a brand new audience (English-speaking, Francophile and exogamous families). This support also enabled the theatre to modernize its ticketing system (in particular by creating a mobile application) and improve its website, making it possible for the theatre to promote its shows over a larger geographic area, in both official languages.

6. Listening to Canadians: Ongoing dialogue

Under section 43(2) of Part VII of the Official Languages Act, the Government of Canada must take measures to ensure public consultation on the development of policies and review of programs that promote progress toward the equal status and use of English and French in Canadian society.

To identify the priorities and needs of official language minority communities, federal institutions use a variety of means, including:

The measures presented in this section demonstrate how some federal institutions contributed to listening to and interacting with Canadians in 2017–2018 in order to better understand their official languages needs in the following areas of activity:

6.1 Profile of the reality of communities

Release of the final report on the consultations that led to the Action Plan for Official Languages 2018–2023

As part of the development of the new Action Plan for Official Languages 2018–2023, Canadian Heritage held cross-Canada consultations from June to December 2016. These consultations made it possible to obtain an overall view of the official languages priorities and needs in our country that laid the groundwork for the new Action Plan.

The final report entitled 2016 Cross-Canada Official Languages Consultations was published in June 2017. It presents the main findings from the round tables and answers to the online questionnaire on:

It also presents a summary of the recommendations made in the many briefs and written submissions on:

Dissemination of linguistic data

In 2017–2018, Statistics Canada released:

Statistics Canada also presented research pertaining to the concerns of official language minority communities, including:

These data enable a better understanding of official languages issues in Canadian society and inform decision-making and the development of programs that better meet the needs of official language minority communities.

6.2 Improvement of internal mechanisms

In 2017–2018, Parks Canada improved its consultation mechanism by incorporating official language minority communities into its consultation framework and amending its consultation guidelines.

The CRTC added an option to its online forms that allows people who are members of an official language minority community to self-identify as such if they wish. In 2017–2018, more than 200 people self-reported being from an official language minority community.

6.3 Education and youth

Canadian Heritage continued to closely monitor concerns, trends and needs regarding minority language education and second language instruction, particularly by participating in annual meetings of the:

Meeting with youth workers

In October 2017, the resource persons responsible for the implementation of section 41 of the Official Languages Act in federal institutions met with various representatives of the Fédération des communautés francophones et acadienne du Canada, the Fédération de la jeunesse canadienne-française, the Quebec Community Groups Network, the Townshippers’ Association and Canadian Parents for French to:

A representative from the Privy Council Office presented:

6.4 Immigration

In 2017–2018, Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada took various measures to better understand and respond to the immigration needs of official language minority communities. In particular, the department:

6.5 Health

Consultations for the renewal of a contribution program

Health Canada conducted extensive consultations with the public, official language minority communities and targeted recipients to guide the renewal of the Official Languages Health Contribution Program for 2018–2023, in accordance with the new federal Action Plan for Official Languages 2018–2023. The Action Plan provides for an additional investment for Health Canada of $16.9 million over the next 5 years and $3.6 million each year thereafter, in the form of contributions to strengthen activities designed to improve access to health services in official language minority communities.

Creation of a federal advisory committee

In November 2017, Health Canada, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the Public Health Agency of Canada created the Federal Health Portfolio Consultative Committee for Official Language Minority Communities in Canada to facilitate the inclusion of these communities’ health needs in the portfolio’s various programs and policies.

This committee includes representatives from these 3 institutions as well as the Société Santé en français, the Consortium national de formation en santé, the Community Health and Social Services Network and McGill University. The first meeting was held in November 2017 and the second in March 2018. A joint work plan will be developed in 2018–2019.

Research and knowledge sharing

Consortium national de formation en santé

Five (5) university members of the Consortium national de formation en santé received support from Health Canada in 2017–2018 to conduct 8 research projects on the following themes:

Since March 2018, the consortium team has been involved in 2 new research projects, in partnership with the University of Ottawa, on the active offer of services in both official languages and on the offer of mental health services in French in Manitoba, New Brunswick and Ontario.

McGill University and the Centre hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal conducted research entitled “Mental Healthcare and Allied Service Access by Anglophone Homeless Youth”. The purpose of this research was to explore where and how Anglophone homeless youth access mental health care and what hinders or facilitates their access to care.

McGill University and the Royal Victoria Hospital are also conducting a mental health research project that will assess the differences between Anglophones and Francophones in terms of the prevalence of the most common chronic diseases by language group and their use of primary health services, emergency rooms and hospital services.

RésoSanté Colombie-Britannique

RésoSanté Colombie-Britannique received support from the Public Health Agency of Canada to collect the data necessary to create a health profile of the health promotion and disease prevention needs of British Columbia’s Francophone community. The organization produced 2 reports with the data collected.

6.6 Justice, democracy and equality

Advisory committee on access to justice

The Advisory Committee on Access to Justice in both Official Languages held its annual meeting in May 2017 in Ottawa. Approximately 40 community organizations participated in this meeting, during which participants discussed issues related to access to justice for:

This committee was created to liaise between representatives of the legal community in official language minority communities, the organizations that represent these communities, and Justice Canada.

Federal-provincial-territorial working group on access to justice

The Federal-Provincial-Territorial Working Group on Access to Justice in both Official Languages held its annual meeting in Halifax in November 2017. In particular, it dealt with:

This working group comprises representatives from each of the justice departments, attorneys general and Francophone affairs officials from the 14 jurisdictions. Its mandate focuses on the implementation of the language provisions of the Criminal Code, but it also covers other issues of shared jurisdiction and allows for the sharing of best practices.

Studies on access to justice

With support from Justice Canada, the Fédération des francophones de Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador (FFTNL) issued a call for tenders in winter 2018 to conduct a study on available resources and tools that enable members of the Francophone community to access legal services in French in the province. The Federation also wanted to educate Francophone and Francophile legal professionals on the importance of offering their services in French.

The Quebec Community Groups Network managed and implemented the People-First Approach to Improving Access to Justice in English in Three Specific Areas project, which aimed to examine the problems involving access to justice experienced by Quebec’s English-speaking community and make recommendations to mitigate or overcome the problems and challenges of access to justice for this community. To achieve this, the network established a goal of developing strategic analyses for 3 specific groups:

In April 2018, the network organized a forum to present and complete its analyses, as well as develop a citizen-centred action plan to improve access to justice in English in Quebec.

Liaison with communities

In advance of the 2019 election, the Office of the Chief Electoral Officer of Canada conducted a demographic analysis to identify ridings with official language minority communities, and created community relations officer positions to liaise with these communities and facilitate the exercise of their right to vote.

Creation of a pan-Canadian women’s network

Status of Women Canada created a pan-Canadian network of 150 women leaders to identify and prioritize systemic issues that impede women’s equality in Canada with the goal of creating a strategic, action-oriented plan. The network comprises representatives of official language minority communities, including:

6.7 Arts, culture and media

Evaluation of a collaboration agreement

In 2017–2018, Canadian Heritage coordinated the evaluation of the Collaboration Agreement for the Development of Arts and Culture in the Francophone Minority Communities of Canada 2013–2018, which expired at the end of March 2018.

This agreement between Francophone minority communities (represented by the Fédération culturelle canadienne-française (FCCF)) and 6 federal institutions representing the arts and culture sector (Canadian Heritage, National Arts Centre, Canada Council for the Arts, CBC/Radio-Canada, National Film Board and Telefilm Canada) includes several mechanisms to ensure that the priorities and needs of these communities are known and taken into account.

The findings of this evaluation were positive and were used to guide the renewal of the agreement for the 2018–2023 period (which was announced in December 2018).

Working group with the English-speaking communities of Quebec

In February 2018, Canadian Heritage, Quebec Region, organized the annual meeting of the Working Group on Arts, Culture and Heritage with the English-speaking communities of Quebec to understand their needs and discuss collaboration with federal institutions.

About 10 federal institutions participated in this meeting, including:

This meeting identified several possible solutions to the issues of visibility of artists from English-speaking communities in Quebec and the promotion of historic Anglophone heritage sites. Co-leaders were also appointed to follow up on the issues raised.

Spotlight on youth

In June 2017, as part of an annual reflection on its French program, the National Film Board of Canada invited 4 young Francophones from different regions of Canada (Montreal, Moncton, Ottawa and Saskatoon) to provide their comments, thoughts and views on a varied sample of its recent works. As the institution undergoes a shift to attract more young people, this exercise enabled it to learn more about the concerns, perceptions and tastes of young Francophones.

Research for the creation of a vitality indicator

Telefilm Canada established an advisory committee with Quebec’s English-speaking community to develop a vitality indicator that will make it possible, among other things, to measure the growth and decline of the vitality of this community and better target its interests, needs and issues.

Government of Canada advertising

To address the concerns of official language minority media that the redirection of Government of Canada advertising to digital sources would be to their detriment, Public Services and Procurement Canada took various measures in 2017–2018 to establish a dialogue between representatives of these media and members of the Government of Canada’s advertising community:

6.8 Economic and social development

In 2017–2018, Public Services and Procurement Canada’s Office of Small and Medium Enterprises established an open dialogue with various official language minority organizations across the country to ensure that businesses in these communities know how to do business with the Government of Canada and can raise issues regarding systemic barriers. It offered seminars and webinars on various topics such as selling to the government, finding business opportunities, the Build in Canada Innovation Program, defence procurement, and so on.

Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada used a variety of consultation methods to gain a better understanding of the economic issues facing official language minority communities:

In fall 2017, the Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario (FedDev Ontario) coordinated 7 consultations in the form of engagement sessions with more than 50 stakeholders and entrepreneurs from Francophone communities in this region. These consultations provided insight into their priorities and challenges in advance of the review of the Economic Development Initiative program guidelines for the new Action Plan for Official Languages 2018–2023. The participants also had an opportunity to comment on the priorities of Canada’s Innovation and Skills Plan.

In February 2018, Western Economic Diversification Canada met with representatives of Francophone economic development organizations to learn more about their successes and best practices in tailoring the priorities of the federal institution to their needs.

In 2017–2018, Status of Women Canada increased its efforts with official language minority community organizations to promote its Women’s Program and discuss the organizations’ needs and challenges, projects in development or underway, as well as opportunities for collaboration. For example, during the year, departmental representatives visited 56 Francophone organizations in the Atlantic region. In addition, as a result of efforts deployed across the country, 3 organizations received funding for 36 months (2018–2021) after the call for proposals in fall 2017:

7. Government collaboration and coordination

7.1 Official Languages Branch

Pursuant to section 42 of the Official Languages Act, the Official Languages Branch (Canadian Heritage) should encourage and promote a coordinated approach to the implementation by federal institutions of the commitments set out in section 41.

Acting as a centre of expertise for some 200 federal institutions subject to this Act, the Official Languages Branch manages and facilitates a network of coordinators and employees responsible for the implementation of section 41 of the Act (Network 41). These people are an important point of contact for members of minority communities within federal institutions.

A network of officers responsible for official languages in the regional offices of Canadian Heritage (Network 42) also supports the work of federal institutions in all provinces and territories. Through these networks, the Official Languages Branch is able to fully deliver on the coordination mandate, both nationally and regionally.

Furthermore, the Official Languages Branch collaborates on a continual basis with the Treasury Board Secretariat and the Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions to increase official languages leadership and facilitate the sharing of best practices.

7.2 Other federal institutions

Other federal institutions have also exercised a leadership role among federal institutions. This is the case for the following institutions:

7.3 Collaboration with the provinces and territories

The Government of Canada remains convinced of the importance of working closely with its provincial and territorial partners to ensure the vitality of official language minority communities across Canada.

Several examples of collaboration between the Government of Canada and provincial and territorial governments, particularly in the areas of justice, immigration and education, are mentioned in Section 2: Update on the Government of Canada’s official languages mechanisms in 2017–2018 of this report.

Conclusion

As you read in this report, fiscal year 2017–2018 was a year rich in initiatives and positive measures taken by federal institutions in several areas of activity (education, immigration, health, justice, social development, arts and culture, economic development, entrepreneurship, vocational training) to foster the development and growth of young people, newcomers, women and entrepreneurs in official language minority communities in Canada, and to promote the full recognition and use of both official languages in Canadian society.

The year 2017–2018 was marked by the announcement of the new Action Plan for Official Languages 2018–2023: Investing in Our Future, which brings the Government of Canada’s support to nearly $2.7 billion over 5 years. This historic investment, which responds to community needs identified by organizations during the consultation process described earlier, aims to support these communities and help official languages to prosper in the coming years.

The year 2017–2018 also marked the end of activities celebrating the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation, which provided excellent opportunities to promote Canada’s bilingual character, here and abroad.

The year 2018–2019 will be just as busy, notably with:

The Official Languages Branch (Canadian Heritage) will also continue to work closely with federal institutions to encourage them to continue their work with official language minority communities across Canada.

Note: To learn more about the activities surrounding the 50th anniversary of the Act in 2019, please consult Celebrating and modernizing the Official Languages Act.

Appendices

Appendix 1: Actual annual spending on the initiatives of the Roadmap for Official Languages 2013–2018

Table 1: Annual spending on all pillars of the Roadmap for Official Languages 2013–2018 — Grand total (in dollars)
Pillars 2013–2014 2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017 2017–2018 Total from 2013–2014 to 2017–2018
Planned spending Actual spending Planned spending Actual spending Planned spending Actual spending Planned spending Actual spending Planned spending Actual spending Planned spending Actual spending
Pillar 1 subtotal: Education[1] 131,501,550 128,176,009 131,601,550 131,326,829 132,017,483 131,727,646 132,067,580 131,942,830 131,634,247 131,569,257 658,822,410 654,742,571
Pillar 2 subtotal: Immigration[2] 29,668,098 29,670,000 29,719,370 29,720,000 30,000,000 30,037,726 30,100,000 30,061,138 29,911,638 29,911,638 149,399,106 149,400,502
Pillar 3 subtotal: Communities[3] 55,748,736 43,229,797 67,535,286 56,824,675 66,088,532 58,314,372 67,134,093 61,028,939 64,699,374 57,625,133 321,206,021 277,022,916
Grand total 216,918,384 201,075,806 228,856,206 217,871,504 228,106,015 220,079,744 229,301,673 223,032,907 226,245,259 219,106,028 1,129,427,537 1,081,165,989

[1] Refer to table 2 for a detailed breakdown of spending on the initiatives of pillar 1 (Education).
[2] Refer to table 3 for a detailed breakdown of spending on the initiatives of pillar 2 (Immigration).
[3] Refer to table 4 for a detailed breakdown of spending on the initiatives of pillar 3 (Communities).

Table 2: Annual spending on the initiatives of pillar 1 (Education) (in dollars)
Federal partners Initiatives 2013–2014 2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017 2017–2018 Total from 2013–2014 to 2017–2018
Planned spending Actual spending Planned spending Actual spending Planned spending Actual spending Planned spending Actual spending Planned spending Actual spending Planned spending Actual spending
Canadian Heritage Support for minority language education 53,004,809 53,004,809 53,004,809 53,004,808 53,004,809 53,004,808 53,004,808 53,004,808 53,004,808 53,004,808 265,024,043 265,024,041
Support for second language learning 35,004,809 35,004,809 35,004,809 35,004,808 35,004,809 35,004,808 35,004,808 35,004,808 35,004,808 35,004,808 175,024,043 175,024,041
Summer language bursaries 7,320,966 7,320,966 7,320,966 7,320,966 7,320,966 7,320,966 7,320,966 7,320,966 7,320,966 7,320,966 36,604,830 36,604,830
Official language monitors 3,720,966 3,720,966 3,720,966 3,720,965 3,720,966 3,720,965 3,720,965 3,720,965 3,720,965 3,720,965 18,604,828 18,604,826
Exchanges Canada 2,250,000 2,250,000 2,250,000 2,250,000 2,250,000 2,250,000 2,250,000 2,250,000 2,250,000 2,250,000 11,250,000 11,250,000
Health Canada Training, networks and access to health services (education component) 21,300,000 18,929,302 21,300,000 21,256,122 21,733,333 21,733,333 21,733,333 21,733,333 21,300,000 21,300,000 107,366,666 104,952,090
Justice Canada Training, networks and access to justice services (education component, including internal services) 3,800,000 2,883,092 3,800,000 3,674,789 3,782,600 3,777,093 3,782,700 3,677,986 3,782,700 3,673,227 18,948,000 17,686,187
Public Services and Procurement Canada Language Portal of Canada 3,100,000 3,062,065 3,200,000 3,094,371 3,200,000 2,915,673 3,250,000 3,229,964 3,250,000 3,250,000 16,000,000 15,552,073
National Research Council of Canada Strengthening the language industry and technologies 2,000,000 2,000,000 2,000,000 2,000,000 2,000,000 2,000,000 2,000,000 2,000,000 2,000,000 2,044,483 10,000,000 10,044,483
All federal partners Pillar 1 subtotal: Education 131,501,550 128,176,009 131,601,550 131,326,829 132,017,483 131,727,646 132,067,580 131,942,830 131,634,247 131,569,257 658,822,410 654,742,571
Table 3: Annual spending on the initiatives of pillar 2 (Immigration) (in dollars)
Federal partners Initiatives 2013–2014 2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017 2017–2018 Total from 2013–2014 to 2017–2018
Planned spending Actual spending Planned spending Actual spending Planned spending Actual spending Planned spending Actual spending Planned spending Actual spending Planned spending Actual spending
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada Language training for economic immigrants 24,000,000 24,000,000 24,000,000 24,000,000 24,000,000 24,000,000 24,000,000 24,000,000 24,000,000 24,000,000 120,000,000 120,000,000
Immigration to official language minority communities (including support to Francophone immigration in New Brunswick) [1] 5,668,098 5,670,000 5,719,370 5,720,000 6,000,000 6,037,726 6,100,000 6,061,138 5,911,638 5,911,638 29,399,106 29,400,502
All federal partners Pillar 2 subtotal: Immigration 29,668,098 29,670,000 29,719,370 29,720,000 30,000,000 30,037,726 30,100,000 30,061,138 29,911,638 29,911,638 149,399,106 149,400,502
[1] As part of the Roadmap for Official Languages 2013–2018, Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) has invested $29.4 million for the Immigration to Official Language Minority Communities initiative. There is a small $100,000 discrepancy between this amount and the IRCC funding publicly announced in March 2013. This change was made pursuant to a budget review and it has not had an impact on IRCC’s ability to deliver services to official language minority communities. The same support has been provided and results achieved.
Table 4: Annual spending on the initiatives of pillar 3 (Communities) (in dollars)
Federal partners Initiatives 2013–2014 2014–2015 2015–2016 2016–2017 2017–2018 Total from 2013–2014 to 2017–2018
Planned spending Actual spending Planned spending Actual spending Planned spending Actual spending Planned spending Actual spending Planned spending Actual spending Planned spending Actual spending
Canadian Heritage Support for official language minority communities 4,452,455 4,452,455 4,452,455 4,452,455 4,452,455 4,452,455 4,452,455 4,452,455 4,452,455 4,452,455 22,262,275 22,262,275
Intergovernmental cooperation 4,452,455 4,452,455 4,452,455 4,452,455 4,452,455 4,452,455 4,452,455 4,452,455 4,452,455 4,452,455 22,262,275 22,262,275
Community Cultural Action Fund 0 0 2,750,000 1,923,726 2,750,000 2,750,000 2,500,000 2,462,593 2,000,000 1,705,200 10,000,000 8,841,519
Music Showcase Program for Artists from official language minority communities 1,150,000 1,150,000 1,150,000 1,150,000 1,150,000 1,150,000 1,150,000 1,150,000 1,150,000 1,150,000 5,750,000 5,750,000
National Translation Program for Book Publishing 800,000 800,000 800,000 800,000 800,000 800,000 800,000 800,000 800,000 800,000 4,000,000 4,000,000
Canada Council for the Arts Market Access Strategy for Artists from official language minority communities 250,000 248,820 500,000 501,060 500,000 498,745 750,000 750,000 750,000 693,517 2,750,000 2,692,142
Employment and Social Development Canada Enabling Fund for official language minority communities 13,730,000 13,730,000 13,670,000 13,670,000 13,800,000 13,203,946 14,060,000 13,356,209 13,740,000 13,185,590 69,000,000 67,145,745
Official language minority communities Literacy and Essential Skills Initiative 1,500,000 1,500,000 1,500,000 1,277,166 1,500,000 1,052,434 1,500,000 606,697 604,654 728,647 6,604,654 5,164,944
Social Partnership Initiative in official language minority communities 800,000 0 800,000 0 260,000 0 600,000 1,212,316 2,077,856 2,087,595 4,537,856 3,299,911
Justice Canada Contraventions Act Fund (including internal services) 9,922,326 5,969,676 9,922,326 4,341,386 9,875,960 4,016,284 9,875,960 4,689,624 9,875,960 4,085,605 49,472,532 23,102,575
Training, networks and access to justice services (community component, including internal services) 4,239,000 2,589,362 4,239,000 3,924,728 4,171,945 3,770,680 4,171,944 4,178,350 4,171,944 3,802,454 20,993,833 18,265,574
Health Canada Training, networks and access to health services (community component) 13,007,500 6,582,250 15,770,000 15,248,952 15,336,667 15,336,667 15,916,667 15,796,262 13,560,000 13,136,737 73,590,834 66,100,868
Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada Economic Development Initiative for regional operations 70,000 62,534 390,000 364,062 380,000 375,833 380,000 366,927 380,000 355,971 1,600,000 1,525,327
Federal Economic Development Initiatives for Northern Ontario (FedNor) Economic Development Initiative 165,000 90,000 1,115,000 432,269 1,065,000 1,403,069 1,015,000 1,238,943 1,090,000 876,338 4,450,000 4,040,619
Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec (CED) Economic Development Initiative 440,000 1,409,282 2,660,000 1,720,489 2,360,000 1,942,788 2,370,000 2,186,476 2,370,000 2,058,445 10,200,000 9,317,480
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA) Economic Development Initiative 330,000 37,903 1,470,000 853,337 1,340,000 1,227,733 1,340,000 1,513,925 1,330,000 2,258,049 5,810,000 5,890,947
Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario (FedDev Ontario) Economic Development Initiative 120,000 45,060 1,074,050 1,114,865 1,074,050 1,090,818 979,612 1,101,249 1,074,050 979,612 4,321,762 4,331,604
Western Economic Diversification Canada (WED) Economic Development Initiative 240,000 110,000 740,000 523,590 740,000 710,465 740,000 634,458 740,000 736,463 3,200,000 2,714,976
Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency (CanNor) Economic Development Initiative 80,000 0 80,000 74,135 80,000 80,000 80,000 80,000 80,000 80,000 400,000 314,135
All federal partners Pillar 3 subtotal: Communities 55,748,736 43,229,797 67,535,286 56,824,675 66,088,532 58,314,372 67,134,093 61,028,939 64,699,374 57,625,133 321,206,021 277,022,916

Appendix 2: 2017–2018 expenditures of the Official Languages Support Programs by component

Table 5: Expenditures of Canadian Heritage Official Languages Support Programs — Grand total (in dollars)
Program Expenditures
Development of Official Language Communities Program [1] 230,448,656
Enhancement of Official Languages Program [2] 117,749,141
Grand total 348,197,797

[1] Refer to table 6 for a detailed breakdown of the 2017–2018 expenditures of the Development of Official Language Communities Program.
[2] Refer to table 7 for a detailed breakdown of the 2017–2018 expenditures of the Enhancement of Official Languages Program.

Table 6: Expenditures of the Development of Official Language Communities Program by component (in dollars)
Component Sub-component Expenditures
Community Life Cooperation with the Community Sector 32,857,036
Intergovernmental Cooperation on Minority Language Services 23,394,310
Strategic Fund 3,880,187
Community Cultural Action Fund 1,705,200
Young Canada Works (official languages) 2,386,750
Subtotal: "Community Life" component 64,223,483
Minority Language Education Intergovernmental Cooperation on Minority Language Education 161,868,975
Complementary Support for Language Learning 2,622,198
Cooperation with the Non-Governmental Sector 1,734,000
Subtotal "Minority Language Education" component 166,225,173
All components Total 230,448,656
Table 7: Expenditures of the Enhancement of Official Languages Program by component (in dollars)
Component Sub-component Expenditures
Promotion of Linguistic Duality Appreciation and Reconciliation 3,644,431
Promotion of Bilingual Services 335,745
Bilingual Advantage 34,247
Language Rights Support 109,373
Support for Interpretation and Translation 491,896
Subtotal: "Promotion of Linguistic Duality" 4,615,692
Second Language Learning Intergovernmental Cooperation on Second Language Learning 89,108,682
Complementary Support for Language Learning 20,631,315
Cooperation with the Non-Governmental Sector 1,006,703
Young Canada Works (official languages) 2,386,749
Subtotal: "Second Language Learning" component 113,133,449
All components Total 117,749,141

Appendix 3: 2017–2018 expenditures of the Official Languages Support Programs by province and territory

Table 8: Expenditures of Canadian Heritage Official Languages Support Programs by their geographic scope — Grand total (in dollars)
Scope Development of Official Language Communities Program Enhancement of Official Languages Program Total
Provinces and territories 223,705,708 93,724,374 317,430,082 [1]
National programs 6,742,948 24,024,767 30,767,715 [2]
Grand total 230,448,656 117,749,141 348,197,797

[1] Refer to table 9 for a detailed breakdown by province and territory.
[2] Refer to table 13 for a detailed breakdown by national program.

Table 9: Expenditures of the Official Languages Support Programs by province and territory (in dollars)
Province or territory Development of Official Language Communities Program Enhancement of Official Languages Program Subtotal by province or territory
Newfoundland and Labrador 2,878,081 2,776,005 5,654,086
Prince Edward Island 4,318,832 1,800,302 6,119,134
Nova Scotia 9,254,878 3,990,385 13,245,263
New Brunswick 24,918,968 5,190,399 30,109,367
Quebec 52,961,673 18,497,499 71,459,172
Ontario 63,452,638 24,788,254 88,240,892
Manitoba 11,064,769 5,804,781 16,869,550
Saskatchewan 6,370,481 4,688,856 11,059,337
Alberta 9,644,941 9,457,149 19,102,090
British Columbia 11,555,048 10,761,606 22,316,654
Northwest Territories 7,854,104 1,346,545 9,200,649
Yukon Territory 6,270,648 1,090,010 7,360,658
Nunavut 5,017,173 599,746 5,616,919
National (including pan-Canadian and inter-regional projects) 8,143,474 2,932,837 11,076,311
Subtotal for all provinces and territories 223,705,708 [1] 93,724,374 [2] 317,430,082

[1] Refer to tables 10 and 11 for a detailed breakdown of expenditures of the Development of Official Language Communities Program by province and territory.
[2] Refer to table 12 for a detailed breakdown of expenditures of the Enhancement of Official Languages Program by province or territory.

Table 10: Expenditures of the Development of Official Language Communities Program by province and territory (in dollars)
Province or territory "Community Life" component "Minority Language Education" component Subtotal by province or territory
Newfoundland and Labrador 1,576,530 1,301,551 2,878,081
Prince Edward Island 2,459,750 1,859,082 4,318,832
Nova Scotia 3,258,153 5,996,725 9,254,878
New Brunswick 5,564,023 19,354,945 24,918,968
Quebec 4,538,060 48,423,613 52,961,673
Ontario 6,560,206 56,892,432 63,452,638
Manitoba 4,190,020 6,874,749 11,064,769
Saskatchewan 3,177,463 3,193,018 6,370,481
Alberta 3,958,975 5,685,966 9,644,941
British Columbia 3,395,689 8,159,359 11,555,048
Northwest Territories 6,285,254 1,568,850 7,854,104
Yukon Territory 4,534,848 1,735,800 6,270,648
Nunavut 4,194,288 822,885 5,017,173
National (including pan-Canadian and inter-regional projects) 8,143,474 0 8,143,474
Subtotal for all provinces and territories 61,836,733 [1] 161,868,975 223,705,708
[1] Refer to table 11 for a detailed breakdown of expenditures of the “Community Life” component of the Development of Official Language Communities Program by province and territory.
Table 11: Expenditures of the “Community Life” component of the Development of Official Language Communities Program by province and territory (in dollars)
Province or territory “Cooperation with the Community Sector” sub-component “Intergovernmental Cooperation on Services” sub-component Subtotal by province or territory
Newfoundland and Labrador 1,226,530 350,000 1,576,530
Prince Edward Island 1,222,250 1,237,500 2,459,750
Nova Scotia 1,957,153 1,301,000 3,258,153
New Brunswick 3,967,023 1,597,000 5,564,023
Quebec 4,138,060 400,000 4,538,060
Ontario 5,160,206 1,400,000 6,560,206
Manitoba 2,790,020 1,400,000 4,190,020
Saskatchewan 2,417,463 760,000 3,177,463
Alberta 3,030,475 928,500 3,958,975
British Columbia 2,695,689 700,000 3,395,689
Northwest Territories 633,990 5,651,264 6,285,254
Yukon Territory 538,560 3,996,288 4,534,848
Nunavut 521,530 3,672,758 4,194,288
National (including pan-Canadian and inter-regional projects) 8,143,474 0 8,143,474
Subtotal for all provinces and territories 38,442,423 23,394,310 61,836,733
Table 12: Expenditures of the Enhancement of Official Languages Program by province and territory (in dollars)
Province or territory “Promotion of Linguistic Duality” component “Second Language Learning” component Subtotal by province or territory
Newfoundland and Labrador 136,710 2,639,295 2,776,005
Prince Edward Island 112,200 1,688,102 1,800,302
Nova Scotia 147,630 3,842,755 3,990,385
New Brunswick 147,065 5,043,334 5,190,399
Quebec 0 18,497,499 18,497,499
Ontario 294,500 24,493,754 24,788,254
Manitoba 149,330 5,655,451 5,804,781
Saskatchewan 149,330 4,539,526 4,688,856
Alberta 189,290 9,267,859 9,457,149
British Columbia 303,760 10,457,846 10,761,606
Northwest Territories 53,040 1,293,505 1,346,545
Yukon Territory 0 1,090,010 1,090,010
Nunavut 0 599,746 599,746
National (including pan-Canadian and inter-regional projects) 2,932,837 0 2,932,837
Subtotal for all provinces and territories 4,615,692 89,108,682 93,724,374
Table 13: Expenditures of the Official Languages Support Programs by national program (in dollars)
National programs Development of Official Language Communities Program ("Minority Education" component, with one exception) [1] Enhancement of Official Languages Program ("Second Language Learning" component only) Subtotal by national program
Complementary Support for Language Learning: Explore and Destination Clic 815,171 15,488,236 16,303,407
Complementary Support for Language Learning: Odyssey 1,807,027 5,143,079 6,950,106
Cooperation with Non-Governmental Sector/Education 1,734,000 1,006,703 2,740,703
Young Canada Works 2,386,750 [1] 2,386,749 4,773,499
Subtotal for all national programs 6,742,948 24,024,767 30,767,715
[1] Unlike other national initiatives of the Development of Official Language Communities Program that are funded by the "Education" component, Young Canada Works is funded by the "Community Life" component.

Appendix 4: 2017–2018 education expenditures

Table 14: Breakdown of education expenditures (in dollars)
Minority language education Second language learning Total
Federal funds Share of total federal funds Provincial funds Federal funds Share of total federal funds Provincial funds Federal funds Share of total federal funds Provincial funds
Intergovernmental cooperation [1] 161,868,975 97.4% 212,130,508 89,108,682 78.8% 155,357,631 250,977,657 89.8% 367,488,139
National programs [2] 4,356,198 2.6% 0 24,024,767 21.2% 0 28,380,965 10.2% 0
Grand total 166,225,173 100% 212,130,508 113,133,449 100% 155,357,631 279,358,622 100% 367,488,139

[1] Refer to table 15 for a detailed breakdown of intergovernmental cooperation initiatives expenditures in education.
[2] Refer to table 16 for a detailed breakdown of national programs expenditures in education.

Table 15: Breakdown of education expenditures — Intergovernmental cooperation (in dollars)
Minority language education Second language learning Total
Federal funds Share of total federal funds Provincial funds Federal funds Share of total federal funds Provincial funds Federal funds Share of total federal funds Provincial funds
Student participation 28,599,105 17.2% 36,032,839 9,548,495 8.4% 9,779,180 38,147,600 13.7% 45,812,019
Program availability 60,130,958 36.2% 75,813,601 45,769,601 40.5% 103,616,416 105,900,559 37.9% 179,430,017
Student performance 7,271,575 4.4% 12,758,250 5,556,973 4.9% 6,326,969 12,828,548 4.6% 19,085,219
Enriched school environment 13,279,917 8% 13,126,097 8,875,136 7.8% 9,072,816 22,155,053 7.9% 22,198,913
Access to post-secondary education 28,869,200 17.4% 28,053,489 7,173,347 6.3% 7,868,724 36,042,547 12.9% 35,922,213
Support for educational staff and research 11,027,602 6.6% 11,117,368 9,418,563 8.3% 12,319,687 20,446,165 7.3% 23,437,055
Complementary funds – Projects 12,690,618 7.6% 35,228,864 2,766,567 2.4% 6,373,839 15,457,185 5.5% 41,602,703
Subtotal 161,868,975 97.4% 212,130,508 89,108,682 78.8% 155,357,631 250,977,657 89.8% 367,488,139
Table 16: Breakdown of education expenditures — National programs (in dollars)
Minority language education Second language learning Total
Federal funds Share of total federal funds Provincial funds Federal funds Share of total federal funds Provincial funds Federal funds Share of total federal funds Provincial funds
Complementary Support for Language Learning: Explore and Destination Clic (Bursaries) 815,171 0.5% 0 15,488,236 13.7% 0 16,303,407 5.8% 0
Complementary Support for Language Learning: Odyssey (Monitors) 1,807,027 1.1% 0 5,143,079 4.5% 0 6,950,106 2.5% 0
Cooperation with the Non-Governmental Sector: Support for education 1,734,000 1% 0 1,006,703 0.9% 0 2,740,703 1% 0
Cooperation with the Non-Governmental Sector: Young Canada Works 0 0 0 2,386,749 2.1% 0 2,386,749 0.9% 0
Subtotal 4,356,198 2.6% 0 24,024,767 21.2% 0 28,380,965 10.2% 0

Appendix 5: School enrolment in 2016–2017

Source: Centre for Education Statistics, Statistics Canada

Note: This report presents the 2016–2017 data, because the 2017–2018 data were not available when this report was produced. The enrolment data for second language instruction and minority language education do not include data from private schools and/or home schooling.

Enrolments in second language instruction programs in majority language school systems

Note: Second language figures include enrolments for the majority language system (French in Quebec and English elsewhere). For second language enrolment totals outside Quebec, French immersion enrolments are included and provided separately as well. French immersion students in Quebec’s English language schools are not included in the second language totals. Data on second language enrolments in the French language minority system in New Brunswick were not available.

Table 17: Enrolments in second language instruction programs in majority language school systems — All of Canada
Type of second language instruction program Year Total enrolment in majority schools Second language (including immersion) French immersion
Coating Percentage of Percentage (of total population) Coating Percentage of Percentage (of total population)
Total – Students in majority language school systems taking French as a second language combined with students taking English as a second language 1983–1984 [1] 4,401,997 2,199,253 50% 117,454 2.7%
2016–2017 4,557,813 2,409,714 52.9% 449,769 9.9%
Total – English language students in majority systems learning French as a second language (Canada minus Quebec) 1983–1984 [1] 3,464,272 1,607,335 46.4% 117,454 3.4%
2016–2017 3,733,902 1,686,570 45.2% 449,769 12%
Total – Students in the French language education system learning English as a second language in Quebec 1983–1984 [1] 937,725 591,918 63.1% - -
2016–2017 823,911 723,144 87.8% - -
[1] Second language totals for 1983–1984 do not include Yukon, Northwest Territories or Nunavut, for which no data were available. For each of these jurisdictions, the earliest year for which data are available is provided in the table 8, to establish a base year.
Table 18: Enrolments in second language instruction programs in majority language school systems by province or territory
Province or territory Year Total enrolment in majority schools Second language (including immersion) French immersion
Coating Percentage of Percentage (of total population) Coating Percentage of Percentage (of total population)
Newfoundland and Labrador 1983–1984 147,500 75,056 50.9% 970 0.7%
2016–2017 65,823 38,910 59.1% 10,545 16%
Prince Edward Island 1983–1984 24,964 15,911 63.7% 1,833 7.3%
2016–2017 19,143 11,577 60.5% 5,094 26.6%
Nova Scotia 1983–1984 172,770 95,201 55.1% 894 0.5%
2016–2017 112,872 59,613 52.8% 15,171 13.4%
New Brunswick 1983–1984 98,284 70,289 71.5% 11,009 11.2%
2016–2017 68,922 42,552 61.7% 20,016 29%
Quebec 1983–1984 937,725 591,918 63.1% - -
2016–2017 823,911 723,144 87.8% - -
Ontario 1983–1984 1,682,302 909,290 54.1% 65,310 3.9%
2016–2017 1,900,995 985,974 51.9% 262,626 13.8%
Manitoba 1983–1984 194,182 91,058 46.9% 9,090 4.7%
2016–2017 177,288 82,149 46.3% 24,384 13.8%
Saskatchewan 1983–1984 200,362 52,324 26.1% 4,018 2%
2016–2017 177,345 48,687 27.5% 14,556 8.2%
Alberta 1983–1984 447,759 120,868 27% 14,523 3.2%
2016–2017 644,127 185,706 28.8% 42,567 6.6%
British Columbia 1983–1984 496,149 177,338 35.7% 9,807 2%
2016–2017 544,230 226,296 41.6% 53,208 9.8%
Yukon Territory 1984–1985 4,667 2,221 47.6% 186 4%
2016–2017 5,067 2,529 49.9% 717 14.2%
Northwest Territories 1990–1991 14,016 4,360 31.1% 404 2.9%
2016–2017 8,136 2,577 31.7% 885 10.9%
Nunavut 2002–2003 8,861 0 Not available 0 Not available
2016–2017 9,954 0 Not available 0 Not available

Enrolments in minority language education programs

Table 19: Enrolments in minority language education programs — All of Canada
Scope Year Total of school enrolment Enrolment in minority language schools Classes Minority language share of total school enrolment
Total – Canada 1983–1984 [1] 4,682,999 281,002 - 6%
2016–2017 4,805,025 247,212 - 5.1%
Total – French minority language schools 1983–1984 [1] 3,634,315 152,594 - 4.2%
2016–2017 3,897,417 163,515 - 4.2%
[1] Minority language figures for 1983–1984 exclude Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut, where there were no minority language schools in 1983–1984. For each of these jurisdictions, the earliest year for which data is available is provided in the table 20 to establish a base year.
Table 20: Enrolments in minority language education programs by province and territory
Province or territory Year Total of school enrolment Enrolment in minority language schools Classes Minority language share of total school enrolment
Newfoundland and Labrador 1983–1984 147,603 103 Kindergarten to 12 0.1%
2016–2017 66,183 360 Kindergarten to 12 0.5%
Prince Edward Island 1983–1984 25,480 516 1 to 12 2%
2016–2017 20,007 864 Kindergarten to 12 4.3%
Nova Scotia 1983–1984 177,240 4,470 Kindergarten to 12 2.5%
2016–2017 118,566 5,694 Kindergarten to 12 4.8%
New Brunswick 1983–1984 146,045 47,761 Kindergarten to 12 32.7%
2016–2017 97,842 28,920 Kindergarten to 12 29.6%
Quebec 1983–1984 1,066,133 128,408 Kindergarten to 11 12%
2016–2017 907,608 83,697 Kindergarten to 11 9.2%
Ontario 1983–1984 1,773,478 91,176 Kindergarten to 12 5.1%
2016–2017 2,006,700 105,705 Kindergarten to 12 5.3%
Manitoba 1983–1984 199,743 5,561 Kindergarten to 12 2.8%
2016–2017 183,018 5,730 Kindergarten to 12 3.1%
Saskatchewan 1983–1984 201,130 768 Kindergarten to 12 0.4%
2016–2017 179,190 1,845 Kindergarten to 12 1%
Alberta 1983–1984 448,835 1,076 Kindergarten to 12 0.2%
2016–2017 652,272 8,145 Kindergarten to 12 1.2%
British Colombia 1983–1984 497,312 1,163 Kindergarten to 12 0.1%
2016–2017 549,921 5,691 Kindergarten to 12 1%
Yukon Territory 1984–1985 4,697 30 Kindergarten to 8 0.6%
2016–2017 5,343 276 Kindergarten to 12 4.6%
Northwest Territories 1990–1991 14,079 63 Kindergarten to 11 0.4%
2016–2017 8,337 201 Kindergarten to 12 2.4%
Nunavut 2002–2003 8,901 40 Kindergarten to 12 0.4%
2016–2017 10,038 84 Kindergarten to 12 0.8%

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, 2019
Catalogue number: CH10-2E-PDF, ISSN: 2562-704X

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