2015–16 Report on Plans and Priorities - Horizontal Initiatives

1. Youth Employment Strategy

Name of horizontal initiative Youth Employment Strategy

Name of lead department Employment and Social Development Canada

Federal partner organizations Agriculture and Agri food Canada; Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada; Canadian Heritage; Environment Canada; Industry Canada; National Research Council; Natural Resources Canada; Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation; Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada; and Parks Canada.

Non-federal and non-governmental partner Not applicable

Start date of the horizontal initiative April 1, 2003

End date of the horizontal initiative Ongoing

Total federal funding allocated (start to end date) Ongoing

Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not Applicable

Description of the horizontal initiative The Youth Employment Strategy (YES) helps youth aged 15 to 30 gain the skills, career information and work experience they need to find and maintain employment. YES is an Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC)-led horizontal initiative involving 10 other federal departments and agencies that assist youth in making a successful transition into today’s changing labour market. YES has three program streams—Skills Link, Career Focus and Summer Work Experience, which includes Canada Summer Jobs. This program is delivered nationally, regionally and locally via funding instruments such as contribution agreements and direct delivery methods.

This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: YES.

Shared outcomes The shared outcomes of partners for the common key results are:

  • number of youth served;
  • number of youth employed / self-employed; and
  • number of youth returning to school.

Governance structures YES has in place a horizontal Results-based Management and Accountability Framework that represents a commitment among the 11 participating federal departments to undertake ongoing collection of common performance management data to ensure effective overall performance management of the program.

Oversight of the YES horizontal initiative is provided through a collaborative committee structure. ESDC is responsible for facilitating coordination among the departments and agencies funding YES activities. As lead of this horizontal initiative, ESDC chairs and is responsible for the coordination and management of the YES Interdepartmental Operations Committee and the YES Evaluation Sub-Committee. ESDC is ultimately accountable for attaining the expected results for YES and has the ultimate decision-making authority for issues related to the overall policy, design and implementation of YES.

Planning highlights: Economic Action Plan 2014 committed to review the YES to better align it with the evolving realities of the job market and to ensure federal investments in youth employment provide young Canadians with real-life work experience in high-demand fields such as science, technology, engineering, mathematics and the skilled trades. In 2015–16, the Department will:

  • launch a call for proposal seeking projects based on new directions;
  • collaborate with other government departments to implement new directions;
  • implement reforms from YES review; and
  • continue ongoing policy development.

Results to be achieved by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable

Contact information

John Atherton, Director General

Employment Programs and Partnerships

Skills and Employment Branch

Telephone: 819-654-3289

john.atherton@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca

Place du Portage, Phase IV

140 Promenade du Portage

Gatineau, Quebec

Planning Information Youth Employment Strategy
Federal organizations Link to departmental Program Alignment Architectures Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) 2015–16

Planned spending (dollars)
2015–16

Expected results
2015–16

Targets
Employment and Social Development Canada Skills and Employment Career Focus Ongoing 53,000,000 Expected result: Youth have access to programs that allow them to acquire the skills, learning experiences, and opportunities they need to find and maintain employment or return to school

Clients Served: 2,000

Employed or Self-Employed: 1,500

Return to School: 200

Contribution Agreements: 100

Funds Leveraged: $4.5M

Skills Link Ongoing 96,978,938

Clients Served: 9,000

Employed or Self-Employed: 4,500

Return to School: 1,800

Contribution Agreements: 725

Funds Leveraged: $20M

Canada Summer Jobs Ongoing 111,450,241 Clients Served: 35,000
Agriculture and Agri food Canada Career Focus Program Career Focus Ongoing 1,061,850 Youth have access to programs that allow them to acquire the skills, learning experiences and opportunities they need to find and maintain employment or return to school

Clients Served: 66

Employed or Self-Employed: 30

Return to School: 12

Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada International Youth Internship Program (IYIP) Career Focus Ongoing 6,400,000 The expected results for the IYIP include: i) increased awareness for female and male Canadian youth of the equal possibility of working internationally; ii) enhanced equal employability of female and male IYIP interns in Canada and in the field of international development; iii) improved capacity of female and male IYIP interns to contribute to international development in a gender-sensitive way

Clients Served: 332

Employed or Self-Employed: 116

Return to School: 17

Canadian Heritage (a) Young Canada Works Career Focus Ongoing 676,000 Youth have access to programs that allow them to acquire the skills, learning experiences and opportunities they need to find and maintain employment or return to school

Clients Served: 64

Employed or Self-Employed: 16

Return to School: Not applicable

Summer Work Experience Ongoing 6,481,000

Clients Served: 1,278

Return to School: 1,278

Environment Canada Science Horizons Youth Internship Program (SHYIP) Career Focus Ongoing 3,153,000 Youth have access to programs that allow them to acquire the skills, learning experiences and opportunities they need to find and maintain employment or return to school Clients Served: 200

Employed or Self-Employed: 120

Return to School: 20
Industry Canada

Computer for Schools – Technical Work Experience Program (TWEP);

Community Access Program Youth Initiative (CAP-YI)

Career Focus Ongoing 10,142,098 Youth have access to programs that allow them to acquire the skills, learning experiences and opportunities they need to find and maintain employment or return to school

Clients Served: 1,030 (260 TWEP; 770 CAP-YI)

Employed or Self-Employed: Not applicable

Return to School: Not applicable

Youth internships at community access sites Summer Work Experience Ongoing 3,531,842 Clients Served: 540
National Research Council Industrial Research Assistance Program (IRAP) Youth Employment Program (YEP) (b) Career Focus Ongoing 20,373,000 Youth have access to programs that allow them to acquire the skills, learning experiences and opportunities they need to find and maintain employment or return to school

Clients Served: 1,416

Employed or Self-Employed: 1,274

Return to School: 28

Natural Resources Canada Science and Technology Internship Program Career Focus Ongoing 600,000 Youth have access to programs that allow them to acquire the skills, learning experiences and opportunities they need to find and maintain employment or return to school

Clients Served: 50

Employed or Self-Employed: 40

Return to School: 1

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation Housing Internship Initiative for First Nations and Inuit Youth Skills Link Ongoing 1,000,000 Youth have access to programs that allow them to acquire the skills, learning experiences and opportunities they need to find and maintain employment or return to school

Clients Served: 125

Employed or Self-Employed: 20

Return to School: 5

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada The First Nations and Inuit Skills Link Program Skills Link Ongoing 18,331,414 Youth have access to programs that allow them to acquire the skills, learning experiences and opportunities they need to find and maintain employment or return to school

Clients Served: 1,638

Employed or Self-Employed: Data collection to begin in 2016–17

Return to School: Data collection to begin in 2016–17

The First Nations and Inuit Summer Work Experience Program (c) Summer Work Experience Ongoing 7,843,586

Clients Served: 1,382

Employed or Self-Employed: Data collection to begin in 2016–17

Return to School: Data collection to begin in 2016–17

Parks Canada Young Canada Works in National Parks and National Historic Sites Summer Work Experience Ongoing 2,000,000 Youth have access to programs that allow them to acquire the skills, learning experiences and opportunities they need to find and maintain employment or return to school Clients Served: 222
Total for all federal organizations Not applicable 343,022,969 Clients Served:

Career Focus – 5,158

Skills Link – 10,763

Summer Work Experience – 38,422

(a) Canadian Heritage also contributes an additional $5 million annually through its Young Canada Works program to fund student employment positions in small and medium-sized museums.

(b) The National Research Council received $15 million in addition to its $5 million base budget as part of Budget 2014 to support program deliver in high demand fields.

(c) Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada’s Young Canada Works for Aboriginal Urban Youth ceased to be part of the YES as of March 31, 2014.

2. Temporary Foreign Worker Program

Name of horizontal initiative Temporary Foreign Worker Program

Name of lead department Employment and Social Development Canada

Federal partner organizations Citizenship and Immigration Canada

Non-federal and non-governmental partner(s) Not applicable

Start date of the horizontal initiative June 13, 2007

End date of the horizontal initiative Ongoing

Total federal funding allocated (start to end date) Ongoing

Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable (Note that employers pay for Labour Market Impact Assessments)

Description of the horizontal initiative The Temporary Foreign Worker Program (TFWP) enables employers to hire foreign workers on a temporary basis to fill short-term labour needs when Canadians and permanent residents are not available. This program is delivered in partnership with Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) and the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA). Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) assesses applications from employers requesting permission to hire temporary foreign workers and conducts a labour market impact assessment to determine the likely effect these workers would have on the Canadian job market. This sub-program assesses the impact by looking at available labour market information for the region and the occupation, the employers’ recruitment and advertisement efforts, wages and working conditions, labour shortages and the transfer of skills and knowledge to Canadians. ESDC works closely with CIC, the CBSA and the provinces and territories to monitor and share information that has an impact on the integrity of the TFWP. This program is legislated through the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act and Regulations. In Quebec, the TFWP is administered in partnership with the province.

Shared outcomes

  • Employers’ temporary human resource needs are addressed.
  • Canadians are not displaced or replaced by temporary foreign workers.
  • Temporary foreign workers’ rights and protections are respected.
  • Entry of eligible temporary foreign workers into Canada in a timely manner.
  • Temporary migration that is consistent with federal, provincial and territorial regulations, standards and international obligations.
  • Migration that significantly benefits Canada’s economic, social and cultural development.

Governance structures:

  • ESDC is responsible for providing a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) to employers, on the likely impact foreign workers may have on the Canadian labour market. ESDC processes LMIA applications to support the work permit application process.
  • CIC is responsible for assessing work permit applications and authorizing the issuance of work permits to eligible temporary foreign workers.
  • Each department is responsible for the design and management of those elements of the program under its minister's responsibility.

Planning highlights: Ensuring that Canadians are considered first for jobs by integrating new labour market information into the TFWP.

The Program will also focus on continuing to negotiate with the provinces and territories for new Information Sharing Agreements (ISA) to ensure the protection of foreign workers and the Canadian labour market.

Additionally, the department will:

  • Continue to implement on-line applications for all employers and streams;
  • Increase transparency of Temporary Foreign Worker Program by making more information (policies, operational directives, statistics) available on the ESDC website; and,
  • Implement expanded inspection regime including Administrative Monetary Penalties.

Results to be achieved by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable

Contact information

Alexis Conrad, Director General

Temporary Foreign Worker Directorate

Skills and Employment Branch

Telephone: 819-654-3203

alexis.conrad@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca

Place du Portage, Phase IV

140 Promenade du Portage

Gatineau, Quebec

Planning Information Temporary Foreign Worker Program
Federal organizations Link to departmental Program Alignment Architectures Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) 2015–16

Planned spending (dollars)
2015–16

Expected results
2015–16

Targets
Employment and Social Development Canada Skills and Employment Temporary Foreign Worker Program Ongoing 33,046,342

Employers have timely access to temporary foreign workers only when Canadians genuinely are unable to fill the available jobs

Improve the integrity of the Temporary Foreign Worker Program, with the implementation of stronger enforcement and tougher penalties

Percentage of eligible applications received during the fiscal year are processed within 10 business days: 80%

Percentage of employers receiving a positive Labour Market Impact Assessment subject to compliance activities: 25%

Citizenship and Immigration Canada Temporary Resident Program Temporary Foreign Worker Program (TFWP) Ongoing 19,766,866
  • Continue to collaborate with ESDC to implement changes to the TFWP
  • Improve the exchange of information relevant to the TFWP with federal and provincial /territorial partners:
    • begin work towards information sharing protocols and authorities with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and Canada Border Services Agency; and
    • begin amending existing Information Sharing Agreement (ISAs) and develop new ISAs with provinces and territories to assist in the administration and enforcement of employment standards and occupational health and safety legislation.
Not Available
Total for all federal organizations Not applicable 52 813 208

3. National Child Benefit Initiative

Name of horizontal initiative National Child Benefit Initiative

Name of lead department Employment and Social Development Canada

Federal partner organizations Canada Revenue Agency; Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada; Citizenship and Immigration Canada

Non-federal and non-governmental partners Provinces and Territories

Start date of the horizontal initiative 1998

End date of the horizontal initiative Ongoing

Total federal funding allocated (start to end date) Ongoing

Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not available

Description of the horizontal initiative The National Child Benefit (NCB) initiative, a partnership among federal, provincial and territorial governments, with a First Nations component, is designed: to help prevent and reduce the depth of child poverty, promote attachment to the labour market by ensuring families are always better off as a result of working, and reduce program overlap and duplication. The NCB initiative provides income support and other benefits and services to low-income families with children. The Government of Canada’s contribution to the NCB initiative is the NCB supplement. The NCB Supplement, is an additional benefit paid to low-income families with children through the Canada Child Tax Benefit (CCTB), and complements other federal supports for families with children. The NCB Supplement is enabled by the Income Tax Act. While the NCB Supplement is delivered by the Canada Revenue Agency, ESDC is responsible for policy development with respect to the federal–provincial/territorial (F–P/T) NCB initiative and coordinates annual F–P/T reports to Canadians on progress.

Shared outcomes The NCB initiative has three goals:

  • help prevent and reduce the depth of child poverty;
  • promote attachment to the labour market by ensuring that families will always be better off as a result of working; and
  • reduce overlap and duplication by harmonizing program objectives and benefits and simplifying administration.

Federal spending:

The Government of Canada contributes to the F-P/T NCB initiative through a supplement to its Canada Child Tax Benefit (CCTB) called the NCB Supplement. In addition to the base benefit of the CCTB, which is targeted to both low- and middle-income families, the NCB Supplement provides extra income support to low-income families with children. Federal spending on the CCTB, including the NCB Supplement, is tracked by the Canada Revenue Agency, which is responsible for its administration and delivery. As the CCTB is a tax benefit, Finance Canada is responsible for policy related to the CCTB and the preparation of spending forecasts.

The federal government provided $3.84 billion through the NCB Supplement in the 2013–14 benefit year (July to June). Children’s benefits, including the Canada Child Tax Benefit, are projected to increase moderately over the forecast horizon, reflecting growth in the eligible population and adjustments for inflation. By 2014–15, total annual federal support delivered through the CCTB is projected to reach $10.48 billion, including a projected $3.85 billion through the NCB Supplement.

Provincial and territorial and First Nations spending:

Under the F-P/T NCB initiative, provinces, territories and First Nations provide benefits and services that further the goals of the initiative. The F-P/T National Child Benefit Progress Report: 2008 reports that in 2008–09, total reinvestments and investments for provinces, territories and First Nations were estimated at $765.3 million in programs and services. These programs and services include child/day care initiatives, child benefits and earned income supplements, early childhood services and children-at-risk services, supplementary health benefits and youth initiatives. First Nations investments and reinvestments in programs and services were estimated at $52.2 million in 2008–09.

Indicators and impacts:

The F-P/T National Child Benefit Progress Report: 2008 includes an analysis of both direct outcome indicators, which measure only those changes that are directly attributed to the NCB initiative, and societal level indicators, which measure areas such as low income and labour force attachment.

With respect to direct outcome indicators, the report shows that the number of children prevented from living in low income (based on the after-tax low income cut-off) as a direct result of the NCB initiative was 132,900. Therefore, the NCB was responsible for a 2.0 percentage point decrease in the rate of children living below the after-tax low income cut-off.

In addition, in October 2013, F-P/T governments released a second comprehensive evaluation of the first four years of the NCB initiative (1998–99, 1999–00, 2000–01 and 2001–02). It builds on the methodology of the first evaluation, reported in 2005, using two different methods of statistical analysis. The results provide clear evidence that the NCB initiative continues to meet its goal with respect to child poverty, reducing both the incidence of low income and the extent of income shortfalls for lone-parent families. The NCB initiative was also found to promote attachment to the labour market for lone-parent families.

For a complete discussion of indicators, please see Chapters 4 and 5 of the F-P/T National Child Benefit Progress Report: 2008 available on the NCB website at www.nationalchildbenefit.ca. For a discussion of evaluation results, please see the Summative Evaluation of the National Child Benefit which is available on Employment and Social Development Canada’s website at: http://www.rhdcc-hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications/evaluations/social_development/2013/sp_1052_10_13_eng.pdf

Governance structures: The F-P/T NCB initiative Governance and Accountability Framework outlines the key characteristics of the F-P/T partnership: cooperation, openness, flexibility, evolution and accountability. As a cooperative effort among governments, the NCB initiative combines the strengths of a national program with the flexibility of provincial and territorial initiatives designed to meet the specific needs and conditions within each jurisdiction.

With respect to accountability, under the Governance and Accountability Framework, F-P/T Ministers Responsible for Social Services have committed to sharing data on reinvestment initiatives and reviewing results and outcomes achieved in order to identify best practices. F P/T governments have also agreed to report annually to the public with a primary focus on the performance of the initiative. To date, 10 annual progress reports have been published, as well as a second report on a comprehensive evaluation of the first four years of the initiative.

The federal role:

Under the NCB initiative, the Government of Canada provides additional income support to low-income families with children via the NCB Supplement component of the CCTB. The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) delivers these benefits to families.

ESDC is responsible for policy development with respect to the F P/T NCB initiative, and the Minister of Employment and Social Development represents the Government of Canada in this F-P/T initiative.

The CCTB (including the NCB Supplement) is a tax benefit and is administered by the CRA. Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC) and Citizenship and Immigration Canada have roles in reinvestments and investments.

The provincial and territorial role:

Under the F-P/T NCB initiative, provinces, territories and First Nations provide benefits and services that further the goals of the initiative. The initiative is designed so that provinces, territories and First Nations have the flexibility to develop and deliver programs and services that best meet the needs and priorities of their communities. As part of this flexibility, provinces and territories may adjust social assistance or child benefit payments by the full or partial amount of the NCB Supplement. This approach has resulted in families on social assistance being no worse off in terms of their level of benefits, while providing additional funds for new or enhanced provincial and territorial programs benefitting low-income families with children.

Under the F-P/T NCB initiative, provincial and territorial governments, along with First Nations, have committed to re allocating available social assistance funds into benefits and services for children in low-income families that further the goals of the initiative. Jurisdictions have focused reinvestments primarily in key areas:

  • child benefits and earned income supplements;
  • child care;
  • early childhood services and children-at-risk services;
  • supplementary health benefits; and
  • youth initiatives.

As the NCB initiative has matured, the majority of provinces and territories no longer recover increases to the NCB Supplement. This means that the vast majority of children living in low-income families, including those on social assistance, are currently receiving some or all of the NCB Supplement.

First Nations role:

First Nations deliver the reinvestment on reserve, receiving funding from AANDC for self-prioritized activities in line with the stated objectives of the NCB. AANDC administers the on-reserve counterpart to reinvestment programming administered by provinces and territories off reserve. AANDC’s National Child Benefit Reinvestment (NCBR) follows the reference provincial/territorial approach to adjusting social assistance, reinvesting the savings by providing funding to First Nations for community-based projects. Developed in collaboration with First Nations, there are five activity areas for the NBCR on-reserve: childcare; child nutrition; support for parents; home-to-work transition; and cultural enrichment.

Planning highlights In 2015–16, ESDC will continue to work with its federal partners and the provinces and territories to release annual progress reports using the new reporting approach. The progress report will also use revised data from the new Canadian Income Survey. Statistics Canada has acknowledged that there are methodological differences between the new survey and the former Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics. It is not known at this time whether these differences will necessitate adjustments to the NCB targets. The third evaluation of the NCB, this one covering the years post-2001, will also be underway.

Results to be achieved by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not applicable

Contact information Siobhan Harty, Director General

Social Policy Directorate

Strategic and Service Policy Branch

Telephone: 819-654-3660

siobhan.harty@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca

Place du Portage, Phase IV

140 Promenade du Portage

Gatineau, Québec

Planning Information National Child Benefit Initiative
Federal organizations Link to departmental Program Alignment Architectures Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) 2015–16

Planned spending (dollars)
2015–16

Expected results
2015–16

Targets
Employment and Social Development Canada Income Security National Child Benefit Ongoing 300,000 Poverty among low-income families with children is reduced and prevented

The low-income rate for children (based on the after-tax low income cut-off) will be at least 1.5 percentage points lower than it would have been without the NCB initiative in place.

The number of children prevented from living in low-income (based on the after-tax low income cut-off) as a direct result of the NCB initiative will be at least 110,000.

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC) Social Development National Child Benefit Ongoing 110,000 Reduction in the incidence, depth and effects of child poverty

The percentage of Income Assistance clients and dependents with children aged 0–17 who participated in active measures will equal the baseline + 1% annually ( Baseline established using 2015–16 data)

Food security* (of families with children on reserve) will be within 10% (+/-) of rate off-reserveby March 31, 2024

Canada Revenue Agency (CRA)

(While Employment and Social Development Canada is responsible for policy development with respect to the National Child Benefit initiative, the Canada Child Tax Benefit (including the National Child Benefit Supplement) is a tax measure and is administered by the Canada Revenue Agency. In addition, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada and Citizenship and Immigration Canada have roles in reinvestments and investments.)

Benefit programs National Child Benefit Ongoing 3,890,000,000 Not available Not applicable
Total for all federal organizations Not applicable 3,890,410,000
*The Government of Canada endorsed the 1996 UN World Food Summit definition of food security as: "when all people at all times have physical and economic access to sufficient, safe, nutritious food to maintain their dietary needs and food preferences for a healthy and active life."

4. Early Childhood Development

Name of horizontal initiative Early Childhood Development

Name of lead department Employment and Social Development Canada

Federal partner organization Department of Finance Canada

Non-federal and non-governmental partners Provincial and territorial governments

Start date of the horizontal initiative September 2000 with funding beginning April 2001

End date of the horizontal initiative Ongoing

Total federal funding allocated (start to end date) Ongoing

Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not available

Description of the horizontal initiative In September 2000, federal, provincial and territorial ministers responsible for social services agreed to improve and expand early childhood development supports for young children (prenatal to age six) and for their parents.

The Government of Canada is transferring $1.313 billion in 2014–15 to provinces and territories in support of families with young children through the Canada Social Transfer. This is a notional allocation in support of early childhood development, early learning and child care, and child care spaces.

Shared outcomes The objectives of the early childhood development initiative are to:

  • promote early childhood development so that, to their fullest potential, children will be physically and emotionally healthy, safe and secure, ready to learn and socially engaged and responsible; and
  • help children reach their potential and to help families support their children within strong communities.

Governance structures First ministers recognized that provinces and territories have the primary responsibility for early childhood development programs and services.

Federal, provincial and territorial ministers responsible for social services and ministers of health are responsible for commitments under the initiative.

Planning highlights As funds are transferred to the provinces and territories via the Canada Social Transfer, provinces and territories are responsible for planning and prioritizing how the funds are invested.

Results to be achieved by non-federal and non-governmental partners Provincial and territorial governments are investing the funds transferred to them by the Government of Canada in any or all of the following four areas of action outlined in the Early Childhood Development Agreement:

  • promoting healthy pregnancy, birth and infancy;
  • improving parenting and family supports;
  • strengthening early childhood development, learning and care; and
  • strengthening community supports.

Each participating government committed to report to the public on early childhood development programs and initiatives, including indicators of child well-being. Information about the initiative, including the text of the first ministers' commitment, is available on the federal, provincial and territorial Web portal on early childhood development and early learning and child care at www.ecd-elcc.ca. Government of Canada reports are available at www.ecd-elcc.ca and www.faeyc-adfje.gc.ca.

The Government of Quebec supports the general principles expressed in the early childhood development initiative but did not participate in developing the initiative because it wishes to retain sole responsibility for social matters. However, it receives its share of funding granted by the Government of Canada and makes significant investments in programs and services that benefit families and children.

Contact information

Siobhan Harty, Director General

Social Policy Directorate

Strategic and Service Policy Branch

Telephone: 819-654-3660

siobhan.harty@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca

Place du Portage, Phase IV

140 Promenade du Portage

Gatineau, Québec

Planning Information Early Childhood Development
Federal organizations Link to departmental Program Alignment Architectures Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) 2015–16

Planned spending (dollars)
2015–16

Expected results
2015–16

Targets
Employment and Social Development Canada 4.2 Social Development Early Childhood Development – Canada Social Transfer Not applicable Not applicable

Children will be physically and emotionally healthy, safe and secure, ready to learn and socially engaged and responsible;

Children will be assisted to reach their potential and

Families will be supporting their children within strong communities.

As funds are transferred to the provinces and territories via the Canada Social Transfer, provinces and territories are responsible for planning and prioritizing how the funds are invested.
Department of Finance Canada Early Childhood Development – Canada Social Transfer Not applicable Not applicable Financial support to help provincial and territorial governments improve access to affordable, provincially and territorially regulated early learning and child care programs and services. As funds are transferred to the provinces and territories via the Canada Social Transfer, provinces and territories are responsible for planning and prioritizing how the funds are invested.
Total for all federal organizations Not applicable Not applicable

5. Early Learning and Child Care

Name of horizontal initiative Early Learning and Child Care

Name of lead department Employment and Social Development Canada

Federal partner organization Department of Finance Canada

Non-federal and non-governmental partners Provincial and territorial governments

Start date of the horizontal initiative March 2003

End date of the horizontal initiative Ongoing

Total federal funding allocated Ongoing

Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners Not available

Description of the horizontal initiative In March 2003, federal, provincial and territorial Ministers responsible for Social Services, agreed on a framework for improving access to affordable, quality, provincially and territorially regulated early learning and child care programs and services. The objective of this initiative, which complements the September 2000 Early Childhood Development initiative, is to further promote early childhood development and support the participation of parents in employment or training by improving access to affordable, quality early learning and child care programs and services.

The Government of Canada is transferring $1.313 billion in 2014–15 to provinces and territories in support of families with young children through the Canada Social Transfer. This is a notional allocation in support of early childhood development, early learning and child care, and child care spaces.

Shared outcomes The objectives of the early learning and child care initiative are to:

  • promote early childhood development; and
  • support the participation of parents in employment or training by improving access to affordable, quality early learning and child care programs and services.

Governance structures The early learning and child care initiative recognizes that provinces and territories have the primary responsibility for early learning and child care programs and services.

Federal, provincial and territorial ministers responsible for social services are responsible for commitments under the initiative.

Planning highlights As funds are transferred to the provinces and territories via the Canada Social Transfer, provinces and territories are responsible for planning and prioritizing how the funds are invested.

Results to be achieved by non-federal and non-governmental partners Provincial and territorial governments have agreed to invest the funding provided in regulated early learning and child care programs for children under the age of six. Early learning and child care programs and services funded through this initiative will primarily provide direct care and early learning for children in settings such as child care centres, family child care homes, preschools and nursery schools. Investments can include capital and operating funding, fee subsidies, wage enhancements, training, professional development and support, quality assurance and parent information and referral. Programs and services that are part of the formal school system are not included in this initiative.

Each participating government committed to report on the progress being made in improving early learning and child care programs and services. Information about the initiative, including the text of the early learning and child care initiative, is available on the federal, provincial and territorial Web portal on early childhood development and early learning and child care at www.ecd-elcc.ca. Government of Canada reports are available at www.ecd-elcc.ca and www.faeyc-adfje.gc.ca.

The Government of Quebec supports the general principles expressed in the early learning and child care initiative but did not participate in developing the initiative because it wishes to retain sole responsibility for social matters. However, it receives its share of funding granted by the Government of Canada and makes significant investments in programs and services that benefit families and children.

Contact information

Siobhan Harty, Director General

Social Policy Directorate

Strategic and Service Policy Branch

Telephone: 819-654-3660

siobhan.harty@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca

Place du Portage, Phase IV

140 Promenade du Portage

Gatineau, Québec

Planning Information Early Learning and Child Care
Federal organizations Link to departmental Program Alignment Architectures Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) 2015–16

Planned spending (dollars)
2015–16

Expected results
2015–16

Targets
Employment and Social Development Canada Early Childhood Development – Canada Social Transfer Not applicable Not applicable

Early childhood development is supported;

Participation of parents in employment or training by improving access to affordable, quality early learning and child care programs and services is supported.

As funds are transferred to the provinces and territories via the Canada Social Transfer, provinces and territories are responsible for planning and prioritizing how the funds are invested.
Finance Canada Early Learning and Childcare – Canada Social Transfer Not applicable Not applicable Financial support to help provincial and territorial governments improve and expand early childhood development programs and services. As funds are transferred to the provinces and territories via the Canada Social Transfer, provinces and territories are responsible for planning and prioritizing how the funds are invested.
Total for all federal organizations Not applicable Not applicable
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