The Promoting Health Equity: Mental Health of Black Canadians Fund

Current Status of funding opportunity: Closed 

As part of the new initiative on Promoting Health Equity: Mental Health of Black Canadians Fund, the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) is partnering with community-based organizations, researchers and others in Black communities to generate new evidence on culturally focused programs and interventions that address mental health and its determinants for Black Canadians. This work will include supporting the implementation of this initiative by also undertaking knowledge development and capacity building efforts. The new information and evidence produced by projects under the Mental Health of Black Canadians program will be shared as it becomes available.

Webinar information sessions on the Promoting Heath Equity: Mental Health of Black Canadians Fund took place at the beginning of October 2018. Please contact the Centre for Grants and Contributions to obtain a copy of the PowerPoint presentation from the webinars.

On this page:

Other related funding opportunities

The Mental Health of Black Canadians Working Group

PHAC recognizes the efforts and dedication of the Mental Health of Black Canadians Working Group (the “Working Group”) who collaborate with the Agency on the implementation of the Promoting Heath Equity: Mental Health of Black Canadians Fund.

The membership of the Working Group includes individuals from Black communities across Canada and reflects mental health practitioners, researchers, advocates and those with lived experience. Members bring a diverse range of experience and expertise to the table regarding mental health and its intersections with anti-Black racism, and other social and economic issues facing Black communities.

The ongoing role of the Working Group includes:

  • providing strategic advice and recommendations on project funding that will advance the promotion of mental health and well-being for Black communities;
  • providing essential guidance on capacity building and knowledge mobilization, and;
  • contributing to strengthening evidence on mental health and its determinants for Black communities.

Members bring their own views to the table based on their personal and professional expertise. They are not expected to represent the views of the organizations with which they are affiliated.

Members

  • Asante Haughton – Mental Health Advocate and Motivational Speaker; Peer Development and Training Manager, Stella’s Place; Co-Founder "Reach Out Response Network"; "Cypher" Web Series Host and Interviewer; Contributing Editor "Inspire Magazine"; Freelance Thinker and Writer
  • Brooke Chambers – Mental Health Consultant, Speaker and Trainer; Board Member, Ontario Peer Development Initiative
  • Bukola Salami – Associate Professor, Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta
  • Carl James – Jean Augustine Chair in Education, Community and Diaspora, York University; Professor, Faculty of Education, York University
  • Charmaine Williams – Vice-Dean, Students, School of Graduate Studies and Professor, University of Toronto; Faculty Member, Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto
  • Kwame McKenzie – Chief Executive Officer, Wellesley Institute; Director of Health Equity, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health; Professor of Psychiatry, University of Toronto
  • Myrna Lashley – Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry, McGill University; Researcher, Culture and Mental Health Research Unit, Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research
  • Pascale Kaniasta C. Annoual – Founder and Director, Arts, Racine et Thérapies
  • Robert S. Wright – Executive Director, The Peoples’ Counselling Clinic Halifax NS
  • Sophie Yohani – Associate Professor, Faculty of Education, Educational Psychology Department, University of Alberta
  • Wesley Crichlow – Professor, Past Associate Dean (Equity); Scholar, Black queer interdisciplinary Critical Race and Intersectionality, Ontario Tech University; Board member, Black Legal Action Committee;  Member, City of Toronto Partnership and Accountability Circle, Confronting Anti-Black Racism Unit

Funded projects

 Incubator Stream

Cultural Beliefs and Mental Health
Lead/Recipient: Regroupement des intervenant(e)s d'origine haïtienne
Location: Montreal, QC
Duration: 12 months
In brief: This project seeks to better understand and address the barriers faced by Black communities in Montreal North in accessing mental health services. This initiative aims to promote positive mental health and raise awareness around mental health challenges to reduce stigma related to the use of and access to mental health services. The project, which focuses on youth and their families, brings together experts to form an advisory committee, establish partnerships with community organizations and develop support groups.

Is Mental Health the Black Church's Business?
Lead/Recipient: Kaleo Productions Inc.
Location: Greater Toronto Area, ON
Duration:  12 months
In brief: The project aims to develop and deliver an annual Mental Health Symposium for Black Churches to equip its members to help eliminate stigma and uncover and educate on the realities of mental health in the Black Church. Project activities include a Town Hall, three symposia on subgroups within Black Churches (youth, women, elders) and short documentaries and podcasts to raise awareness. The target population is Black, African or Caribbean members of the Black Church in the Greater Toronto Area.

Alternative and Restorative Justice for and by the Black Communities of Montreal North
Lead/Recipient: Événement Hoodstock
Location: Montreal, QC
Duration: 12 months
In brief: This project looks at the impacts of over-criminalization because of mental health within the Montreal North Black community, with a particular focus on youth and their families. The project is establishing partnerships and answering research questions that are helping the design and development of a longer-term implementation project focused on alternative justice models to help improve the overall mental health of Black Canadians in the community. Événement Hoodstock is conducting in-depth field research to identify best practices and develop culturally adapted alternative and restorative justice prevention approaches. Research is being conducted through a literature review and interviews with victims, ex-offenders and families.

Mental Health Initiative Curriculum and Evaluation Plan Development
Lead/Recipient: Aspire for Higher
Location: Brampton, ON
Duration: 12 months
In brief: This project aims to develop a mental health education curriculum, and build capacity for its implementation, in Aspire for Higher Elite Basketball's programs for youth. The new mental health curriculum is being developed in consultation with mental health professionals, education professionals, child welfare organizations, and other partners and organizations. This project offers targeted support to Black youth, particularly males, in Brampton, Ontario.

Mobilizing Partnerships: Taking Steps Together for Supported Re-Integration
Lead/Recipient: Dalhousie University
Location: Multiple communities, NS
Duration: 12 months
In brief: This project aims to develop approaches to support the reintegration of African Nova Scotians from the criminal justice system into the community and to address mental health-related barriers, including stigma. This capacity building project focuses on identifying knowledge and service gaps and building a network of advocates, organizations and professionals to support the development and implementation of culturally relevant programs. The target population is youth of African descent aged 15 to 35 who were incarcerated or in conflict with the law. This project incorporates people of all genders to ensure multiple perspectives are represented.

Promoting Health Capacity for Black Families in the Maritimes
Lead/Recipient: African Diaspora Association of the Maritimes (ADAM)
Location: Multiple communities, Atlantic Region, NS
Duration: 12 months
In brief: This project works within communities to promote understanding of mental health, including the role of racism-induced stress. The project is building capacity in local Black communities by establishing a community advisory team, training Black community members on mental health first aid, holding community engagement sessions to help identify challenges to accessing mental health services among Black Canadians and holding events aimed at providing healthy outlets for stress. The project is also working to establish a network of culturally proficient mental health professionals that can help to deliver training and workshops and advise on longer term mental health promotion strategies. The project's community events are open to all individuals of African-descent throughout the Maritimes and have an emphasis on reaching African diaspora communities who are recent to Canada.

Promoting mental health equity for Canada's Black refugees: A pilot intervention with Rwandan and South Sudanese Refugees in Calgary and Edmonton, Alberta
Lead/Recipient: University of Calgary
Location: Calgary and Edmonton, Alberta
Duration: 12 months
In brief: The project aims to build a collaborative partnership between academics, Black Canadian leaders, and representatives of Black refugee communities to enhance understanding of mental health problems among Canada's Black refugees. Project activities include strengthening community-based partnerships, synthesizing community-based knowledge and identifying promising approaches, and, designing a community-based intervention. The target population includes Rwandan and South Sudanese refugees because of their shared values, beliefs, and pre- and post-migration experiences.

Mental Health of African-Canadian Students, Researchers and Intellectuals
Lead/Recipient: Université du Québec à Montréal
Location: Multiple cities (Halifax, Moncton, Montreal, Toronto, Vancouver)
Duration: 12 months
In brief: The project aims to build the foundation for a pan-Canadian network of African-Canadian post-secondary students, researchers and academics. The project is researching and analyzing the impacts of racism in academia on the mental health of students, researchers and academics. Culturally appropriate interventions to address these challenges are being identified and an interface between researchers working on issues affecting Black academics' mental health and community stakeholders is being created. The project is rolling out in various cities: Montreal, Halifax, Toronto, Vancouver, Moncton, and Rimouski.

 Implementation Stream

African-Caribbean-Black (ACB) Women Living Life to the Full: Peer Based Mental Health Promotion Initiatives for ACB Women
Lead/Recipient: Women's Health in Women's Hands Community Health Centre
Location: Toronto, Ottawa, Windsor and Hamilton, ON
Duration: 46 months
In brief: The project is testing and adapting the Living Life to the Full Course, a group-based interactive course based on the principles of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy. This course is being adapted to be women-centered, adopt an anti-oppressive approach, and address the unique determinants of health for African, Caribbean and Black (ACB) women in a culturally appropriate way. The project is developing training materials, in consultation with the community and an advisory group, and establishing a network of peer facilitators to deliver the training.
The project focuses on hard-to-serve and marginalized ACB women, which include newcomers, immigrants, refugees, women on low incomes, women with complex health and mental health issues, youth and LGBTQ2+. The project responds to a research study conducted by the applicants that identified several barriers to mental health specific to ACB women, including stigma, distrust of services and lack of cultural competence in service providers.

ArTeMo Project
Lead/Recipient: Council for the Advancement of African Canadians (Africa Centre)
Location: Edmonton, Calgary, Fort McMurray, AB
Duration: 36 months
In brief: The project is developing and testing a suite of culturally informed interventions for Black Canadian youth, particularly those in marginalized situations.  The project seeks to increase knowledge on addressing mental health and its determinants through programs that connect youth to their culture, create a sense of belonging and identity, and enhance empowerment. Activities for youth include workshops, community fora, youth conferences, mentorship and employment support, mental health services navigation and cultural learning activities. The project also includes activities for organizations that provide services to at-risk Black youth such as health care, social services and law enforcement in order to increase cultural competency of these organizations and facilitate access to services. The project principally targets Black Canadian youth facing social and economic barriers such as homelessness, pre-existing mental health conditions or diverse sexual orientation or identities. The project also focuses on newcomer and refugee families with youth from war-torn countries.

Jane-Finch Wellness Advocates for Youth (WAY)
Lead/Recipient: Black Creek Community Health Centre
Location: Greater Toronto Area, ON
Duration: 23 Months
In brief: The project aims to improve the understanding of the mental health and well-being of hard-to-reach Black youth from the Jane and Finch neighbourhood in Toronto, particularly as it relates to the social determinants of health. The project is researching, implementing and evaluating interventions for supporting hard-to-reach Black youth and improving their educational and mental health outcomes. Programming addresses the social determinants of mental health and includes supports for alternative learning, food security, housing and employment. Mentors are helping Black youth navigate through difficult community issues such as substance use, criminal activity, street involvement and trauma associated with witnessing violence. The primary target population of the project is hard-to-reach Black youth, in the Jane and Finch area of Toronto. The project is delivering interventions and activities for families, social service organizations and the broader youth community. The project directly involves a cohort of Black youth as well as engaging their families, peer mentors and other community members.

Pathways to Care: Improving Mental Health and Addictions Services for Black Children, Youth and their Families in Ontario
Lead/Recipient: Black Health Alliance
Location: Greater Toronto Area, ON
Duration: 45 months
In brief: The project aims to define and improve pathways to care for Black children, youth, and their families who require mental health and addictions services. The project builds on an existing project that is currently focused on Black youth aged 12 to 29. The project activities include documenting a treatment protocol and best practices for delivering cultural safe and responsive mental healthcare for Black children and their families and then working with organizations to collaborate on implementing these practices. Furthermore, the project is building capacity amongst families, caregivers and communities to support the mental health care needs of children in areas such as stigma, mental health first-aid and systems navigation.  The target population includes children aged 5 to 11 and their families. The project is enhancing service to French speaking and Francophone Black Ontarians.

Mental Health of Black Communities in the National Capital Region: Assessment, Prevention and Intervention Tools
Lead/Recipient: University of Ottawa
Location: Ottawa, ON
Duration: 48 months
In brief: The project aims to better understand and support the social determinants and mental health needs of Black youth and their families from both French and English communities in the National Capital Region. Research on the prevalence of mental health challenges in these communities, the underlying causes, and the current patterns of service use is informing the development of resources and supports currently lacking for this population. The project is developing and distributing education and awareness materials, as well as culturally-adapted tools to support the communities' and mental health practitioners' needs. Black youth are involved in the longitudinal study of the project. Moreover, the academic community is reached through scientific articles in English and French scientific journals.

STAY (Storytelling, Training, Advocacy, and Youth drop-in)- Strengthening the Ecosystems of Black Youth Facing Involvement with Child Welfare or Protective Services
Lead/Recipient: Head and Hands / À deux Mains
Location: Montreal, QC
Duration: 36 months
In brief: The project is developing a series of programs to build the capacity of Black youth in child welfare or protective services, referred to as "youth in care", as well as other marginalized Black youth, to express themselves and advocate for themselves on issues related to mental wellbeing, while also working to train community workers to better serve these youth. The project seeks to improve the mental health and well-being of Black youth by developing their skills and knowledge around their own mental health needs and creating safe spaces for peer support and social inclusion. As well, the project aims to improve the social environment and service provision for marginalized Black youth by sensitizing organizations that interact with marginalized Black youth to their needs and decreasing stigma.

The IMARA Generation Peer Leadership
Lead/Recipient: TAIBU Community Health Centre
Location: Greater Toronto Area, ON
Duration: 46 months
In brief: The project is collaborating with Black youth to co-develop a youth-focused, culturally appropriate mental health awareness and support program. This youth peer leadership program is being delivered through community organizations in the Greater Toronto Area that serve Black youth. It is engaging the families of Black youth to teach them about positive parenting and mentorship and their influence on mental health.
The project aligns with TAIBU's recently developed and adapted Model of Black Health and Wellbeing, as well as the Afrocentric principles of self-determination, collective work and responsibility, and unity. The project works with youth aged 15 to 24 who identify as Black or of African descent, and their families. Outreach and recruitment include a focus on groups at higher risk such as East African youth, Francophone youth, LGBTQ youth, and youth of Muslim faith. Family members are engaged to provide youth with support and mentorship.

Towards Positive Change to Promote Mental Health and Well-being for Black Canadians in Manitoba
Lead/Recipient: Barbados Association of Winnipeg Inc.
Location: Winnipeg, MB
Duration: 24 months
In brief: The project aims to develop a culturally appropriate toolkit for mental health promotion and equity based on community engagement. The project is researching existing mental health promotion tools and selecting a model to adapt to be culturally appropriate for Black Canadians. The ultimate goal is that the toolkit be integrated by organizations serving Black communities in Winnipeg, the province of Manitoba, and possibly nationally. The tool kit will address issues and topics relevant to a range of Black Canadian populations that organizations may be serving, including youth, adults, seniors and newcomers.

Section 1: Overview

The new Promoting Health Equity: Mental Health of Black Canadians Fund ("Fund") will support Black Canadians to develop more culturally focused knowledge, capacity and programs to improve mental health in their communities. 

This Fund consists of two separate streams (applicants may apply to only one funding stream):

Implementation Stream:

The Implementation Stream provides funding to recipients for community-led projects that implement and evaluate culturally focused programs that promote mental health and address its determinants for Black Canadians.

Incubator Stream:

The Incubator Stream provides short-term funding to support community-based applicants that operate with limited organizational capacity and resources to first undertake steps to increase their capacity to design, develop, implement, and evaluate culturally focused programs that promote mental health and address its determinants for Black Canadians. Incubator Stream funding recipients who demonstrate success in increasing their capacity and readiness will be invited to apply for additional funding to implement the project idea developed through this initial incubation process.

1.1 Context

Mental health is an important component of Canadians' overall health. In its 2016 Advancing the Mental Health Strategy for Canada: A Framework for Action, the Mental Health Commission of Canada noted that "mental well-being is deeply impacted by social determinants of health, such as precarious housing, poverty, social exclusion, and racism."

In particular, Black Canadians face significant social and economic challenges that have negative implications for their mental health. These challenges include experiences of interpersonal and institutional anti-Black racism and discrimination; systemic socioeconomic and other disadvantages, including lower rates of educational attainment, higher levels of poverty and social exclusion, and more frequent interactions with law enforcement, criminal justice, and child welfare systems; a lack of access to culturally appropriate and culturally competent services; and stigma related to mental health and to accessing support services.

In response, the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) is launching the new Promoting Health Equity: Mental Health of Black Canadians Fund, with the aim of supporting more culturally focused knowledge, capacity, and programs that address mental health and its determinants for Black Canadians, including a focus on youth.

Section 2: Objectives and principles

2.1 Objectives

The objectives of the Promoting Health Equity: Mental Health of Black Canadians Fund are to:

  • Increase understanding of the unique barriers to and social determinants of mental health for Black Canadians;
  • Increase knowledge of effective, culturally focused approaches and programs for improving mental health and addressing its key social determinants for Black Canadians, including a focus on youth and their family and community environments; and
  • Increase capacity within Black Canadian communities to address barriers to mental health.

2.2 Principles

The Fund is guided by the following key principles. Applicants to both the Implementation and Incubator Streams must apply all of these principles to their proposals when submitting a request for funding:

  • Leadership by Black Canadians: Projects are led by, or developed in close collaboration with, Black Canadian community groups, not-for-profit organizations, and/or researchers. Projects are delivered in, and are of primary benefit to, Black Canadian community members.
  • Evidence-based: Projects are anchored in meaningful data and evidence that demonstrate the potential of the proposed program to have a positive impact on mental health among Black Canadians.Footnote 1 Funding applications must include robust project evaluation and knowledge translation plans to assess the outcomes and impact of planned activities, and contribute to the evidence base about effective interventions and approaches to improve mental health.  Partnerships with academics or other researchers are encouraged to support this work.
  • Social determinants of health approach: Projects address one or more social determinants of mental health for Black communities, such as anti-Black racism, education, housing, policing and criminal justice systems, poverty, and/or social exclusion. Projects may be undertaken in a range of settings related to these determinants of mental health for Black communities, including schools and post-secondary institutions, workplaces, community health care settings, community centres, police departments, and detention and correctional institutions.
  • Health equity lens: Projects integrate throughout their design, implementation and evaluation a health equity lens that considers and addresses unfair and avoidable differences in determinants of health, health outcomes, and reach and impact of interventions for various subgroups with the diverse Black Canadian population. For example, it recognizes and responds to differences based on sex and gender, ethnic/cultural backgrounds, migration histories, geographic locations, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic status.Footnote 2
  • Cultural competence and safety: Where applicable, projects recognize and challenge unequal power relations between program providers and participants by building equitable, two-way relationships characterized by respect, shared responsibility, and cultural exchange. Project participants must have their culture, values, and preferences taken into account in the provision of services.
  • Partnerships and collaboration: Projects are informed by, and benefit from, in-kind and/or financial support provided by partners from various sectors (e.g., not-for-profit sector, academic/research sector, private sector, organizations within and outside of the health sector, and other levels of government).

Section 3: Funding details and requirements – Implementation Stream

3.1 Funding details and requirements

The Implementation Stream provides funding for community-based projects that are ready to be implemented to better promote mental health and address its determinants for Black Canadians.  See Eligible Activities – Implementation Stream, below. Applicants under this Stream must demonstrate sufficient existing financial and human resource capacity to support project implementation and evaluation.

Interested applicants to the Implementation Stream are invited to submit a Letter of Intent (LOI) for initial review and assessment.  See Application Process – Implementation Stream, below. Based on the results of this review, selected applicants will be invited to submit a full proposal for up to 4 years of funding.

Implementation Stream funding decisions will be based on the results of a competitive proposal assessment process and available funds.  Not all eligible applications will be funded.

3.2 Funding amount and duration

Applicants to the Implementation Stream may request funding of up to $200,000 per year for 1 to 4 years. The maximum funding request is $800,000 over 4 years.

All Implementation Stream project activities must be completed by March 31, 2023.

Section 4: Funding details and requirements – Incubator Stream

4.1 Funding details and requirements

The Incubator Stream provides short-term funding to support capacity-building activities for the purpose of enabling the design, development, implementation, and evaluation of projects that promote mental health and address its determinants in Black Canadian communities. Capacity-building activities may include, but are not limited to, development of project networks, collaborations, and partnerships; community-based knowledge synthesis and mobilization activities; and program concept development and feasibility testing. See Eligible Activities – Incubator Stream, below. Applicants under this Stream must demonstrate the need for initial funding to support capacity-building activities.

Based on a final report describing an increase in organizational capacity and readiness, Incubator Stream funding recipients will be invited to submit a request for up to 3 years of additional funding to implement the project idea developed through the initial incubation process.

Interested applicants to the Incubator Stream are invited to submit a funding request form See Application Process – Incubator Stream, below.

Incubator Stream funding decisions will be based on the results of a competitive proposal assessment process and available funds. Not all eligible applications will be funded.

4.2 Funding amount and duration

Applicants to the Incubator Stream may request funding of up to $75,000 for capacity-building activities lasting up to 12 months.

Incubator Stream funding recipients who demonstrate success in increasing organizational capacity and readiness will be invited to submit a request for additional funding of up to $200,000 per year for up to 3 years to implement the project idea developed through the initial incubation process.

All Incubator Stream activities must be completed by March 31, 2020.

Section 5: Additional source of funding from Canadian Heritage

Funding may also be available from Canadian Heritage through its Community Support for Black Canadian Youth Initiative to increase awareness of issues faced by Black youth that affect their full participation in society and the economy, as well as to increase capacity within Black communities to address racism and promote Black history, culture and identity.

This related funding opportunity will support projects that focus on combatting discrimination through awareness-raising and/or digital literacy; providing opportunities for Black Canadian youth; empowering Black youth through the promotion of Black history, culture and identity; and/or developing the leadership skills and civic engagement of Black youth.

Interested applicants are encouraged to contact Canadian Heritage at pch.jeunescanadiensnoirs-blackcanadianyouth.pch@canada.ca to explore eligibility to apply for complementary funding.

Section 6: Eligibility

To be eligible for funding under either the Implementation Stream or the Incubator Stream, proposed projects must align with the Fund's objectives and principles, described above. Applicants must also clearly demonstrate how their funding request meets the following eligibility criteria for recipients and activities.

6.1 Eligible recipients

The following types of applicants are eligible for funding under the Implementation Stream and Incubator Stream:

  • Canadian not-for-profit organizations and unincorporated groups, societies, and coalitions, with priority given to those led by and serving Black communities in Canada;
  • Non-federal Canadian public institutions such as boards of education, schools, colleges and universities, chambers of commerce, law enforcement and police agencies, hospitals and other health care institutions (must apply in partnership with at least one not-for-profit organization);
  • Crown Corporations as defined in the Financial Administration Act (must apply in partnership with at least one not-for-profit organization);
  • Provincial, territorial, regional and municipal governments and their agencies (must apply in partnership with at least one not-for-profit organization);
  • Research organizations and academics affiliated with post-secondary institutions (must apply in partnership with at least one not-for-profit organization); and
  • Private sector organizations (must apply in partnership with at least one not-for-profit organization).

In all cases, projects must be led by, or developed in close collaboration with, Black Canadian community groups, not-for-profit organizations, and/or researchers.

6.2 Eligible activities

All projects under both the Implementation Stream and Incubator Stream must be delivered in, and be of primary benefit to, Black communities and populations in Canada. The following activities are eligible for funding:

Implementation Stream:

  • Adapting existing mental health promotion programs to be more culturally focused and appropriate to Black recipients/users; and
  • Implementing and evaluating novel, culturally focused programs that promote mental health and address its determinants for Black Canadians, in key populations, communities, and settings.

Incubator Stream:

  • Building and strengthening community-based engagement, networks, collaborations, and partnerships;
  • Gathering and analyzing data and information from diverse sources (e.g., community consultations and needs assessments, peer and key informant interviews, focus groups, secondary data);
  • Consolidating knowledge of what works through knowledge synthesis, mobilization of evidence and/or community resources and assets, and analysis of relevant data;
  • Assessing past and present mental health promotion programs for lessons learned and promising practices;
  • Developing the design and/or methodology for a novel, culturally focused mental health programs; and
  • Testing the feasibility of implementing and evaluating novel, culturally focused mental health programs.

6.3 Eligible expenditures

Funding is limited to cash expenses that are pertinent, reasonable and essential to accomplish the objectives of an eligible project. Eligible expenses include, but are not limited to:

  • Salaries, benefits and consultant fees directly related to the project;
  • Rental of office space, and equipment not normally used in your organization's daily operations;
  • Travel expenses and accommodation within Canada, which must not exceed the rates permitted for travel on government business (www.njc-cnm.gc.ca/directive/d10/v238/en);
  • Meetings, events and workshops – expenses associated with meeting space rental, transportation, accommodation, and meals must not exceed the rates permitted for government business (http://www.njc-cnm.gc.ca/directive/d10/en);
  • Dissemination, promotion and communications;
  • Insurance (recipients must ensure that any public events funded by the Program are covered by appropriate insurance);
  • Third-party project evaluation and audit services; and
  • Other costs related to the approved project.

In all cases, project-related administrative expenses (e.g., rental of office space) are limited to a maximum of 15% of total project funding.

A detailed budget will be required as part of the application process for both the Implementation Stream and the Incubator Stream.

No project expenses may be incurred prior to the acceptance of the funding agreement by all parties.

6.4 Ineligible activities and expenditures

The following activities and expenses are not eligible for funding under either the Implementation Stream or Incubator Stream:

  • Provision of mental health services or clinical treatment for mental illnesses (e.g., psychological counselling);
  • Provision of services that are the responsibility of other levels of government;
  • Core operating expenses, including those incurred by the organization in its normal or daily conduct of business (e.g., rent);
  • Capital costs or expenditures (e.g., purchase of land, buildings, vehicles);
  • Any type of Director's fees for volunteer members of Boards or other governing bodies;
  • Annual general meetings or regular executive board meetings of an organization or association, including related travel;
  • Ongoing production of newsletters, newspapers, magazines, journals, or radio and television broadcasts;
  • Pure research in any discipline (pure research is original investigation undertaken to gain new scientific or technical knowledge and understanding, but without specific applications);
  • Project-related travel and hospitality expenses that exceed the National Joint Council rates;
  • Unidentified miscellaneous costs; and
  • In-kind expenses.

Section 7: Application and assessment process

Informational webinars will be scheduled to support applicants in completing application materials for both the Incubator Stream and the Implementation Stream.

7.1 Application process – Implementation Stream

The application process for the Implementation Stream consists of two stages. The first stage is the submission of a Letter of Intent (LOI) that provides a brief overview and outline of the proposed project. Submitted LOIs will be assessed to determine best fit with the overall objectives of the Fund. Selected LOI applicants will be invited to complete the second stage, the submission of a Full Proposal. Applicants with ineligible, incomplete or unsuccessful LOI submissions will not be invited to submit a full proposal.

The maximum length of the LOI is 10 pages. As appropriate, appendices that document the supporting evidence base are permitted in addition to the 10 page maximum. Examples of possible appendices include literature reviews, needs assessments, and past evaluation results.

To obtain a copy of the LOI template, or for additional information about this funding stream, please contact: phac.cgc.solicitations-csc.aspc@canada.ca.

The deadline for submitting completed LOIs is November 7, 2018. All LOIs must be submitted via email to: phac.cgc.solicitations-csc.aspc@canada.ca. Receipt of LOIs will be acknowledged via email. Please ensure that your email address is included in your LOI application.

Successful applications will be determined based on the results of a competitive review process and budgetary considerations. Funding under the Implementation Stream will not be available before April 2019.

7.2 Application process – Incubator Stream

The application process for the Incubator Stream requires the completion of a funding request form. To obtain a copy of the funding request form template, or for additional information about this funding stream, please contact phac.cgc.solicitations-csc.aspc@canada.ca.

The deadline for submitting completed funding request forms is November 7, 2018. All funding request forms must be submitted via email to: phac.cgc.solicitations-csc.aspc@canada.ca. Receipt of funding request forms will be acknowledged via email. Please ensure that your email address is included in your application.

Successful applications will be determined based on the results of a competitive review process and budgetary considerations. Funding under the Incubator Stream will not be available before February 2019.

7.3 Assessment criteria

The following criteria will be used to assess applications under both the Implementation Stream and Incubator Stream:

  • Alignment with the Fund's objectives and principles;
  • Responsiveness to, and anticipated impact on, needs identified by Black Canadian communities;
  • Proposed use of resources (e.g., cost-efficiency, value for money); and
  • Quality, clarity, and completeness of the proposal.

The following additional criteria will be used to assess applications under the Implementation Stream:

  • Applicant and partner capacity to undertake the proposed project. This includes required infrastructure, organizational and financial capacity, and relevant skills, knowledge, and experience);
  • Quality and diversity of partnerships and community engagement;
  • Quality and achievability of project plans for implementing, delivering, evaluating and reporting on clear and measurable results; and
  • Quality of knowledge mobilization plans related to project results, lessons learned, and implications.

Section 8: Other considerations

8.1 Official language requirements

The Government of Canada is committed to enhancing the vitality of English and French linguistic minority communities in Canada (Francophones living outside the province of Quebec and Anglophones living in the province of Quebec), supporting and assisting their development, and fostering the full recognition and use of both official languages in Canadian society. Projects must be accessible in one or both official languages depending on the reach and audience. For additional information, consult the Official Languages Act.

8.2 Gender-based analysis requirements

The Government of Canada is committed to Gender-based Analysis Plus (GBA+). GBA+ incorporates consideration of gender as well as other identity factors such as age, education, language, geography, culture and income in the development of policies and programs. Applicants are expected to incorporate these considerations into their submission. See more information on GBA+.

8.3 Research ethics approval

All projects that involve an intervention research component involving humans must be approved by a research ethics board that adheres to the Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans. In addition, project leads should consult the Tri-Council Policy Statement website before the research portion of the project begins. Research is defined as an activity designed to test a hypothesis or answer a specific research question, permit conclusions to be drawn, and extend knowledge through the use of scientific methods and standardized protocols, systematic collection or analysis of data, or other types of inquiry.

Section 9: Contact us

For additional information about this funding opportunity, please contact: phac.cgc.solicitations-csc.aspc@canada.ca.

PHAC is under no obligation to enter into a funding agreement as a result of this invitation to submit LOIs (Implementation Stream) or funding request forms (Incubator Stream).

PHAC reserves the right to:

  • Reject any submission received in response to this invitation;
  • Accept any submission in whole or in part; and
  • Cancel and/or re-issue this invitation at any time.

PHAC will not reimburse an applicant for costs incurred in the preparation or submission of a funding request form, LOI, or a full proposal in response to this invitation.

Section 10: Glossary of terms

Black Canadians
generally includes diverse individuals, populations, and communities in Canada that identify as having African or Caribbean ancestry.
Health equity
refers to the absence of unfair/unjust, systematic, and avoidable differences in health status or social determinants of health. A health equity approach seeks to reduce inequalities and to increase access to opportunities and conditions conducive to health for all. Heightened efforts to address the needs of populations that are at higher risk for poor health outcomes can help reduce health inequities between different population groups.  For more information refer to the PHAC webpage on social determinants of health and health inequalities.
Knowledge mobilization
includes the synthesis, adaptation, dissemination and active exchange of knowledge.
Mental health
refers to a person's state of psychological, emotional, and social well-being. It is a necessary resource for living a healthy life and a main factor in overall health. It does not mean the same thing as mental illness. However, poor mental health can lead to mental and physical illness. Good/positive mental health allows a person to feel, think, and act in ways that help them enjoy life and cope with its challenges. Mental health can be positively or negatively influenced by factors at the individual, family, community and societal levels, including life experiences, social relationships, physical health, and social determinants of health. For more information on risk and protective factors for mental health refer to PHAC's Positive Mental Health Surveillance Indicator Framework.
Social determinants of health
are the broad range of social, economic and environmental factors that relate to an individual's place in society (such as gender, race, income, education, or employment) and that determine individual and population health.  For more information refer to Social determinants of health and health inequalities.
Youth
generally refers to people aged 15-24 years.

More information on funding program and requirements

Further clarification on the term 'Black Canadian community groups and not-for-profit organizations'

  • For the purpose of this funding opportunity, this term refers to Canadian not-for-profit organizations and coalitions whose mandate and/or priorities include activities specifically designed to serve Black communities and benefit Black Canadians.
  • Evidence that such organizations are based in, led by, and/or serving Black communities in Canada may include:
    • Organizational mission statements, operational plans, and other corporate documents;
    • Current and previous project work; and/or
    • Substantive organizational leadership by Black Canadians (e.g., Board governance, staff leadership).
  • To be eligible for funding, projects must be led by, or developed in close collaboration with, Black Canadian community groups or not-for-profit organizations.
  • Other applicants, such as academic or research organizations, private sector organizations, public institutions or other levels of government may also apply in partnership with at least one Black community-based not-for-profit organization.
  • For more information on application requirements, refer to the Call for Proposals.

Distinction between the Implementation Stream and the Incubator Stream

  • The Implementation Stream is intended to support eligible applicants who have sufficient capacity (in terms of internal expertise, having relevant project partners and collaborators, etc.) to begin undertaking project-related activities.  Applicants to this funding stream will need to document that this capacity currently exists.  Implementation Stream applicants may request funding of up to $200,000 per year for up to 4 years.
  • The Incubator Stream is intended to support eligible applicants who require initial funding to first strengthen their internal capacity (in terms of increasing expertise, building the right project partnerships, etc.) to be able to implement a proposed project idea. Incubator Stream projects can also test the feasibility of a new initiative or intervention approach in order to better define and address capacity needs.  Applicants to this funding stream will need to document that they currently face a capacity gap.  Incubator Stream applicants may request funding of up to $75,000 for up to 12 months.  Recipients of Incubator Stream funding who have successfully completed capacity-building activities will be invited to submit a further application for project implementation funding (up to $200,000 per year for up to 3 years).

Number of projects being funded

  • Approximately 10 to 15 projects are expected to be funded.  This includes projects funded under the Implementation Stream, and projects funded under the Incubator Stream – some of which may go forward to multi-year implementation funding after capacity building activities are complete.

  
Eligibility of specific populations within Black Canadian communities (e.g. youth, newcomers, women) 

  • Projects that focus on a specific population within Black Canadian communities may be considered for funding.
  • Applicants are encouraged to consider priorities and needs within their communities as well as the social determinants of health, and to demonstrate in their proposal how their project will address these issues.
  • For more information on eligibility requirements, refer to the Call for Proposals.

Eligibility of mental health services

  • Provision of direct clinical health care services, including mental health services, are not eligible for funding. Providing health care services is not within the mandate or roles of the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC).  PHAC's work focuses on promoting positive mental health, understanding risk and protective factors, and working in partnership with others to address mental health determinants.
  • Organizations that provide mental health services may apply for funding, either as a lead applicant or a partner organization.  However, the proposed project, and the organization's contributions to it, must focus on mental health promotion activities.

Eligibility of research projects

  • Intervention research projects may be considered for funding, as long as they meet the Fund's objectives and principles.  The intervention that is the subject of study should be a culturally focused program that aims to promote mental health for Black Canadians.
  • Pure research projects (those undertaken to gain new scientific or technical knowledge and understanding, but without specific applications) are not eligible.
  • For more information on eligibility requirements, refer to the Call for Proposals.

Submission of more than one funding proposal

  • Applicants can submit only one proposal, under either the Implementation Stream or the Incubator Stream. 
  • Applicants may participate as a partner on more than one proposal.

Funding sources

  • Proposed projects may receive additional funding from other sources.  However, applicants are not required to seek additional project funding from other sources.
  • The total amount of government assistance (including federal, provincial and municipal funding) for a project cannot exceed 100% of the project's cost.
  • Proposals must disclose all additional sources of funding for the proposed project, if any, including from other Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) programs, other federal departments, other levels of government, and charitable foundations.  Additionally, in the course of project implementation, recipients are required to report to PHAC regarding any additional funds received to support the approved project.

Assessment criteria 

  • General eligibility and assessment criteria for both the Implementation and Incubator Streams are listed in the Call for Proposals. 
  • Specific assessment criteria are outlined in the application packages, which can be requested via email to the Public Health Agency of Canada's Centre for Grants and Contributions: phac.cgc.solicitations-csc.aspc@canada.ca.

Funding decisions

  • For the Implementation Stream, decisions on which organizations will be invited to submit full proposals are expected in early 2019. 
  • Final funding decisions for both the Implementation and Incubator Streams are anticipated to be made in Spring 2019. 

Further information on gender-based analysis (GBA+)

  • GBA+ is a tool to assess how different groups of women, men and gender-diverse people may experience policies, programs and initiatives in different ways.  The 'plus' in GBA+ acknowledges that GBA goes beyond biological (sex) and socio-cultural (gender) differences to consider the many identity factors that intersect to make us who we are – including race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability.  Information about GBA+ and other resources are provided in the Call for Proposals and application materials.
  • To address the GBA+ requirement in project proposals, applicants should demonstrate that they have considered:
    • Whethergender and/or other identity factors will influence the way in which proposed activities are designed, implemented and evaluated.
    • How different groups of Black Canadians may experience and/or benefit from proposed activities.
    • Whether certain groups of Black Canadians may encounter barriers or challenges in taking part in and/or benefitting from proposed activities.

Further information on official languages requirements

  • To address the official language requirement in project proposals, applicants should:
    • Indicate whether there are official language minority communities in the area(s) in which proposed activities will take place;
    • Explain whether proposed activities will include these communities.
  • The Public Health Agency of Canada can support funded projects to translate final reports or other materials in order to facilitate broader knowledge mobilization and exchange.

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Where available, funding applicants should cite applicable peer-reviewed scientific data, research, and analysis and/or previous evaluation results that support the proposed project. However, it is recognized that significant gaps exist in the current state of data and evidence for Black communities in Canada. Other forms of acceptable evidence include: non-Canadian peer-reviewed data, research, and analysis on mental health issues, determinants, and interventions in Black populations; community needs assessments; organizational expertise and knowledge; and perspectives from individuals with lived experience.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

Information on integrating health equity considerations in project activities is available in:
Toward Health Equity - Practice Tool:
http://publications.gc.ca/site/eng/9.805225/publication.html (EN)  http://publications.gc.ca/site/eng/9.805227/publication.html (FR)

Toward Health Equity - A tool for developing equity-sensitive interventions:
http://publications.gc.ca/site/eng/9.805230/publication.html (EN) http://publications.gc.ca/site/eng/9.805231/publication.html (FR)

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