HIV and Hepatitis C Community Action Fund

This Invitation to Submit a Letter of Intent (LOI) is now CLOSED.

The following is for information purposes only.

 

The Public Health Agency of Canada's HIV and Hepatitis C Community Action Fund is supporting excellent community programming that will address priority public health issues. The Agency is investing $26.4 million a year in community-based programs across the country to address HIV, hepatitis C and other sexually transmitted and blood borne infections (STBBI). This level of investment has not changed from funding support provided in previous years.

The development of the new integrated Fund was informed following a consultation process with stakeholders beginning in 2014, which resulted in new priorities, priority populations and eligible activities.

The new, integrated Fund aims to foster innovation, encourage more collaboration and partnerships, maximize efficiencies and increase the effectiveness of community-based investment.

Following a review of Letters of Intent (LOI) submitted to the Agency, successful applicants were invited to submit full proposals. LOIs were assessed on individual merit by a group that included the Public Health Agency of Canada, other federal departments, provincial and territorial governments, subject matter experts and people living with HIV and/or hepatitis C.

Successful LOIs were selected on the basis of having the greatest potential to make an impact on HIV, hepatitis C and other related sexually transmitted and blood borne infections in Canada to end HIV as a public health concern by 2030.

A total of 123 organizations will receive funding through the Community Action Fund for up to five years to implement 85 individual and alliance projects in every province and territory of Canada. These initiatives will work to increase STBBI prevention behaviours, reduce stigma, increase the uptake of STBBI testing, and facilitate improved access to care and treatment services.

The following organizations will be receiving funding through the Community Action Fund.

National projects and organizations

  • HIV and HCV Knowledge to Action (K2A): Canadian Society for International Health (CSIH), Canadian Association for HIV Research (CAHR)

    This Knowledge to Action (K2A) Community Alliance project seeks to improve the capacity of community-based organizations, researchers, people with lived experience, and public health and healthcare professionals to apply program science to their interventions. Program science is the systematic application of knowledge to improve public health programs. K2A activities include a combination of in-person and online information sessions, workshops, and training courses, as well as technical and funding support for promising program science intervention ideas.

  • Smarter Prevention: Sexual health literacy and combination prevention planning for gay men: Community Based Research Centre (CBRC)

    This project will offer training programs, peer-led research and prevention messaging to increase the uptake of information and services that prevent HIV, hepatitis C and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections (STBBI) among gay men (including bisexual and queer cisgender and transgender men, and Two-Spirit people). A combination prevention package includes regular testing, early treatment and effective prevention measures against STBBI, as well as mental health and related services.

  • A Social Marketing Campaign to Increase STBBI Testing Among Marginalized Youth: Action Canada

    This social marketing campaign will aim to increase testing for sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections among marginalized youth. Following an initial national social marketing campaign, three successive six-month campaigns will use regionally-adapted, population-specific messaging and media to increase testing behaviours among young gay men, LGTBQ+ youth and youth from immigrant, racialized and newcomer communities.

  • Preventing STBBI among Marginalized Youth: A Multi-component Project to Increase the Capacity of the Education Sector to Provide Effective Sexual Health Education: Sex Information & Education Council of Canada (SIECCAN)

    To improve the capacity of the education sector to deliver effective sexual health education in teaching environments, this project will update existing resources (including the Canadian Guidelines for Sexual Health Education), produce new resources, and promote and disseminate these resources broadly. The guidelines, models of teaching curricula and online training will provide the education sector with the knowledge, materials, and skills necessary to implement sexual health education that will enable youth, particularly marginalized youth, to prevent HIV, hepatitis C and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections.

  • Walking the RED Path: Re-forging Connections, Empowering Indigenous Women to Heal, and Driving Change for a Healthy Future: Native Women’s Association of Canada

    This project will provide health education workshops, peer leadership training, sharing circles and other culturally relevant and gender appropriate activities and resources to Indigenous women in federal correctional facilities. These activities will increase their awareness and knowledge of HIV, hepatitis C (HCV) and related sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections (STBBI) and increase their capacity to adopt HIV/HCV/STBBI prevention measures and to navigate services.

  • Home Fire/Reconciliation as Prevention: Informing Policy That Addresses Health Inequities for Indigenous People Living With HIV and/or Hepatitis C: Canadian Aboriginal AIDS Network (CAAN)

    This project will increase the capacity of community-based organizations across Canada to implement programs that improve prevention and treatment of HIV, hepatitis C (HCV) and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections among Indigenous people living with, and affected by, HIV/HCV. This will be achieved through community readiness training and tools (skills building workshops, webinars, toolkits), a social media campaign and the promotion of promising program models—all of which will be culturally adapted to the needs of Indigenous communities.

  • Addressing Sexually Transmitted and Blood-borne Infections and Related Stigma through Partnerships, Capacity Building and Community Engagement: Canadian Public Health Association (CPHA)

    This project will decrease stigma and discrimination related to sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections (STBBI) within health and social services sectors by offering training to service providers and managers working within these services. Training resources will include online professional development modules, in-person workshops, webinars and turn-key training materials (e.g., facilitation manuals, presentation slides, participant workbooks) that organizations can use to increase STBBI related capacity within their respective communities.

  • The Advance Pan-Canadian Community Alliance for Gay, Bi, Trans, Two-Spirit, and Queer Men’s Health: Community Based Research Centre (CBRC), Health Initiative for Men (HIM), AIDS Committee of Toronto (ACT), MAX Ottawa, RÉZO

    This Community Alliance will implement innovative interventions in partnership with local communities and stakeholders to increase access to and uptake of priority health services by gay, bisexual, transgender, Two-Spirit and queer (GBT2Q) men across Canada. Priority health services include: prevention, testing and treatment for HIV, hepatitis C (HCV) and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections (STBBI); vaccinations (for human papillomavirus and hepatitis A and B); and, mental health, substance use, and addictions services. The pilot interventions will include projects to expand HIV/HCV/STBBI testing and treatment services, enhanced counselling and referral systems to increase uptake of services, campaigns to promote new effective HIV prevention options among GBT2Q men and health providers. A Community Trainee Program will support emerging GBT2Q leaders to mobilize prevention knowledge and interventions that address local and/or regional community health priorities.

  • Creating enabling environments: Promoting health equity for people living with HIV and other episodic disabilities: Realize

    This project will enhance the capacity of policy-makers, health insurance providers, healthcare providers, community-based organizations and people living with HIV and/or hepatitis C (HCV) to address the mental health, aging, rehabilitation and exercise-related needs of people living with HIV/HCV. This will be achieved through information sessions, workshops and practicums.

  • Positive Leadership Development Institute Expansion: Coalition des organismes communautaires québécois de lutte contre le sida (COCQ-sida), Ontario AIDS Network (OAN), Pacific AIDS Network (PAN)

    This Community Alliance will focus on strengthening the leadership capacities and communication skills of people living with HIV in Québec, Ontario and British Columbia through skills building workshops delivered by peers. Graduates of the program will use their knowledge and leadership skills to reduce stigma and promote effective interventions and prevention practices related to HIV, hepatitis C and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections. They will also become volunteers, board members or staff in their local AIDS Service Organizations, and become more engaged as community leaders.

  • Ending HIV Stigma in Canada: Adapting and Applying Contact-Based Interventions: Providence St. Joseph’s and St. Michael’s Health Care

    This project will implement the People Living with HIV Stigma Index, a tool that documents stigma and discrimination experienced by people living with HIV and identifies interventions to reduce stigma. Working with people living with HIV and healthcare professionals and community-based organizations, the project will use findings from the Stigma Index to provide training to reduce stigma in health and social services.

  • Canadian HIV/AIDS Black African Caribbean Network (CHABAC): Mobilizing across Regions to Build an Effective HIV Response in ACB Communities: Interagency Coalition on AIDS and Development (ICAD), African Black Diaspora Global Network on HIV and AIDS (ABDGN), Health Association of African Canadians (HAAC), HIV Community Link Society, HIV Network of Edmonton Society, AIDS Committee of Ottawa (ACO)

    This Community Alliance will develop a program science model for HIV prevention services (meaning that it has been systematically evaluated and is grounded in scientific evidence) that is specifically designed for African, Caribbean and Black communities. The project will provide training on this model to service providers in Alberta, Ontario and Nova Scotia, allowing them to adapt their existing interventions and to adopt new ones. Through webinars, fact sheets and conference presentations, the project will broadly share its program science model and the interventions developed by local service providers.

  • Enhancing Health and Human Rights: Creating an Enabling Environment for Prevention, Testing and Treatment of HIV, HCV and related STBBI: Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network

    This project will provide resources, analyses and recommendations on a range of HIV-related legal, policy and human rights issues, including the criminalization of HIV and barriers to supervised consumption services and to access to this health service for people who use drugs. The project will also address stigma toward priority populations including people living with HIV and promote health-friendly policing practice.

  • Global Connections, Canadian Realities: Community Systems Strengthening to End HIV Syndemics as a Public Health Threat by 2030: Interagency Coalition on AIDS and Development (ICAD)

    This project will host a series of knowledge exchange activities including policy dialogues and webinars and develop information resources (e.g., factsheets, policy briefs, case studies, weekly syntheses) for Canadian community-based organizations and policy-makers. These activities will strengthen the target audiences’ knowledge of Canadian and global evidence and lessons learned related to the prevention of HIV, hepatitis C and other sexually-transmitted and blood-borne infections and will increase their skills and competencies to implement evidence-informed interventions.

  • Prison Focussed HIV/HCV Education and Training Program: Prisoners with HIV/AIDS Support Action Network (PASAN)

    This project will offer educational workshops and health resource materials to incarcerated men from nine institutions to increase their knowledge, skills and capacity regarding hepatitis C (HCV), HIV and co-infection transmission, prevention and treatment. These activities will be supported by trained peer experts. The project will also facilitate connection to community-based HIV/HCV resources and services through in-person and telephone support, by establishing contacts with health and social services in community, and by developing a pre-release planning tool.

  • Canadian Positive People Network: Canadian Positive People Network (CPPN)

    The project will work to achieve several objectives including: decreasing the number of individuals criminally charged with HIV non-disclosure; decreasing the number of people who are unaware of their positive HIV and/or HCV status; and, increasing the number of positive people who achieve a suppressed HIV viral load and/or who achieve HCV clearance. The project will achieve these objectives through the stronger and more meaningful engagement of positive people in community-based responses, policy development, and public disclosure.

  • National HIV and Hepatitis C Knowledge Broker: CATIE

    This project will deliver educational tools and resources to increase knowledge of HIV and hepatitis C (HCV) among public health and health care professionals, frontline service providers working in community organizations, and policy-makers working with all priority populations. These educational tools and resources will focus on effective HIV/HCV prevention and testing methods and on the importance of early diagnosis, engagement and retention in care. The project activities will also increase the capacity of frontline service providers to respond to community needs and to deliver evidence-based programs, services and policies.

  • Footnote *HIV/STI Awareness, Prevention and Referral Tools for Francophone Immigrants in Ontario, Manitoba and Alberta: La Passerelle

    This project has three objectives: to break the silence, taboo and stigma about HIV among Francophone immigrants from countries with high HIV prevalence; to promote the importance of prevention and preventive behaviour; and to promote access to locally available HIV and sexual health services. The project will work in partnership with the health and social services sectors (immigration, HIV, mental health, sexual health) and the targeted community to develop and distribute awareness tools, a smartphone app and social media content to reach members of the target community and thus meet the project objectives.

British Columbia projects and organizations

  • Engage:Educate:Connect - Vancouver Island HIV/Hepatitis C/STI Peer Education Project: Vancouver Island AIDS Society / AIDS Vancouver Island

    This project will reduce the transmission of HIV, hepatitis C (HCV) and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections (STBBI) by providing training to members of priority populations (gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men, youth at risk, people who use drugs, and people living with HIV/HCV) and their service providers. To achieve this, peer leaders from priority populations will be trained to deliver STBBI education to their peers, while service providers will be trained to deliver stigma-free health services.

  • PAN Provincial Capacity and Skills Building Project: Pacific AIDS Network (PAN)

    This project will offer training events, educational forums and webinars to community-based staff, public health and healthcare professionals, people living with HIV or hepatitis C (HCV), and policymakers. These skills-building opportunities will increase the capacity of participants to develop policies, programs and interventions that address the prevention and care needs of people living with and at risk of HIV/HCV, including in Indigenous communities.

  • Real Talk: Burnaby Association for Community Inclusion (BACI), posAbilities, Kinsight (formerly SF Society for Community Living)

    This Community Alliance will increase the capacity of people with cognitive disabilities and their service providers to openly discuss sexual health and prevention of sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections, to be aware of consensual versus abusive relationships, and to access sexual health services. This will be achieved through educational sessions and facilitated discussions, videos, social media and web-based content. Content will be tailored to reach women, gay men, people who use drugs and transgender individuals.

  • HIV and Viral Hepatitis Interventions Among British Columbia’s At-Risk Immigrants and Refugees Through Alignment between Social Services and Provincial Care: Progressive Intercultural Community Services Society (PICS), SUCCESS

    This Community Alliance will deliver culturally appropriate core health competency training to service providers who work with immigrant and refugee communities, to improve their knowledge of HIV and hepatitis C (HCV) and their ability to refer clients to health and social services. Community outreach events, educational workshops, messaging through social media and individualized follow-up will reach members of immigrant and refugee communities, raising their awareness of HIV/HCV, facilitating their access to health and social services, and supporting their retention in care and adherence to treatment.

  • Peers Educating and Empowering to Reduce Stigma (PEERS) Project: YouthCO

    This project will increase health literacy and encourage the uptake of practices that prevent sexually transmitted infections and blood-borne infections (STBBI) among youth from priority populations—young gay, bisexual and queer men, Indigenous youth, and young people living with HIV and/or hepatitis C. This will be achieved by engaging youth in setting priorities for peer learning and offering workshops in partnership with YouthCO that will address sexual health, stigma, social determinants of health, and STBBI prevention, testing and treatment. The project will also offer workshops to strengthen the competency of service providers working with youth from priority populations and to strengthen referral networks among health and social services.

  • A Targeted Northern BC HIV/AIDS, HCV and STBBI Strategy: Positive Living North (PLN): No kheyoh t'sih'en t'sehena Society

    This project will provide educational presentations and tools to members of priority populations (people who use drugs, people living with HIV and hepatitis C, Indigenous men, women and youth at risk) and service and healthcare providers. These activities will improve the capacity of priority populations to adopt safer sex and drug-using practices, while improving the capacity of service and healthcare providers to advocate for the adoption of safer sex and drug-using practices and to decrease their stigmatizing behaviours with priority populations.

  • Sex Workers’ Rights are Human Rights: Community-Based HIV and Hepatitis C Interventions for Prevention, Increased Care Access and Stigma Reduction: Downtown Eastside Sex workers United Against Violence Society (SWUAV), Health Initiative for men (HIM), St. Paul’s Foundation of Vancouver (Gender and Sexual Health Initiative, GSHI), Supporting Women’s Alternatives Network Society (SWAN Vancouver), WISH Drop-in Centre Society

    The Vancouver Sex Work Community Alliance (VSWCA) will provide workshops and one-on-one interventions to sex workers to increase their knowledge and uptake of prevention, testing, treatment and care for HIV, hepatitis C and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections. In addition, workshops for health and social service providers will reduce stigma and discrimination relating to sex work. The Alliance will also work with policy-makers to remove policy barriers that contribute to harm associated with sex work and to promote evidence-based interventions.

  • Participatory Approach to Preventing HIV, Hepatitis C, and Related Sexually Transmitted and Blood-Borne Infections with Federally Incarcerated Men in British Columbia: University of British Columbia Collaborating Centre for Prison Health and Education

    This Community Alliance will train incarcerated men as peer health educators (Health Ambassadors) to co-deliver prevention workshops on HIV, hepatitis C (HCV) and sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections (STBBI) to men in two facilities. The project will also offer workshops to increase knowledge and prevention-leadership, and reduce fear and stigma related to HIV/HCV/STBBI among correctional and healthcare staff.

Alberta projects and organizations

  • Northern Indigenous Health Alliance: Grand Prairie Friendship Centre, High Level Native Friendship Centre Society, Sagitawa Friendship Society, Sandy Beach Kimamow Atoskanow Foundation

    This Community Alliance will improve access to prevention, testing and treatment for HIV and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections (STBBI) among Indigenous people living with or at risk of HIV/STBBI through enhanced coordination of services, workshops for service providers and community members, and prevention strategies that blend traditional and medical healing practices. It will also build the capacity of organizations to address community needs by discussing solutions to access barriers and promoting an understanding of cultural teachings.

  • Alberta Community Council on HIV – PHAC and Alberta Health jointly provide funding to ACCH which in turn is provided to organizations in Alberta based on the criteria of the Community Action Fund. Organizations receiving funding from CAF through ACCH include:
    • Centre for Sexuality

      This project will promote healthy sexual relationships, increase knowledge of tools that prevent transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections (STBBI), and improve access to point-of-care HIV and STBBI testing among gay men and other men who have sex with men. This will be achieved through workshops, online and social media outreach, and community-based testing clinics. In addition, the project will build leadership skills and health literacy among young gay men through a leadership training program.

    • Shining Mountains Living Community Services

      This project will increase knowledge of sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections and promote the adoption of testing and prevention strategies among Indigenous people, including women and youth. This will be achieved through culturally appropriate and peer-led educational resources, training sessions, outreach during community events, health promotion and support services.

    • HIV Community Link Society

      This project will deliver preventive education and outreach services to priority populations at risk of HIV and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections (STBBI), including gay men and other men who have sex with men as well as individuals from ethno-cultural communities. Through workshops, discussion groups, community outreach and information materials, the project aims to: increase awareness, knowledge and access to HIV/STBBI prevention information and testing; support the adoption of safer sex and harm reduction practices; and, improve access to health, social and support services among priority populations.

    • HIV Edmonton

      This project will increase knowledge of effective interventions to prevent HIV, hepatitis C (HCV) and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections (STBBI) for gay men and other men who have sex with men, African, Caribbean, Black communities and Indigenous Peoples, as well as public health and/or health care professionals. The project will also increase the capacity of priority populations to access HIV/HCV/STBBI testing, treatment and other health and social services through educational activities, online and in-person outreach, and referrals.

    • HIV North

      This project will deliver workshops, education sessions and materials to increase knowledge of HIV, hepatitis C (HCV) and other sexually transmitted infections (STBBI), to decrease stigma, and to build the capacity of service providers working in urban and rural healthcare and community-based settings to provide care and support to priority populations, including Indigenous people, African, Black and Caribbean communities, and people living with HIV/HCV. An online video series and virtual support groups will provide spaces for people living with HIV/HCV from various settings to connect and address prevention, testing and treatment of HIV/HCV/STBBI.

Saskatchewan projects and organizations

  • Take Care Down There! STBBI Prevention Project: Planned Parenthood Regina

    This project will provide training and volunteer placement opportunities for primarily Indigenous youth, in order to improve their knowledge, attitudes and beliefs related to sexual health and sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections. The project will work with schools, community-based organizations, child and family services, and Indigenous groups to access the target population.

  • Saskatchewan Stories: A Community-Based Gathering of HIV/HCV-Related Projects, Programs and Interventions: Saskatchewan HIV/AIDS Research Endeavour (SHARE)

    This project will promote evidence-based best practices and innovative approaches to addressing HIV and hepatitis C in Saskatchewan through the development of an interactive database, a series of online self-directed learning modules, and a provincial conference. These tools will be developed to address the needs of community-based organizations, Indigenous groups and healthcare providers working in urban, rural and on-reserve settings. The project will also improve coordination of surveillance mechanisms to facilitate monitoring of key HIV prevention and treatment targets.

  • A Culturally Appropriate HIV, Hep C, and other STBBI Prevention Intervention for Youth and Young Adults: OUTSaskatoon, Saskatoon Sexual Health

    This Community Alliance will increase awareness and uptake of safer sex and drug using practices to prevent the transmission of HIV, hepatitis C and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections among lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and Two-Spirit youth. This will be achieved through the development of youth-centered educational materials (e.g., zines, online webpages and digital storytelling), peer-led educational sessions, and presentations for school staff, healthcare providers and community partners.

  • Impacting HIV/AIDS, Hep C and STBBI in SK; Culture, Education, Access and Capacity Development: STC Health and Family Services

    This project will improve access and uptake of prevention, testing, care and treatment for HIV, hepatitis C and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections among Indigenous communities and people who use drugs. This will be achieved by promoting testing and through educational campaigns, outreach and peer navigation efforts, training for service providers, and the development of multidisciplinary healthcare teams.

  • Prince Albert Health Promotion: Prince Albert Metis Women’s Association (PAMWA)

    This project will increase knowledge of HIV and sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections, promote the adoption of safer sex and drug-using practices and improve access to evidence-based prevention options for people who use drugs, sex workers, Indigenous people, women and youth. This will be achieved through education and mentoring sessions for priority populations, training for service providers, and the implementation of strategies to remove barriers to access.

  • AIDS Programs South Saskatchewan HIV/HCV/STBBI Prevention, Awareness and Education Project: AIDS Programs South Saskatchewan

    This project will increase uptake of personal behaviours that prevent HIV, hepatitis C (HCV) and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections (STBBI), including a decrease in sharing drug equipment, among priority populations. This will be achieved through educational sessions and activities that promote the adoption of harm reduction behaviours among people who use drugs as well as adults and youth (gay men and other men who have sex with men; people living with HIV/HCV) living in correctional facilities. Furthermore, the project will improve the capacity of health and service providers to reduce barriers to HIV/HCV/STBBI prevention, diagnosis and treatment through educational sessions.

Manitoba projects and organizations

  • Currents of Knowledge: An STBBI Prevention Project for Youth and Service Providers: Klinic Inc.

    This project will increase knowledge of sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections (STBBI), reduce stigma, and improve the capacity of youth from priority populations and service providers to prevent STBBI, by providing workshops and training on STBBI prevention, substance use, relationships, stigma, diversity and stigma. Priority populations include youth in custody, LGBT2SQ+ youth and Indigenous and northern youth.

  • Working Together for Better Health: An Integrated Approach to HIV/STBBI in Manitoba: Nine Circles

    This project will leverage partnerships with local health and social service agencies to improve HIV-related services (e.g., testing, linkage to care, harm reduction, treatment) for priority populations (Indigenous people, gay and bisexual men, people living with HIV). It will also implement a peer-based approach to measuring and addressing the stigma that is informed by the lived experience of people with HIV. Furthermore, the project will increase the uptake of personal behaviours that prevent the transmission of HIV, hepatitis C and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections through evidence-based prevention programs for people living with HIV.

  • Knowledge into Action: Reducing STIgma, Improving Health for African Newcomers from HIV endemic countries: Sexuality Education Resource Centre (SERC)

    This project will reduce stigma as a barrier to prevention, diagnosis and treatment services for sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections (STBBI) among migrants, immigrants and refugees from HIV endemic countries. This will be achieved by identifying best practices and developing tools to address stigma through leadership development workshops and community education sessions for service providers, young people, people living with HIV and community leaders from a range of ethno-cultural and linguistic communities.

  • Improving Access to Services for Priority Populations Affected by STBBI, through Capacity Building and Collaboration: Manitoba Harm Reduction Network (MHRN)

    This project will provide training and support to networks of service providers, policy-makers and community members from priority populations (people who use drugs and people living with HIV or hepatitis C) living in rural, remote, Northern, and Indigenous communities in Manitoba to enhance an integrated approach to address sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections (STBBI) and harms related to substance use. Through workshops, peer education and the delivery of sexual health and harm reduction services, the project will increase knowledge and uptake of effective interventions and prevention strategies for STBBI among priority populations. Furthermore, it will reduce policy and programmatic barriers to accessing health care services for priority populations by convening and training networks of community members, youth, service providers and policy-makers in rural, remote, and Northern Manitoba.

  • Mino Pimatisiwin: Developing an Indigenous Response to STBBI in Manitoba: Ka Ni Kanichihk

    This project aims to improve prevention, testing, care, treatment and support services related to sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections among Indigenous people in Manitoba. The approach involves promoting health service delivery mechanisms, policies and practices that are evidence-based and culturally safe for Indigenous populations.

Ontario projects and organizations

  • Advancing our Region's Engagement with HIV/HCV/STBBI Prevention, Testing and Connection to Care: Regional HIV/AIDS Connection

    This project will deliver a multi-platform campaign (including digital/social media) to increase knowledge of testing for HIV and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections (STBBI) and improve the intent to test among gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (GBMSM) and members of ethno-cultural communities. In addition, the project will reach GBMSM who use drugs through one-on-one and group prevention and education sessions aimed at increasing both HIV/STBBI testing and the adoption of safer sex, drug use and tattooing/piercing practices.

  • iRESPECT - Integrated Regional Education & Peer Engagement Capacity Transfer: HIV/AIDS Resources and Community Health (ARCH), AIDS Committee of Cambridge, Kitchener, Waterloo & Area (ACCKWA)

    This Community Alliance will improve the knowledge and uptake of effective prevention interventions for HIV, hepatitis C and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections among gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men, transgender individuals, at-risk youth and people living with HIV. This will be achieved through workshops, educational sessions and materials, counselling, peer engagement and community events. In addition, the project will provide workshops to service providers on the sexual health needs and barriers to accessing services for transgender individuals.

  • Primary and Secondary Prevention in Toronto: AIDS Committee of Toronto (ACT)

    This project will offer a wide range of activities to increase the knowledge, skills and capacity of priority populations in Toronto to implement behaviours that prevent HIV infection and improve overall health outcomes. These include: small educational groups that support knowledge and uptake of healthy behaviours; in-person and virtual (text/phone/online) interventions; outreach activities; Community Health Education Forums; educational workshops; referrals to health and social services; and peer engagement programs. These project activities will facilitate uptake and linkage to HIV prevention and related health and social services for members of priority populations, including people living with HIV and  hepatitis C co-infection; gay and bisexual men, including young gay/bi men (29 and under); newly diagnosed gay men; and, people aging with HIV.

  • My Sexuality Bundle: Traditional & contemporary tools for a healthy sex life: Wabano Centre for Aboriginal Health

    This project will develop a manual, workshops and poster series grounded in Indigenous culture to promote the uptake of health practices that prevent HIV, hepatitis C (HCV) and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections (STBBI) among Indigenous people. My Sexuality Bundle: Traditional & contemporary tools for a healthy sex life will use traditional teachings to empower and educate Indigenous people on sexual health and HIV/HCV/STBBI prevention. The project will also improve access to culturally appropriate health and social services for Indigenous people affected by HIV/HCV/STBBI through referrals and presentations to partner agencies.

  • Building Parent, Child and Adolescent Resilience in an Environment of HIV Stigma: Teresa Group

    This project will offer peer support and weekly group programs to children and adolescents living with or affected by HIV to improve their access to and retention in care, treatment adherence and uptake of safer sex practices. The project will also build leadership and parenting skills among parents living with or affected by HIV through training programs and toolkits. The majority of clients are from African, Caribbean and Black communities and many are new to Canada, often coming here as refugees.

  • Forward Together: Building a Community Legacy from Individual Engagement to Collective Empowerment: Committee for Accessible AIDS Treatment (CAAT)

    This project will improve access to health and social services, address stigma, increase uptake of behaviours that prevent HIV and improve health and wellbeing among people living with and affected by HIV, especially those who are from racial minority communities and those who are newcomers to Canada. This will be achieved by offering peer mentoring, capacity building training and arts-based programs to members of priority populations.

  • CHAMP in Action: Advancing community health through evidence-based HIV stigma reduction interventions: Africans in Partnership Against AIDS (APAA), Alliance for South Asian AIDS Prevention (ASAAP), Asian Community AIDS Services (ACAS), Centre for Spanish Speaking Peoples (CSSP), Committee for Accessible AIDS Treatment (CAAT)

    This Community Alliance will deliver training to members of priority populations—ethno-racial communities (African, Caribbean and Black; Asian; Latino), racialized and newcomer people living with HIV—and members of target audiences (community and academic researchers, frontline health service providers, policy-makers) working with culturally diverse priority populations. The project will use a train-the-trainer model to deliver an evidence-based intervention that will build participants’ skills to reduce stigma, promote social justice and reduce systemic barriers to accessing health and social services.

  • Men 2 Men (M2M) Sexual Health Project: AIDS Committee of Windsor

    This project will increase knowledge of HIV, hepatitis C (HCV) and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections (STBBI), including awareness of effective prevention options. The goal is to improve HIV/HCV/STBBI testing rates and to increase the uptake of personal behaviours that prevent the transmission among gay men and other men who have sex with men and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer youth. This will be achieved through a range of approaches including educational presentations and one-on-one counselling for the project’s priority populations, as well as educational sessions for service providers.

  • Building a Community of Practice of ASOs Implementing Peer Engagement: Learning Together and Leading Together (LT2): AIDS Bereavement and Resiliency Project of Ontario, AIDS Committee of Thunder Bay (ACTB), AIDS Committee of Windsor (ACW), Fife House, Réseau ACCESS Network, Toronto People with AIDS Foundation (Toronto PWA)

    This Community Alliance is working to reduce infections among people living with and at risk of HIV, hepatitis C and other related sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections, including sex workers and people who use drugs. The approach involves strengthening the capacity to adopt safer sex and drug-using practices, improving access and retention in care, and increasing adherence to treatment. These objectives will be reached by engaging members of these priority populations as peer educators and health navigators, supporting them to deliver educational and training activities to their peers.

  • Connected for Care: Supporting ACB Engagement in the Cascade: Africans in Partnership Against AIDS (APAA), Black Coalition for AIDS Prevention (Black CAP), Women’s Health in Women’s Hands (WHWH)

    This Community Alliance will reduce HIV stigma and increase the uptake of personal behaviours that prevent the transmission of HIV among African, Caribbean, and Black (ACB) people in Toronto and across Canada. The project will train ACB men living with or at risk of HIV to provide education and support to their peers through community outreach, workshops, health services navigation, referrals, one-on-one sessions and support groups while supporting those living with HIV to deal with stigma and discrimination. Both the training and the interventions will address HIV testing, prevention, care and treatment as well as health literacy, healthy relationships, multidimensional stigma, mental health, housing and employment.

  • Youth HIV Project: Prevention, Engagement, Action & Knowledge (PEAK) 2.0: Planned Parenthood of Toronto

    This project will provide training to youth who experience higher rates of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STI) and more barriers to care, leading to an increase in their uptake of safer sex practices, HIV/STI testing and other health services. Trained youth volunteers will educate their peers through workshops and digital stories that address HIV/STI prevention, safer sex, sexual health, healthy relationships, self-esteem and personal resilience.

  • Reaching to Engage: An Integrated Approach to Providing HIV and HCV Education, Prevention and Testing in Rural Northeastern Ontario: AIDS Committee of North Bay and Area (ACNBA)

    This project will offer workshops, online outreach and testing campaigns to improve access to testing and to improve knowledge of HIV, hepatitis C (HCV) and safer sex and drug-using practices among gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men, people who use drugs, and people living with HIV. Through toolkits, workshops and networks of health and social service providers, the project will improve knowledge of HIV/HCV and harm reduction, reduce stigma and discrimination, and improve the capacity and competency to care for priority populations among service providers, including in rural and remote areas.

  • HIV/AIDS Youth Peer Engagement Program – HYPE: AIDS Committee of Durham Region (ACDR)

    This project will increase knowledge of HIV and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections and promote the uptake of safer sex and drug-using behaviours among youth aged from 13 to 29 from priority populations, including young gay, bisexual, trans and queer men, street-involved youth, youth with mental health concerns, incarcerated youth, young people living with HIV, and young people from African, Caribbean and Black communities. This will be achieved through peer-led workshops, street and online outreach, leadership development programs and school-based forums. The project will also provide educational sessions to service providers on best practices for HIV prevention among youth. Finally, the project will improve retention in care for young people living with HIV as they transition from pediatric to adult care.

  • Sex Workers Community Empowerment Project: Maggie’s

    This project will improve access to safer sex and drug use supplies and increase knowledge of prevention, testing and treatment of HIV, hepatitis C and sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections among sex workers and their clients through peer outreach. The project will also reduce stigma and improve access to health and social services for sex workers through stigma reduction training for healthcare and social service providers.

  • Engaging Community for Greater Impact - Building an Integrated Peer Intervention Program: Peel HIV/AIDS Network (PHAN)

    This project will increase knowledge and health-seeking behaviours (screening and risk reduction practices) related to HIV, hepatitis C (HCV) and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections (STBBI) among priority populations (young cisgender and transgender gay, bisexual and queer men who have sex with men; young Black women; transgender and gender non-binary folks). This will be achieved through a peer-led leadership and training program that builds knowledge and skills necessary to promote prevention-related behaviour change. The project will also offer workshops to build the capacity of health and social service organizations to deliver HIV/HCV/STBBI prevention and harm reduction services for priority populations.

  • Project AFFIRM: Delivering Affirmative Coping Skills Programs to Prevent HIV and Hepatitis C: University of Toronto, Planned Parenthood of Toronto

    This Community Alliance will increase the knowledge and skills of gender minority youth through an evidence-informed, community-based intervention that addresses factors that impact vulnerability to HIV, hepatitis C and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections. Training will be delivered through multiple sessions, supported by a manual. The project will build the capacity of organizations serving youth to deliver the intervention through a combination of training and support.

  • Smarter Sex, Pleasure and Maintaining Health: The AIDS Network

    This project will offer workshops to improve the capacity of priority populations including gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men, people who use drugs and people living with HIV, to reduce the risk of new infections. It will also improve accessibility of testing services through enhanced promotion and targeted testing clinics. The project will facilitate linkages to clinical and social services for priority populations through peer navigation, enhanced partnerships and referrals, and workshops for service providers.

  • Making the Link-Addressing Barriers to Prevention, Diagnosis and Treatment of HIV and Hepatitis C: London InterCommunity Health Centre, Middlesex-London Health Unit, Regional HIV/AIDS Connection

    This Community Alliance will collaborate with community partners to increase access to health and social services for people living with HIV and/or hepatitis C (HCV) and people who use drugs through referrals, outreach, information sessions and educational materials. The project will also develop a partnership with the local health unit to obtain key statistics on new HIV, HCV and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections diagnoses to identify gaps, monitor progress and target outreach.

  • Increasing the Capacity of People Living with HIV and HCV through Self-Management Programs: Gilbert Centre

    This project will train people living with or affected by HIV or hepatitis C (HCV) through evidence-based programs that promote the uptake of behaviours that prevent infection and that promote adherence to medical treatment. Through a variety of group activities, participants receive HIV/HCV information, hear about treatment from people with lived experience, learn to communicate with healthcare providers about treatment options, and develop personal action plans to achieve behavioural changes.

Quebec projects and organizations

  • Footnote *Fighting against HIV and HCV in Quebec:Mouvement d'information et d'entraide dans la lutte contre le VIH-sida à Québec (MIELS-Québec)

    This project aims to improve the knowledge and skills of priority populations—gay and bisexual men, people who inject drugs, people living with HIV—and people who may interact with people living with HIV in the course of their work. To do this, the project will offer training workshops and information sessions on prevention to people from priority populations and people who may interact with people living with HIV in their work.

  • Footnote *Mouve: L’Anonyme

    This project will promote the adoption of safer sexual behaviours and reduce stigma among at-risk youth from Montreal's Caribbean and sub-Saharan African communities by increasing their knowledge about the transmission of sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections and building their capacity to manage their sexual health. To do this, the project will offer workshops that are culturally adapted to the realities and needs of young people. In addition, it will facilitate access to testing services for participants. Awareness-raising kiosks will be organized during festivals and neighbourhood festivals.

  • Footnote *ETIAM : Portail VIH, CACTUS Montréal, Centre d’aide aux personnes atteintes de l’hépatite C (CAPAHC)

    This Community Alliance will offer workshops, organize symposia and disseminate reliable information to increase the knowledge and skills of community workers, professionals working in prisons and people from priority populations (trans people; people living in correctional facilities; people living with HIV, hepatitis C or sexually transmitted infections). A trans-inclusive approach will be adopted by alliance members and the participation of people with lived experience will be sought.

  • Footnote *Nika: Centre d’amitié autochtone de Val-d’Or

    This project aims to increase the level of awareness and access to services among Aboriginal people in high-risk situations (homelessness, sex work and/or injection drug use) related to the prevention of HIV/AIDS, hepatitis C and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections. To do this, the project will provide participants with group discussions, capacity building sessions and health navigation services, as well as training sessions for service providers.

  • Footnote *Sexual Health Education Programs for Populations at Risk of HIV/HCV/STBBI: Émissaire

    This project aims to increase knowledge and adopt strategies to reduce risk behaviours for HIV, hepatitis C and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections (STBBI) among adults and young people who use drugs. The project will offer an education program that includes a series of several workshops on STBBI, sexual health, healthy relationships and drug use.

  • Prevention, Treatment Information and Support for Anglophone People Living With or at Risk for HIV and Hepatitis C: AIDS Community Care Montreal (ACCM)

    Through workshops, outreach at community events, support groups, individual consultations, referrals, printed and web-based educational information, and a texting helpline, this project will reach Anglophone gay, bisexual, queer and trans youth, youth living with HIV and hepatitis C (HCV), gay men and other men who have sex with men, and people living with HIV/HCV over 50 years of age. The project aims to increase knowledge of prevention and treatment for HIV, HCV and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections, to promote the adoption of safer sex practices and healthy relationships, to combat stigma and discrimination, and to ensure equal access to services.

  • Footnote *Your Health Online (EnLigneTaSanté): RÉZO

    This project will strengthen the capacity of men who have sex with men (MSM) to adopt preventive behaviours for HIV, hepatitis C (HCV) and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections (STBBI). Through workshops and a web platform that will offer different online intervention options, the project will specifically target two sub-populations at risk of HIV/HCV/STBBI: MSM who use alcohol and drugs and MSM of immigrant background (whether first or second generation, temporary residents or non-status). The capacity of service providers will also be strengthened through the development of a web platform and the creation of a virtual community of practice that will provide a mechanism for training, exchange and sharing among sexual health professionals.

  • Footnote *Culturally Adapted Health Prevention and Promotion for People from Countries with High HIV or Hepatitis C Prevalence: Groupe d’action pour la prévention de la transmission du VIH et l’éradication du sida (GAP-VIES)

    This project will conduct health promotion, prevention and mobilization activities to reduce new infections and to combat HIV and hepatitis C (HCV)-associated stigma among people from countries with high HIV or HCV prevalence. These culturally appropriate activities include workshops and educational and prevention activities for priority populations, support groups and a peer support program for people living with HIV, expertise transfer and capacity building seminars and workshops for health professionals and service providers from community-based organizations working with people living with HIV from priority populations, as well as educational and training activities to foster the engagement of religious and lay leaders.

  • Footnote *Regional HIV/AIDS and STBBI Preventive Interventions: Bureau de lutte aux Infections Transmissibles Sexuellement et par le Sang (BLITSS), Bureau régional d’action Sida (BRAS), Intervention régionale et information sur le SIDA (IRIS Estrie), Sidaction Mauricie

    This Community Alliance will reach priority populations in the Outaouais, Estrie, Mauricie and Centre-du-Québec regions, including gay men and other men who have sex with men, people involved in the sale, trade or purchase of sex, people who use drugs, and people living in and recently released from correctional facilities. Through in-person and online interventions using mobile apps, focus groups, peer helper programs and training workshops, the project aims to increase the knowledge and uptake of effective prevention methods against HIV and sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections among priority populations.

  • Jeunes Queer Youth: Leadership, Prevention, Anti-Stigma for Montreal Area At-Risk Youth: AIDS Community Care Montreal (ACCM), Action Santé Travesti(e)s et Transsexuel(le)s du Québec (ASTT(e)Q), Coalition montréalaise des groupes jeunesse LGBT, Project 10, RÉZO

    This Community Alliance will increase knowledge of HIV, hepatitis C (HCV) and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections (STBBI) and encourage the adoption of personal behaviours that reduce the risk of HIV/HCV/STBBI among youth from priority populations—transgender youth, youth living with HIV/HCV as well as gay and bisexual male youth. The project will support youth-led projects related to sexual health, STBBI prevention, anti-stigma, risk reduction and overall health and wellness, as well as community outreach activities.

  • Footnote *Stella Mobilized! Strengthening our Capacities, Increasing our Knowledge and Sharing our Expertise for Equitable Access to Health:  Stella

    To increase knowledge about HIV, hepatitis C and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections and to promote the uptake of risk reduction behaviours (e.g., testing, use of sterile equipment, uptake of safer sex practices), the project, rooted in a "by and for" approach, will offer workshops, mobilization campaigns, individual and group meetings, and will distribute prevention toolkits to sex workers, Indigenous women and women living in correctional facilities. In addition, the project will seek to widen the network of professionals from the public and community sectors working with sex workers and will offer training workshops to increase their capacity to provide services to sex workers, to reduce stigma and to dismantle potential barriers to access services.

New Brunswick projects and organizations

  • New Brunswick STBBI Community Alliance: AIDS New Brunswick, Ensemble, Avenue B

    This Community Alliance will work with community-based partner organizations, public health and healthcare professionals to identify and reduce barriers to accessing prevention, testing and treatment services for HIV, hepatitis C (HCV) and sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections (STBBI) for people who use drugs. Activities will include implementing pilot projects to facilitate access to STBBI testing and integrating an expanded range of HIV prevention options into existing programs. In addition, healthcare providers and people who use drugs will receive training to overcome access barriers to HIV/HCV/STBBI prevention, testing and treatment services.

  • Education for Prevention & Support in Correctional settings: John Howard Society of Southeastern New Brunswick

    This project will reach incarcerated men, women and youth through education sessions and the development of individualized pre-release plans. These activities will be supported by peer education mentors and will lead to increased knowledge of sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections (STBBI), the adoption of safer sex and drug-using behaviours in correctional settings and on release, and greater access to STBBI and health services in community.

Nova Scotia projects and organizations

  • Engaging African, Caribbean and Black Communities (ACB) in Nova Scotia in Prevention of HIV, Hepatitis C and other STBBI: Association of Black Social Workers (ABSW), African Diaspora Association of the Maritimes (ADAM), Health Association of African Canadians (HAAC)

    This Community Alliance will provide training to service providers and peer educators from—and working with—African, Caribbean and Black (ACB) communities. This will support their efforts to improve knowledge, attitudes and behaviours in regard to HIV, hepatitis C and sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections among ACB women, youth, men and individuals living in or recently released from correctional facilities.

  • Seeing it Our Way; Bridging the Gap in Indigenous Health: Healing Our Nations (HON)

    This project aims to increase the uptake of personal behaviours that prevent transmission of HIV, hepatitis C and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections and increase testing among individuals from four Indigenous nations in Atlantic Canada: Mi'kmaq, Maliseet, Innu and Inuit. This will be achieved through a peer mentorship program for off-reserve Indigenous youth and Indigenous people living with HIV and a testing campaign aimed at Indigenous people who use drugs. The project will also increase the capacity of non-Indigenous service providers to deliver culturally sensitive services and programs.

  • Hep No: Strike out STBBI: Hepatitis Outreach Society of Nova Scotia

    This project will offer peer-led workshops to promote the adoption of behaviours that reduce the risk of hepatitis C and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections among priority populations including youth at risk for drug use, people who use drugs and offenders who are residing in, or who were currently released from, correctional facilities. Through new partnerships with healthcare professionals and community-based organizations, the project will facilitate referrals and promote educational materials.

  • STBBI on Both Sides of the Straight: The PEI-NS Community Alliance: AIDS Coalition of Nova Scotia (ACNS), PEERS Alliance

    This Community Alliance will provide training to service providers and priority populations at risk of HIV, hepatitis C and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections (STBBI) in Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. The project includes sexual health leadership training for gay, bisexual, Two-Spirit, transgender and queer (GB2STQ*) men to increase knowledge and adoption of behaviours that reduce the risk of STBBI. As well, in Prince Edward Island, additional work will be done with young GB2STQ* men through community-based social and social media supports and engagement opportunities. The project will also offer a learning program for young people in Nova Scotia who use drugs to increase their knowledge and adoption of harm reduction and risk reduction practices related to sex, drug use and street safety. In Prince Edward Island, this project will develop a people who use drug engagement and peer knowledge transfer program that will increase the adoption of risk reduction practices and increase peer to peer knowledge sharing skill. In addition, the project will train service providers in both provinces to provide STBBI prevention, testing, treatment, care and support services to priority populations.

Prince Edward Island project and organization

  • STBBI on Both Sides of the Straight: The PEI-NS Community Alliance: AIDS Coalition of Nova Scotia (ACNS), PEERS Alliance

    This Community Alliance will provide training to service providers and priority populations at risk of HIV, hepatitis C and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections (STBBI) in Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. The project includes sexual health leadership training for gay, bisexual, Two-Spirit, transgender and queer (GB2STQ) men to increase knowledge and adoption of behaviours that reduce the risk of STBBI. As well, in Prince Edward Island, additional work will be done with young GB2STQ men through community-based social and social media supports and engagement opportunities. The project will also offer a learning program for young people in Nova Scotia who use drugs to increase their knowledge and adoption of harm reduction and risk reduction practices related to sex, drug use and street safety. In Prince Edward Island, this project will develop a people who use drug engagement and peer knowledge transfer program that will increase the adoption of risk reduction practices and increase peer to peer knowledge sharing skill. In addition, the project will train service providers in both provinces to provide STBBI prevention, testing, treatment, care and support services to priority populations.

Newfoundland/Labrador projects and organizations

  • Social Health Information Exchange Labrador District (SHIELD Project): Labrador Friendship Centre

    This project will offer annual arts-based leadership summits for Indigenous youth in Labrador communities, in order to improve their leadership skills, self-worth, holistic well-being and knowledge and uptake of effective ways to prevent HIV, hepatitis C and sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections (STBBI). Using ACT (Arts, Culture, Technology), Peer Leadership Teams will support, empower and educate youth on sexual health, STBBI, healthy relationships and positive life skills through skills sharing opportunities at regional events and in participants’ home communities. An arts-based, culturally-relevant and multi-language website (English, Innu-aimun languages, Inuktitut) will provide resources and information to increase access to holistic health and social services for Labradorians (especially Indigenous youth).

  • Getting to Zero: AIDS Committee of Newfoundland and Labrador

    This project will increase knowledge of effective prevention interventions for HIV, hepatitis C and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections through training, a youth-focussed educational app and a social media campaign. The training will be offered to front-line professionals (social workers, nurses, correctional officers) working with target populations—lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer youth, gay men, seniors, people who use drugs, people living in correctional facilities. The educational app will reach youth between the ages of 16-29 from across the province. The social media campaign will reach people living with HIV and/or hepatitis C.

Northwest Territories project and organization

  • SMASH (Strength, Masculinities, and Sexual Health) Project: Preventing HIV, Hepatitis C, and STBBI among Young Northern & Indigenous Men in the Northwest Territories Using the Arts: FOXY

    This project will raise awareness of HIV, hepatitis C (HCV) and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections (STBBI) by providing arts-based leadership training grounded in Northern and Indigenous culture to young men, and by offering school-based workshops to young men in communities in the Northwest Territories. SMASH Peer Leader Retreat graduates will create digital stories that will serve as the basis for social media posts and screenings at community forums aimed at promoting discussion about HIV/HCV/STBBI among young men, parents, community members and healthcare providers.

Yukon projects and organizations

  • Healthy Pathways: Reducing HIV, STBBI and hepatitis C risk in rural Yukon First Nation Communities: Blood Ties Four Directions Centre Society, Council of Yukon First Nations

    This Community Alliance will build the capacity of health departments, community leaders and community members in rural Yukon First Nations communities to reduce the risk of HIV, hepatitis C and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections among Indigenous people, including women and youth, and people who inject drugs. The project will offer workshops for First Nations community members, host community forums, develop and disseminate educational materials, and provide one-on-one training to Community Health Coordinators in rural communities.

  • Upstream: Effective Interventions for Yukoners at risk: Blood Ties Four Directions Centre Society

    This project will provide training programs, deliver education sessions and disseminate information resources to improve the knowledge and skills of Yukoners vulnerable to HIV, hepatitis C (HCV) and other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections (STBBI) and their service providers. The project activities will reach: Indigenous street-involved men, women and youth; incarcerated men and women; current and former drug users; people living with HIV/HCV; health and social service providers; community workers; and, peer workers. Education sessions, training programs and information resources will address STBBI, harm reduction best practices, healthy sexuality, stigma, access to health and social services, health literacy, leadership and life skills.   

Nunavut project and organization

  • Culturally-Responsive Arts- and Social Media-Based Interventions to Promote Positive Sexual Health, Attitudes and Behaviours among Nunavut Youth: Qaujigiartiit Health Research Centre (QHRC)

    This project aims to improve knowledge, attitudes and behaviours towards sexual health, sexuality and relationships, and to increase social media and internet safety among 12 to 25 year-old youth in Nunavut. This will be accomplished through Inuit knowledge-sharing and teaching techniques, including arts-based workshops for youth and a resource to support parent-adolescent conversations about sexual health and relationships. The initiative will also involve a youth-driven Photovoice project, which is an arts-based research method that allows the photographer to be the researcher. 


For more information about the funding of these organizations please visit PHAC’s Proactive Disclosure page at the following address:
http://www.gcdisclosure-divulgationsc.phac-aspc.gc.ca/phac-aspc/pd-dp/gc-oc.nsf/WEBbyperiod?OpenView&Count=1000&ExpandAll&lang=eng&

The Community Action Fund also provides support through Northern Wellness Agreements with:

  • Government of Northwest Territories
  • Government of Nunavut

On this page

What are the objectives of the Fund?

The objectives of the Community Action Fund are to:

  • increase knowledge of effective HIV, hepatitis C and/or related STBBI interventions and prevention evidence
  • increase access to health and social services for priority populations
  • strengthen capacity (skills, competencies and abilities) of priority populations and target audiences to prevent infection and improve health outcomes
  • enhance application of knowledge in community-based interventions
  • increase uptake of personal behaviours that prevent the transmission of HIV, hepatitis C and/or related STBBI

What are the priorities of the Fund?

The Community Action Fund supports the Agency's mandate to prevent and control infectious diseases. It also reflects priorities to end HIV and hepatitis C by 2030 as outlined in the UNAIDS 2016-2021 Strategy - On the Fast-Track to end AIDS and the WHO Draft Global Health Sector Strategy on Viral Hepatitis, 2016-2021.

Preference will be given to LOIs with activities that fall under the following priorities:

  • reduce the number of people who are unaware of their HIV or hepatitis C status
  • address stigma related to HIV or hepatitis C or populations affected by these infections
  • reduce new HIV or hepatitis C infections through targeted combination prevention interventions
  • identify evidence-informed solutions to addressing barriers to prevention, diagnosis and treatment services, including legal and policy barriers that impact efforts to slow the spread of STBBI
  • implement social marketing campaigns that work to change a specific behaviour among a clearly identified audience
  • enhance collaboration with other sectors in order to reduce barriers to prevention, diagnosis and treatment for HIV, hepatitis C and/or related STBBI and/or to address social determinants of health
  • implement prevention programming directed at people living with HIV and/or hepatitis C (i.e., Positive Prevention, or Poz Prevention).

The Agency is seeking applications that take an integrated approach to prevent and control HIV, hepatitis C, and related STBBI. It is understood that in certain circumstances some disease-specific activities may be more appropriate.

The Agency will also consider applications that address other aspects of health related to STBBI such as aging, mental health, stigma, discrimination, and health equity.

Who are the priority populations of the Fund?

All proposed activities must focus on specific populations, supported by evidence of need. Priority will be given to activities that focus on:

  • gay men and other men who have sex with men
  • people who use drugs
  • Indigenous people
  • ethno-cultural communities, particularly those representing countries with high HIV or hepatitis C prevalence, including immigrants, migrants and refugees
  • people engaged in the sale, trade or purchase of sex
  • people living in or recently released from correctional facilities
  • transgender people
  • people living with, or affected by, HIV and/or hepatitis C
  • women and youth among these populations, as appropriate

The Agency may consider activities targeting other populations not listed above, based on the evidence of need provided in a Letter of Intent.

Proposed activities to address the needs of a priority population may be directed at a different audience than the population itself. Activities must target one or more of the following audiences:

  • one or more of the priority populations as defined above
  • policy and decision-makers/leaders
  • public health and health care professionals
  • educators
  • non-governmental organizations
  • researchers/academics/trainees
  • global partners (including policy and decision-makers/leaders and non-governmental organizations outside of Canada)

Who may apply to the Community Action Fund?

Applicants must be not-for-profit Canadian organizations and:

  • registered as incorporated, voluntary organizations or corporations;
  • registered as unincorporated organizations, societies or coalitions; or
  • post-secondary institutions seeking to undertake community-based programming, but not research.

Applicants who are not eligible to apply include:

  • for-profit organizations
  • international organizations
  • organizations considered an arm of government (e.g., Regional Health Authority)
  • individuals

Organizations may apply as a single organization, and/or apply as part of a community alliance.

If applying as an individual organization, the applicant must demonstrate:

  • a minimum 2 years of experience addressing HIV or hepatitis C, sexual health or STBBI that can impact HIV and/or hepatitis C prevention and control; and,
  • a minimum 2 years of experience actively and meaningfully engaging the priority populations identified in the proposed project.

Organizations with less than 2 years of experience in either of the previous two criteria must work through a community alliance with organizations that meet the minimum experience requirements.

What activities are eligible under the Fund?

The following describes the activities the Community Action Fund will support, depending on the intended reach of the project.

Front-line Activities: for projects limited to a small geographic area such as a city, a town or a neighborhood.

  • interventions with priority populations to prevent the transmission and acquisition of new infections and to promote health outcomes
  • local adaptation of resources developed at the national/regional level
  • capacity and skills building for priority populations

Regional Activities: for projects in a larger geographic area which may or may not have fixed boundaries. This can include an entire province or territory, or the northern regions of several provinces, as examples.

  • knowledge synthesis, mobilization and exchange
  • creation of population-specific resources that can be used and adapted to the local context such as social marketing campaign materials, health promotion/prevention education and training resources
  • capacity and skills building for front-line organizations, public health and other health professionals

National Activities: for projects that cross at least three Public Health Agency of Canada regions and have potential applicability across Canada.

  • knowledge synthesis, mobilization and exchange
  • creation of population-specific resources that can be used and adapted to the local and/or regional contexts such as social marketing campaign materials, health promotion/prevention education and training resources
  • capacity and skills building for front-line organizations, public health and other health professionals

Priority will be given to those projects which include activities that demonstrate sustainability, and/or the potential to be adapted for other populations or contexts and/or to be scaled up to reach broader geographical areas.

Additional consideration will be given to projects that demonstrate originality and innovative approaches in terms of the population involvement, project activities and the role and involvement of partners.

Ineligible activities include:

The following activities will not be considered for funding under the Community Action Fund:

  • activities taking place on reserve;
  • political activities;
  • fundraising;
  • direct health service delivery activities that fall under municipal, provincial or territorial jurisdiction;
  • activities that fall under other federal jurisdictions;
  • pure research

What expenditures are eligible for funding?

Eligible expenditures are costs directly related to a proposed project and associated with:

  • personnel
  • travel and accommodation
  • rent and utilities
  • material and supplies
  • costs of equipment
  • performance measurement and evaluation
  • translation and interpretation
  • dissemination of resources

Ineligible expenditures include:

  • organizational costs not directly related to project activities
  • capital costs such as the purchase of land, buildings, or vehicles
  • rental charges for space and office equipment when already owned by the applicant organization
  • unidentified miscellaneous costs
  • employee benefits not required by law or an applicable collective agreement

The Agency will not reimburse any applicant for costs related to the submission of a LOI, or costs associated with any subsequent proposal that an applicant may be invited to submit.

What type, amount and duration of funding can be requested?

There are two types of funding:

A Grant is a legal agreement to provide a one-time, up-front annual payment to a single organization for agreed upon activities as described in an approved funding proposal. The organization is not subject to financial monitoring or audit by the Agency but is subject to performance reporting and evaluation.

A grant under this solicitation will only be provided to support the following activities:

  • conferences
  • forums
  • skills-building events
  • online learning initiatives (e.g., webinars)

A Contribution Agreement is a legal agreement to provide funding in instalments each fiscal year (for a specified term) to an organization for agreed upon activities as described in an approved funding proposal. The organization is subject to financial monitoring and audit by the Agency and is subject to performance reporting and evaluation.

What is a community alliance?

A community alliance is created when two or more organizations agree to work together to achieve the objectives of a single project. These projects can be front-line, regional or national in scope.

The Letter of Intent requires a list of member organizations and a total annual budget for the project. In the full proposal stage, each member of the alliance will identify activities each member will be responsible for, and the corresponding detailed budget required to undertake these activities.

Organizations which are part of an alliance will only be responsible and accountable for their project activities. One alliance member will not be responsible for the work of any other alliance member organization.

Each member of the community alliance will:

  • receive separate funding payments directly; and
  • provide individual financial reports to the Agency.

Performance measurement and evaluation reporting will be done by all alliance members, for the project as a whole.

There is no maximum to the number of organizations that can make up an alliance, but each organization must be seeking funding from the Community Action Fund to be a member of the alliance.

Community alliances are encouraged to seek out additional partnerships with other organizations in order to help the project achieve its objectives. Unlike alliance members, project partners will not receive funding.

What is the deadline for submissions?

The solicitation for this Fund currently closed.

The review of the HIV and Hepatitis C Community Action Fund

In 2017-2018, the Public Health Agency of Canada commissioned a review of the process used to develop and implement the HIV and Hepatitis C Community Action Fund. The objective of the review was to provide the Agency with lessons learned for future grant and contribution program development and implementation.

The review conducted by Goss Gilroy Inc. examined:

  • the efficiency and effectiveness of the review and feedback process;
  • stakeholder engagement in the development, design and implementation of the Community Action Fund; and,
  • communications with external stakeholders.

To request a copy of the Community Action Fund review report, please contact: phac.ccdic-clmti.aspc@canada.ca.

For more information

To obtain additional information about the LOI, please contact: CGCOperationsCSC@phac-aspc.gc.ca.

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Unofficial translation of the original title.

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