Annual Report to Parliament 2014-2015

Canada Revenue Agency
Financial Statements – Administered Activities

Logo of the Office of the Auditor General of Canada

INDEPENDENT AUDITORS REPORT

To the Board of Management of the Canada Revenue Agency and the Minister of National Revenue

I have audited the accompanying statement of administered assets and liabilities of the Canada Revenue Agency as at 31 March 2015, and the statement of administered revenues and pension contributions, statement of administered expenses and recoveries and statement of administered cash flows for the year then ended, and a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory information (together "the financial information"). The financial information has been prepared by management using the basis of accounting described in Note 2.

Management's Responsibility for the Financial Information

Management is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of this financial information in accordance with the basis of accounting described in Note 2; this includes determining that the basis of accounting is an acceptable basis for the preparation of the financial information in the circumstances, and for such internal control as management determines is necessary to enable the preparation of the financial information that is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error.

Auditor's Responsibility

My responsibility is to express an opinion on the financial information based on my audit. I conducted my audit in accordance with Canadian generally accepted auditing standards. Those standards require that I comply with ethical requirements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial information is free from material misstatement.

An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial information. The procedures selected depend on the auditor's judgment, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial information, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the entity's preparation and fair presentation of the financial information in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the entity's internal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial information.

I believe that the audit evidence I have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my audit opinion.

Opinion

In my opinion, the financial information presents fairly, in all material respects, the administered assets and liabilities of the Canada Revenue Agency as at 31 March 2015, and the results of its administered operations and its administered cash flows for the year then ended in accordance with the basis of accounting described in Note 2.

Emphasis of Matter

Without modifying my opinion, I draw attention to Note 2 to the financial information, which describes the purpose and basis of accounting for reporting activities administered by the Canada Revenue Agency on behalf of others. This financial information may not be suitable for another purpose. Management prepares a separate set of financial statements to report the operational revenues and expenses of the Canada Revenue Agency.

Original signed

Michael Ferguson, CPA, CA
FCA (New Brunswick)
Auditor General of Canada

28 August 2015
Ottawa, Canada

Canada Revenue Agency
Statement of Administered Assets and Liabilities
as at March 31
(in thousands of dollars)
  2015 2014
Administered assets    
Cash on hand 7,397,817 7,489,261
Amounts receivable from taxpayers (note 3) 96,885,030 90,955,765
Amounts receivable under the tobacco civil settlements (note 4) 310,633 398,444
Total assets 104,593,480 98,843,470
Administered liabilities    
Amounts payable to taxpayers (note 5) 56,203,780 52,605,357
Amounts payable to provinces (note 6) 600,570 648,017
Deposit accounts (note 7) 178,508 162,330
  56,982,858 53,415,704
Net amount due to the Consolidated Revenue Fund on behalf of the Government of Canada and others (note 8) 47,610,622 45,427,766
Total liabilities 104,593,480 98,843,470
Contingent liabilities (note 9)    

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements

Approved by: 

original signed by

Andrew Treusch
Commissioner of Revenue and Chief Executive Officer of the Canada Revenue Agency

August 28, 2015

original signed by

Richard Thorpe, CPA, CMA, FCMA
Director and Chair, Board of Management  

August 28, 2015

Canada Revenue Agency
Statement of Administered Revenues and Pension Contributions
for the year ended March 31
(in thousands of dollars)
  2015 2014
Federal administered revenues    
Income tax revenues    
Individuals and Trusts (note 10) 135,810,323 130,894,581
Corporations 39,446,519 36,587,157
Non-resident tax withholdings 6,216,306 6,404,440
  181,473,148  173,886,178
Other taxes, duties, and charges    
Goods and services tax (note 11) 10,310,612 11,493,496
Energy taxes 5,469,039 5,425,949
Other excise taxes and duties 3,530,554 3,359,545
Miscellaneous charges (note 12) 691,002 714,727
  20,001,207 20,993,717
Employment insurance premiums 22,962,274 22,160,249
Interest, penalties, and other revenues (note 13) 4,508,971 5,267,408
Revenues administered on behalf of the Government of Canada 228,945,600 222,307,552
Provincial and territorial governments and First Nations administered revenues    
Income tax revenues    
Individuals and Trusts 62,206,617 58,438,947
Corporations 15,869,127 13,424,320
  78,075,744 71,863,267
Provincial portion of harmonized sales tax (note 14) 23,515,772 22,224,003
Other revenues (note 15) 568,300 207,966
Revenues administered on behalf of provincial and territorial governments and First Nations 102,159,816 94,295,236
Pension contributions, interest, and penalties administered on behalf of the Canada Pension Plan (note 16) 45,158,794 43,264,617
Total administered revenues and pension contributions 376,264,210 359,867,405

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements.

Canada Revenue Agency
Statement of Administered Expenses and Recoveries
for the year ended March 31
(in thousands of dollars)
  2015 2014
Federal administered expenses    
Transfers to individuals    
Child tax benefits 10,372,188 10,401,573
Universal child care benefits 3,935,467 2,728,757
Working income tax benefit 1,257,805 1,231,341
Children's special allowances 214,761 235,403
Refundable medical expense supplement 142,496 139,497
  15,922,717 14,736,571
Transfers to corporations    
Refundable investment tax credit 1,392,292 1,389,776
Film and video tax credits 357,768 322,611
   1,750,060 1,712,387
Other federal expenses    
Provision for doubtful accounts (note 3) 3,861,357 3,722,605
Interest expense 388,469 280,936
Transfers to provinces for softwood lumber products export charge (15,119) 42,345
  4,234,707 4,045,886
Total 21,907,484 20,494,844
Federal administered recoveries    
Old age security benefits (1,449,945) (1,342,851)
Employment insurance benefits (235,234) (212,474)
  (1,685,179) (1,555,325)
Net expenses and recoveries administered for the Government of Canada 20,222,305 18,939,519
Provincial and territorial administered expenses    
Transfers to individuals    
Ontario energy and property tax credit 1,196,643 1,138,612
Family benefit programs 1,188,203 1,120,812
British Columbia low-income climate action tax credit 191,869 191,989
Ontario senior homeowners' property tax grant 232,893 179,585
Other property tax credits 121,184 129,953
Other transfers 398,527 342,426
  3,329,319 3,103,377
Transfers to corporations    
Refundable investment tax credits 852,539 818,318
Film and television production services tax credits 873,830 722,904
  1,726,369 1,541,222
Expenses administered for provinces and territories 5,055,688 4,644,599
Provision for doubtful accounts administered for the Canada Pension Plan (note 3) 113,056 83,519
Total net administered expenses and recoveries 25,391,049 23,667,637

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements.

Canada Revenue Agency Statement of Administered Cash Flows
for the year ended March 31
(in thousands of dollars)
  2015 2014
Total administered revenues and pension contributions 376,264,210 359,867,405
Total net administered expenses and recoveries (25,391,049) (23,667,637)
Revenues paid or payable directly to a province  (520,648) (162,582)
Changes in administered assets and liabilities:    
Cash on hand 91,444 (1,014,331)
Amounts receivable from taxpayers (5,929,265) (1,996,235)
Amounts receivable under the tobacco civil settlements 87,811 64,473
Amounts payable to taxpayers 3,598,423 (2,282,681)
Amounts payable to provinces (47,447) 111,375
Deposit accounts 16,178 12,880
Net cash deposited in the Consolidated Revenue Fund of the Government of Canada (note 8) 348,169,657 330,932,667
Consisting of:    
Cash deposits to the Consolidated Revenue Fund 469,928,612 451,259,475
Cash refunds/payments from the Consolidated Revenue Fund (121,758,955) (120,326,808)
Net cash deposited in the Consolidated Revenue Fund of the Government of Canada (note 8) 348,169,657 330,932,667

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these financial statements.

Canada Revenue Agency

Notes to the Financial Statements - Administered Activities

1. Authority and objectives

The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) is an agent of Her Majesty in right of Canada under the Canada Revenue Agency Act. The CRA is a departmental corporation named in Schedule II of the Financial Administration Act and reports to Parliament through the Minister of National Revenue.

The mandate of the CRA is to support the administration and enforcement of tax legislation and other related legislation. The CRA provides support, advice and services by:

(a) supporting the administration and enforcement of the program legislation;

(b) implementing agreements between the Government of Canada or the CRA and the government of a province, territory, or other public body performing a function of government in Canada to carry out an activity or administer a tax or program;

(c) implementing agreements or arrangements between the CRA and departments or agencies of the Government of Canada to carry out an activity or administer a program; and

(d) implementing agreements between the Government of Canada and First Nations governments to administer a tax.

The CRA administers revenues, including income and sales taxes and Employment insurance premiums, administers tax legislation, delivers a number of social benefit programs to Canadians for the federal, provincial, territorial, and First Nations governments, and administers other amounts, including Canada Pension Plan contributions, for other groups or organizations. It is responsible for administering and enforcing the following acts or parts of acts: the Air Travellers Security Charge Act, the Canada Revenue Agency Act, the Children's Special Allowances Act, Part V.1 of the Customs Act, section 2 of the Energy Costs Assistance Measures Act, the Excise Act, the Excise Tax Act (including the goods and services tax (GST) and the harmonized sales tax (HST) except for GST/HST on imported goods), the Excise Act, 2001, the Income Tax Act, the Softwood Lumber Products Export Charge Act, 2006, the Universal Child Care Benefit Act, and others including various provincial acts.

In the province of Quebec, Revenu Québec (RQ) acts as an agent of the CRA in administering and enforcing the GST, except for GST in respect of selected listed financial institutions. The CRA monitors cash transfers made by RQ, reports the GST revenues administered on its behalf, and transfers funds out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund to RQ so it can issue refunds.

Under an agreement with the province of Nova Scotia, the CRA receives worker's compensation payments and transfers these to the province. The CRA's mandate for administering customs legislation is limited to the collection functions noted under Part V.1 of the Customs Act. The CRA also provides collection services to Employment and Social Development Canada for certain accounts receivable under various acts.

2. Summary of significant accounting policies

For financial reporting purposes, the CRA's activities have been divided into two sets of financial statements: agency activities and administered activities. The purpose of these administered activities statements is to give information about the tax-related revenues, expenses, assets, and liabilities that the CRA administers on behalf of the federal, provincial, and territorial governments, First Nations, and other organizations. The CRA administers individual income tax for all provinces except Quebec, and corporation income tax for all provinces except Quebec and Alberta. The Financial Statements - Agency Activities include the operational revenues and expenses that the CRA manages and uses to run the organization.

The Canada Revenue Agency Act requires the CRA to prepare financial statements in accordance with accounting principles consistent with those applied in preparing the financial statements of the Government of Canada. As a result, CRA follows those accounting principles to account for the federal administered activities. In addition, activities administered for the provincial and territorial governments, First Nations and other organizations are accounted for on the same basis as those administered for the federal government, and may differ from the accounting principles used by those provincial and territorial governments, First Nations and other organizations. These stated accounting policies are based on Canadian public sector accounting standards.

A summary of the significant accounting policies follows:

(a) Revenue and pension contributions recognition

Revenues and pension contributions are recognized in the year in which the event that generates the revenue or the pension contribution occurs and when the effective date of the related legislation has passed and either the legislation, regulation or by-laws have been approved by the legislature or the ability to assess and collect tax has been provided through legislative convention.

The Canadian tax system is based on self-assessment, so taxpayers are expected to understand the tax laws and comply with them. This has an impact on the completeness of tax revenues when taxpayers fail to comply with tax laws, for example, if they do not report all of their income. The CRA has implemented systems and controls to detect and correct situations where taxpayers are not complying with the various acts it administers. These systems and controls include audits of taxpayer records when the CRA decides they are necessary, but these procedures cannot be expected to identify all sources of unreported income or other cases of non-compliance with tax laws. The CRA is unable to estimate the amount of unreported tax.

An assessment (or reassessment) of tax includes all decisions and other steps made or taken by the Minister of National Revenue and officials of the CRA under the federal, provincial, and territorial acts or sections of the acts the CRA administers to calculate tax payable by taxpayers. When verifying a taxpayer's return, the CRA uses the various tax acts it administers and other criteria it developed that are designed to substantially meet the provisions of these acts. Reassessments include changes to previously assessed taxes payable at the request of the taxpayer, for example to claim a subsequent loss carry-back, or changes the CRA initiated as a result of applying procedures to verify reporting compliance, such as taxpayer audits.

Revenues are reported net of tax concessions. As foregone revenue, tax concessions do not give rise to assets or expenses of the taxing government. Refundable tax credits, deductions, or exemptions provided by the federal, provincial, territorial or First Nations governments are considered tax concessions when they provide tax relief to taxpayers and relate to the types of taxes that are a revenue source administered by CRA. When the CRA does not administer the related tax revenue, these refundable tax credits, deductions, or exemptions are accounted for as transfers made through the tax system.

The following policies are applied for specific streams:

(i) Income taxes, Canada Pension Plan contributions, and Employment insurance premiums:

Income tax revenues are recognized when the taxpayer has earned income that is subject to tax. Income is calculated net of tax deductions and credits allowed under the Income Tax Act, including refundable taxes resulting from current-year activity.

Canada Pension Plan (CPP) contributions from employees, employers and self-employed persons are recognized when the pensionable income is earned. Employment insurance (EI) premiums are recognized as revenue in the period the insurable earnings are earned. For non-resident taxpayers (individuals and corporations), revenues are recognized when the taxpayers receive income from which tax is withheld on active and inactive income they earned in Canada.

These revenues and pension contributions are measured from amounts assessed/reassessed and from estimates of amounts not yet assessed/reassessed based on cash received that relates to the fiscal year ended March 31. Revenues and pension contributions for the fiscal year also include adjustments between the estimated revenues of previous years and actual amounts, as well as revenues from reassessments relating to prior years. An additional estimate of future reassessments is only recorded when it can be reliably determined. This is limited to assessments under objection or appealed to various courts.

(ii) Other taxes, duties, and charges:

Goods and services tax (GST) and harmonized sales tax (HST) revenues on domestic goods and services, as well as the Quebec sales tax in respect of selected listed financial institutions are recognized at the time the goods are sold or the services provided. Revenues are reported net of input tax credits, GST/HST rebates, and the GST quarterly tax credits in the case of GST revenues. Input tax credits are the recovery of GST/HST paid or owed on purchases related to domestic and imported commercial activities of the taxpayer. Rebates are granted in various circumstances, for example to relieve the tax burden in areas where the cost of housing is very high, or to allow for the recovery of taxes on purchases where the purchaser cannot claim an input tax credit. The GST quarterly tax credit for low-income individuals and families is recorded in the period it relates to. It is intended to offset the cost of the tax for low-income individuals and families.

For excise taxes, revenue is recognized when a taxpayer sells goods taxable under the Excise Tax Act. For excise duties, revenue is recognized when the taxpayer manufactures goods taxable under the Excise Act and the Excise Act, 2001.

These revenues are measured from amounts assessed, and from estimates of amounts not yet assessed based on cash received or historical information, that relate to the fiscal year ended March 31. Miscellaneous charges are recognized as revenue when they are earned.

(iii) Interest, penalties, and other revenues:

Interest, penalties, and other revenues are recorded when they are earned. Except for the portion related to CPP which is credited to the CPP account, all interest and penalty revenues are reported as revenues administered for the federal government as stated in the terms of the tax collection agreements with the provinces and territories. Interest and penalties are recorded net of amounts waived under the various tax acts.

(b) Expenses

(i) Transfers:

Transfers are recognized in the year during which the events giving rise to them occur, provided that the transfer is authorized and all eligibility criteria have been met by the recipient, and a reasonable estimate of the amounts can be made. Transfers made through a tax system are considered authorized when the related tax measures are authorized. Transfers to provinces for the softwood lumber products export charge are recorded as an expense in the same year that the related softwood lumber products export charge revenues are recognized.

(ii) Interest expense:

Refunds may arise late, largely from the resolution of long-standing corporation tax files in favour of the taxpayer. Interest is accrued on refunds from the date that the tax instalment was initially paid to the date that the case is resolved. The CRA records the interest expense in the fiscal year it relates to.

(iii) Administered recoveries:

Recoveries of old age security and EI benefits are recognized when assessed. Amounts not yet assessed are estimated. The CRA reports only recoveries assessed through the individual income tax system. Recoveries determined by other federal government departments are not reported in these financial statements.

(c) Cash on hand

Cash on hand refers to amounts received in the CRA's offices or by its agents up to March 31 but not yet deposited to the credit of the Consolidated Revenue Fund of the Government of Canada. CRA or its agents deposit funds to the Consolidated Revenue Fund on a daily basis.

(d) Amounts receivable from taxpayers

Amounts receivable from taxpayers include taxes, interest, penalties, and other revenues assessed or estimated by the CRA but not yet collected. A significant portion of the receivable balance results from recording accrued receivables that relate to the current fiscal year but are not due to be paid by taxpayers until the next fiscal year.

(e) Allowance for doubtful accounts

The allowance for doubtful accounts is management's best estimate of the collectability of amounts that have been assessed, including the related interest and penalties, but not yet paid. The allowance for doubtful accounts has two components. A general allowance is calculated based on the age and type of tax accounts using rates based on historical collection experience. A specific allowance is calculated based on an annual review of all accounts over $10 million.

The allowance for doubtful accounts is adjusted every year through a provision for doubtful accounts and is reduced by amounts written off as uncollectible during the year. The annual provision is reported in the Statement of Administered Expenses and Recoveries. Except for the portion related to CPP contributions, which is charged to the CPP account, the provision is charged to expenses administered for the federal government because it assumes all collection risks, as stated in the terms of the tax collection agreements with the provinces, territories, and First Nations.

(f) Amounts payable to taxpayers

Amounts payable to taxpayers include refunds and related interest assessed or estimated by the CRA that were not paid up to March 31. A significant portion of the amount payable results from recording accrued payables that relate to the current year but are not due for payment until the next fiscal year. They include refunds resulting from assessments completed after March 31, and estimates of refunds for individual and trust income tax and corporation income tax not yet assessed.

(g) Contingent liabilities

Contingent liabilities are potential liabilities resulting from, for example, previously assessed taxes recorded as revenue that might become actual liabilities if one or more future events occurs or does not occur. If the future event is likely to occur or does not occur, and a reasonable estimate of the loss can be made, an estimated liability is accrued and the revenues are reduced. If the likelihood cannot be determined or an amount cannot be reasonably estimated, the contingency is disclosed in the notes to the financial statements.

(h) Measurement uncertainty

To prepare these statements, management has to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues, expenses, and recoveries reported. For these financial statements items, measurement uncertainty is inherent but inestimable. Estimates are used to record unassessed tax revenues and the related amounts receivable and payable, as well as the allowance for doubtful accounts. In particular, estimates are made to determine individual and trust income tax revenues, corporation income tax revenues, non-resident tax withholdings, GST/HST revenues, energy taxes, other excise tax and duty revenues, EI premiums, CPP contributions, and the related amounts receivable and payable.

A key assumption used in estimating tax revenues is that tax installments and historical information on refund rates, payments received upon filing tax returns and amounts receivable assessed are good indicators of the amount of tax revenue earned to March 31 that has not yet been assessed. Another assumption is that historical tax assessment information is a good basis to allocate tax revenues between their various components (for example, between federal, provincial and territorial tax revenues). Relevant factors such as new administered activities, legislative changes and economic factors may also be considered. Finally, the key assumption used to estimate the general allowance for doubtful accounts is that historical collection information is a good indicator of uncollectible receivables.

Estimates are based on the best information available at the time of preparation of these statements and management believes these estimates and assumptions to be reasonable. Actual results could differ significantly from the estimates and any differences are recorded in the year the actual amounts are determined. Management monitors the accuracy of the estimates and the underlying assumptions through annual validation procedures and adjusts its estimation models as required.

3. Amounts receivable from taxpayers

Amounts receivable from taxpayers include taxes, interest, penalties, and other revenues assessed or estimated by the CRA but not yet collected. A significant portion of the receivable balance results from recording accrued receivables that relate to the current fiscal year but are not due to be paid by taxpayers until the next fiscal year.

The following table shows details of the amounts receivable from taxpayers as reported in the Statement of Administered Assets and Liabilities. Amounts receivable from individuals and employers include Canada Pension Plan contributions and Employment insurance premiums as applicable.

(in thousands of dollars) 2015
Gross
2015
Allowance for
doubtful accounts
2015
Net
2014
Net
Income taxes        
Individuals 55,149,639 (6,659,992) 48,489,647 45,540,386
Employers 17,853,567 (1,051,753) 16,801,814 15,499,659
Corporations 16,964,503 (2,282,670) 14,681,833 13,257,747
Non-residents 1,462,071 (137,764) 1,324,307 1,303,804
GST/HST 16,951,164 (2,693,741) 14,257,423 13,813,938
Excise taxes and duties and miscellaneous charges 1,525,695 (195,689) 1,330,006 1,540,231
Total 109,906,639 (13,021,609) 96,885,030 90,955,765

Changes in the allowance for doubtful accounts include the following:

(in thousands of dollars) Allowance for doubtful accounts
March 31, 2014
Provision for doubtful accounts  Write-offs Allowance for doubtful accounts 
March 31, 2015
Income taxes        
Individuals (6,621,152) (1,889,502) 1,850,662 (6,659,992)
Employers (944,913) (437,716) 330,876 (1,051,753)
Corporations (2,151,715) (646,002) 515,047 (2,282,670)
Non-residents (138,538) (36,066) 36,840 (137,764)
GST/HST (2,702,600) (806,246) 815,105 (2,693,741)
Excise taxes and duties and miscellaneous charges (38,601) (158,881) 1,793 (195,689)
Total (12,597,519) (3,974,413) 3,550,323 (13,021,609)

The provision of $3,974 million ($3,806 million in 2014) reported above includes an amount of $3,861 million ($3,722 million in 2014) recorded as an expense administered on behalf of the federal government (see note 2(e)) and $113 million ($84 million in 2014) charged against expenses administered on behalf of the Canada Pension Plan.

4.  Amounts receivable under the tobacco civil settlements

On July 31, 2008, the federal and provincial governments entered into civil settlement agreements with two tobacco companies to resolve potential civil claims. Under the terms of the agreements, payments totalling $850 million are to be made to Canada, for Canada and the provinces. The federal government's share is $325 million and the provincial governments' share is $525 million. The settlement agreements state that the amounts will be fully paid by 2023. Up to $800 million is expected to be received in the first 10 years of the agreements and about $50 million in the following five years. These amounts are recorded at the nominal value.

The following table gives details of the amounts receivable related to the tobacco civil settlement agreements:

 (in thousands of dollars) 2015
Government of Canada share
2015
 Provincial share
2015 Total  2014
Government of Canada share
2014
Provincial share
2014 Total
Balance, beginning of year 196,000 202,444 398,444 230,000 232,917 462,917
Amounts received during the year (34,000) (53,811) (87,811) (34,000) (30,473) (64,473)
Balance, end of year 162,000 148,633 310,633 196,000 202,444 398,444
5. Amounts payable to taxpayers

The following table gives details of the amounts payable to taxpayers as reported in the Statement of Administered Assets and Liabilities:

(in thousands of dollars) 2015 2014
Individuals 35,815,426 32,149,939
Corporations 9,327,020 9,806,505
GST/HST 10,904,114 10,524,546
Employers and non-residents 59,617 75,232
Excise taxes and duties and miscellaneous charges 97,603 49,135
Total 56,203,780 52,605,357
6. Amounts payable to provinces

The following table gives details of amounts payable to provinces as reported in the Statement of Administered Assets and Liabilities:

(in thousands of dollars) 2015 2014
Provincial share of the tobacco civil settlements (note 4) 148,633 202,444
Amounts payable to Quebec:    
Individual income tax withholdings 221,576 227,549
GST refunds issued by Quebec 110,504 88,953
Quebec sales tax in respect of selected listed financial institutions 139,375 117,242
British Columbia sales tax transitional measures (2,942) 12,588
Nova Scotia worker's compensation 1,126 2,080
Ontario corporation income tax and opportunities fund 1,584 1,212
Softwood lumber products export charge net of costs incurred by the federal government (19,286) (4,051)
Total 600,570 648,017

The CRA is acting as an agent for the provinces under the tobacco civil settlements. The CRA's liability to the provinces for their expected share of the settlement amounts is limited to the amounts that will ultimately be collected from the tobacco companies.

Amounts payable to provinces, territories, and other organizations, which are settled by other departments such as the Department of Finance for provincial, territorial, and First Nations taxes, are not recorded in these financial statements because these amounts are outside the CRA's responsibility.

The CRA received $265 million in Nova Scotia worker's compensation payments during the year ($258 million in 2014), these payments are transferred directly to the province. Since this is a flow through arrangement, it is not reported as administered revenues.

7. Deposit accounts

Deposit accounts are established to record cash and securities required to guarantee payment of GST for non-resident registrants and certain licensees for excise taxes, which are both payable pursuant to the Excise Tax Act. The following table shows activity on the deposit accounts as reported in the Statement of Administered Assets and Liabilities:

(in thousands of dollars) 2015 2014
Balance, beginning of year 162,370 149,590
Receipts and other credits 41,120 48,231
Payments and other charges (24,942) (35,451)
Balance, end of year 178,548 162,370
Securities held in trust (40) (40)
Net deposit accounts 178,508 162,330
8. Net amount due to the Consolidated Revenue Fund

The net amount due to the Consolidated Revenue Fund on behalf of the Government of Canada and others is the difference between administered assets (taxes not yet received and/or deposited in the fund) and administered liabilities payable by the CRA out of the fund.

The net cash deposited in the Consolidated Revenue Fund of the Government of Canada includes amounts the CRA receives on behalf of the federal government, provinces, territories, and other organizations and deposits in the fund, less refunds and payments issued from the fund during the year.

The following table shows the change in the net amount due to the Consolidated Revenue Fund during the fiscal year:

 (in thousands of dollars)  2015 2014
Net amount due to the Consolidated Revenue Fund on behalf of the Government of Canada and others at the beginning of the year 45,427,766 40,323,247
Total administered revenues and pension contributions 376,264,210 359,867,405
Total net administered expenses and recoveries (25,391,049) (23,667,637)
Revenues paid or payable directly to a province (520,648) (162,582)
Net cash deposited in the Consolidated Revenue Fund of the Government of Canada (348,169,657) (330,932,667)
Net amount due to the Consolidated Revenue Fund on behalf of the Government of Canada and others at the end of the year 47,610,622 45,427,766
9. Contingent liabilities

Contingent liabilities include previously assessed taxes where amounts are under objection or are being appealed to the Tax Court of Canada, the Federal Court of Canada, or the Supreme Court of Canada. As of March 31, 2015, $22,987 million was under objection at the CRA level ($22,230 million for 2014) and $5,450 million was being appealed to the courts ($4,715 million for 2014). The CRA has recorded, in the amounts payable to taxpayers or in reduction of the amounts receivable from taxpayers, as applicable, the estimated amount of objections or appeals that are considered likely to be lost and that can be reasonably estimated.

10. Quebec abatement

The Quebec abatement is provided to Quebec residents under the Income Tax Act (ITA) and the Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangement Act. Residents of Quebec subtract 16.5 per cent of the Basic Federal Tax owed to the Government of Canada when compiling their taxes while the government of Quebec receives additional tax room. In accordance with the Federal-Provincial Fiscal Revision Act, 1964 and the Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangement Act, the Government of Quebec pays the federal government the value of the Quebec Abatement through an equivalent reduction in transfer payments to the province of Quebec for programs delivered by the federal government.

The Quebec Abatement reduces the federal tax payable under the ITA and is therefore accounted for as a tax concession netted against individual income tax revenues. For the fiscal year ended March 31, 2015, the Quebec abatement assessed by CRA was $4,236 million ($3,975 million for 2014).

11. Goods and services tax revenues

The GST reported on the Statement of Administered Revenues and Pension Contributions includes the federal portion of HST. It is net of input tax credits (ITC), rebates, and the GST quarterly tax credit for low-income individuals and families that the CRA administers. It does not include GST revenues on imported goods, which are administered and reported by the Canada Border Services Agency. The CRA has sole responsibility for administering all ITC, including those claimed on imported goods. ITC relating to GST on imports are not accounted for separately from ITC relating to GST on domestic transactions.

The following table shows details of the GST revenues that the CRA administers for the Government of Canada as reported in the Statement of Administered Revenues and Pension Contributions:

(in thousands of dollars) 2015 2014
Gross GST revenues 155,155,484 150,234,833
ITC (134,592,306) (128,821,525)
GST revenues net of ITC 20,563,178 21,413,308
GST rebates (6,058,107) (5,809,564)
GST quarterly tax credits for low-income individuals and families (4,194,459) (4,110,248)
GST net revenues 10,310,612 11,493,496
12. Miscellaneous charges

The following table details the miscellaneous charges that the CRA administers for the federal government as reported in the Statement of Administered Revenues and Pension Contributions:

(in thousands of dollars) 2015 2014
Softwood lumber products export charge (4,700) 52,779
Air travellers security charge   695,702 661,948
Total   691,002 714,727
13. Interest, penalties, and other revenues

Various tax legislations give the CRA the authority, under certain conditions, to assess interest and penalties related to taxes due and regulations that taxpayers have not complied with. Interest is charged on overdue balances using rates determined quarterly, which in most cases are based on the ninety day Treasury Bills rate rounded plus 4%. The interest rate applicable as at March 31, 2015 on most overdue balances was 5% (5% in 2014). The CRA has the authority to waive the interest and penalties that would normally be charged under certain circumstances such as processing delays caused by the CRA, financial hardship experienced by taxpayers, or other extraordinary circumstances.

Other revenues consist of miscellaneous fees and charges such as court fines and administration charges for dishonoured payments.

The following table gives details on interest, penalties, and other revenues that the CRA administers for the federal government as reported in the Statement of Administered Revenues and Pension Contributions:

(in thousands of dollars) 2015 2014
Gross interest and penalties 4,775,971 5,491,414
Interest and penalties waived under authority of the Income Tax Act (274,874) (232,774)
Net interest and penalties 4,501,097 5,258,640
Fines imposed under various acts 6,620 7,353
Other revenues 1,254 1,415
Interest, penalties, and other revenues 4,508,971 5,267,408
14. Provincial portion of harmonized sales tax

During the year, CRA administered the provincial portion of the HST for the provinces of Ontario, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador and Prince Edward Island as well as returns for the period from July 2010 to March 2013 for British Columbia. CRA recorded these revenues in accordance with the accounting policies described in note 2.

The provincial portion of HST reported on the Statement of Administered Revenues and Pension Contributions is net of input tax credits (ITC), rebates and credits accounted as tax concessions. It includes the recaptured ITC, which applies to certain types of supplies purchased by large businesses. It does not include the provincial portion of HST collected on imported goods, which is administered and reported by the Canada Border Services Agency.

The following table details the provincial portion of HST revenues as reported in the Statement of Administered Revenues and Pension Contributions:

(in thousands of dollars) 2015 2014
Provincial portion of gross HST revenues 108,574,218 105,772,495
Provincial portion of ITC (79,425,774) (78,152,620)
Provincial portion of HST rebates (900,547) (888,745)
Recaptured ITC 524,468 581,270
Transitional tax   26,537 34,487
HST provincial rebates   (3,963,636) (3,816,510)
Provincial portion of HST net revenues before credits 24,835,266 23,530,377
Provincial sales tax credits    
Ontario sales tax credit (1,193,820) (1,168,025)
British Columbia harmonized sales tax credit (9,960) (16,636)
Nova Scotia affordable living tax credit (65,698) (66,434)
Newfoundland and Labrador harmonized sales tax credit (43,888) (40,415)
Ontario sales tax transition benefit 22 (10,392)
Prince Edward Island sales tax credits (6,150) (4,472)
Total provincial sales tax credits (1,319,494) (1,306,374)
Net Provincial portion of HST 23,515,772 22,224,003
15. Other revenues

The following table gives details of other revenues the CRA administers for provincial and territorial governments and First Nations as reported in the Statement of Administered Revenues and Pension Contributions.

(in thousands of dollars)  2015 2014
Quebec sales tax in respect of selected listed financial institutions 520,648 162,582
First Nations sales tax and GST 24,494 21,022
First Nations income tax 23,158 24,362
Total 568,300 207,966
16. Pension contributions, interest, and penalties administered on behalf of the Canada Pension Plan

The following table shows details of the transactions the CRA administers on behalf of the Canada Pension Plan as reported in the Statement of Administered Revenues and Pension Contributions:

(in thousands of dollars) 2015 2014
Pension contributions 44,959,939 43,082,324
Interest and penalties 198,855 182,293
Total 45,158,794 43,264,617
17. Related-party transactions

The CRA is related in terms of common ownership to all Government of Canada departments, agencies, and Crown corporations. The CRA deposits all monies received to the Consolidated Revenue Fund (CRF), and the Department of Finance makes payments out of the CRF to provinces, territories, and other organizations for amounts such as provincial, territorial, and First Nations taxes, for which the CRA administers the revenue. Old age security benefit recoveries, Canada Pension Plan contributions (net of overpayments refunded by the CRA), and Employment insurance premiums are credited to Employment and Social Development Canada, which administers the Old Age Security program, the Canada Pension Plan, and the Employment Insurance Operating Account. The CRA also administers a refund set-off program that can use individuals' tax refunds to pay debts they owe under federal, provincial, or territorial programs.

The CRA provides collection services to the Canada Border Services Agency under Part V.I of the Customs Act. It also provides collection services to Employment and Social Development Canada for certain accounts receivable under the Canada Education Savings Act, the Canada Student Loans Act, the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act, the Canada Pension Plan, and the Old Age Security Act. The related payments are made directly to either the Canada Border Services Agency or Employment and Social Development Canada, who are responsible for their deposits to the CRF, as well as their accounting and reporting. These payments are not recorded in the CRA's accounts.

Employment insurance premiums administered on behalf of the federal government include the employer's share that the federal government pays. The GST declared to the CRA includes the GST the federal government pays to its suppliers on domestic purchases. The GST that other federal government departments collect is deposited to the CRF, declared to the CRA, and included in the GST domestic revenues.

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