Complete text - 2016–17 Estimates

Table of Contents

Introduction

Governments collect funds through taxes and other levies in order to provide services to their citizens. In Canada, the federal government's primary sources of revenue are income and sales taxes.

Payments that go directly to individuals, to provincial and territorial governments, and to other organizations are called "transfers." Transfers are the largest category of spending for the federal government. The largest transfers include elderly benefits, as well as transfers to provinces and territories to help fund health care services.

Federal departments, agencies and Crown corporations also provide programs and services for Canadians. In order for federal government organizations to operate, Parliament must give these organizations authority to spend.

While spending is often announced in a Federal Budget, spending authority is actually granted through legislation passed by Parliament. Approximately one-third of federal government spending is approved by Parliament on an annual basis. These expenditures are authorized through an appropriation act and are called "voted" expenditures. Expenditures authorized through other legislation are called "statutory". Due to the need to table Main Estimates on or by March 1, emerging priorities and items announced in Budget 2016 will be included in future Estimates documents.

Estimates publications explain how federal organizations plan to spend funds. The Main Estimates and Supplementary Estimates provide information on spending authority that Parliament will be asked to approve during the fiscal year. Individual departments and agencies also produce Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) and Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs). The RPPs are typically tabled soon after the Main Estimates and show an organization's priorities and planned results for the next three years. DPRs, tabled in the fall, are accounts of results achieved during the most recent fiscal year.

Estimates documents are prepared on a near cash basis of accounting, which recognizes payments when goods or services are received. This allows Parliament to control the amounts spent during a fiscal year through the appropriation acts it passes. Forecasts in the Federal Budget and the Update of Economic and Fiscal Projections are prepared on a full accrual basis, which recognizes that the economic benefit of expenditures may last for more than a fiscal year.

The Public Accounts of Canada include financial statements for the Government of Canada as well as details of expenses and revenues for completed fiscal years. Information in Volume I corresponds to the Federal Budget. Volume II provides information on the same near cash basis as the Estimates.

This Document

Part I of this document, the Government Expenditure Plan, gives an overview of spending requirements for 2016–17 and comparisons to previous fiscal years.

Part II of this document, the Main Estimates, provides information on estimated spending by each federal organization requesting authority to spend through a 2016-17 appropriation bill.

Summary of Estimates

These Estimates support the government's request to Parliament for authority to expend through annual appropriations:

  • $89.8 billion for budgetary expenditures – operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations; and
  • $26.7 million for non-budgetary expenditures – net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

These voted expenditures require annual approval from Parliament which is sought through an appropriation bill. The bill provides the specific wording that governs the purpose and conditions under which expenditures can be made and the funds subject to these terms and conditions.

Statutory forecasts represent payments to be made under legislation previously approved by Parliament. Statutory forecasts are included in these Estimates to provide a more complete picture of total estimated expenditures. Of these forecasts, $160.3 billion is for budgetary expenditures including the cost of servicing the public debt. Major transfer payments, most notably elderly benefits and the Canada Health Transfer, account for the bulk of the increase from the 2015–16 Main Estimates. Forecast cash outlays for loans, investments and advances are expected to exceed recoveries by $338.8 million.

Figure 1. Comparison of Estimates and Expenditures - Budgetary
Data table used to populate this graph is found below.
Figure 2. Comparison of Estimates and Expenditures - Non-budgetary
Data table used to populate this graph is found below.
Table 1. Comparison of Estimates and Expenditures (billions of dollars)
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates

Note: Totals may not add and may not agree with details presented later in this document due to rounding.

Budgetary
Voted 84.16 88.18 94.97 89.85
Statutory 146.96 153.39 155.72 160.29
Total Budgetary 231.12 241.57 250.69 250.14
Non-budgetary
Voted 0.04 0.07 0.07 0.03
Statutory 71.13 0.93 0.68 0.34
Total Non-budgetary 71.17 1.00 0.75 0.37

The following graphs present the voted and statutory components of Main Estimates and a comparison of Main Estimates over the last ten years of Main Estimates.

Figure 3. Long-term comparison of Main Estimates - Budgetary
Data table used to populate this graph is found below.
Figure 4. Composition of Estimates and Expenditures - Budgetary
Data table used to populate this graph is found below.
Table 2. Composition of Estimates and Expenditures (billions of dollars)
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates

Note: Totals may not add and may not agree with details presented later in this document due to rounding.

Budgetary
Transfer Payments 142.13 148.80 154.84 158.58
Operating and capital 65.50 67.16 72.80 68.77
Public Debt 23.49 25.62 23.05 22.78
Total Budgetary 231.12 241.57 250.69 250.14
Non-budgetary
Loans, Investments and Advances 71.17 1.00 0.75 0.37
Total Non-budgetary 71.17 1.00 0.75 0.37

Composition of Estimates

The majority of expenditures in 2016–17 will be transfer payments – payments made to other levels of government, individuals and other organizations. Transfer payments make up approximately 63.4% of expenditures or $158.6 billion, operating and capital expenditures account for approximately 27.5% of expenditures or $68.8 billion, while public debt charges are approximately 9.1% of expenditures or $22.8 billion.

Public Debt Charges

Total interest costs are approximately 9.1% of expenditures or $22.8 billion, a projected decrease of $2.8 billion or 10.9% from previous Main Estimates and $0.7 billion less than actual expenditures for 2014–15. The decrease largely reflects the downward revision of forecasted interest rates by private sector economists, consistent with the 2015 Update of Economic and Fiscal Projections, as well as a decrease in the average Government of Canada long-term bond rate that is used to calculate interest on the public sector pension obligations pertaining to service prior to April 1, 2000. Total interest costs are comprised of interest on unmatured debt of $15.7 billion and other interest costs of $7.1 billion. Interest on unmatured debt represents the interest resulting from certificates of indebtedness issued by the Government of Canada that have not yet become due. Other interest costs include interest on liabilities for federal public service pension plans, deposit and trust accounts and other specified purpose accounts.

Major Transfer Payments

Figure 5. Major Transfer Payments - Top 3
Data table used to populate this graph is found below.
Figure 6. Major Transfer Payments - Top 3
Data table used to populate this graph is found below.
Figure 7. Major Transfer Payments - Top 3
Data table used to populate this graph is found below.
Table 3. Major Transfer Payments (billions of dollars)
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Projection for April 1 2015–16 Projection to Date 2016–17 Projection for April 1

Note: Totals may not add and may not agree with details presented later in this document due to rounding.

Transfers to other levels of government
Canada Health Transfer 32.11 34.03 34.03 36.07
Fiscal Equalization 16.67 17.34 17.34 17.88
Canada Social Transfer 12.58 12.96 12.96 13.35
Territorial Financing 3.47 3.56 3.56 3.54
Gas Tax Fund 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.10
Additional Fiscal Equalization Offset Payment to Nova Scotia 0.06 0.04 0.04 0.03
Additional Fiscal Equalization to Nova Scotia 0.13 0.08 0.09 0.02
Youth Allowances Recovery (0.77) (0.85) (0.84) (0.89)
Alternative Payments for Standing Programs (3.47) (3.87) (3.82) (4.04)
Total transfers to other levels of government 62.80 65.28 65.35 68.05
Transfers to persons
Elderly Benefits 44.13 46.07 46.01 48.41
Employment Insurance 18.05 18.20 19.30 19.70
Other Children's Benefits 11.56 15.45 10.56 10.70
Universal Child Care Benefits 2.74 2.85 7.64 7.70
Total transfers to persons 76.49 82.57 83.51 86.50
Total Major Transfer Payments 139.28 147.85 148.86 154.55

Major Transfer Payments

Major transfer payments – significant transfers to other levels of government and transfers to persons – account for a large proportion of the government's total expenditure framework.

Forecast expenditures for major transfer payments are included in the total budgetary Main Estimates of the responsible organization, with two exceptions. One is Employment Insurance, which is reported through the Employment Insurance Operating Account and is separate from any of the appropriated organizations listed in these Main Estimates. The other exception is "Other Children's Benefits", details of which are included in the Department of Finance's Tax Expenditures and Evaluations report.

As presented in the table, major statutory transfers to other levels of government are projected to total $68.1 billion in 2016–17, an increase of $2.8 billion over the previous year's Main Estimates.

The Canada Health Transfer (CHT) is a federal transfer provided to provinces and territories in support of health care. As of 2014–15, the CHT is distributed on an equal per capita cash basis. In 2016–17, the CHT will increase by $2.0 billion, or 6%, from the 2015–16 amount to a total of $36.1 billion. Starting in 2017-18, growth of the CHT will be based on a 3-year moving average of nominal gross domestic product, with funding guaranteed to increase by at least 3% per year. CHT support is subject to the five conditions of The Canada Health Act: universality; comprehensiveness; portability; accessibility; and public administration, and the prohibitions against extra-billing and user fees.

Fiscal Equalization refers to unconditional transfer payments to enable less prosperous provincial governments to provide their residents with public services that are reasonably comparable to those in other provinces, at reasonably comparable levels of taxation. These payments will be $17.9 billion in 2016–17, an increase of $0.5 billion from the Main Estimates 2015–16, and $1.2 billion more than 2014–15 actual expenditures.

The Canada Social Transfer (CST) is a federal transfer to provinces and territories in support of social assistance and social services, post-secondary education, and programs for children. The legislated 3% growth rate results in an increase of $388.8 million to $13.3billion in 2016-17.

The Territorial Formula Financing (TFF) Program, provides unconditional federal transfers that allow territorial governments to provide their residents with public services comparable to those offered by provincial governments, at comparable levels of taxation. The transfers are based on a formula that fills the gap between a proxy of territorial expenditure requirements and a territory's revenue-raising capacity. These payments will be $3.5 billion in 2016–17, $24.7 million lower than the 2015–16 Main Estimates.

The Gas Tax Fund provides predictable, long-term, stable funding for Canadian municipalities to help them build and revitalize their local public infrastructure while creating jobs and long term prosperity. Beginning in 2014–15, the Gas Tax Fund became a statutory payment. Prior to the 2014–15 fiscal year, payments were approved through Appropriation Acts (Voted).

The Additional Fiscal Equalization Offset Payment to Nova Scotia is a payment related to its 2005 Offshore Accord. This Accord guaranteed the province that its Equalization payments would not be reduced due to offshore oil and gas revenues that entered the Equalization formula. This is derived by applying the Equalization formula with and without offshore oil and gas revenues and comparing the resulting Equalization payments. The province is expected to receive $33.3 million for 2016–17, a decrease of $3.5 million compared with the amount for 2015–16.

Additional Fiscal Equalization Payments to Nova Scotia are payments related to its 2005 Offshore Accord. Following the introduction of a new formula for Equalization in 2007, Nova Scotia was guaranteed that, on a cumulative basis beginning in 2008–09 over the lifetime of the Accord, the new formula would not reduce its Equalization payments and 2005 Offshore Accord payments when compared with what the province would have received under the formula that was in place when it signed its 2005 Offshore Accord. Based on the first calculation of 2016–17, Nova Scotia is entitled to an advance payment of $16.0 million in 2016–17, a decrease of $63.3 million when compared to Main Estimates 2015–16. However, the December 2015 official determination of 2015–16 (upon which payments will be made), is $88.2 million, which is reflected in the Supplementary Estimates (C), 2015–16.

The Youth Allowance Recovery relates to tax points transferred to the province of Quebec for the Youth Allowance program, which has since expired. The equivalent value of the tax point reduction is recovered each year from the province of Quebec. The change in recoveries for the Youth Allowances Recovery Program is entirely due to year-over-year changes to the value of federal personal income taxes, the recovery being a percentage of these taxes. For 2016–17, the forecast recovery of $890.7 million is $37.6 million higher than the initial 2015–16 forecast in Main Estimates and $48.5 million higher than the forecast in the 2015–16 Supplementary Estimates (C) due to higher forecast levels of federal personal income taxes.

Alternative Payments for Standing Programs represent recoveries from Quebec of an additional tax point transfer above and beyond the tax point transfer traditionally computed under the Canada Health Transfer, the Canada Social Transfer and the Youth Allowances Recovery. The change in recoveries for the Alternative Payments for Standing Programs is entirely due to year-over-year changes to the value of federal personal income taxes, the recovery being a percentage of these taxes. For 2016–17, the forecast recovery of $4.0 billion is $170.8million higher than the forecast in the 2015–16 Main Estimates and $219.4 million higher than that in 2015–16 Supplementary Estimates (C) due to higher forecast levels of federal personal income taxes.

Transfers to Persons

Elderly benefits include Old Age Security, Guaranteed Income Supplement, and Allowance payments. Elderly benefit payments are expected to be $48.4 billion in 2016–17, an increase of $2.3 billion over the 2015–16 Main Estimates and $4.3 billion more than actual expenditures in 2014–15.

The Universal Child Care Benefit is a taxable child benefit provided to families in monthly payments. "Other Children's Benefits" include the Canada Child Tax Benefit – a tax-free monthly payment made to eligible families to help them with the cost of raising children under age 18. The Universal Child Care Benefit was increased on July 1, 2015, from $100 per month for each child under the age of six to $160 per month, and a new benefit of $60 per month for each child age six through seventeen was created. The change was retroactive to January 1, 2015. Payments from the two programs are forecast to total $18.4 billion in 2016–17, an increase of $0.2 billion over the 2015–16 Main Estimates and $4.1 billion more than actual expenditures in 2014–15.

Employment Insurance provides temporary financial assistance to unemployed Canadians who have lost their job through no fault of their own, while they look for work or upgrade their skills. Employment Insurance is reported through the Employment Insurance Operating Account and is separate from any of the appropriated organizations listed in these Main Estimates.

Estimates by Organization

One hundred thirty-one organizations are represented in the 2016–17 Estimates. More information about each organization can be found in Part II – Main Estimates

Table 4. Estimates by Organization (dollars)
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Administrative Tribunals Support Service of Canada 26,737,475 60,896,030 60,896,030 58,024,536
Agriculture and Agri-Food 2,013,991,368 2,257,088,060 2,345,960,234 2,263,733,256
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency 305,273,091 298,584,989 303,757,469 308,197,204
Atomic Energy of Canada Limited 326,743,000 119,143,000 336,326,692 968,615,589
Auditor General 81,863,430 78,295,020 78,295,020 78,533,732
Canada Border Services Agency 2,001,144,370 1,774,214,921 1,850,524,916 1,673,039,553
Canada Council for the Arts 182,224,388 182,097,387 182,224,388 182,347,387
Canada Industrial Relations Board 7,488,344 0 0 0
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation 2,053,213,063 2,025,629,000 2,025,629,000 2,027,901,048
Canada Post Corporation 22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000
Canada Revenue Agency 4,060,833,990 3,804,844,388 3,887,739,495 4,085,718,183
Canada School of Public Service 88,509,012 70,879,683 70,879,683 83,244,944
Canadian Air Transport Security Authority 623,896,764 678,420,347 684,934,134 624,005,722
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation 1,038,023,798 1,038,023,798 1,038,023,798 1,038,023,798
Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety 4,685,938 5,070,269 5,070,269 8,952,372
Canadian Commercial Corporation 14,240,000 8,880,000 8,880,000 3,510,000
Canadian Dairy Commission 3,884,137 3,605,377 3,605,377 3,599,617
Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency 29,757,089 17,351,870 23,928,920 30,911,035
Canadian Food Inspection Agency 848,492,889 698,151,888 738,061,543 739,739,165
Canadian Grain Commission (16,912,346) 5,475,177 5,475,177 5,381,924
Canadian Heritage 1,481,855,307 1,254,696,561 1,263,479,582 1,294,505,478
Canadian High Arctic Research Station 0 0 263,078 19,475,274
Canadian Human Rights Commission 23,219,162 22,162,418 22,162,418 22,149,172
Canadian Human Rights Tribunal 2,468,673 0 0 0
Canadian Institutes of Health Research 1,017,279,382 1,008,583,999 1,025,117,614 1,025,620,003
Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat 5,169,487 5,967,541 5,967,541 5,974,970
Canadian International Trade Tribunal 5,724,496 0 0 0
Canadian Museum for Human Rights 21,700,000 21,700,000 21,700,000 21,700,000
Canadian Museum of History 68,923,716 83,369,477 83,369,477 66,199,477
Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21 9,900,000 7,700,000 7,700,000 7,700,000
Canadian Museum of Nature 26,276,818 26,129,112 26,129,112 26,129,112
Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency 49,120,561 50,668,666 50,731,666 26,233,451
Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission 138,139,569 133,179,745 133,283,236 136,166,216
Canadian Polar Commission 2,355,267 2,574,085 2,574,085 0
Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission 11,446,162 12,256,890 12,160,264 12,123,695
Canadian Security Intelligence Service 515,275,578 537,037,245 551,928,885 572,069,066
Canadian Space Agency 376,090,938 483,428,281 487,428,282 432,394,821
Canadian Tourism Commission 57,975,770 57,975,770 62,975,770 70,475,770
Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board 32,219,331 29,729,799 29,729,799 29,788,652
Canadian Transportation Agency 28,777,849 27,733,404 27,733,404 27,792,087
Chief Electoral Officer 150,766,375 395,959,817 395,959,817 98,535,261
Citizenship and Immigration 1,360,751,108 1,464,667,008 1,762,638,045 1,650,832,227
Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police 9,599,971 10,011,723 10,011,723 10,028,317
Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs 517,620,426 524,851,120 527,851,120 555,174,253
Communications Security Establishment 856,433,238 538,201,730 577,615,137 583,624,818
Copyright Board 3,069,506 3,110,713 3,110,713 3,111,724
Correctional Service of Canada 2,575,228,312 2,350,488,926 2,363,378,926 2,362,592,079
Courts Administration Service 69,150,406 63,952,587 63,952,587 72,351,643
Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec 253,897,916 261,082,194 264,519,194 303,119,941
Employment and Social Development 52,204,757,172 54,265,536,116 59,205,590,929 61,637,881,808
Enterprise Cape Breton Corporation 9,865,841 0 0 0
Environment 976,186,637 961,051,076 983,310,734 902,089,198
Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario 104,103,143 215,251,719 211,251,719 234,447,852
Finance 85,683,154,816 89,646,397,112 87,199,382,405 89,463,792,510
Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada 51,404,430 50,450,180 54,439,944 56,697,062
Fisheries and Oceans 1,736,967,289 1,889,240,348 2,278,555,600 2,241,049,589
Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development 5,939,344,157 5,526,817,200 6,052,320,264 5,515,540,897
Governor General 20,861,040 20,131,117 21,993,417 23,145,434
Health 3,814,473,966 3,658,770,349 3,691,631,997 3,756,604,937
House of Commons 421,827,802 443,449,092 469,016,903 463,627,783
Immigration and Refugee Board 119,750,033 112,709,491 114,412,311 114,502,666
Indian Affairs and Northern Development 7,691,653,138 8,187,417,868 8,812,909,136 7,505,552,140
Indian Residential Schools Truth and Reconciliation Commission 5,994,737 3,660,158 3,660,158 0
Industry 1,097,414,496 1,170,502,156 1,272,292,861 1,297,074,670
International Development Research Centre 190,023,783 183,478,242 183,478,242 149,205,625
International Joint Commission (Canadian Section) 6,764,952 6,761,044 6,761,044 6,772,067
Justice 708,851,618 673,866,874 683,917,443 678,860,530
Library and Archives of Canada 102,593,650 93,011,489 100,097,505 116,858,567
Library of Parliament 41,830,343 42,739,595 42,739,595 43,071,239
Marine Atlantic Inc. 127,484,000 19,384,000 374,331,000 140,122,000
Military Grievances External Review Committee 6,249,905 6,741,810 6,741,810 6,753,945
Military Police Complaints Commission 4,965,273 5,614,814 5,614,814 4,685,311
National Arts Centre Corporation 35,321,395 34,222,719 54,722,719 79,397,056
National Battlefields Commission 12,097,378 12,976,836 12,976,836 8,687,714
National Capital Commission 92,446,209 92,721,330 93,039,331 88,792,180
National Defence 18,453,938,461 18,942,053,629 19,353,508,936 18,640,268,933
National Energy Board 87,321,083 76,820,510 94,102,055 89,425,447
National Film Board 62,562,516 59,652,377 59,652,377 61,894,820
National Gallery of Canada 44,308,269 43,773,542 43,773,542 43,888,410
National Museum of Science and Technology 33,370,395 29,754,746 59,109,746 59,979,776
National Research Council of Canada 955,704,916 853,254,782 974,567,390 1,053,658,576
Natural Resources 2,049,418,787 2,214,476,711 2,515,174,980 1,592,518,753
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council 1,085,445,456 1,086,570,325 1,117,728,643 1,120,184,669
Northern Pipeline Agency 516,310 750,775 750,775 751,835
Office of Infrastructure of Canada 3,095,882,113 3,633,262,748 3,739,441,053 3,869,509,257
Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying 4,680,527 4,452,540 4,452,540 4,462,686
Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages 22,415,874 20,833,525 20,833,525 20,891,619
Office of the Communications Security Establishment Commissioner 2,043,560 2,031,067 2,031,067 2,125,377
Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner 6,277,212 6,952,226 6,952,226 6,970,653
Office of the Co-ordinator, Status of Women 30,125,744 29,543,077 30,669,444 31,736,324
Office of the Correctional Investigator 4,768,000 4,655,541 4,655,541 4,664,536
Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions 175,246,750 170,718,195 183,335,490 185,665,457
Office of the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner 4,841,027 5,448,442 5,448,442 5,462,474
Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions 146,308,874 147,934,112 147,934,112 149,703,956
Offices of the Information and Privacy Commissioners of Canada 37,340,644 35,586,666 35,586,666 35,809,330
Parks Canada Agency 721,799,860 737,273,003 1,095,080,224 1,173,538,301
Parliamentary Protective Service 0 0 20,572,818 62,115,110
Parole Board of Canada 50,122,396 45,915,750 46,960,291 46,789,956
Patented Medicine Prices Review Board 7,930,280 10,945,181 10,945,181 10,965,108
PPP Canada Inc. 209,500,000 231,200,000 231,200,000 279,500,000
Privy Council 123,193,655 118,833,279 123,011,733 120,684,380
Public Health Agency of Canada 636,969,185 567,152,421 580,812,095 589,737,802
Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness 675,462,786 1,150,436,251 1,135,152,033 1,096,958,408
Public Service Commission 77,597,931 83,601,016 84,105,017 83,603,063
Public Service Labour Relations Board 8,004,719 0 0 0
Public Service Staffing Tribunal 2,973,549 0 0 0
Public Works and Government Services 2,767,163,511 2,871,525,596 3,024,776,320 2,870,459,398
Registry of the Competition Tribunal 575,378 0 0 0
Registry of the Public Servants Disclosure Protection Tribunal 965,243 0 0 0
Registry of the Specific Claims Tribunal 1,312,698 0 0 0
Royal Canadian Mounted Police 2,861,888,975 2,630,057,696 2,789,675,280 2,759,327,834
Royal Canadian Mounted Police External Review Committee 1,584,606 952,848 1,552,849 1,554,862
Security Intelligence Review Committee 2,980,020 2,796,368 3,086,243 2,801,996
Senate Ethics Officer 703,221 1,168,700 1,168,700 1,171,300
Shared Services Canada 1,622,381,855 1,444,044,025 1,498,258,332 1,549,854,701
Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council 712,926,648 717,089,852 718,933,521 720,012,809
Standards Council of Canada 12,889,535 9,829,000 9,829,000 9,329,000
Statistics Canada 467,202,461 525,090,820 525,090,821 751,484,013
Supreme Court of Canada 31,992,787 31,763,943 31,763,943 33,217,202
Telefilm Canada 95,453,551 95,453,551 95,453,551 95,453,551
The Federal Bridge Corporation Limited 8,138,200 35,281,996 35,281,996 31,414,312
The Jacques-Cartier and Champlain Bridges Inc. 244,957,619 368,737,000 426,801,000 351,919,000
The Senate 85,402,391 88,747,958 88,747,958 90,115,308
Transport 1,605,081,311 1,615,012,278 1,685,413,449 1,265,907,597
Transportation Appeal Tribunal of Canada 884,415 0 0 0
Treasury Board Secretariat 3,221,689,682 6,892,444,333 7,941,060,118 6,570,806,029
Veterans Affairs 3,376,879,954 3,522,078,175 3,660,068,788 3,628,281,702
Veterans Review and Appeal Board 11,423,299 10,896,563 10,896,563 10,921,149
VIA Rail Canada Inc. 406,210,121 330,077,000 395,067,134 382,830,000
Western Economic Diversification 162,002,536 159,913,914 163,429,033 173,391,536
Windsor-Detroit Bridge Authority 8,059,104 58,469,905 461,094,912 215,989,827
Total Budgetary 231,119,942,327 241,574,296,708 250,686,079,790 250,136,477,494
Non-budgetary
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (10,465,313,333) (139,123,000) (139,123,000) (644,314,000)
Canadian Dairy Commission (34,865,529) 0 0 0
Citizenship and Immigration 1,201,648 0 0 0
Correctional Service of Canada (170) 0 0 0
Employment and Social Development 844,568,846 1,027,422,531 776,467,550 979,969,792
Finance 80,735,156,755 0 0 0
Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development 66,603,112 45,146,541 45,471,875 3,098,451
Indian Affairs and Northern Development 38,448,505 70,303,000 70,303,000 25,903,000
Industry 0 800,000 800,000 800,000
National Defence (4,645,510) 0 0 0
Public Works and Government Services (11,463,186) 0 0 0
Veterans Affairs (416) 0 0 0
Total Non-budgetary 71,169,690,722 1,004,549,072 753,919,425 365,457,243

Structure of these Estimates

Votes

The basic structural units of the Estimates are the Votes. The following kinds of Votes appear in the Estimates:

A program expenditures vote is used when there is no requirement for either a separate "capital expenditures" vote or a "grants and contributions" vote because neither equals or exceeds $5 million. In this case, all expenditures are charged to the one vote.

An operating expenditures vote is used when there is also a requirement for either a "capital expenditures" vote or a "grants and contributions" vote or both; that is, when expenditures of either type equal or exceed $5 million. Where they do not, the appropriate expenditures are included in the "program expenditures" vote.

A capital expenditures vote is used when the aggregate of capital expenditures equal or exceed $5 million. Capital expenditures are those made for the acquisition or development of items that are classified as tangible capital assets as defined by Government accounting policies. For example, the acquisition of real property, infrastructure, machinery or equipment, or for purposes of constructing or developing assets, where an organization expects to draw upon its own labour and materials, or employs professional services or other services or goods. Expenditure items in a Capital Expenditures Vote are for items that generally exceed $10,000; although an organization may select a reduced threshold to be applied to different capital classes.

A grants and contributions vote is used when grants and/or contributions expenditures equal or exceed $5 million. It should be noted that the inclusion of a grant, contribution or other transfer payment item in the Estimates imposes no requirement to make a payment, nor does it give a prospective recipient any right to the funds. It should also be noted that in the vote wording, the meaning of the word "contributions" is considered to include "other transfer payments" because of the similar characteristics of each.

A non-budgetary vote, identified by the letter "L", provides authority for spending in the form of loans or advances to, and investments in, Crown corporations; and loans or advances for specific purposes to other governments, international organizations or persons or corporations in the private sector.

Where it is necessary to appropriate funds for a payment to a Crown corporation or for the expenditures of a legal entity that is part of a larger program, a separate vote is established. Where this is the case, a separate vote structure is established for each. A legal entity for these purposes is defined as a unit of government operating under an Act of Parliament and responsible directly to a Minister.

To support the Treasury Board in performing its statutory responsibilities for managing the government's financial, human and materiel resources, a number of special authorities are required. These authorities are described in the vote wording found in the Proposed Schedules to the Appropriation Bill.

Information Presented in the 2016–17 Main Estimates

Departments and agencies are presented alphabetically according to the legal name of the department or agency. For some organizations, the legal name differs from the name in common usage. In such cases, their commonly-used name is noted in their raison d'être.

Forecast statutory expenditures are summarized in this document. Details are available in the 2016–17 Statutory Forecasts online table.

Abbreviated vote wordings are used in organization summaries. Complete vote wording is shown in the Proposed Schedules to the Appropriation Bill following Part II.

Information on 2014–15 actual expenditures and 2015–16 Estimates to Date are included to provide context for the 2016–17 amounts. The 2014–15 actual expenditures are taken from the 2014–15 Public Accounts of Canada. 2015–16 Estimates to Date is the sum of the amounts presented in the 2015–16 Main Estimates and increases sought through the 2015–16 Supplementary Estimates A, B and C. Estimates to date excludes any funding deemed to have been appropriated to a department following the transfer of a portion of the federal administration. Allocations from Treasury Board Central Votes are made throughout the year and the expenditure authority provided by these allocations is also not included in Estimates to Date.

The 2016–17 Program Alignment Architecture is used for the tables presenting information by Strategic Outcome and Program. If there has been a change in the Architecture, amounts for previous years have not been reclassified to the new structure and are reported as "Funds not allocated to the 2016–17 Program Alignment Architecture".

If applicable, a table provides a listing of transfer payments planned for the 2016–17 fiscal year, with comparative amounts from previous fiscal years for programs with funding in 2016–17. A transfer payment is a grant, contribution or other payment made for the purpose of furthering program objectives but for which no goods or services are received. Details on transfer payments made in a previous year can be found in Volumes 2 and 3 of the Public Accounts of Canada.

Supplementary online tables for the 2016–17 Main Estimates show forecast expenditures by:

  • Standard Object: the table shows the types of goods or services to be acquired, or the transfer payments to be made and the revenues to be credited to the vote; and,
  • Strategic Outcome and Program: planned expenditures are classified under the 2016–17 Program Alignment Architecture. If there has been a change in the Architecture, amounts for previous years have not been reclassified to the new structure.

In-year information on expenditure authorities is available in departmental Quarterly Financial Reports, and final expenditure authority and actual expenditures for a fiscal year are reported in the Public Accounts of Canada. The Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS) InfoBase also provides financial and people management data for all organizations that receive government appropriations.

Changes to these Estimates

The purpose of this section is to provide the reconciliation of these Estimates with the previous year's Main Estimates in the following areas:

  • Changes to government organization and structure; and
  • Changes in authorities (Votes).

Changes to Government Organization and Structure

Following the tabling of the 2015–16 Main Estimates on February 24, 2015, these changes were made.

Supplementary Estimates (A), 2015–16:
The Canadian High Arctic Research Station Act, which came into force on June 1, 2015, established the Canadian High Arctic Research Station.
Supplementary Estimates (B), 2015–16:
The Economic Action Plan 2015 Act, No. 1 established the Parliamentary Protective Service.

Changes in Voted Authorities

This sub-section lists Votes which contain specific authorities that differ from those included in the previous year's Main Estimates as well as new expenditure authorities appearing for the first time. In light of the House of Commons Speaker's rulings in 1981, the government has made a commitment that the only legislation that will be enacted through the Estimates process, other than cases specifically authorized by Statute, will be previous Appropriation Acts.

Citizenship and Immigration

The department has a new capital expenditures vote in 2016–17.

Wording is added to the grants and contributions vote, adding authority to provide goods and services.

Finance

Vote 1 becomes a vote for program expenditures and contributions. A separate grants and contributions vote is no longer required.

The wording of Vote 10 sets out the maximum amount of financial assistance to the International Development Association for the 2016–17 fiscal year.

Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada

The authority to expend revenues received in a fiscal year through the provision of internal support is removed from the wording of Vote 1.

Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development

The wording of Votes 20 and L25 sets out the maximum amount of financial assistance to international financial institutions for the 2016–17 fiscal year.

Library and Archives of Canada

The organization has a new capital expenditures vote in 2016–17.

Vote 1 program expenditures wording adds authority for contributions.

National Defence

The wording of Vote 1 sets out the maximum total amount of commitments the department can make during the 2016–17 fiscal year, regardless of the year in which the payment of those commitments comes due.

National Research Council of Canada

Vote 10 grants and contributions wording adds authority to provide goods and services for the international Thirty Meter Telescope Observatory.

Offices of the Information and Privacy Commissioners of Canada

The wording of Vote 5 adds authority to expend revenues received in a fiscal year through the provision of internal support.

Statistics Canada

Vote 1 program expenditures wording adds authority for the payment of grants listed in the estimates.

Transport

Parliament is asked to approve appropriations by vote. The vote structure is currently based on the type of expenditure (e.g. operating, capital, grants and contributions). The Department of Transport is the subject of a pilot project through which its grants and contributions will appear in separate votes based on a program structure. Transport's grants and contributions are divided into three separate votes in 2016–17 based on the departmental Program Alignment Architecture. More information about the pilot project may be found in a separate online document.

Main Estimates

Administrative Tribunals Support Service of Canada

Raison d'être

The Administrative Tribunals Support Service of Canada (ATSSC) is responsible for providing the support services and the facilities that are needed by each of the administrative tribunals it serves to enable them to exercise their powers and perform their duties and functions in accordance with their legislation and rules. Additional information can be found in the ATSSC's Report on Plans and Priorities.

The Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 1. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Administrative Tribunals Support Service of Canada
Data table used to populate this graph is found below.
Table 1. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Administrative Tribunals Support Service of Canada
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 23,002,097 52,297,037 52,297,037 48,879,363
Total voted 23,002,097 52,297,037 52,297,037 48,879,363
Total Statutory 3,735,378 8,598,993 8,598,993 9,145,173
Total budgetary 26,737,475 60,896,030 60,896,030 58,024,536

Highlights

The ATSSC is estimating budgetary expenditures of $58.0 million in 2016–17. Of this amount, $48.9 million requires Parliamentary approval. The remaining $9.1 million represents the statutory funding forecast that does not require additional approval.

ATSSC's 2016–17 Voted Main Estimates have decreased by $3.4 million from 2015–16. This decrease is mainly due to the sunsetting of funding related to the Specific Claims Tribunal.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 2. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Administrative Tribunals Support Service of Canada
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Efficient and effective services which support tribunal chairs and members in exercising their statutory responsibilities and ensure that their independence is protected in a manner which promotes Canadians' confidence in the federal tribunal system.
Tribunal Specialized and Expert Support Services 7,845,015 23,749,452 21,445,348
Payments to tribunal chairs and members 4,888,986 17,050,888 12,830,814
Registry Services 3,786,373 8,525,444 7,799,725
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 10,217,101 11,570,246 15,948,649
Total 26,737,475 60,896,030 58,024,536

Agriculture and Agri-Food

Raison d'être

The Department of Agriculture and Agri-Food (AAFC) was created in 1868 — one year after Confederation — because of the importance of agriculture to the economic, social and cultural development of Canada. Today, the Department helps create the conditions for the long-term profitability, sustainability and adaptability of the Canadian agricultural sector. AAFC supports the sector through initiatives that promote innovation and competitiveness, and that proactively manage risk. The Department's goal is to position agriculture, agri-food and agri-based product industries to realize their full potential by seizing new opportunities in the growing domestic and global marketplace.

The Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 2. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Agriculture and Agri-Food
Data table used to populate this graph is found below.
Table 3. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Agriculture and Agri-Food
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 577,712,678 548,177,880 547,629,547 534,827,658
5 Capital expenditures 25,835,661 27,872,294 48,775,032 74,750,000
10 Grants and contributions 345,165,608 367,238,619 435,756,388 343,252,000
Total voted 948,713,947 943,288,793 1,032,160,967 952,829,658
Total Statutory 1,065,277,421 1,313,799,267 1,313,799,267 1,310,903,598
Total budgetary 2,013,991,368 2,257,088,060 2,345,960,234 2,263,733,256

Highlights

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada is estimating budgetary expenditures of $2.3 billion in 2016–17. Of this amount, $952.8 million is voted funding which requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $1.31 billion represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information only.

The majority of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada's funding is in support of programs under Growing Forward 2 with a significant portion being for grants and contributions.

2016–17 marks the fourth year of Growing Forward 2, a five-year (2013-18) policy framework for Canadaʼs agricultural and agri-food sector. Growing Forward 2 is a $3 billion dollar investment by federal, provincial and territorial governments and the foundation for government agricultural programs and services. This framework supports a shift in focus towards strategic investments that promote innovation, competitiveness and market development initiatives to help producers meet rising demand, both in Canada and internationally, while continuing to proactively manage risk.

Compared to 2015–16, the Main Estimates have increased by $6.6 million. The major changes include:

  • An increase of $32.1 million for the Federal Infrastructure Initiative;
  • An increase of $5 million for AgriRisk Initiatives. The funding allocation increases over the five years of Growing Forward 2 in expectation of increased interest and demand for the program;
  • An increase of $1.0 million for the Growing Forward 2 AgriMarketing Program, reflecting a return to the program's initial funding profile. This profile was adjusted in 2015-16 when $1.0 million was transferred to Western Economic Diversification to support the establishment of the Canadian Beef Centre of Excellence;
  • A planned decrease of $25.4 million related to sunsetting programs ($24.3 million for the Canadian Wheat Board Transition Costs program and $1.1 million for the Plum Pox Monitoring and Management program); and
  • A decrease of $5.7 million related to the Growing Forward 2 AgriInnovation program, reflecting a return to the program's initial funding profile. This profile was adjusted in 2015–16 when $5.7 million was carried forward from 2014–15.

For additional information, please refer to the department's Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 4. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Agriculture and Agri-Food
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
A competitive and market-oriented agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk.
Business Risk Management 1,033,315,991 1,301,429,496 1,305,927,027
Market Access, Negotiations, Sector Competitiveness, and Assurance Systems 163,511,328 194,586,263 171,704,257
Farm Products Council of Canada 3,032,055 3,028,779 3,036,170
An innovative and sustainable agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector.
Science, Innovation, Adoption and Sustainability 575,890,434 537,550,506 560,789,990
Industry Capacity 76,204,095 70,990,651 73,027,026
Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency (2,233,091) 0 0
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 164,270,556 149,502,365 149,248,786
Total 2,013,991,368 2,257,088,060 2,263,733,256

Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments

Table 5. Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments - Agriculture and Agri-Food
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Grants
Grant payments for the Churchill Port Utilisation program 4,585,371 4,600,000 4,600,000
Grants to foreign recipients for participation in international organizations supporting agriculture 756,170 883,000 883,000
Grant payments for the AgriRisk Initiatives program 100,000 100,000 100,000
Total Statutory 185,779,299 167,300,000 167,300,000
Contributions
Contributions for Cost-Shared Strategic Initiatives programming in Innovation under Growing Forward 2 91,546,837 100,179,252 100,179,252
Contributions for Cost-Shared Strategic Initiatives programming in Competitiveness and Market Development under Growing Forward 2 88,267,210 60,869,892 60,869,892
Contribution payments for the AgriInnovation program under Growing Forward 2 63,105,754 66,141,619 60,455,000
Contributions for Cost-Shared Strategic Initiatives programming in Adaptability and Industry Capacity under Growing Forward 2 30,038,615 44,830,856 44,830,856
Contribution payments for the AgriMarketing program under Growing Forward 2 24,308,985 34,500,000 35,500,000
Contributions for the AgriRisk Initiatives program 4,018,823 11,400,000 16,400,000
Contributions to support the Canadian Agricultural Adaptation program 1,742,371 10,061,000 10,061,000
Contributions in support of the Agricultural Greenhouse Gases program 4,431,565 5,382,000 5,382,000
Contribution payments for the AgriCompetitiveness program under Growing Forward 2 2,668,742 3,127,000 3,127,000
Contributions under the Career Focus program – Youth Employment Strategy 684,345 864,000 864,000
Total Statutory 815,401,699 1,075,124,348 1,075,124,348

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

Raison d'être

Established in 1987 (Part I of the Government Organization Act, Atlantic Canada 1987, R.S.C., 1985, c.41 (4th Supp.), also known as the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency Act), the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA) is the federal department responsible for the Government of Canada's economic development efforts in the provinces of New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, and Newfoundland and Labrador.

ACOA works to create opportunities for economic growth in Atlantic Canada by helping businesses become more competitive, innovative and productive, by working with diverse communities to develop and diversify local economies, and by championing the strengths of Atlantic Canada. Together, with Atlantic Canadians, it is building a stronger economy.

The Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 3. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 6. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 65,978,345 64,399,896 64,399,896 64,222,120
5 Grants and contributions 231,078,546 225,573,493 230,745,973 235,160,493
Total voted 297,056,891 289,973,389 295,145,869 299,382,613
Total Statutory 8,216,200 8,611,600 8,611,600 8,814,591
Total budgetary 305,273,091 298,584,989 303,757,469 308,197,204

Highlights

ACOA is estimating budgetary expenditures of $308.2 million for 2016–17. Of this amount, $299.4 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $8.8 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes only.

ACOA's approved authorities for 2016–17 of $308.2 million represent an increase of $9.6 million when compared to the 2015–16 Estimates of $298.6 million.

The increase in spending of $9.6 million is due to an increase in contributions and other transfer payments of $9.6 million, a decrease in operating costs of $0.2 million, and an increase of $0.2 million in statutory costs. Factors contributing to the net increase include:

Impact of temporary initiatives:

  • $8.3 million increase in funding to support the Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program as announced in Budget 2015;
  • $1.0 million increase in funding to support the spruce budworm outbreak intervention as announced in Budget 2014; and
  • $4.7 million decrease in funding to support specific projects in innovation, commercialization and community development in New Brunswick.

Impacts of other adjustments:

  • $5.0 million increase related to changes in collections from repayable contributions;
  • $0.2 million increase in statutory costs;
  • $0.1 million decrease in operating funding to support the cost of the 2015–16 to 2020–21 Census of population; and
  • $0.1 million decrease to support the Canada School of Public Service model.

In 2016–17, the Agency will build on regional competitive advantages and continue to foster economic development by delivering strategic support that addresses the specific issues facing small and medium-sized enterprises and urban and rural communities throughout the region. ACOA will partner with businesses and sectors to support their efforts to increase productivity and innovation, and to help Atlantic firms compete successfully in export markets so they can create good quality jobs and generate wealth for Atlantic Canadians. The Agency will work with communities to help them find ways to develop their capacity to create jobs and economic stability. ACOA will continue to advocate for Atlantic Canada among partners, stakeholders and decision-makers, with special focus on the region's strengths and opportunities.

For further details on ACOA's planned spending, refer to the 2016–17 Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 7. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
A competitive Atlantic Canadian economy.
Enterprise Development 173,992,156 171,221,612 172,961,681
Community Development 90,659,999 89,727,582 97,704,593
Policy, Advocacy and Coordination 12,444,235 11,774,749 11,740,443
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 28,176,701 25,861,046 25,790,487
Total 305,273,091 298,584,989 308,197,204

Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments

Table 8. Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments - Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Grants
Grants to organizations to promote economic cooperation and development 442,941 2,000,000 2,000,000
Contributions
Contributions under the Business Development Program 126,625,641 119,894,990 131,176,388
Contributions for the Atlantic Innovation Fund 45,027,132 51,500,000 42,500,000
Contributions for the Innovative Communities Fund 41,646,990 36,208,465 36,756,518
Contributions under the Community Futures Program 12,664,849 12,642,000 12,642,000
Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program 0 0 8,300,000
Contributions to promote and coordinate economic development throughout Cape Breton Island 4,093,435 2,728,038 1,185,587
Contributions under the Atlantic Policy Research Initiatives 577,558 600,000 600,000

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

Raison d'être

The mandate of Atomic Energy Canada Limited (AECL) is to deliver on Canada's radioactive waste and decommissioning responsibilities, provide nuclear expertise to support federal responsibilities for the benefit of Canadians, and offer services to users of the nuclear laboratories on commercial terms.

The Minister of Natural Resources is responsible for AECL.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 4. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Atomic Energy of Canada Limited
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 9. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Atomic Energy of Canada Limited
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for operating and capital expenditures 325,643,000 102,143,000 319,326,692 968,615,589
Total voted 325,643,000 102,143,000 319,326,692 968,615,589
Total Statutory 1,100,000 17,000,000 17,000,000 0
Total budgetary 326,743,000 119,143,000 336,326,692 968,615,589

Highlights

2016–17 will be the first full year during which AECLʼs nuclear sites will be managed and operated under a Government-owned, Contractor-operated model. The implementation of this model marked the completion of the restructuring of AECL. As such, starting in 2016–17, AECL is receiving all funding necessary to deliver on its mandate through the Main Estimates. This differs from previous years, when AECL received funding from a variety of sources, including Main and Supplementary Estimates, transfers from Natural Resources Canada and, occasionally Treasury Board Central Votes. This explains, in part, the variance between the amounts noted under 2014–15 Expenditures and 2015–16 Estimates to Date, as compared to the 2016–17 Main Estimates presented in this document.

As a result of the restructuring, the Strategic Outcome table included in these Main Estimates will be revised to reflect AECLʼs new role. Furthermore, funding for 2016–17 has been grouped into a single program area: Facilities and Nuclear Operations, which includes all funding to enable AECL to deliver on its mandate. AECL will propose changes to the Program Alignment Architecture with a proposed breakdown as follows:

  • Decommissioning and Waste Management $529.8 million

The objective is to safely and efficiently reduce the Government of Canadaʼs radioactive waste liabilities, including associated risks to health, safety, security and the environment. The focus is on enabling Canadian Nuclear Laboratories to significantly advance infrastructure decommissioning, site remediation and waste management for Canada. Funding for these activities was previously provided through Natural Resources Canadaʼs Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program, the Port Hope Area Initiative and the Low-level Radioactive Waste Management Office, and as such, would not have been reflected in Parliamentary Appropriations to AECL. Starting in 2016–17, all funding for these activities is being provided directly to AECL through the Main Estimates, with increased funding to accelerate work that will reduce risks and discharge Canadaʼs radioactive waste liabilities faster.

  • Nuclear Laboratories $438.8 million

The objective is to enable the effective implementation of the Government-owned, Contractor operated model and thereby enable Canadian Nuclear Laboratories to manage and operate AECLʼs sites efficiently and effectively to provide expertise, products and services, and science and technology capabilities in support of: (i) Canadaʼs federal roles, responsibilities and priorities; (ii) commercial services for third parties; and, (iii) capital projects and other corporate activities at the nuclear laboratories. Work in this activity includes renewal and modernization of the Chalk River site to enhance Canadian Nuclear Laboratoriesʼ ability to provide safe and world-class science and technology and other services for Canada.

More information on AECLʼs activities can be found in its Corporate Plan Summary.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 10. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Atomic Energy of Canada Limited
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Be the top worldwide nuclear products and services company. Protect the health and safety of the public, our employees and the environment. Minimize nuclear legacy obligations for future generations.
Facilities and Nuclear Operations 0 67,006,000 968,615,589
Commercial Business 0 17,000,000 0
Research and Development 0 35,137,000 0
Waste Management and Decommissioning 0 0 0
Funds not allocated to the 2016–17 Program Alignment Architecture 326,743,000 0 0
Total 326,743,000 119,143,000 968,615,589

Auditor General

Raison d'être

The Auditor General is an Officer of Parliament, who is independent from the government and reports directly to Parliament. The Office of the Auditor General is the legislative audit office of the federal government and of the three northern territories. The main legislative auditing duties are financial audits, performance audits, special examinations, and sustainable development monitoring activities and environmental petitions. Our audits and studies provide objective information, advice and assurance to Parliament, territorial legislatures, governments and Canadians. With our reports and testimony, we assist parliamentarians and territorial legislators in their work on the authorization and oversight of government spending and operations. The Minister of Finance is responsible for tabling the Auditor General's administrative reports in Parliament, including the Report on Plans and Priorities and Departmental Performance Report.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 5. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Auditor General
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 11. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Auditor General
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 72,739,877 68,269,099 68,269,099 68,269,099
Total voted 72,739,877 68,269,099 68,269,099 68,269,099
Total Statutory 9,123,553 10,025,921 10,025,921 10,264,633
Total budgetary 81,863,430 78,295,020 78,295,020 78,533,732

Highlights

The Office of the Auditor General is estimating budgetary expenditures of $78.5 million in 2016–17. Of this amount, $68.3 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $10.2 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

In total, the Office is estimating an increase of $0.2 million or 0.3% from the previous Main Estimates. Additional information can be found in the Office of the Auditor General's 2016–17 Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 12. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Auditor General
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Through legislative auditing, we contribute to a well-managed and accountable government for Canadians.
Legislative Auditing 81,863,430 78,295,020 78,533,732
Total 81,863,430 78,295,020 78,533,732

Canada Border Services Agency

Raison d'être

The Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness is responsible for the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA).

The CBSA provides integrated border services that support national security priorities and facilitate the flow of people and goods across the border. Responsibilities include:

  • Administering legislation that governs the admissibility of people and goods into and out of Canada;
  • Identifying, detaining, and removing people who are inadmissible to Canada;
  • Interdicting illegal goods at Canadaʼs border;
  • Protecting food safety, plant and animal health, and Canada's resource base;
  • Administering trade legislation and agreements, including the enforcement of trade remedies that protect Canadian industry;
  • Administering a fair and impartial redress mechanism; and
  • Collecting duties and taxes on imported goods.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 6. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canada Border Services Agency
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 13. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canada Border Services Agency
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 1,628,333,847 1,411,403,312 1,437,507,776 1,357,329,190
5 Capital expenditures 174,709,785 180,203,476 223,868,451 130,999,015
Total voted 1,803,043,632 1,591,606,788 1,661,376,227 1,488,328,205
Total Statutory 198,100,738 182,608,133 189,148,689 184,711,348
Total budgetary 2,001,144,370 1,774,214,921 1,850,524,916 1,673,039,553

Highlights

The Canada Border Services Agency is estimating budgetary expenditures of $1,673.0 million in 2016–17. Of this amount,

$1,488.3 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $184.7 million represents statutory forecasts related to Employee Benefit Plans (EBP) that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

The CBSA's decrease in net spending of $101.2 million or 5.7% is due to a decrease in Operating expenditures of $54.1 million, a decrease in Capital expenditures of $49.2 million and an increase of $2.1 million in Statutory expenditures (EBP).

Major items contributing to the year-over-year net change of $101.2 million in funding levels include:

Increases totaling $25.0 million in the 2016–17 Main Estimates are mainly due to:

  • $16.3 million to expand biometric screening in Canada's Immigration proceedings;
  • $6.6 million to continue to implement and administer reforms of the Temporary Foreign Worker Program (TFWP) and the International Mobility Program; and
  • $2.1 million adjustment of the employee benefit rate from 16.8% to 17.2%.

The increases in the 2016–17 Main Estimates are offset by the following decreases totaling $126.2 million and are mainly due to:

  • $49.8 million due to the completion of Arming of CBSA officers at the border;
  • $26.9 million reduction of funding for major initiatives included in the Beyond the Border Action Plan;
  • $19.3 million reduction of funding received to complete the phase 2 of the CBSA Assessment and Revenue Management project (CARM) and the Accounts Receivable Ledger (ARL) project;
  • $11.4 million decrease of the project funding for Postal Modernization initiative; and
  • The balance of $18.8 million is related to a decrease of funding for various projects.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 14. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canada Border Services Agency
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
International trade and travel is facilitated across Canada's border and Canada's population is protected from border-related risks.
Admissibility Determination 982,394,090 949,587,807 901,059,087
Risk Assessment Program 181,814,888 162,698,196 162,510,532
Immigration Enforcement 186,711,928 146,023,258 128,654,073
Revenue and Trade Management 88,403,795 102,179,578 80,336,485
Secure and Trusted Partnerships 42,228,468 39,094,941 35,243,046
Criminal Investigations 37,290,323 26,079,013 33,348,629
Recourse 13,359,832 11,473,302 11,485,183
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 468,941,046 337,078,826 320,402,518
Total 2,001,144,370 1,774,214,921 1,673,039,553

Canada Council for the Arts

Raison d'être

The Canada Council for the Arts (CCA) is a Crown corporation created in 1957 "to foster and promote the study and enjoyment of, and the production of works in, the arts." Its grants to artists and arts organizations contribute to a vibrant arts scene in Canada. Its awards celebrate creativity by recognizing exceptional Canadians in the arts, humanities and sciences. The Canada Council Art Bank is a national collection of over 17,000 Canadian contemporary artworks, accessible to the public through rental, loan and outreach programs. The Canadian Commission for UNESCO operates under the general authority of the Canada Council.

The CCA reports to Parliament through the Minister of Canadian Heritage.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 7. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canada Council for the Arts
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 15. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canada Council for the Arts
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Canada Council for the Arts 182,224,388 182,097,387 182,224,388 182,347,387
Total voted 182,224,388 182,097,387 182,224,388 182,347,387
Total budgetary 182,224,388 182,097,387 182,224,388 182,347,387

Highlights

The Canada Council for the Arts' (CCA) planned expenditures will show a reallocation of funds to Grants and Services from savings in Internal Services related to efficiencies. 2016–17 is the first year in the CCA's new strategic plan. Main areas of activity include:

  • Public launch and implementation of a new 2016–21 Strategic Plan that will guide the Council's activities over this five-year period;
  • Transition from the current programs to a new funding model that will simplify the Canada Council's granting programs and processes to better serve artists and arts organizations and scale up its impact for Canadians. The new funding model will be in effect April 1, 2017; and
  • Working on Council's priorities, including:
    • Supporting the adaptability of the arts sector in a digital society;
    • Renewed and greater support for Aboriginal Arts and the role of the arts in reconciliation;
    • Investing in the international presence and success of Canadian artists, and strengthening international role of the Canada Council, including through the activities of the Canadian Commission for UNESCO; and
    • Supporting the diversity of the arts in Canada through specific approaches to equity, including cultural diversity, Official Language Minority and Deaf and disability arts.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 16. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canada Council for the Arts
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
A vibrant and dynamic arts sector in Canada.
Grants and services to support creation, production and dissemination of arts for individuals and organizations 0 162,352,141 162,761,612
Arts promotion to foster public knowledge and appreciation of the Canadian arts and culture 0 8,666,048 9,119,304
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 0 11,079,198 10,466,471
Funds not allocated to the 2016–17 Program Alignment Architecture 182,224,388 0 0
Total 182,224,388 182,097,387 182,347,387

Canada Industrial Relations Board

Raison d'être

Pursuant to the Administrative Tribunals Support Service of Canada Act, the Canada Industrial Relations Board was amalgamated to the Administrative Tribunals Support Service of Canada, effective November 1, 2014.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 8. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canada Industrial Relations Board
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 17. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canada Industrial Relations Board
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
- Program expenditures 6,589,868 0 0 0
Total voted 6,589,868 0 0 0
Total Statutory 898,476 0 0 0
Total budgetary 7,488,344 0 0 0

Highlights

Not applicable

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 18. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canada Industrial Relations Board
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Effective dispute resolution services that support constructive labour management relations in sectors regulated by the Canada Labour Code and professional relations in sectors regulated by the Status of the Artist Act.
Adjudication and Dispute Resolution Program 5,502,428 0 0
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 1,985,916 0 0
Total 7,488,344 0 0

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation

Raison d'être

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) is Canada's national housing agency. Established as a federal Crown corporation in 1946 to help address post-war housing shortages, its role has evolved as Canadians' needs have changed.

Today, CMHC's mandate is to facilitate access to housing and contribute to financial stability in order to help Canadians meet their housing needs.

CMHC receives Parliamentary appropriations to fund housing programs on and off reserve. Working with provinces, territories, First Nations, and the private and not-for-profit sectors, CMHC helps Canadians in housing need by improving access to affordable housing.

CMHC's role in housing finance (providing mortgage loan insurance and securitization guarantee products) contributes to the health and stability of Canada's housing finance system and facilitates access to financing for housing across the country.

CMHC's Market Analysis and Research Activity supports informed decision making through the creation, interpretation and sharing of housing-related data and information.

CMHC is accountable to Parliament through the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 9. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Figure 10. Organizational Estimates - Non-budgetary - Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory non budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 19. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Reimbursement under the provisions of the National Housing Act and the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation Act 2,053,213,063 2,025,629,000 2,025,629,000 2,027,901,048
Total voted 2,053,213,063 2,025,629,000 2,025,629,000 2,027,901,048
Total budgetary 2,053,213,063 2,025,629,000 2,025,629,000 2,027,901,048
Non-budgetary
Total Statutory (10,465,313,333) (139,123,000) (139,123,000) (644,314,000)
Total non-budgetary (10,465,313,333) (139,123,000) (139,123,000) (644,314,000)

Highlights

CMHC is estimating budgetary expenditures of $2.0 billion in 2016–17. Included in the budgetary expenditures is $253.1 million related to the third year of the five-year extension of funding under the Investment in Affordable Housing.

A total budgetary increase of $2.3 million from the 2015–16 Main Estimates is due primarily to the following:

  • An increase of $4.0 million for additional housing construction and rehabilitation on-reserve. This funding allows for new commitment activity to assist First Nations in the construction, purchase and rehabilitation of suitable, adequate and affordable rental housing, as well as providing financial assistance to repair substandard homes to a minimum level of health and safety; and
  • A decrease of $1.2 million due to updated pace of spending for renovation programs on-reserve.

CMHC is estimating non-budgetary net repayments of $644 million in 2016–17 compared to $139 million in the 2015–16 Main Estimates. The variance of $505 million from 2015–16 to 2016–17 is due to the following:

  • An increase of $260 million in scheduled repayments under the Crown Borrowing Program; and
  • A decrease of $245 million in loan advances for renewals on existing Direct Lending Activity as well as advances made in support of new capital commitments over the planning period.

Once tabled in the House of Commons, additional information will be available in CMHC's Summary of the Corporate Plan, available on its website.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 20. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Canadians in need have access to affordable housing.
Funding Under Long-Term Commitments for Existing Social Housing 1,646,446,541 1,689,932,000 1,674,922,048
Funding for New Commitments of Affordable Housing 354,019,775 284,352,000 285,866,000
Housing Support 7,647,169 7,962,000 16,025,000
Canada has a stable, competitive and innovative housing system.
Market Analysis Information 23,716,148 24,673,000 27,419,000
Housing Policy, Research and Information Transfer 21,383,430 18,710,000 23,669,000
Total 2,053,213,063 2,025,629,000 2,027,901,048
Table 21. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Non-budgetary - Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Canadians in need have access to affordable housing.
Funding Under Long-Term Commitments for Existing Social Housing (451,220,483) (3,690,000) (508,422,000)
Funding for New Commitments of Affordable Housing 0 500,000 500,000
Housing Support (155,836,876) (135,933,000) (136,392,000)
Canada has a stable, competitive and innovative housing system.
Insured Mortgage Purchase Program (9,858,255,974) 0 0
Total (10,465,313,333) (139,123,000) (644,314,000)

Canada Post Corporation

Raison d'être

Canada Post Corporation has a mandate to provide an efficient, effective and quality-driven postal service to Canadians, to be profitable, and to maintain and increase the value of the Corporation for Canadians.

Under the terms of the Canada Post Corporation Act, the Corporation is mandated to operate the postal service on a financially self-sustaining basis. In addition to core postal service, Canada Post also delivers certain public policy programs for the Government.

The Minister of Public Services and Procurement is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 11. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canada Post Corporation
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 22. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canada Post Corporation
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Canada Post Corporation for special purposes 22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000
Total voted 22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000
Total budgetary 22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000

Highlights

Canada Post Corporation receives an annual appropriation of $22.2 million from the Government for the delivery of Parliamentary mail and materials for the use of the blind, which are sent free of postage under the Act. This appropriation helps to offset the financial impact of these programs on the Corporation.

Parliamentary Mail

The Canada Post Corporation Act allows for the free mailing of letters between Canadians and the Governor General, Members of Parliament, the Speakers of the Senate and House of Commons, the Parliamentary Librarian and the Ethics Commissioner. Under the Act members of the House of Commons are also allowed up to four free householder (Unaddressed Admail) mailings to their constituents in any calendar year.

Materials for the Use of the Blind

The Canada Post Corporation Act provides for free mailing of materials for the blind. Today, thousands of visually impaired Canadians and many libraries across the country, including that of the Canadian National Institute for the Blind, send talking books and other materials free of charge.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 23. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canada Post Corporation
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Compensation for the provision of Parliamentary mail and Materials for the use of the blind services, which are sent free of postage under the Canada Post Corporation Act.
Concessionary Governmental Services 0 22,210,000 22,210,000
Funds not allocated to the 2016–17 Program Alignment Architecture 22,210,000 0 0
Total 22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000

Canada Revenue Agency

Raison d'être

The Minister of National Revenue is responsible for the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). The CRA administers tax, benefits and related programs, and ensures compliance on behalf of governments across Canada. The CRA collects the revenues governments need to deliver essential services to Canadians. The CRA processes hundreds of billions of dollars in taxes and issues billions of dollars in benefit and credit payments annually.

The CRA's mandate is to make sure Canadians:

  • Pay their required share of taxes;
  • Receive their rightful share of benefits; and
  • Get an impartial review of the decisions they contest.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 12. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canada Revenue Agency
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 24. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canada Revenue Agency
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures, contributions and recoverable expenditures on behalf of the Canada Pension Plan and the Employment Insurance Act 3,167,429,873 2,898,927,871 2,971,859,696 3,032,118,914
5 Capital expenditures and recoverable expenditures on behalf of the Canada Pension Plan and the Employment Insurance Act 76,291,182 80,496,902 81,570,214 37,066,000
Total voted 3,243,721,055 2,979,424,773 3,053,429,910 3,069,184,914
Total Statutory 817,112,935 825,419,615 834,309,585 1,016,533,269
Total budgetary 4,060,833,990 3,804,844,388 3,887,739,495 4,085,718,183

Highlights

The Canada Revenue Agency is estimating budgetary expenditures of $4.1 billion in 2016–17. Of this amount, $3.1 billion requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $1.0 billion represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

In total, the Agency is displaying an increase of $280.9 million or 7.4% from previous Main Estimates, which is the net result of various increases offset by certain planned decreases.

The CRA budgets will be increasing by $331.8 million due to the following:

  • $128.0 million presented under the Taxpayer and Business Assistance Program Activity related to the disbursements to provinces under the Softwood Lumber Products Export Charge Act;
  • $55.8 million for the implementation and administration of enhanced compliance measures included in the 2015 Federal Budget;
  • $52.0 million in payments under the Childrenʼs Special Allowance Act for eligible children in the care of agencies and foster parents;
  • $41.4 million related to adjustments to accommodation and real property services provided by Public Works and Government Services Canada;
  • $25.7 million for the implementation and administration of legislative measures announced in the 2015 Federal Budget;
  • $19.6 million for the reimbursement as a result of a reduction in the Canada Revenue Agencyʼs accommodation requirements; and
  • $9.3 million related to contributions to employee benefit plans.

The above mentioned increases are offset by decreases totalling $50.9 million due to the following:

  • $13.8 million in savings identified as part of the Budget 2012 spending review;
  • $10.5 million related to planned decrease in funding for the administration of the Softwood Lumber Agreement;
  • $9.1 million transfer to the Canada School of Public Service;
  • $6.0 million for government advertising programs;
  • $5.9 million in the spending of revenues received through the conduct of its operations primarily attributable to reductions in initiatives administered on behalf of Canada Border Services Agency and the province of Ontario;
  • $5.2 million for various initiatives announced in the 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014 Federal Budgets;
  • $0.3 million transfer to Industry for "Get it in Writing" project for the Canadian Home Buildersʼ Association; and
  • $0.1 million transfer to Statistics Canada for the 2016 Census.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 25. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canada Revenue Agency
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Taxpayers meet their obligations and Canadaʼs revenue base is protected.
Reporting Compliance 1,108,667,741 1,045,193,249 1,067,140,214
Collections, Compliance and Verification 519,837,234 469,453,195 632,051,666
Assessment of Returns and Payment Processing 640,377,518 614,590,330 503,182,149
Taxpayer and Business Assistance 292,809,925 280,181,661 412,286,804
Appeals 204,406,362 179,658,662 185,568,739
Eligible families and individuals receive timely and accurate benefit payments.
Benefit Programs 351,409,527 375,217,640 434,832,503
Taxpayers and benefit recipients receive an independent and impartial review of their service-related complaints.
Taxpayersʼ Ombudsman 2,614,097 3,198,657 3,235,854
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 940,711,586 837,350,994 847,420,254
Total 4,060,833,990 3,804,844,388 4,085,718,183

Canada School of Public Service

Raison d'être

The Canada School of Public Service (the School) is the common learning service provider for the Public Service of Canada. The School has a legislative mandate to provide a range of learning activities to build individual and organizational capacity and management excellence within the public service. The School has one strategic outcome: Federal public service employees have the common knowledge, skills and competencies to fulfill their responsibilities in serving Canadians.

The President of the Treasury Board is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 13. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canada School of Public Service
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 26. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canada School of Public Service
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 37,933,386 53,794,403 53,794,403 69,217,505
Total voted 37,933,386 53,794,403 53,794,403 69,217,505
Total Statutory 50,575,626 17,085,280 17,085,280 14,027,439
Total budgetary 88,509,012 70,879,683 70,879,683 83,244,944

Highlights

The Canada School of Public Service is estimating budgetary expenditures of $83.2 million in 2016–17. Of this amount, $69.2 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining amount of $14.0 million represents statutory authority that does not require additional approval and is provided for information purposes.

In comparison with 2015–16, the 2016–17 Main Estimates have increased by $12.4 million. This increase is the result of the transition to a new funding model, shifting over time to reduce fee-based learning to a primarily appropriated core funding model.

Once tabled in the House of Commons, additional information will be available in the departmental Report on Plans and Priorities available at: http://www.csps-efpc.gc.ca/about_us/currentreport/index-eng.aspx.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 27. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canada School of Public Service
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Federal public service employees have the common knowledge, skills and competencies to fulfill their responsibilities in serving Canadians.
Learning Services 0 51,113,769 62,098,772
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 27,497,043 19,765,914 21,146,172
Funds not allocated to the 2016–17 Program Alignment Architecture 61,011,969 0 0
Total 88,509,012 70,879,683 83,244,944

Canadian Air Transport Security Authority

Raison d'être

The Canadian Air Transport Security Authority (CATSA) is a Crown corporation with the mandate to protect the public by securing critical elements of the air transportation system as assigned by the Government of Canada. CATSA's goal is to provide a professional, effective, efficient and consistent level of security screening services, at or above the standards set by Transport Canada, its regulator. Funded by parliamentary appropriations, CATSA is accountable to Parliament through the Minister of Transport. CATSA's vision is to excel in air transportation security through its service to passengers, its people and its partnerships.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 14. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Air Transport Security Authority
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 28. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Air Transport Security Authority
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Canadian Air Transport Security Authority for operating and capital expenditures 623,896,764 678,420,347 684,934,134 624,005,722
Total voted 623,896,764 678,420,347 684,934,134 624,005,722
Total budgetary 623,896,764 678,420,347 684,934,134 624,005,722

Highlights

CATSA's 2016–17 Main Estimates of $624.0 million, which require approval from Parliament, are $54.4 million or 8% lower than its 2015–16 Main Estimates of $678.4 million. The Main Estimates consist of $471.4 million for operating expenditures and $152.6 million for capital expenditures.

CATSA's 2016–17 Main Estimates for operating expenditures of $471.4 million are $72.2 million or 13% lower than its 2015–16 Main Estimates of $543.6 million. The variance is mainly attributable to a delay in receiving the 2016–17 incremental funding to deliver Enhanced Non-Passenger Screening in support of the strengthened International Civil Aviation Organization standard for Non-Passenger Screening.

CATSA's 2016–17 Main Estimates for capital expenditures of $152.6 million are $17.8 million or approximately 13% higher than its 2015–16 Main Estimates of $134.8 million. The year-over-year variance reflects a realignment of CATSA's capital budget envelope to meet its annual cash flow requirements. This includes an increase in capital spending for Pre-Board Screening in fiscal year 2016–17 as CATSA strives to optimize the checkpoints through the deployment of new screening concepts and advanced technology. The increase in capital spending in Pre-Board Screening is partially offset by a decrease in capital spending to support the Enhanced Non-Passenger Screening program.

As set out in its 2015–16 to 2019–20 Corporate Plan, CATSA's funding priorities for the 2016–17 fiscal year will continue to focus on the delivery of its core mandated activities. This will include the ongoing deployment of CATSA's new Hold Baggage Screening system as part of its capital life-cycle management plan, and the delivery of the Enhanced Non-Passenger Screening program which is contingent upon the approval of the 2016–17 incremental funding by Parliament.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 29. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Air Transport Security Authority
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Screening programs at designated Canadian airports protect the travelling public.
Pre-Board Screening 0 292,610,000 351,245,332
Hold Baggage Screening 0 224,647,347 210,862,820
Non-Passenger Screening 0 110,320,000 18,722,126
Restricted Area Identity Card 0 1,646,000 2,177,019
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 0 49,197,000 40,998,425
Funds not allocated to the 2016–17 Program Alignment Architecture 623,896,764 0 0
Total 623,896,764 678,420,347 624,005,722

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Raison d'être

As defined by the 1991 Broadcasting Act, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (the Corporation), as the national public broadcaster, should provide radio and television services incorporating a wide range of programming that informs, enlightens and entertains. The programming provided by the Corporation should:

  • Be predominantly and distinctively Canadian;
  • Reflect Canada and its regions to national and regional audiences, while serving the special needs of those regions;
  • Actively contribute to the flow and exchange of cultural expression;
  • Be in English and in French, reflecting the different needs and circumstances of each official language community, including the particular needs and circumstances of English and French linguistic minorities;
  • Strive to be of equivalent quality in English and French;
  • Contribute to shared national consciousness and identity;
  • Be made available throughout Canada by the most appropriate and efficient means and as resources become available for the purpose; and
  • Reflect the multicultural and multiracial nature of Canada.

The Corporation reports to Parliament through the Minister of Canadian Heritage.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 15. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 30. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation for operating expenditures 929,283,798 928,331,798 928,331,798 927,306,798
5 Payments to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation for working capital 4,000,000 4,000,000 4,000,000 4,000,000
10 Payments to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation for capital expenditures 104,740,000 105,692,000 105,692,000 106,717,000
Total voted 1,038,023,798 1,038,023,798 1,038,023,798 1,038,023,798
Total budgetary 1,038,023,798 1,038,023,798 1,038,023,798 1,038,023,798

Highlights

2016-17 will be the second year of the Corporation's new 5-year strategy, A Space for us all. The strategy aims to better position the broadcaster to meet the fundamental shifts that are transforming the media universe, and consequently how it connects with Canadians. A Space for us all is a promise by CBC/Radio-Canada to intensify and deepen its one-on-one relationship with individual Canadians; work in partnership with the creative community to communicate the breadth and depth of Canada's reality; and set the Corporation on a clear course to long-term financial sustainability. The vision is that by 2020, CBC/Radio-Canada will be the public space at the heart of our conversations and experiences as Canadians.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 31. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
A national public broadcasting service exists that is primarily Canadian in content and connects citizens to the Canadian experience.
Television, Radio and Digital Services 0 989,603,427 985,915,196
Transmission and Distribution of Programs 0 43,015,695 46,764,284
Specialty Channels for Specific Audiences 0 0 0
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 0 5,404,676 5,344,318
Funds not allocated to the 2016–17 Program Alignment Architecture 1,038,023,798 0 0
Total 1,038,023,798 1,038,023,798 1,038,023,798

Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety

Raison d'être

The Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS) was founded by an Act of Parliament in 1978 with a mandate to promote health and safety in the workplace and to enhance the physical and mental health of working Canadians. CCOHS operates under the legislative authority of the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety Act (S.C., 1977–78, c. 29) which was passed by unanimous vote in the Canadian Parliament. The purpose of this Act is to promote the fundamental right of Canadians to a healthy and safe working environment by creating a national institute (CCOHS) concerned with the study, encouragement and co-operative advancement of occupational health and safety. CCOHS functions as an independent departmental corporation under Schedule II of the Financial Administration Act and is accountable to Parliament through the Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour.

Its funding is derived from a combination of appropriations, cost recoveries and collaboration with the provinces. It is expected that a portion of the budget will be funded through cost recoveries from the creation, production, and worldwide sales of fee-for-service and revenue generating occupational health and safety products and services.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 16. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 32. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 3,633,019 3,969,600 3,969,600 3,969,600
Total voted 3,633,019 3,969,600 3,969,600 3,969,600
Total Statutory 1,052,919 1,100,669 1,100,669 4,982,772
Total budgetary 4,685,938 5,070,269 5,070,269 8,952,372

Highlights

The Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safetyʼs planned cash expenditures remain the same as previous years, however the increase in statutory authority reflects the fact CCOHS will no longer use a vote netting authority to collect and spend revenues and will instead use the existing authority provided in Section 6 (1)(g) of the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety Act.

CCOHS will focus its efforts on providing a wide range of needed, relevant and practical information, resources and training that assist Canadians to improve health and safety. We will work with Canadian and global partners to develop the resources and tools that will improve health and safety and contribute to making Canada's workplaces safe and more productive.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 33. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Improved workplace conditions and practices that enhance the health, safety, and well-being of working Canadians.
Occupational health and safety information development, delivery services and tripartite collaboration 1,846,820 2,259,188 6,141,291
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 2,839,118 2,811,081 2,811,081
Total 4,685,938 5,070,269 8,952,372

Canadian Commercial Corporation

Raison d'être

The Canadian Commercial Corporation (CCC) is governed by its enacting legislation, the 1946 Canadian Commercial Corporation Act. The Act outlines CCC's broad mandate, which is to assist in the development of trade by helping Canadian exporters access markets abroad and by helping foreign buyers obtain goods from Canada. The legislation also provides CCC with a range of powers, including the ability to export goods from Canada either as principal or as agent in such a manner and to such an extent as it deems appropriate. As a result, CCC negotiates and executes bilateral government-to-government procurement arrangements, facilitating export transactions on behalf of Canadian exporters.

CCC reports to Parliament through the Minister of International Trade.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 17. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Commercial Corporation
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 34. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Commercial Corporation
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Canadian Commercial Corporation 14,240,000 8,880,000 8,880,000 3,510,000
Total voted 14,240,000 8,880,000 8,880,000 3,510,000
Total budgetary 14,240,000 8,880,000 8,880,000 3,510,000

Highlights

The Canadian Commercial Corporation estimates budgetary expenditures of $3.51 million in 2016–17 which requires approval by Parliament. The funding will be used to facilitate sales of goods and services from Canadian exporters to the U.S. Department of Defence in support of the North American Defence Industrial Base and to facilitate the Corporation's corporate services in support of the governmentʼs overarching public policy priorities, broad strategic goals and expectations.

On all other export transactions CCC charges fees for service. These fees support CCC's other expenditures.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 35. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Commercial Corporation
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Enhanced market access for Canadian exporters to complex international public sector markets.
Defence 0 8,880,000 3,510,000
Emerging and Developing Markets 0 0 0
Funds not allocated to the 2016–17 Program Alignment Architecture 14,240,000 0 0
Total 14,240,000 8,880,000 3,510,000

Canadian Dairy Commission

Raison d'être

The Canadian Dairy Commission (CDC) is a federal Crown corporation created in 1966 through the Canadian Dairy Commission Act. It reports to Parliament through the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food. Its legislated objectives are twofold: to provide efficient producers of milk and cream with the opportunity of obtaining a fair return for their labour and investment; and to provide consumers of dairy products with a continuous and adequate supply of dairy products of high quality.

The CDC plays a central facilitating role for the multi-billion dollar Canadian dairy industry. Federal-provincial agreements now provide the authority for many of the programs and activities that the CDC employees administer and facilitate on a day-to-day basis. The CDC strives to balance and serve the interests of all dairy stakeholders — producers, processors, further processors, exporters, consumers and governments.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 18. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Dairy Commission
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Figure 19. Organizational Estimates - Non-budgetary - Canadian Dairy Commission
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory non budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 36. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Dairy Commission
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 3,884,137 3,605,377 3,605,377 3,599,617
Total voted 3,884,137 3,605,377 3,605,377 3,599,617
Total budgetary 3,884,137 3,605,377 3,605,377 3,599,617
Non-budgetary
Total Statutory (34,865,529) 0 0 0
Total non-budgetary (34,865,529) 0 0 0

Highlights

The Canadian milk supply management system rests on three pillars: production management, price setting and import controls. The CDC is directly involved in the administration of two of the three pillars (production management and price setting) via the establishment of industrial milk quota and support price.

The CDC administers the three revenue pooling and market sharing pools that exist among milk producers. Monthly, the CDC receives data from provincial milk marketing boards and calculates the payment transfers between provinces to equalize returns and adjusts quota allocations to provinces to account for the sharing of markets.

To ensure a steady supply of dairy products on the Canadian market, the CDC operates the Domestic Seasonality Programs. To ensure that milk components for which there is no outlet on the domestic market are removed in a timely fashion, the CDC operates the Surplus Removal Program. The CDC operates two programs related to innovation: the Dairy Marketing Program and the Dairy Innovation Program.

In addition, the CDC, on the industry's behalf, administers the Special Milk Class Permit Program (SMCPP) and the Planned Export Program for Cheese (PEPC). The parameters of these programs are decided by the industry.

The CDC imports the tariff rate quota of butter and sells this butter to participants in the SMCPP through butter manufacturers. Profits that the CDC generates by this activity are used to finance initiatives that provide benefits to the industry. Examples of these initiatives are a laboratory accreditation program and the Dairy Research Cluster.

The CDC also controls the subsidized exports of Canadian dairy products through the issuance of export permits. This permit system has been put in place to ensure that Canadian exports of dairy products do not exceed the limits imposed on Canada by the World Trade Organization (WTO) for subsidized exports.

To stimulate investments and growth in the use of Canadian milk and dairy ingredients, the CDC created a program called Milk Access for Growth.

No significant changes are expected in the programs that the CDC administers in fiscal year 2016–17. Further details can be found in the Canadian Dairy Commission's Corporate Plan.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 37. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Dairy Commission
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
To enhance the vitality of the Canadian dairy industry for the benefit of all stakeholders.
Administer milk supply management system 3,884,137 3,605,377 3,599,617
Total 3,884,137 3,605,377 3,599,617
Table 38. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Non-budgetary - Canadian Dairy Commission
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
To enhance the vitality of the Canadian dairy industry for the benefit of all stakeholders.
Administer milk supply management system (34,865,529) 0 0
Total (34,865,529) 0 0

Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency

Raison d'être

The Minister of Environment and Climate Change is responsible for this organization.

Environmental assessment contributes to informed decision making in support of sustainable development.

The Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency delivers high-quality environmental assessments in support of government decisions about major projects.

Additional information can be found in the Agency's Report on Plans and Priorities.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 20. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 39. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 26,847,609 15,591,619 21,825,669 27,512,578
Total voted 26,847,609 15,591,619 21,825,669 27,512,578
Total Statutory 2,909,480 1,760,251 2,103,251 3,398,457
Total budgetary 29,757,089 17,351,870 23,928,920 30,911,035

Highlights

In support of its strategic outcome: high-quality and timely environmental assessments of major projects to protect the environment and support economic growth, the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency works towards achieving the following organizational priorities:

  • Delivering high-quality environmental assessments of major projects.
  • Building effective relationships with Indigenous Peoples, and
  • Playing a lead role in shaping the future of federal environmental assessments

The Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency's 2016–17 Main Estimates of $30.9 million are $13.5 million more than the 2015–16 Main Estimates. The difference is mainly attributable to the renewal of sunsetting funds in Budget 2015 to improve Canadaʼs regulatory framework for major resource projects and Indigenous consultation.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 40. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
High quality and timely environmental assessments of major projects to protect the environment and support economic growth.
Environmental Assessment Delivery Program 13,552,979 9,476,761 21,729,743
Environmental Assessment Policy Program 4,141,055 3,117,153 3,932,432
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 12,063,055 4,757,956 5,248,860
Total 29,757,089 17,351,870 30,911,035

Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments

Table 41. Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments - Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Contributions
Contributions for the support of public participation in the environmental assessment review process – Participant Funding Program 2,069,320 1,469,000 4,469,000
Contribution to the Province of Quebec – James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement 245,500 246,000 246,000

Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Raison d'être

The Minister of Health is responsible for this organization.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is Canadaʼs largest science-based regulatory agency, with employees working across Canada, in the National Capital Region (NCR) and in four operational areas (Atlantic, Quebec, Ontario and Western).

The CFIA is dedicated to safeguarding food, animal and plant health, which enhances the health and well-being of Canadaʼs people, environment, and economy.

The CFIA develops and delivers inspection and other services to:

  • prevent and manage food safety risks;
  • protect plant resources from pests, diseases and invasive species;
  • prevent and manage animal and zoonotic diseases;
  • contribute to consumer protection; and,
  • contribute to market access for Canadaʼs food, plants, and animals.

The CFIA bases its activities on science, effective management of risk, commitment to service and efficiency, and collaboration with domestic and international organizations that share its objectives.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 21. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Food Inspection Agency
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 42. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Food Inspection Agency
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures and contributions 646,617,028 537,749,431 545,413,013 512,042,839
5 Capital expenditures 20,608,538 25,783,194 57,162,334 93,074,099
Total voted 667,225,566 563,532,625 602,575,347 605,116,938
Total Statutory 181,267,323 134,619,263 135,486,196 134,622,227
Total budgetary 848,492,889 698,151,888 738,061,543 739,739,165

Highlights

Mitigating risks to food safety is the CFIA's highest priority. Safeguarding the health and well-being of Canada's people, environment, and economy is the driving force behind the design and development of the CFIA's programs. The CFIA, in collaboration and partnership with industry, consumers, universities, and federal, provincial and municipal organizations, continues to work towards protecting Canadians from preventable health risks related to food and zoonotic diseases.

The CFIA works with its partners to implement food safety measures; manage food, animal, and plant risks, incidents and emergencies; and promotes the development of food safety and disease control systems to maintain the safety of Canada's high-quality agriculture, agri-food, aquaculture and fishery products. The CFIA's activities include verifying the compliance of imported products; registering and inspecting establishments; testing food, animals, plants, and their related products; and approving the use of many agricultural inputs.

The 2016–17 Main Estimates for the CFIA total $739.7 million, an increase of $41.5 million from the 2015–16 Main Estimates of

$698.2 million. The major items contributing to this increase are:

  • An increase of $54.9 million related to resources received for the Federal Infrastructure Initiative;
  • an increase of $21.3 million in funding to implement the Electronic Service Delivery Platform Initiative; and,
  • an increase of $14.0 million in resources to strengthen Canada's food safety oversight system.

These increases are mainly offset by:

  • A decrease of $44.4 million related to the sunsetting of various initiatives in the Food Safety Program. The Agency will assess the level of resources required for these sunsetting initiatives and seek renewal as required to maintain and continuously improve Canada's strong food safety system and safe and accessible food supply.

Additional information is available in the departmental Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 43. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Food Inspection Agency
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.
Food Safety Program 421,520,442 362,958,350 364,582,938
Animal Health and Zoonotics Program 162,039,970 113,659,211 137,163,044
Plant Resources Program 90,262,195 76,204,256 93,368,850
International Collaboration and Technical Agreements 40,718,768 30,000,919 31,045,476
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 133,951,514 115,329,152 113,578,857
Total 848,492,889 698,151,888 739,739,165

Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments

Table 44. Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments - Canadian Food Inspection Agency
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Contributions
Contributions in support of the Federal Assistance Program 879,210 819,000 819,000
Total Statutory 12,555,078 3,500,000 3,500,000

Canadian Grain Commission

Raison d'être

The Canadian Grain Commission (CGC) is a federal government department that administers the provisions of the Canada Grain Act (CGA). The CGCʼs mandate as set out in the CGA is to, in the interests of the grain producers, establish and maintain standards of quality for Canadian grain and regulate grain handling in Canada, to ensure a dependable commodity for domestic and export markets. CGCʼs vision is "To be a world class science-based quality assurance provider". The Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food is responsible for the CGC.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 22. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Grain Commission
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 45. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Grain Commission
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 6,676,731 4,883,698 4,883,698 4,776,362
Total voted 6,676,731 4,883,698 4,883,698 4,776,362
Total Statutory (23,589,077) 591,479 591,479 605,562
Total budgetary (16,912,346) 5,475,177 5,475,177 5,381,924

Highlights

The CGC is estimating budgetary expenditures of $5.4 million in 2016-17. Of this amount, $4.8 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $0.6 million is to support employee benefit plan obligations.

The authority requested for 2016-17 Main Estimates is consistent with authority provided in 2015-16 Main Estimates.

The current CGC funding structure is based on budgetary authorities that are comprised of both statutory and voted authorities. The statutory authorities include employee benefit plan authority for appropriation funded positions and the CGC revolving fund authority which allows the CGC to re-spend fees that it has collected. The voted authority is Vote 1 – Program Expenditures which includes annual appropriation authority and any ad hoc appropriation authority for the fiscal year.

Revenues credited to the revolving fund are expected to be $56.0 million in 2016-17.

Additional information can be found in the CGC's Reports on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 46. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Grain Commission
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Canada's grain is safe, reliable and marketable and Canadian grain producers are properly compensated for grain deliveries to licensed grain companies.
Grain Quality Research Program 8,277,393 5,230,177 5,136,924
Quality Assurance Program (38,302,367) 0 0
Quantity Assurance Program (3,957,868) 0 0
Producer Protection Program 2,211,578 0 0
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 14,858,918 245,000 245,000
Total (16,912,346) 5,475,177 5,381,924

Canadian Heritage

Raison d'être

The Minister of Canadian Heritage is responsible for this organization.

The Department of Canadian Heritage and Canadaʼs major national cultural institutions play a vital role in the cultural, civic and economic life of Canadians. We work together to support culture, arts, heritage, official languages, citizenship and participation, in addition to Aboriginal, youth, and sport initiatives.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 23. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Heritage
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 47. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Heritage
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 188,373,549 173,741,400 175,122,693 183,944,057
5 Grants and contributions 1,267,460,219 1,056,279,039 1,063,290,972 1,084,961,970
Total voted 1,455,833,768 1,230,020,439 1,238,413,665 1,268,906,027
Total Statutory 26,021,539 24,676,122 25,065,917 25,599,451
Total budgetary 1,481,855,307 1,254,696,561 1,263,479,582 1,294,505,478

Highlights

The Department of Canadian Heritage is estimating budgetary expenditures of $1.29 billion in 2016–17. Of this amount, $1.27 billion requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $25.6 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes. This is an increase of $39.8 million when compared to the 2015–16 Main Estimates.

The overall increase is explained by an increase of $10.2 million in Vote 1 (Operating expenditures), $28.7 million in Vote 5 (Grants and contributions) and $0.9 million in statutory forecasts.

The increase of $10.2 million in Vote 1 is mainly due to:

  • An increase of $20.4 million for the Celebration of Canada's 150th anniversary of Confederation;
  • A decrease of $7.2 million for the government advertising programs – Canada 150 Campaign;
  • A decrease of $1.9 million for the Aboriginal Peoples' Program; and
  • A decrease of $0.7 million for Capital Experience Program related to a reprofile of funds for the Sound and light show.

The increase of $28.7 million in Vote 5 is mainly due to:

  • An increase of $83.8 million for the Celebration of Canada's 150th anniversary of Confederation;
  • A decrease of $37.5 million for the Toronto 2015 Pan American and Parapan American Games;
  • A decrease of $10.0 million for the Celebration of Canada's 150th anniversary of Confederation – Road to 2017;
  • A decrease of $4.9 million for the Aboriginal Peoples' Program – Aboriginal Languages Initiative; and
  • A decrease of $2.0 million for the Cultural Strategy for the Toronto 2015 Pan and Parapan American Games due to a reprofile of funds.

For further details regarding Canadian Heritage, its operations and its use of funds, please refer to the 2016–17 Reports on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 48. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Heritage
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Canadians share, express and appreciate their Canadian identity.
Official Languages 356,997,714 353,365,541 353,724,557
Attachment to Canada 86,818,481 86,572,642 150,174,516
Engagement and Community Participation 42,198,321 48,361,058 60,446,783
Canadian artistic expressions and cultural content are created and accessible at home and abroad.
Cultural Industries 295,742,756 302,493,050 302,463,015
Arts 113,900,585 116,713,634 116,651,447
Heritage 31,563,243 29,785,074 32,530,362
Canadians participate and excel in sport.
Sport 470,497,662 243,877,515 206,246,850
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 84,136,545 73,528,047 72,267,948
Total 1,481,855,307 1,254,696,561 1,294,505,478

Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments

Table 49. Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments - Canadian Heritage
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Grants
Grants to the Canada Periodical Fund 67,338,313 72,775,054 72,775,054
Grants in support of the Celebration and Commemoration Program 5,662,564 8,300,000 47,520,000
Grants in support of the Development of Official-Language Communities Program 6,691,936 33,322,973 33,322,973
Grants to the Athlete Assistance Program 27,100,981 28,000,000 28,000,000
Grants to the Canada Cultural Investment Fund 19,038,432 20,000,000 20,000,000
Grants in support of the Building Communities through Arts and Heritage Program 7,662,695 14,355,000 14,355,000
Grants to the Canada Arts Presentation Fund 8,919,926 13,500,000 13,500,000
Grants to the Canada Book Fund 1,824,174 8,300,000 8,300,000
Grant to TV5 Monde 6,599,119 8,000,000 8,000,000
Grants in support of the Enhancement of Official Languages Program 519,359 5,599,842 5,599,842
Grants to the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund 1,050,990 5,000,000 5,000,000
Grants under the Museums Assistance Program 2,944,575 4,663,680 4,663,680
Grants to the Canada Music Fund 0 2,000,000 2,000,000
Grants in support of the Canada History Fund 140,000 1,150,060 1,150,060
Grants to the Lieutenant-Governors of the provinces of Canada toward defraying the costs incurred in the exercise of their duties:
Quebec 147,372 147,372 147,372
Ontario 105,627 105,627 105,627
British Columbia 97,814 97,814 97,814
Newfoundland and Labrador 77,590 77,590 77,590
Alberta 75,940 75,940 75,940
Manitoba 73,762 73,762 73,762
Saskatchewan 73,758 73,758 73,758
Nova Scotia 64,199 64,199 64,199
New Brunswick 62,947 62,947 62,947
Prince Edward Island 57,071 57,071 57,071
Grants in support of Innovative Youth Exchange Projects 20,000 100,000 100,000
Grants to support the Youth Take Charge Program 0 0 100,000
Total Statutory 1,052,875 819,000 819,000
Contributions
Contributions in support of the Development of Official-Language Communities Program 217,332,230 192,599,017 192,349,017
Contributions for the Sport Support Program 147,701,601 143,315,064 146,315,064
Contributions to support the Canada Media Fund 134,146,077 134,146,077 134,146,077
Contributions in support of the Enhancement of Official Languages Program 116,353,219 105,923,289 105,923,289
Contributions in support of the Celebration and Commemoration Program 17,000,545 20,194,367 52,703,767
Contributions to the Canada Book Fund 34,208,972 28,366,301 28,366,301
Contributions to the Canada Arts Training Fund 22,750,000 22,779,440 22,779,440
Contributions to the Canada Music Fund 23,557,050 22,299,231 22,299,231
Contributions to the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund 23,867,477 20,358,613 20,358,613
Contributions for the Hosting Program 281,941,178 59,625,790 19,865,000
Contributions to the Canada Arts Presentation Fund 19,489,289 18,477,742 18,477,742
Contributions in support of the Exchanges Canada Initiative 17,689,072 17,686,359 17,686,359
Contributions to support the Aboriginal Peoplesʼ Program 15,982,334 16,209,757 11,514,078
Contributions under the Museums Assistance Program 12,494,378 11,076,284 11,076,284
Contributions in support of the Building Communities through Arts and Heritage Program 7,281,841 3,300,000 3,300,000
Contributions to TV5 3,243,670 2,960,900 2,960,900
Contributions in support of the Canada History Fund 4,493,535 2,887,330 2,887,330
Contributions to the Canada Periodical Fund 2,998,607 1,999,544 1,999,544
Contributions to the Canada Cultural Investment Fund 2,930,978 1,972,205 1,972,205
Contributions in support of the Court Challenges Program 180,120 1,406,017 1,406,017
Contributions to support the Youth Take Charge Program 1,860,000 1,453,023 1,353,023

Canadian High Arctic Research Station

Raison d'être

Canadian High Arctic Research Station has been created to:

  • advance knowledge of the Canadian Arctic in order to improve economic opportunities; environmental stewardship and the quality of life of its residents and all other Canadians
  • promote the development and dissemination of knowledge of the other circumpolar regions, including the Antarctic
  • strengthen Canada's leadership on Arctic issues, and
  • establish a hub for scientific research in the Canadian Arctic.

The Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 24. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian High Arctic Research Station
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 50. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian High Arctic Research Station
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 0 0 263,078 18,853,197
Total voted 0 0 263,078 18,853,197
Total Statutory 0 0 0 622,077
Total budgetary 0 0 263,078 19,475,274

Highlights

The Canadian High Arctic Research Station Act of 2015 established the Canadian High Arctic Research Station (CHARS) and fiscal year 2016–17 will be its first full year of operations.

CHARS is estimating expenditures of $19,475,274 in 2016–17, of this amount, $18,853,197 requires Parliamentary approval. The remaining $622,077 represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information.

The planned expenditures will help to establish CHARS as a leader in polar science, environmental monitoring and technology development and transfer. The goal of CHARS is to be recognized as a leading source of polar knowledge mobilization, engagement, northern capacity building and mentoring.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 51. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian High Arctic Research Station
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Canada has world-class Arctic science and technology to support the development and stewardship of Canada's North and is recognized as a leader on circumpolar research issues.
Science and Technology for the North 0 0 13,679,282
Polar Knowledge Application 0 0 2,993,760
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 0 0 2,802,232
Total 0 0 19,475,274

Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments

Table 52. Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments - Canadian High Arctic Research Station
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Grants
Grants to individuals, organizations, associations and institutions to support research and activities relating to the polar regions 0 0 1,086,000
Grants to support the advancement of Northern Science and Technology 0 0 470,000
Contributions
Contributions to support the advancement of Northern Science and Technology 0 0 8,175,000

Canadian Human Rights Commission

Raison d'être

The Canadian Human Rights Commission (the Commission) was established in 1977 under Schedule I.1 of the Financial Administration Act in accordance with the Canadian Human Rights Act (CHRA). The Commission leads the administration of the CHRA and ensures compliance with the Employment Equity Act (EEA). The CHRA prohibits discrimination and the EEA promotes equality in the workplace. Both laws apply the principles of equal opportunity and non-discrimination to federal government departments and agencies, Crown corporations, and federally regulated private sector organizations.

The Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 25. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Human Rights Commission
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 53. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Human Rights Commission
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 20,541,116 19,650,241 19,650,241 19,307,335
Total voted 20,541,116 19,650,241 19,650,241 19,307,335
Total Statutory 2,678,046 2,512,177 2,512,177 2,841,837
Total budgetary 23,219,162 22,162,418 22,162,418 22,149,172

Highlights

The Canadian Human Rights Commission is estimating budgetary expenditures of $22.1 million in 2016–17. Of this amount, $19.3 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $2.8 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

The Commissionʼs planned spending will remain stable in 2015–16 and 2016–17.

Over the next year, the Commission will focus on :

  • Raising awareness and mobilizing stakeholders around human rights issues to positively influence opinions and actions;
  • Exploring ways to create a more user-friendly complaint process that people can easily access and fully participate in; and
  • Shifting the way services are designed, managed and delivered by putting people at the centre of the Commission's processes.

Further details can be found in the Commission's Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 54. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Human Rights Commission
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Equality of opportunity and respect for human rights.
Human Rights Program 0 14,645,923 15,371,307
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 6,989,399 7,516,495 6,777,865
Funds not allocated to the 2016–17 Program Alignment Architecture 16,229,763 0 0
Total 23,219,162 22,162,418 22,149,172

Canadian Human Rights Tribunal

Raison d'être

Pursuant to the Administrative Tribunals Support Service of Canada Act, the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal was amalgamated to the Administrative Tribunals Support Service of Canada, effective November 1, 2014.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 26. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Human Rights Tribunal
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 55. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Human Rights Tribunal
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
- Program expenditures 2,242,752 0 0 0
Total voted 2,242,752 0 0 0
Total Statutory 225,921 0 0 0
Total budgetary 2,468,673 0 0 0

Highlights

Not applicable

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 56. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Human Rights Tribunal
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Individuals have access, as determined by the Canadian Human Rights Act and the Employment Equity Act, to fair and equitable adjudication of human rights and employment equity cases that are brought before the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal.
Hearings of complaints before the Tribunal 1,362,055 0 0
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 1,106,618 0 0
Total 2,468,673 0 0

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Raison d'être

Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) is the Government of Canada's health research funding agency. The Minister of Health is responsible for this organization. It was created in June 2000 by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research Act with a mandate "to excel, according to internationally accepted standards of scientific excellence, in the creation of new knowledge and its translation into improved health for Canadians, more effective health services and products and a strengthened Canadian health care system."

CIHRʼs mandate seeks to transform health research in Canada in an ethically sound manner by:

  • Funding both investigator-initiated and priority-driven research;
  • Building research capacity in under-developed areas and training the next generation of health researchers; and
  • Focusing on knowledge translation that facilitates the application of the results of research and their transformation into new policies, practices, procedures, products and services.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 27. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Institutes of Health Research
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 57. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Institutes of Health Research
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 51,591,197 47,463,563 47,463,563 47,308,587
5 Grants 959,845,009 955,287,128 971,820,743 972,339,220
Total voted 1,011,436,206 1,002,750,691 1,019,284,306 1,019,647,807
Total Statutory 5,843,176 5,833,308 5,833,308 5,972,196
Total budgetary 1,017,279,382 1,008,583,999 1,025,117,614 1,025,620,003

Highlights

CIHR is estimating planned expenditures of $1,025.6 million in 2016–17. Of this amount, $1,019.6 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $6.0 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

The planned expenditures of $1,025.6 million in 2016–17 represent an increase of $17 million, or 1.7%, from the 2015–16 Main Estimates of $1,008.6 million.

The $17 million increase is mainly due to CIHR receiving $16.4 million in 2016–17 as a result of the inaugural competition for the Canada First Research Excellence Fund (CFREF) tri-agency program. In collaboration with the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC), CIHR will be providing funding to Canada's post-secondary institutions to position them to compete with the best in the world for talent, partnership opportunities and breakthrough discoveries, thus creating long-term economic advantages for Canada. Over 7 fiscal years, CIHR will be partially funding 2 of the 5 recipients for a total of $114.9 million of the $349.3 million awarded.

In 2016–17, CIHR will also be funding $3.1 million as a result of the 2016 competition for the Centres of Excellence for Commercialization and Research (CECR) tri-agency program. In collaboration with NSERC and SSHRC, CIHR will be providing funding to support the operation of research and commercialization centres that bring together people, services, and research infrastructure to position Canada at the forefront of breakthrough innovations in Science & Technology (S&T) priority areas. Over 6 fiscal years, CIHR will be partially funding the 2 new centres for a total of $14.1 million of the $48.6 million awarded. While this would represent an increase in CIHR's planned expenditures, it is offset by funding received for a previous CECR competition, which will sunset in 2015–16.

The remaining variance of $0.6 million is due to funds received from other departments for partnership activities in 2016–17 and future fiscal years, as well as various other program funding adjustments.

Further details on CIHR's 2016–17 planned expenditures are available in CIHR's 2016–17 Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 58. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Institutes of Health Research
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Canada is a world leader in the creation, dissemination and application of health research knowledge.
Investigator-Initiated Health Research 726,255,103 702,437,354 692,439,221
Priority-Driven Health Research 287,739,903 294,098,401 304,974,917
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 3,284,376 12,048,244 28,205,865
Total 1,017,279,382 1,008,583,999 1,025,620,003

Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments

Table 59. Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments - Canadian Institutes of Health Research
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Grants
Grants for research projects and personnel support 870,277,008 866,509,031 866,871,648
Networks of Centres of Excellence 22,589,000 22,589,400 22,589,400
Canada Graduate Scholarships 21,222,555 21,250,000 21,250,000
Canada First Research Excellence Fund 0 0 16,440,279
Institute support grants 13,000,000 13,000,000 13,000,000
Centres of Excellence for Commercialization and Research 12,073,000 10,829,947 10,771,143
Canada Excellence Research Chairs 8,950,000 9,800,000 9,800,000
Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarships 8,312,500 8,350,000 8,350,000
Business–Led Networks of Centres of Excellence 3,106,027 2,798,750 3,106,750
Industrial Research Chairs for Colleges 160,000 160,000 160,000

Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat

Raison d'être

The President of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada is responsible for this organization. The Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat (CICS), established pursuant to an agreement reached at the May 1973 First Ministers' Conference, is an agency of the federal, provincial and territorial governments. Its mandate is to provide administrative support and planning services for intergovernmental conferences of First Ministers, Ministers and Deputy Ministers.

These intergovernmental conferences are a key instrument for consultation and negotiation among the different orders of governments and assist in the development of national and/or provincial/territorial policies. They are a critical component of the workings of the Canadian federation and represent a core principle of our democratic society.

By skilfully executing the logistical planning and delivery of these meetings, CICS not only relieves governments of the administrative process burden but also allows them to greatly benefit from significant cost efficiencies and economies of scale.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 28. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 60. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 4,851,471 5,549,653 5,549,653 5,547,133
Total voted 4,851,471 5,549,653 5,549,653 5,547,133
Total Statutory 318,016 417,888 417,888 427,837
Total budgetary 5,169,487 5,967,541 5,967,541 5,974,970

Highlights

The Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat's 2016–17 expenditures remain approximately the same as the previous year. The 2016–17 funding will be utilized to address the following priorities:

  • Enhance and expand strategic partnerships;
  • Ensure a relevant, responsive service delivery model;
  • Effective and efficient use of resources; and
  • Cultivate a continuous learning environment.

Our 2016–17 Report on Plans and Priorities will contain more details regarding our priorities

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 61. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Senior-level intergovernmental conference services are professionally and successfully delivered.
Conference Services 3,508,894 4,141,822 4,163,437
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 1,660,593 1,825,719 1,811,533
Total 5,169,487 5,967,541 5,974,970

Canadian International Trade Tribunal

Raison d'être

Pursuant to the Administrative Tribunals Support of Canada Act, the Canadian International Trade Tribunal was amalgamated to the Administrative Tribunals Support Service of Canada, effective November 1, 2014.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 29. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian International Trade Tribunal
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 62. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian International Trade Tribunal
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
- Program expenditures 5,041,241 0 0 0
Total voted 5,041,241 0 0 0
Total Statutory 683,255 0 0 0
Total budgetary 5,724,496 0 0 0

Highlights

Not applicable

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 63. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian International Trade Tribunal
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Fair, timely and transparent disposition of international trade cases, procurement cases and government-mandated inquiries within the Tribunalʼs jurisdiction.
Adjudication of Trade Cases (quasi-judicial role) 4,236,127 0 0
General Economic Inquiries and References (advisory role) 57,245 0 0
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 1,431,124 0 0
Total 5,724,496 0 0

Canadian Museum for Human Rights

Raison d'être

The Canadian Museum for Human Rights (CMHR) was created in 2008 through an amendment to the Museums Act, which established the Museum as the first national museum to be created since 1967 and the first to be located outside of the National Capital Region. The Museum's mandate is "to explore the subject of human rights, with special but not exclusive reference to Canada, in order to enhance the public's understanding of human rights, to promote respect for others and to encourage reflection and dialogue."

The Minister of Canadian Heritage is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 30. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Museum for Human Rights
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 64. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Museum for Human Rights
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Canadian Museum for Human Rights for operating and capital expenditures 21,700,000 21,700,000 21,700,000 21,700,000
Total voted 21,700,000 21,700,000 21,700,000 21,700,000
Total budgetary 21,700,000 21,700,000 21,700,000 21,700,000

Highlights

The Museum's reference levels in Vote 1 for operating and capital expenditures in 2016–17 are $21.7 million, the same amount that was received in 2015–16.

The Board of Trustees confirmed the five core goals established in early 2015 to guide Museum operations and activities through the CMHR's first five years of full-time operations. These goals serve as a roadmap in five strategic areas – visitor experience, infrastructure, stakeholder relations, financial sustainability and its people.

The Board and Executive of the CMHR are committed to building on the Museum's considerable successes. A defining hallmark of the Canadian Museum for Human Rights is its ability to inspire generations and change lives. The Museum plans to expand its reach across Canada and the world, and to continually refresh and evolve exhibits, content and programming to ensure offerings remain impactful and relevant.

The Museum will continue to maximize its earned revenue from admissions, membership, programs, retail, facility rentals and commissions from the bistro and catering.

Depending on the long-term funding, the Museum will expand its remote and web based offerings; ensure the exhibits remain current and relevant to visitors; launch a travelling exhibits program; bring temporary exhibits from other institutions to CMHR, tailoring them to align with the CMHR mandate; continue to be innovative; expand linkages nationally and internationally to continue to contribute to increased economic benefits for Winnipeg, Manitoba and Canada; develop new and nationally relevant learning resources; and launch the National Student Program.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 65. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Museum for Human Rights
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Enhanced knowledge of human rights, with special but not exclusive reference to Canada, in order to enhance the publicʼs understanding of human rights, to promote respect for others and to encourage reflection and dialogue.
Museum Content and Program 0 11,510,000 10,200,000
Stewardship and Corporate Management 0 4,650,000 6,250,000
Accommodation 0 5,540,000 5,250,000
Funds not allocated to the 2016–17 Program Alignment Architecture 21,700,000 0 0
Total 21,700,000 21,700,000 21,700,000

Canadian Museum of History

Raison d'être

The Canadian Museum of History is a Crown corporation established by the Museums Act (Statutes of Canada 2013, Chapter 38) which came into force on December 12, 2013. The Act states that the role of the corporation is "to enhance Canadians' knowledge, understanding and appreciation of events, experiences, people and objects that reflect and have shaped Canada's history and identity, and also to enhance their awareness of world history and cultures."

The Minister of Canadian Heritage is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 31. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Museum of History
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 66. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Museum of History
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Canadian Museum of History for operating and capital expenditures 68,923,716 83,369,477 83,369,477 66,199,477
Total voted 68,923,716 83,369,477 83,369,477 66,199,477
Total budgetary 68,923,716 83,369,477 83,369,477 66,199,477

Highlights

The Canadian Museum of History is creating an entirely new exhibition on Canadian history. This new exhibition, which represents the largest and most ambitious exhibition project that our Museum has ever undertaken, is called the Canadian History Hall and is due to open on July 1, 2017, the 150th anniversary of Confederation.

The hall's purpose is to tell the story of Canada and its people from the dawn of human habitation to the present day. The new gallery will help the Museum fulfill its mandate.

The appropriation request for 2016–17 is $66.2 million, a decrease of $17.2 million from the previous year's approval. The decrease is due to:

  • A decrease of $17.0 million for the renovation of the Canadian History Hall; and
  • A decrease of $170 thousand in funding for the British Columbia treaty negotiations process.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 67. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Museum of History
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Interest in, knowledge of and appreciation and respect for human cultural achievements and human behaviour through collections of historical and cultural objects, exhibitions, programs and research reflecting a Canadian perspective.
Accommodation 0 33,622,000 27,470,000
Exhibit, Educate and Communicate 0 35,229,000 24,764,000
Collect and Research 0 13,140,000 12,650,000
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 0 1,378,477 1,315,477
Funds not allocated to the 2016–17 Program Alignment Architecture 68,923,716 0 0
Total 68,923,716 83,369,477 66,199,477

Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21

Raison d'être

The Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21 was established in 2010 through an amendment to the Museums Act.

The mandate of the Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21 is "to explore the theme of immigration to Canada in order to enhance public understanding of the experiences of immigrants as they arrived in Canada, of the vital role immigration has played in the building of Canada and of the contributions of immigrants to Canada's culture, economy and way of life."

The Minister of Canadian Heritage is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 32. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 68. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21 for operating and capital expenditures 9,900,000 7,700,000 7,700,000 7,700,000
Total voted 9,900,000 7,700,000 7,700,000 7,700,000
Total budgetary 9,900,000 7,700,000 7,700,000 7,700,000

Highlights

The Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21 is estimating budgetary expenditures of $7.7 million in 2016–17 which require approval by Parliament.

The expanded Museum reopened in May 2015 and is attracting new and repeat visitors. This, along with an enhanced online presence and the launch of the Museum's first travelling exhibit, are extending the Museum's reach and supporting the Museum's national mandate.

For further details on the Museum's plan and priorities, please refer to our Corporate Plan.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 69. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Canadians are engaged in building and exploring the stories, themes and history of Canadian immigration as it continues to unfold.
Accommodations 0 2,622,700 2,700,000
Visitor Experience and Connections 0 2,583,350 2,509,700
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 0 2,493,950 2,490,300
Funds not allocated to the 2016–17 Program Alignment Architecture 9,900,000 0 0
Total 9,900,000 7,700,000 7,700,000

Canadian Museum of Nature

Raison d'être

The Minister of Canadian Heritage is responsible for this organization.

The Canadian Museum of Nature (the Museum) became a Crown corporation on July 1, 1990 through the Museums Act with the mandate to increase, throughout Canada and internationally, interest in, knowledge of and appreciation and respect for the natural world by establishing, maintaining and developing for research and posterity, a collection of natural history objects, with special but not exclusive reference to Canada, and by demonstrating the natural world, the knowledge derived from it and the understanding it represents.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 33. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Museum of Nature
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 70. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Museum of Nature
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Canadian Museum of Nature for operating and capital expenditures 26,276,818 26,129,112 26,129,112 26,129,112
Total voted 26,276,818 26,129,112 26,129,112 26,129,112
Total budgetary 26,276,818 26,129,112 26,129,112 26,129,112

Highlights

In 2016–17, the Museum will advance year three of a new strategic plan that leverages its research and collections strengths in Arctic Knowledge and Species Discovery. New approaches to the design and delivery of visitor experiences will enable the Museum to attract and inspire new audiences. These new engaging experiences will lead to higher memberships, higher membership renewal and will provide a foundation for enhanced fundraising. Overall higher levels of engagement will lead to a better understanding of and connection with Canada's natural world.

Strategic Objective #1:

Create a Centre for Arctic Knowledge and Exploration that transforms people's understanding of Canada's Arctic and its relationship with Canada as a country in a 21st century global context.

Strategies: Advance a five-year program to enhance and advance the research, collections, education and exhibition programs focussed on Canada's Arctic within a national and global context.

Strategic Objective #2:

Create a Centre for Species Discovery and Change that transforms people's understanding of the relevance of species diversity to their lives now and in the future.

Strategies: Advance a five-year program to advance and disseminate the research, collections, education and exhibition programs explaining Canada's species diversity aligned with the United Nations Convention on Biodiversity 2020 program.

Strategic Objective #3:

Create a Centre for Nature Inspiration and Engagement that transforms people's expectations of the Canadian Museum of Nature as a destination for discussion, connection and exploration with nature's past, present and future that advances understanding and respect for Canada's natural world.

Strategies: Advance a five-year program of inspiration and engagement activities on-site and off-site that deliver a different and compelling approach to connection and engagement with nature.

Strategic Objective #4:

Position the Natural Heritage Campus as a centre of excellence in collections management and knowledge creation, advancement and sharing by becoming a collections collaborator with institutions around the world seeking to collect, preserve, digitize and disseminate specimens that document the nature of Canada.

Strategies: Advance a five-year program that positions the Campus as a globally excellent research, collections, administration and experience site that advances understanding and respect for nature.

Strategic Objective #5:

Create a sustainable business enterprise model of operation that leverages the Museum's strategic imperatives: knowledge and discovery, inspiration and engagement, presence, performance and advancement.

Strategies: Advance a five-year program of continuous innovation in all aspects of the Museum operation in order to create a financial and operational model that sustains the Museum now and into the future.

Please refer to the Museum's corporate plan for more information.

These five strategic objectives will be managed through the five program activities (PAA) of the Museum: Inspiration and Engagement, Collections Care and Access, Research and Discovery, Internal Services, and Buildings and Ground which includes the ongoing operations and maintenance of the Museum's two facilities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 71. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Museum of Nature
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Interest in, knowledge of and appreciation and respect for the natural world through collections of natural history objects, public education programmes and research reflecting a special but not exclusive perspective on Canada.
Buildings and grounds 0 10,206,683 10,620,872
Inspiration and engagement 0 6,460,656 6,097,324
Research and discovery 0 3,458,090 3,429,884
Collections care and access 0 1,733,237 1,803,938
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 0 4,270,446 4,177,094
Funds not allocated to the 2016–17 Program Alignment Architecture 26,276,818 0 0
Total 26,276,818 26,129,112 26,129,112

Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency

Raison d'être

Contributing to jobs and growth in Canada, the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency (CanNor) works to develop a diversified, sustainable and dynamic economy across Canada's three territories. It does this by delivering funding programs to Northerners and Aboriginal people, guiding resource development and major projects across the North through the Northern Projects Management Office, undertaking research to support the development of evidence-based policies, advocating for Northern economic prosperity and diversification, and collaborating with and aligning the efforts of other federal departments, territorial governments, Aboriginal organizations, and industry.

The Minister Innovation, Science and Economic Development is responsible for CanNor.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 34. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 72. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 13,538,591 14,409,590 14,409,590 8,874,718
5 Contributions 34,119,582 35,001,622 35,064,622 16,423,487
Total voted 47,658,173 49,411,212 49,474,212 25,298,205
Total Statutory 1,462,388 1,257,454 1,257,454 935,246
Total budgetary 49,120,561 50,668,666 50,731,666 26,233,451

Highlights

The Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency (CanNor) is estimating budgetary expenditures of $26.2 million in 2016–17. Of this amount $25.3 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $0.9 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approvals and are provided for information purposes.

Significant Funding Changes:

The sunsetting of the following programs reduced overall funding: Strategic Investments in Northern Economic Development Program - $19.9 million; Northern Adult Basic Education Program - $4.0 million; and the Northern Projects Management Office - $2.6 million.

Funding for the last year of the capital element of the Centre for Northern Innovation in Mining project was reduced by $1.3 million

($2.4 million to $1.1 million).

Budget 2015 identified funding for the following programs: Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program - $3.2 million; and the Certification and Market Access Program for Seals - $63,000.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 73. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Developed and diversified territorial economies that support prosperity for all Northerners.
Economic Development 38,684,842 40,496,412 18,108,174
Policy and Alignment 3,955,430 4,857,866 2,013,466
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 6,480,289 5,314,388 6,111,811
Total 49,120,561 50,668,666 26,233,451

Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments

Table 74. Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments - Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Contributions
Contributions to support Aboriginal participation in the northern economy 8,760,780 10,800,000 10,800,000
Contributions to support the Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program 0 0 3,200,000
Contributions for promoting regional development in Canadaʼs three territories 18,753,999 20,637,988 2,360,487
Contributions to support the Certification and Market Access Program for Seals 0 0 63,000

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission

Raison d'être

The Minister of Natural Resources is responsible for this organization.

In 1946, Parliament passed the Atomic Energy Control Act and established the Atomic Energy Control Board, providing it with the power to regulate all nuclear activities related to the development and use of atomic energy in Canada.

More than half a century later, in May 2000, the Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA) came into effect and established the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) as the successor to the Atomic Energy Control Board, with responsibilities and authorities to regulate an industry that spans all segments of the nuclear fuel cycle and a wide range of industrial, medical and academic uses of nuclear substances.

Additional information can be found in the CNSC's Report on Plans and Priorities.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 35. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 75. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 40,051,490 38,921,080 39,024,571 38,686,934
Total voted 40,051,490 38,921,080 39,024,571 38,686,934
Total Statutory 98,088,079 94,258,665 94,258,665 97,479,282
Total budgetary 138,139,569 133,179,745 133,283,236 136,166,216

Highlights

The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission is estimating budgetary expenditures of $136.2 million in 2016–17. Of this amount,

$38.7 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $97.5 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

The CNSC has statutory authority – pursuant to paragraph 21(3) of the Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA) – to spend during a fiscal year any revenues that it receives in the current or previous fiscal year through the conduct of its operations. The CNSC receives its revenues from regulatory fees for licenses and applications charged in accordance with the CNSC Cost Recovery Fees Regulations.

In addition to the statutory authority, the CNSC is also funded through the voted budgetary authority from Parliament – Vote 1 – Program expenditures. Voted authority provides funding for activities exempt from paying fees under the CNSC Cost Recovery Fees Regulations (i.e., hospitals and universities), as these entities exist for the public good. Additionally, fees are not charged for activities that result from Canada's obligations that do not provide a direct benefit to identifiable licensees. These include activities with respect to Canada's international obligations (including non-proliferation activities), public responsibilities such as emergency management and public information programs, and the updating of the NSCA and its associated regulations.

In 2016–17, the CNSC's Main Estimates have increased by $3.0 million or 2% when compared to the 2015–16 Main Estimates. The increase is due to a $3.2 million increase in Statutory expenditures resulting from an overall increase in projected expenditures due to salary increases. It is also attributable to an increase in revenues earned from formula fees, as a result of a phased-in review of formulas used within the CNSC Cost Recovery Fees Regulation, to align costs with regulatory activities for the various licence types. The increase in Statutory expenditures is partially offset by a decrease in Program expenditures of $0.2 million, primarily due to a reduction in funding associated with the single window horizontal initiative outlined in Beyond the Border: A Shared Vision for Perimeter Security and Economic Competitiveness (also known as the Beyond the Border Action Plan).

Additional information can be found in the CNSC's Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 76. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Safe and secure nuclear installations and processes used solely for peaceful purposes and an informed public on the effectiveness of Canadaʼs nuclear regulatory regime.
Nuclear Reactors 0 38,370,191 39,242,207
Scientific, Technical, Regulatory and Public Information 0 26,283,818 26,840,929
Nuclear Substances and Prescribed Equipment 0 11,891,601 12,161,854
Nuclear Fuel Cycle 0 11,523,104 11,784,983
Nuclear Non-Proliferation 0 6,299,582 6,442,749
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 42,402,554 38,811,449 39,693,494
Funds not allocated to the 2016–17 Program Alignment Architecture 95,737,015 0 0
Total 138,139,569 133,179,745 136,166,216

Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments

Table 77. Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments - Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Grants
Grants to enable the research, development and management of activities that contribute to the objectives of the Research and Support Program 75,000 75,000 75,000
Contributions
Participant Funding Program 60,862 925,000 925,000
Contributions to enable the research, development and management of activities that contribute to the objectives of the Research and Support Program, and the Canadian Safeguards Support Program 1,733,180 770,000 770,000

Canadian Polar Commission

Raison d'être

Pursuant to the Economic Action Plan 2014 Act, No. 2. the Canadian Polar Commission Act was repealed as of June 1st, 2015. All rights, personal property or movables and real property or immovables and all obligations of the Canadian Polar Commission were transferred to the Canadian High Arctic Research Station

Organizational Estimates

Figure 36. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Polar Commission
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 78. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Polar Commission
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 2,236,843 2,434,137 2,434,137 0
Total voted 2,236,843 2,434,137 2,434,137 0
Total Statutory 118,424 139,948 139,948 0
Total budgetary 2,355,267 2,574,085 2,574,085 0

Highlights

Not Applicable

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 79. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Polar Commission
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Increased Canadian polar knowledge.
Research Facilitation and Communication 2,049,937 2,087,258 0
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 305,330 486,827 0
Total 2,355,267 2,574,085 0

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

Raison d'être

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) is an administrative tribunal that regulates and supervises Canadian broadcasting, and telecommunications in the public interest, as well as contributes to protecting Canadians from unsolicited communications.

The CRTC reports to Parliament through the Minister of Canadian Heritage.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 37. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 80. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 4,975,396 5,379,872 5,283,246 5,072,595
Total voted 4,975,396 5,379,872 5,283,246 5,072,595
Total Statutory 6,470,766 6,877,018 6,877,018 7,051,100
Total budgetary 11,446,162 12,256,890 12,160,264 12,123,695

Highlights

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) is estimating net budgetary expenditures of $12.1 million in 2016–17. Of this amount, $5 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $7.1 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

This is a decrease of $0.2 million when compared to the 2015–16 Main Estimates. Factors contributing to this difference include:

  • Decrease of $0.1 million for the transfer of funds to Canada School of Public Service;
  • Decrease of $0.1 million for the transfer of funds to Public Works and Government Services for the transformation of Pay Administration;
  • Decrease of $0.1 million following the end of the agreement for the transfer of funds from the Offices of the Information and Privacy Commissioners of Canada; and
  • Increase of $0.1 million for statutory budget expenditures related to employee benefits plans.

Once tabled in the House of Commons, additional information will be available in the departmental Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 81. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Canadians have access to a world-class communication system.
Protection within the Communication System 5,076,181 5,276,902 5,152,005
Connection to the Communication System 2,084,716 2,424,184 2,542,213
Canadian Content Creation 1,535,438 2,074,812 1,986,234
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 2,749,827 2,480,992 2,443,243
Total 11,446,162 12,256,890 12,123,695

Canadian Security Intelligence Service

Raison d'être

As per the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) Act, the mandate of CSIS is to collect, analyze and retain information and intelligence on activities suspected of constituting threats to the security of Canada, and to report to and advise the government. CSIS is responsible for the collection of national security intelligence inside and outside Canada; the collection of foreign intelligence within Canada; and for security screening assessments for federal government employees, refugees, immigration and citizenship applicants, and some other sectors such as the Canadian nuclear industry.

The Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness is responsible for CSIS.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 38. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Security Intelligence Service
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 82. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Security Intelligence Service
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 468,194,844 488,215,677 503,107,317 518,483,607
Total voted 468,194,844 488,215,677 503,107,317 518,483,607
Total Statutory 47,080,734 48,821,568 48,821,568 53,585,459
Total budgetary 515,275,578 537,037,245 551,928,885 572,069,066

Highlights

The main estimates for the department are $572.1 million, a net increase of $35.0 million. The major changes are as follows:

  • An increase of $35.5 million in support of Canada's national security and the safety of Canadians; and
  • A decrease of $0.5 million due to miscellaneous government wide initiatives.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 83. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Security Intelligence Service
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Intelligence is used to protect the security and safety of Canada and its citizens.
Intelligence Program 472,027,300 492,461,267 524,459,826
Security Screening Program 43,248,278 44,575,978 47,609,240
Total 515,275,578 537,037,245 572,069,066

Canadian Space Agency

Raison d'être

The mandate of the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) is "to promote the peaceful use and development of space, to advance the knowledge of space through science and to ensure that space science and technology provide social and economic benefits for Canadians".

The CSA is delivering on its mandate in collaboration with Canadian industry, academia, Government of Canada (GoC) organizations and other international space agencies or organizations.

The founding legislation that received Royal Assent in 1990 attributed four main functions to the CSA:

  • Assist the Minister to coordinate the space policies and programs of the Government of Canada;
  • Plan, direct, manage and implement programs and projects relating to scientific or industrial space research and development, and the application of space technology;
  • Promote the transfer and diffusion of space technology to and throughout Canadian industry; and
  • Encourage commercial exploitation of space capabilities, technology, facilities and systems.

The Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 39. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Space Agency
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 84. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Space Agency
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 164,163,675 169,304,033 183,834,034 184,497,707
5 Capital expenditures 162,036,938 258,964,761 248,434,761 192,112,456
10 Grants and contributions 40,816,215 45,356,265 45,356,265 45,748,000
Total voted 367,016,828 473,625,059 477,625,060 422,358,163
Total Statutory 9,074,110 9,803,222 9,803,222 10,036,658
Total budgetary 376,090,938 483,428,281 487,428,282 432,394,821

Highlights

The Canadian Space Agency (CSA) is estimating budgetary expenditures of $432.4 million in 2016–17. Of this amount, $422.4 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $10.0 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

The variation in voted appropriations represents a net decrease of $51.0 million between fiscal years 2015–16 and 2016–17 corresponds to an increase in Operating expenditures of $15.2 million, a decrease in Capital expenditures of $66.9 million and an increase in Grants and Contributions of $0.4 million. These fluctuations are mainly due to the fact that CSA's projects and missions funding profile vary from year to year and require funding from different Votes depending on their development phases. Thus, pre and post project expenditures are Operating expenditures whereas the design and build phases call for Capital expenditures. In addition, the science support associated with some projects may necessitate funds either in Operating expenditures or in Grants and Contributions.

The variation between fiscal years 2015–16 and 2016–17 is composed of:

  • An increase of $9.5 million due to additional funding received for the provision of value-added satellite reports/images for humanitarian needs;
  • A net increase of $3.5 million due to additional funding received for the Canadian Space Agency's David Florida Laboratory (DFL) infrastructure and corresponding equipment to maintain its space capabilities and improve compliance with applicable building codes and standards;
  • An increase of $1.7 million due to additional funding received for the Maritime Monitoring and Messaging Micro-Satellite (M3MSat) project due to the change of the launch provider and associated launch delay;
  • An increase of $1.2 million for activities related to the space station. The current year over year increase reflects different cash flow requirements;
  • A decrease of $43.3 million related to the RADARSAT Constellation Mission (RCM). The current year over year decrease reflects different cash flow requirements; and
  • A decrease of $8.0 million due to additional funding received in 2015–16 for enhanced space-based Automatic Identification System (AIS) data buy.

For further details on trends, please refer to the Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 85. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Space Agency
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Canada's exploration of space, provision of space services and development of its space capacity meet the nation's needs for scientific knowledge, innovation and information.
Space Data, Information and Services 175,496,334 259,609,001 215,085,716
Space Exploration 97,329,795 112,407,879 99,437,817
Future Canadian Space Capacity 58,018,955 66,268,193 66,094,200
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 45,245,854 45,143,208 51,777,088
Total 376,090,938 483,428,281 432,394,821

Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments

Table 86. Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments - Canadian Space Agency
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Grants
Class Grant Program to Support Research, Awareness and Learning in Space Science and Technology 6,955,536 7,456,000 8,860,000
Contributions
Contributions to the Canada/European Space Agency Cooperation Agreement 29,762,875 26,215,000 27,031,000
Class Contribution Program to Support Research, Awareness and Learning in Space Science and Technology 4,097,804 11,685,265 9,857,000

Canadian Tourism Commission

Raison d'être

The Canadian Tourism Commission (CTC) operating as Destination Canada (DC), is Canada's national tourism marketing organization. A Crown corporation wholly owned by the Government of Canada, the CTC's purpose is to sustain a vibrant and profitable tourism industry by marketing Canada as an internationally competitive, premier four-season tourism destination where travelers can indulge in extraordinary experiences. Reporting to Parliament through the Minister of Industry, the CTC's legislative requirements are outlined in the Canadian Tourism Commission Act. Through collaboration and partnerships with the private sector, as well as with the governments of Canada, the provinces and territories, the CTC works with the tourism sector to maintain Canada's competitiveness and generate wealth for Canadians by stimulating demand for Canada's visitor economy. Additional information can be found in the CTC's 2015-2019 Corporate Plan.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 40. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Tourism Commission
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 87. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Tourism Commission
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Canadian Tourism Commission 57,975,770 57,975,770 62,975,770 70,475,770
Total voted 57,975,770 57,975,770 62,975,770 70,475,770
Total budgetary 57,975,770 57,975,770 62,975,770 70,475,770

Highlights

DC was created in 1995, as a Special Operating Agency within Industry Canada, and in 2001, became a Crown corporation pursuant to the Canadian Tourism Commission Act. DC reports to Parliament via the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development. DC is Canada's national tourism marketing organization mandated to sustain a vibrant and profitable Canadian tourism industry; market Canada as a desirable tourist destination; support a cooperative relationship between the private sector and the governments of Canada, the provinces and the territories with respect to Canadian tourism; and provide information about Canadian tourism to the private sector and to the governments of Canada, the provinces and the territories.

In 2016–17, DC's appropriation is $70.5 million. The appropriation is broken down in two components: a core appropriation of

$58.0 million and a special programs appropriation of $12.5 million relating to the Connecting America marketing initiative. Total funding for the Connecting America marketing initiative is $30 million and is spread out over three years: $5.0 million for 2015–16, $12.5 million for 2016–17 and $12.5 million for 2017–18. For 2016, since DC's budget is organized by calendar year, the appropriation will translate into an annual appropriation of $58.0 million with an additional $10 million relating to Connecting America special program funding.

DC's activities are aligned to focus resources on markets of strategic importance to Canada's tourism industry.

DC's corporate strategy as outlined in the 2016–20 Corporate Plan:

Goal:

  • By 2020, DC will support the Industry as it grows the number of arrivals to 20 million international visitors per year with tourism export revenue of $20 billion.

Objectives:

  • Increase demand for Canada with innovative marketing
  • Advance the commercial competitiveness of the tourism sector
  • Increase corporate efficiency and effectiveness

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 88. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Tourism Commission
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Canadian economy benefits from strong tourism demand from Canadian Tourism Commission's (CTC) markets.
Marketing and Sales 0 44,851,770 60,680,457
Tourism Research and Communications 0 3,277,000 2,238,243
Experiential Product Development 0 1,042,000 952,008
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 0 8,805,000 6,605,062
Funds not allocated to the 2016–17 Program Alignment Architecture 57,975,770 0 0
Total 57,975,770 57,975,770 70,475,770

Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board

Raison d'être

The Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board is referred to as the Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) in its day-to-day activities. The TSB is an independent agency created in 1990 by an Act of Parliament. It operates at arm's length from other government departments and agencies to ensure that there are no real or perceived conflicts of interest. TSB's sole objective is to advance air, marine, rail and pipeline transportation safety. This mandate is fulfilled by conducting independent investigations into selected transportation occurrences to identify the causes and contributing factors and the safety deficiencies evidenced by an occurrence. TSB makes recommendations to reduce or eliminate any such safety deficiencies and reports publicly on its investigations. The TSB then follows-up with stakeholders to ensure that safety actions are taken to reduce risks and improve safety.

The TSB may also represent Canadian interests in foreign investigations of transportation accidents involving Canadian registered, licensed or manufactured aircraft, ships or railway rolling stock. In addition the TSB carries out some of Canada's obligations related to transportation safety at the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) and the International Maritime Organization (IMO).

The Leader of the Government in the House of Commons is the designated minister for the purposes of tabling the TSB's administrative reports in Parliament, such as the Report on Plans and Priorities and Departmental Performance Report. The TSB forms part of the Privy Council portfolio of departments and agencies.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 41. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 89. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 28,655,526 26,290,301 26,290,301 26,267,261
Total voted 28,655,526 26,290,301 26,290,301 26,267,261
Total Statutory 3,563,805 3,439,498 3,439,498 3,521,391
Total budgetary 32,219,331 29,729,799 29,729,799 29,788,652

Highlights

The TSB is estimating budgetary expenditures of $29.8 million in 2016–17. Of this amount, $26.3 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $3.5 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes. The organization's funding through Main Estimates has increased from 2015–16 by $0.1 million due mainly to an increase in the Employee Benefit Plan percentage as determined by Treasury Board Secretariat as part of the Annual Reference Level Update. This increase is offset slightly by the government-wide budget reduction in support of the Canada School of Public Service Initiative.

Funding by program between Main Estimates may differ from year to year as these amounts are influenced by the number of active investigations in each program at the time of preparation of the Main Estimates.

In 2016–17, the TSB will continue to strive to be a world leader in influencing changes that advance transportation safety. This vision statement will be achieved by focusing on the strategic objectives outlined in the TSB's five-year strategic plan, which provides a clear framework to guide investments and activities for the planning horizon.

Details on the TSB's priorities will be available in its 2016–17 Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 90. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Independent investigations into transportation occurrences contribute to making the transportation system safer.
Aviation occurrence investigations 14,990,356 12,537,059 12,831,845
Rail occurrence investigations 6,146,776 5,332,576 5,868,756
Marine occurrence investigations 4,934,356 4,902,097 5,089,370
Pipeline occurrence investigations 283,717 600,535 277,784
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 5,864,126 6,357,532 5,720,897
Total 32,219,331 29,729,799 29,788,652

Canadian Transportation Agency

Raison d'être

The Canadian Transportation Agency is an independent, quasi-judicial tribunal and regulator. It plays a unique role with respect to the national transportation system.

The Agencyʼs core mandate is to help ensure the efficiency and accessibility of the national transportation system through the use of a range of authorities and tools, which fall into four main categories:

  • Making and applying rules and guidance: The establishment of "rules of the game" through regulations, guidelines, codes of practice, and interpretation notes, and the use of various instruments to foster compliance.
  • Overseeing market entry and exit: The issuance of operating licences and permits to companies that meet specific criteria and the application of discontinuance processes where prescribed by statute.
  • Resolving disputes: The resolution of disagreements over costs or services between transportation companies and their customers (passengers and shippers) and neighbours (residents and communities), using facilitation, mediation, arbitration, and adjudication.
  • Providing information: The collection, analysis, and dissemination of information on the national transportation system through mechanisms such as the Agencyʼs Annual Report.

The Agency is an armʼs length organization that reports to Parliament through the Minister of Transport.

Additional information on the Agencyʼs role, mission and mandate can be found in the Agencyʼs Report on Plans and Priorities and is available on the Agencyʼs website.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 42. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Transportation Agency
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 91. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Transportation Agency
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 25,547,821 24,313,366 24,313,366 24,290,330
Total voted 25,547,821 24,313,366 24,313,366 24,290,330
Total Statutory 3,230,028 3,420,038 3,420,038 3,501,757
Total budgetary 28,777,849 27,733,404 27,733,404 27,792,087

Highlights

The Canadian Transportation Agency is estimating budgetary expenditures of $27.8 million in 2016–17. Of this amount, $24.3 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $3.5 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

In 2016–17, the Agencyʼs planned expenditures will remain approximately the same as in previous years, during which the Agency has absorbed a number of new mandates without additional funding. For example, additional mandates as a result of the passing of the Fair Rail for Grain Farmers Act in May 2014 and the Safe and Accountable Rail Act in May 2015 placed certain capacity demands on the Agency whose budget has remained essentially unchanged for more than a decade.

Additional information can be found in the Agencyʼs Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 92. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Transportation Agency
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Transparent, fair and timely dispute resolution and economic regulation of the national transportation system.
Economic Regulation 11,306,027 11,814,081 11,315,866
Adjudication and Alternative Dispute Resolution 10,984,842 10,052,252 9,253,556
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 6,486,980 5,867,071 7,222,665
Total 28,777,849 27,733,404 27,792,087

Chief Electoral Officer

Raison d'être

The Office of the Chief Electoral Officer, commonly known as Elections Canada, is an independent, non-partisan agency that reports directly to Parliament. Its mandate is to be prepared to conduct a federal general election, by-election or referendum; to administer the political financing provisions of the Canada Elections Act; to monitor compliance with electoral legislation; to conduct public information campaigns on voter registration, voting and becoming a candidate; to conduct education programs for students on the electoral process; to provide support to the independent commissions in charge of adjusting the boundaries of federal electoral districts following each decennial census; to carry out studies on voting and, with the approval of parliamentarians, test alternative voting processes for future use during electoral events; to provide assistance and co-operation in electoral matters to electoral agencies in other countries or to international organizations.

The Minister of Democratic Institutions is the designated minister for the purpose of tabling the Chief Electoral Officer's administrative reports in Parliament, including the Report on Plans and Priorities and Departmental Performance Report.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 43. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Chief Electoral Officer
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 93. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Chief Electoral Officer
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 30,144,204 29,204,976 29,204,976 29,212,735
Total voted 30,144,204 29,204,976 29,204,976 29,212,735
Total Statutory 120,622,171 366,754,841 366,754,841 69,322,526
Total budgetary 150,766,375 395,959,817 395,959,817 98,535,261

Highlights

Elections Canada is estimating budgetary expenditures of $98.5 million in 2016–17. Of this amount, $29.2 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $69.3 million represents statutory forecasts and is provided for information purposes.

Overall for 2016–17, the agency is estimating a decrease of $297.4 million from the 2015–16 Main Estimates. This net decrease is explained by the October 19, 2015 general election (part of the Electoral Operations and Regulation of Electoral Activities programs).

Additional information can be found in the agency's Report on Plans and Priorities.

The disposition of all authorities will be available in the agency's 2015–16 Departmental Performance Report and the Public Accounts.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 94. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Chief Electoral Officer
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
An Accessible Electoral Framework that Canadians Trust and Use.
Electoral Operations 90,292,796 277,113,580 45,743,386
Regulation of Electoral Activities 18,101,587 79,015,382 11,656,805
Electoral Engagement 8,261,985 8,060,043 9,059,837
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 34,110,007 31,770,812 32,075,233
Total 150,766,375 395,959,817 98,535,261

Citizenship and Immigration

Raison d'être

In the first years after Confederation, Canada's leaders had a powerful vision: to connect Canada by rail and make the West the world's breadbasket as a foundation for the country's economic prosperity. This vision meant quickly populating the Prairies, leading the Government of Canada to establish its first national immigration policies. Immigrants have been a driving force in Canada's nationhood and its economic prosperity – as farmers settling lands, as workers in factories fuelling industrial growth, as entrepreneurs and as innovators helping Canada to compete in the global, knowledge-based economy.

Immigration, Refugees, and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) selects foreign nationals as permanent and temporary residents whose skills contribute to Canadian prosperity. The department maintains Canada's humanitarian tradition by welcoming refugees and other people in need of protection, thereby upholding its international obligations and reputation. The department develops Canada's admissibility policy, which sets the conditions for entering and remaining in Canada; it also conducts, in collaboration with its partners, the screening of potential permanent and temporary residents to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians. The department is also responsible for the issuance and control of Canadian passports which facilitate the travel of Canadians abroad. Fundamentally, IRCC builds a stronger Canada by helping all newcomers settle and integrate into Canadian society and the economy, and by encouraging and facilitating Canadian citizenship.

The Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship is responsible for this organization.

Note: Until the establishing legislation is amended, the legal name of the department for the purposes of Appropriation Acts remains Citizenship and Immigration.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 44. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Citizenship and Immigration
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Figure 45. Organizational Estimates - Non-budgetary - Citizenship and Immigration
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory non budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 95. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Citizenship and Immigration
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 544,983,905 560,219,325 731,673,122 604,119,156
5 Capital expenditures 15,853,986 6,308,103 8,375,482 13,706,741
10 Grants and contributions 989,896,724 993,529,386 1,138,659,540 1,152,355,205
Debt write-off – Immigration loans 1,116,573 0 0 0
Total voted 1,551,851,188 1,560,056,814 1,878,708,144 1,770,181,102
Total Statutory (191,100,080) (95,389,806) (116,070,099) (119,348,875)
Total budgetary 1,360,751,108 1,464,667,008 1,762,638,045 1,650,832,227
Non-budgetary
Total Statutory 1,201,648 0 0 0
Total non-budgetary 1,201,648 0 0 0

Highlights

Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada's budgetary Main Estimates for 2016–17 of $1,650.8 million represents a net increase of $186.2 million from the previous year.

The following are the highlights of this change:

  • An increase of $179.3M to implement the Governmentʼs response to the Syrian refugee crisis;
  • An increase of $29.3M to continue to implement and administer reforms to the Temporary Foreign Worker program and the International Mobility program;
  • An increase of $17.9M related to statutory adjustments to the Passport Canada revolving fund;
  • An increase of $14.9M to expand biometric screening in Canada's immigration system;
  • An increase of $4.5M to the Grant for the Canada-Quebec Accord on immigration;
  • An increase of $3.4M for the Citizenship and Temporary Resident programs;
  • An increase of $3.0M for contribution funding under the Global Assistance for Irregular Migrants Program to support Canada's Migrant Smuggling Prevention Strategy;
  • An increase of $2.5M to manage immigration cases involving classified information;
  • A decrease of $29.5M in statutory funding for the refund of fees for certain terminated applications for the Federal Skilled Workers program;
  • A decrease of $16.5M in statutory funding for the refund of fees for certain terminated applications for the Immigrant Investor Program and Entrepreneur Program;
  • A decrease of $6.7M related to the reform of Canada's Refugee system;
  • A decrease of $6.3M to transfer funds to Global Affairs Canada to provide support to departmental staff located at missions abroad;
  • A decrease of $3.5M related to the Pan American Games that were performed in 2015–16;
  • A decrease of $3.0M for the governmental advertising campaign;
  • A decrease of $2.1M for the Information Sharing under the Perimeter Security and Economic Competitiveness Action Plan; and
  • A decrease of $1.0M due to other minor funding adjustments.

Beginning in 2016–17, a new Capital vote totalling $13.7M will be implemented. Capital funds will be mostly used to support the expansion of biometric screening in Canada's immigration system as well as for the different releases related to Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada's Global Case Management System.

Further information can be found in the Report on Plans and Priorities at: http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/resources/publications/rpp/index.asp

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 96. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Citizenship and Immigration
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Newcomers and citizens participate in fostering an integrated society.
Newcomer Settlement and Integration 1,010,190,212 1,014,017,140 1,174,026,452
Citizenship for Newcomers and All Canadians 82,983,275 68,062,779 62,018,218
Multiculturalism for Newcomers and All Canadians 6,771,604 13,049,066 12,100,261
Migration of permanent and temporary residents that strengthens Canada's economy.
Temporary Economic Residents 28,817,691 24,278,038 53,069,957
Permanent Economic Residents 81,907,913 99,145,934 44,243,952
Family and humanitarian migration that reunites families and offers protection to the displaced and persecuted.
Family and Discretionary Immigration 39,557,058 37,572,058 36,932,907
Refugee Protection 29,926,000 30,059,852 28,013,358
Managed migration and facilitated travel that promote Canadian interests and protect the health, safety and security of Canadians.
Migration Control and Security Management 104,056,335 124,537,482 154,340,892
Health Protection 31,042,845 63,217,689 75,135,278
Canadian Influence in International Migration and Integration Agenda 5,896,698 5,177,541 5,908,956
Passport (287,387,229) (202,153,477) (184,207,868)
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 226,988,706 187,702,906 189,249,864
Total 1,360,751,108 1,464,667,008 1,650,832,227
Table 97. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Non-budgetary - Citizenship and Immigration
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Newcomers and citizens participate in fostering an integrated society.
Newcomer Settlement and Integration 1,201,648 0 0
Total 1,201,648 0 0

Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments

Table 98. Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments - Citizenship and Immigration
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Grants
Grant for the Canada-Quebec Accord on Immigration 340,568,000 340,568,000 345,059,000
Grants in support of the Multiculturalism Program 1,792,227 3,000,000 3,000,000
Grant for Migration Policy Development 349,765 350,000 350,000
Contributions
Settlement Program 575,736,724 588,597,002 631,057,002
Resettlement Assistance 64,212,010 54,922,768 162,869,437
Contributions in support of the Multiculturalism Program 2,251,965 4,593,166 5,521,316
Global Assistance to Irregular Migrants 2,294,308 0 3,000,000
International Organization for Migration 1,871,744 1,454,000 1,454,000
Task Force for International Cooperation on Holocaust Education, Remembrance and Research 42,648 44,450 44,450

Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Raison d'être

The Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (the Commission) is an independent agency created by Parliament and is not part of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP). The Commission's fundamental role is to provide civilian review of the conduct of the RCMP members in carrying out their policing duties, thereby holding the RCMP accountable to the public. The Commission ensures that complaints about the conduct of RCMP members are examined fairly and impartially. Its findings and recommendations help identify and remedy policing problems which stem from the conduct of individual RCMP members or from deficiencies in RCMP policies or practices. The Commission also conducts reviews of specified RCMP activities, reports to provinces which contract RCMP services, conducts research, program outreach and public education, and provides independent observers to investigations of serious incidents involving RCMP members.

The Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 46. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 99. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 8,718,932 9,032,529 9,032,529 9,025,809
Total voted 8,718,932 9,032,529 9,032,529 9,025,809
Total Statutory 881,039 979,194 979,194 1,002,508
Total budgetary 9,599,971 10,011,723 10,011,723 10,028,317

Highlights

The Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police is estimating budgetary expenditures of

$10 million in 2016–17. Of this amount, $9 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $1 million represents statutory authorities that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

The Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police planned expenditures will be similar to previous years.

In 2016–17, the Commission will continue to identify and address the policing issues of daily concern to Canadians. The Commission will examine the conduct of RCMP members in relation to specific complaints and monitor wider trends and developments in RCMP policy and practices. The Commission will provide recommendations that enhance the accountability of the RCMP and contribute to the public's trust and confidence in the RCMP and its members. The Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police has assumed its new responsibilities as outlined in the Enhancing Royal Canadian Mounted Police Accountability Act, which include conducting reviews of specified RCMP activities, providing enhanced reporting to provinces which contract for RCMP services and conducting research and outreach. Details on the Commission's priorities are outlined in its 2016–17 Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 100. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Public Confidence in the RCMP.
Civilian review of RCMP membersʼ conduct in the performance of their duties 6,181,112 6,307,346 6,317,800
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 3,418,859 3,704,377 3,710,517
Total 9,599,971 10,011,723 10,028,317

Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs

Raison d'être

The Office of the Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs (FJA) provides services to the Canadian judiciary and promotes judicial independence.

The Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 47. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 101. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs – Operating expenditures 8,160,332 7,942,728 8,942,728 7,833,778
5 Canadian Judicial Council – Operating expenditures 2,944,764 1,513,611 3,513,611 1,513,611
Total voted 11,105,096 9,456,339 12,456,339 9,347,389
Total Statutory 506,515,330 515,394,781 515,394,781 545,826,864
Total budgetary 517,620,426 524,851,120 527,851,120 555,174,253

Highlights

FJA is estimating budgetary expenditures of $555.17 million in 2016–17. Of this amount, $9.35 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $545.83 million represents statutory forecasts for payments pursuant to the Judges Act ($544.84 million) and employee benefit plans which do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

The total spending for the department shows a continual increase over the planning period.

A net increase of $30.41 million in statutory forecast from the 2015–16 Main Estimates is due to an increase in the number of judicial appointments, an increase in the overall average in the amounts of pensions being paid to pensioners in accordance with the Judges Act, as well as a provision for a salary increase to federally appointed judges.

Please refer to the 2016–17 Report on Plans and Priorities for additional information.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 102. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
An independent and efficient Federal Judiciary.
Payments Pursuant to the Judges Act 505,689,613 514,430,443 544,838,708
Federal Judicial Affairs 8,130,290 7,994,262 7,904,536
Canadian Judicial Council 3,073,719 1,699,615 1,704,209
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 726,804 726,800 726,800
Total 517,620,426 524,851,120 555,174,253

Communications Security Establishment

Raison d'être

As mandated by the National Defence Act, the Communications Security Establishment's (CSE) Signals Intelligence program provides foreign intelligence that addresses the Government of Canada's vital interests in defence, security, and international affairs through the collection, processing, analysis and reporting of intelligence. The Signals Intelligence program also helps protect the electronic information and information infrastructures of importance to the Government of Canada, and provides technical and operational assistance to federal law enforcement and security agencies.

CSE's Information Technology Security program provides advice, guidance, and services to help ensure the protection of electronic information and information systems of importance to the Government of Canada.

The Minister of National Defence is responsible for CSE.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 48. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Communications Security Establishment
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 103. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Communications Security Establishment
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 818,666,848 503,831,701 542,596,708 546,109,459
Total voted 818,666,848 503,831,701 542,596,708 546,109,459
Total Statutory 37,766,390 34,370,029 35,018,429 37,515,359
Total budgetary 856,433,238 538,201,730 577,615,137 583,624,818

Highlights

The Communications Security Establishment is estimating budgetary expenditures of $583.6 million in 2016–17. Of this amount, $546.1 million requires approval of Parliament. The remaining $37.5 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

The Main Estimates for the department are $583.6 million, a net increase of $45.4 million. The major changes are as follows:

  • An overall reduction in accommodations funding of $14.1M associated with CSE's new facility and the shift from the construction phase into the operational phase; and
  • A net increase of $59.5M in support of CSE's mandate, notably CSE's capacity to address cyber threats and advancements in technology.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 104. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Communications Security Establishment
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Foreign signals intelligence and technical security capabilities advance and protect Canada's vital interests.
Signals Intelligence 609,194,573 388,225,246 420,929,869
Information Technology (IT) Security 247,238,665 149,976,484 162,694,949
Total 856,433,238 538,201,730 583,624,818

Copyright Board

Raison d'être

The Copyright Board is an economic regulatory body empowered to establish, either mandatorily or at the request of an interested party, the royalties to be paid for the use of copyrighted works, when the administration of such copyright is entrusted to a collective-administration society. The Board also has the right to supervise agreements between users and licensing bodies and issues licences when the copyright owner cannot be located.

The Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 49. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Copyright Board
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 105. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Copyright Board
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 2,790,199 2,818,917 2,818,917 2,813,641
Total voted 2,790,199 2,818,917 2,818,917 2,813,641
Total Statutory 279,307 291,796 291,796 298,083
Total budgetary 3,069,506 3,110,713 3,110,713 3,111,724

Highlights

The Copyright Board of Canada is estimating budgetary expenditures of $3.1 million in 2016-17. Of this amount, $2.8 million require approval by Parliament and the remaining $298.1 thousand represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

The Copyright Board of Canada will continue to ensure balanced decision-making and provide proper incentive for the creation and use of copyrighted works. The Board will also examine possible avenues to improve its practices and procedures, with the aim of streamlining them and reduce uncertainty, while safeguarding fairness of process.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 106. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Copyright Board
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Fair decision-making to provide proper incentives for the creation and use of copyrighted works.
Copyright Tariff Setting and Issuance of Licences 2,486,300 2,519,678 2,520,496
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 583,206 591,035 591,228
Total 3,069,506 3,110,713 3,111,724

Correctional Service of Canada

Raison d'être

The Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness is responsible for the Correctional Service of Canada.

The purpose of the federal correctional system, as defined in law, is to contribute to the maintenance of a just, peaceful and safe society by carrying out sentences imposed by courts through the safe and humane custody and supervision of offenders; and by assisting the rehabilitation of offenders and their reintegration into the community as law-abiding citizens through the provision of programs in penitentiaries and in the community (Corrections and Conditional Release Act, s. 3).

The Correctional Service of Canada, as part of the criminal justice system and respecting the rule of law, contributes to public safety by actively encouraging and assisting offenders to become law-abiding citizens, while exercising reasonable, safe, secure and humane control.

Additional information can be found in the organization's Report on Plans and Priorities.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 50. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Correctional Service of Canada
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Figure 51. Organizational Estimates - Non-budgetary - Correctional Service of Canada
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory non budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 107. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Correctional Service of Canada
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures, grants and contributions 2,134,769,681 1,928,746,713 1,930,535,159 1,925,556,005
5 Capital expenditures 200,606,427 176,944,519 188,046,073 185,711,724
Total voted 2,335,376,108 2,105,691,232 2,118,581,232 2,111,267,729
Total Statutory 239,852,204 244,797,694 244,797,694 251,324,350
Total budgetary 2,575,228,312 2,350,488,926 2,363,378,926 2,362,592,079
Non-budgetary
Voted
- Loans to individuals under mandatory supervision and parolees through the Paroleesʼ Loan Account (170) 0 0 0
Total voted (170) 0 0 0
Total non-budgetary (170) 0 0 0

Highlights

The Correctional Service of Canada is estimating budgetary expenditures of $2,362.6 million in 2016–17. Of this amount, $2,111.3 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $251.3 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes. This represents a net increase of $12.1 million from 2015–16 Main Estimates.

The major changes are as follows:

  • An increase of $1.1 million related to the implementation of the Canadian Victims Bill of Rights;
  • A net increase of $6.5 million related to the allocation of the employer's share of the Employee Benefit Plan;
  • A net increase of $5.1 million in capital investments due to adjustments related to reprofiling of funds from previous years;
  • An increase of $4.3 million related to the funding for the Accelerated Infrastructure Program;
  • A decrease of $2.1 million related to increase in Correctional Service of Canada's contribution to the Canada School of Public Service new service delivery model;
  • A decrease of $1.0 million related to the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan;
  • A decrease of $1.0 million in the National Infrastructure Contribution Program due to adjustments related to reprofiling of funds in previous year; and
  • A net decrease of $0.8 million for miscellaneous items.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 108. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Correctional Service of Canada
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
The custody, correctional interventions, and supervision of offenders in communities and in institutions, contribute to public safety.
Custody 1,686,218,075 1,501,862,617 1,512,168,537
Correctional Interventions 452,349,073 410,155,772 408,423,801
Community Supervision 125,590,617 129,857,404 137,257,516
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 311,070,547 308,613,133 304,742,225
Total 2,575,228,312 2,350,488,926 2,362,592,079
Table 109. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Non-budgetary - Correctional Service of Canada
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
The custody, correctional interventions, and supervision of offenders in communities and in institutions, contribute to public safety.
Correctional Interventions (170) 0 0
Total (170) 0 0

Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments

Table 110. Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments - Correctional Service of Canada
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Grants
Grant to the University of Saskatchewan for Forensic Research Centre 120,000 122,000 120,000
Contributions
Correctional Services of Canada's National Infrastructure Contribution Program 2,545,865 5,680,000 4,700,000

Courts Administration Service

Raison d'être

The Courts Administration Service (CAS) was established in 2003 with the coming into force of the Courts Administration Service Act. The role of CAS is to provide effective and efficient judicial, registry and corporate services to four superior courts of record – the Federal Court of Appeal, the Federal Court, the Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada and the Tax Court of Canada. The Act enhances judicial independence by placing administrative services at arm's length from the Government of Canada and enhances accountability for the use of public money.

The Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 52. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Courts Administration Service
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 111. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Courts Administration Service
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 62,132,593 57,320,466 57,320,466 65,199,516
Total voted 62,132,593 57,320,466 57,320,466 65,199,516
Total Statutory 7,017,813 6,632,121 6,632,121 7,152,127
Total budgetary 69,150,406 63,952,587 63,952,587 72,351,643

Highlights

The Courts Administration Service (CAS) is estimating budgetary expenditures of $72.4 million in 2016–17. Of this amount, $65.2 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $7.2 million represents the statutory funding forecast that does not require additional approval and is provided for information purposes.

The core programs of the CAS have remained relatively constant over the years. Nevertheless, CAS' reference levels have been impacted by legislative changes affecting the workload of the federal courts as well as various government initiatives resulting in an increase of

$8.4 million over the 2015–16 Main Estimates.

The activities that have caused the majority of the variations in reference levels include:

  • Budget 2015 funding for investment in physical security enhancements such as additional cameras, security personnel and screening tools that will help ensure the federal courts remain secure and function properly. In addition, it will enable IT security enhancements to further protect judicial and CAS information ($4.65 million); and
  • Renewal of funding for Division 9 proceedings of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA) aimed at addressing challenges in the management of security inadmissibility cases, protecting classified information in immigration proceedings, and obtaining diplomatic assurances of safety for inadmissible individuals facing a risk of torture ($4.3 million).

More details on important trends and variances can be found in the CAS 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities, as well as the Financial Statements Discussion and Analysis and the Quarterly Financial Reports.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 112. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Courts Administration Service
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
The public has timely and fair access to the litigation processes of the Federal Court of Appeal, the Federal Court, the Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada and the Tax Court of Canada.
Judicial Services 21,961,589 23,176,362 27,994,392
Registry Services 25,696,130 23,937,466 24,278,931
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 21,492,687 16,838,759 20,078,320
Total 69,150,406 63,952,587 72,351,643

Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec

Raison d'être

The Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec's (CED) mission is to promote the long-term economic development of the regions of Quebec by giving special attention to those where slow economic growth is prevalent or opportunities for productive employment are inadequate.

As part of its mission, CED promotes the start-up and performance of businesses. It helps them become more competitive, productive, innovative and active on domestic and foreign markets. It supports communities' engagement efforts in Quebec's regions and helps to attract investment that will increase the prosperity of the Quebec economy.

CED works primarily with small and medium-sized enterprises, as well as non-profit organizations, through its business offices.

The Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 53. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 113. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 37,486,267 38,266,985 38,266,985 38,180,803
5 Grants and contributions 212,168,051 217,995,801 221,432,801 260,021,718
Total voted 249,654,318 256,262,786 259,699,786 298,202,521
Total Statutory 4,243,598 4,819,408 4,819,408 4,917,420
Total budgetary 253,897,916 261,082,194 264,519,194 303,119,941

Highlights

The total budget for CED for the 2016–17 fiscal year amounts to $303.1 million. The budget will cover expenditures for grants and contributions and operating expenses, in the following four programs: Business Development, Regional Economic Development, Strengthening Community Economies and Internal Services.

Compared to the 2015–16 fiscal year, CED'S budget for the next fiscal year increases by $42 million or 16%. Forecasted expenditures for operating expenses and statutory amounts are stable from one fiscal year to the next. Expenditures for grants and contributions vary the most, showing an increase of $42 million in 2016–17. This increase is explained primarily by the new Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program, announced in Budget 2015. As well, a project and an initiative will see their funding increased. These are the extension of the natural gas network between Lévis and Ste-Claire and the Canadian Economic Diversification Initiative for Communities' Dependant on Asbestos.

Please see CED's Report on Plans and Priorities for a description of CED's programs.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 114. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Quebec's regions have a growing economy.
Business Development 146,564,462 151,677,176 158,796,744
Strengthening Community Economies 55,328,034 53,720,902 87,644,272
Regional Economic Development 34,133,620 35,237,511 38,450,858
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 17,871,800 20,446,605 18,228,067
Total 253,897,916 261,082,194 303,119,941

Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments

Table 115. Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments - Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Grants
Grants under the Quebec Economic Development Program 140,638 1,650,000 1,650,000
Contributions
Contributions under the Quebec Economic Development Program 183,582,593 187,377,783 229,403,700
Contributions under the Community Futures Program 28,444,820 28,968,018 28,968,018

Employment and Social Development

Raison d'être

The‎ Minister of Families, Children and Social Development, the Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour, and the Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities‎ are responsible for this organization.

The mission of Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC), including the Labour Program and Service Canada, is to build a stronger and more competitive Canada, to support Canadians in making choices that help them live productive and rewarding lives, and to improve Canadians' quality of life.

ESDC delivers a range of programs and services that affect Canadians throughout their lives. The Department provides seniors with basic income security, supports unemployed workers, helps students finance their post-secondary education and assists parents who are raising young children. The Labour Program is responsible for labour laws and policies in federally regulated workplaces. Service Canada helps citizens access ESDC's programs, as well as other Government of Canada programs and services. Additional information can be found in the organization's Report on Plans and Priorities.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 54. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Employment and Social Development
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Figure 55. Organizational Estimates - Non-budgetary - Employment and Social Development
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory non budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 116. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Employment and Social Development
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 618,337,341 561,409,860 620,496,059 607,999,524
5 Grants and contributions 1,570,718,755 1,712,658,484 1,714,027,708 1,692,443,880
- Debt write-off – Government Annuities Account 0 0 62,859 0
- Debt write-off – Canada Student Loans 287,430,643 0 175,959,012 0
Total voted 2,476,486,739 2,274,068,344 2,510,545,638 2,300,443,404
Total Statutory 49,728,270,433 51,991,467,772 56,695,045,291 59,337,438,404
Total budgetary 52,204,757,172 54,265,536,116 59,205,590,929 61,637,881,808
Non-budgetary
Total Statutory 844,568,846 1,027,422,531 776,467,550 979,969,792
Total non-budgetary 844,568,846 1,027,422,531 776,467,550 979,969,792

Highlights

ESDC is planning budgetary expenditures on programs and services totaling $61.6 billion in 2016–17. More than 96% of planned budgetary expenditures will directly benefit Canadians through the Old Age Security Program and other statutory transfer payment programs.

Of the total amount of planned expenditures, $2.3 billion requires approval from Parliament. The remaining $59.3 billion represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

The 2016–17 planned expenditures represent an increase of $9.4 billion, or approximately 18%, when compared to the 2014–15 actual budgetary expenditures of $52.2 billion. This increase is partly explained by an increase to Old Age Security Pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement payments resulting from the aging population and the planned increase in the average monthly benefit amount.

When compared to the 2015–16 budgetary Main Estimates of $54.3 billion, the 2016–17 planned expenditures represent an increase of $7.3 billion, primarily associated with statutory items. In particular, forecasted Old Age Security Pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement payments are $47.9 billion and represent an increase of $2.4 billion, explained by changes in the average monthly rate and in the number of beneficiaries. Other factors contributing to the increase include:

  • An increase of $4.8 billion in Universal Child Care Benefit based on Budget 2015 enhancements;
  • A $67.2 million increase to the Canada Disability Savings Grants and Bonds, which is due to a steady increase in total registered Canada Disability Savings Plans and participation in the program;
  • An increase of $57.2 million to the Canada Student Loans Program, mostly explained by an increase in payments related to the direct financing arrangement under the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act, which is mainly due to an increase to repayment assistance costs; and
  • An increase of $24.0 million in Canada Education Savings Grant payments due to more families saving for their children's post-secondary education.

The Department plans to spend $608.0 million in 2016–17 in net operating expenditures (Vote 1), representing an increase of $46.6 million from the 2015–16 Main Estimates of $561.4 million. The net increase is mainly related to additional resources to administer the Temporary Foreign Worker Program, including measures to ensure that Canadians are considered first for available jobs, enhancing the quality and availability of labour market information to support the Labour Market Impact Assessment process, and establishing a more comprehensive compliance regime.

Voted grants and contributions (Vote 5) are expected to reach $1.7 billion in 2016–17, a decrease of $20.3 million from the 2015–16 Main Estimates. The decrease is mainly attributable to a reduction in funding to the First Nations Job Fund as per the funding profile approved in previous years.

For non-budgetary loans, there is a net decrease in authorities of $47.4 million from the 2015–16 Main Estimates, mainly as a result of higher than originally forecast volume of repayments against previously issued loans.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 117. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Employment and Social Development
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities.
Income Security 44,481,738,204 46,624,099,750 49,042,853,716
Social Development 2,939,900,967 3,081,658,183 7,933,212,853
A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market.
Learning 2,555,956,846 2,391,384,094 2,479,065,886
Skills and Employment 1,528,534,409 1,706,013,120 1,693,306,935
Safe, fair and productive workplaces and cooperative workplace relations.
Labour 127,308,633 160,715,470 161,240,615
Government-wide service excellence.
Service Network Supporting Government Departments 0 56,013,514 51,132,597
Delivery of Services for Other Government of Canada Programs 0 22,389,992 23,418,496
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 274,202,887 223,261,993 253,650,710
Funds not allocated to the 2016–17 Program Alignment Architecture 297,115,226 0 0
Total 52,204,757,172 54,265,536,116 61,637,881,808
Table 118. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Non-budgetary - Employment and Social Development
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market.
Learning 844,021,846 1,027,422,531 979,969,792
Safe, fair and productive workplaces and cooperative workplace relations.
Labour 547,000 0 0
Total 844,568,846 1,027,422,531 979,969,792

Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments

Table 119. Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments - Employment and Social Development
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Grants
Apprenticeship Grants 99,402,626 114,552,200 114,552,200
New Horizons for Seniors Program 35,263,449 41,340,000 41,340,000
Grants to not-for-profit, for-profit, and aboriginal organizations, municipal, provincial and territorial governments for adult learning, literacy and essential skills 0 18,300,000 14,800,000
Grants to non-profit organizations for activities eligible for support through the Social Development Partnerships Program 5,319,561 14,775,000 14,775,000
Enabling Accessibility Fund Small Projects Grant 12,453,191 13,650,000 13,650,000
Federal Income Support for Parents of Murdered or Missing Children 95,830 10,000,000 10,000,000
Pathways to Education Canada Grant 6,000,000 6,000,000 9,500,000
Labour Funding Program 1,476,451 1,703,000 1,703,000
Grants to not-for-profit organizations, individuals, municipal governments, Band/tribal councils and other Aboriginal organizations, public health and educational institutions, Régies régionales, for-profit enterprises, research organizations and research institutes to carry out research on homelessness to help communities better understand and more effectively address homelessness issues 0 250,000 250,000
Named grants for the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development 90,021 100,000 100,000
Total Statutory 48,822,019,139 51,057,118,525 58,339,214,355
Contributions
Payments to provinces, territories, municipalities, other public bodies, organizations, groups, communities, employers and individuals for the provision of training and/or work experience, the mobilization of community resources, and human resource planning and adjustment measures necessary for the efficient functioning of the Canadian labour market 518,810,029 590,945,161 563,032,566
Contributions to not-for-profit organizations, individuals, municipal governments, Band/tribal councils and other Aboriginal organizations, public health and educational institutions, Régies régionales, for-profit enterprises, research organizations and research institutes to support activities to help alleviate and prevent homelessness across Canada and to carry out research on homelessness to help communities better understand and more effectively address homelessness issues 99,184,967 105,050,000 111,494,275
Contributions to provincial/territorial governments, band councils, tribal councils, Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy agreement holders, municipal governments, not-for-profit organizations, professional associations, business and private sector organizations, consortia, industry groups, unions, regulatory bodies, ad-hoc associations, public health institutions, school boards, universities, colleges, CEGEPs, sector councils, and cross-sectoral councils to support enhanced productivity and competitiveness of Canadian workplaces by supporting investment in and recognition and utilization of skills 13,515,423 27,144,123 27,144,123
Contributions to assist unemployed older workers in communities with ongoing high unemployment and/or affected by downsizing 20,245,645 24,000,000 25,253,716
Contributions to organizations to support the development of human resources, economic growth, job creation and retention in official language minority communities 12,000,000 12,000,000 12,000,000
Payments to provinces, territories, municipalities, other public bodies, organizations, groups, communities, employers and individuals for the provision of training and/or work or business experience, the mobilization of community resources and human resource planning and adjustment measures necessary for the social development of Canadians and other participants in Canadian life 7,797,758 5,840,000 5,840,000
Contributions to not-for-profit, for-profit, and aboriginal organizations, municipal, provincial and territorial governments for adult learning, literacy and essential skills 12,160,665 3,209,000 3,209,000
Payments to non-profit organizations to develop national or provincial/territorial/regional educational and awareness activities to help reduce the incidence of elder abuse and fraud 4,903,140 1,800,000 1,800,000
Total Statutory 529,112,954 560,301,287 593,556,097
Other Transfer Payments
Payments to provinces and territories to deliver employment programs and services under the Canada Job Fund and under the Labour Market Agreements 500,000,000 500,000,000 500,000,000
Payments to provinces and territories under the Multilateral Framework for Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities 222,000,000 222,000,000 222,000,000

Enterprise Cape Breton Corporation

Raison d'être

Economic Action Plan 2014 Act, No. 1 dissolved Enterprise Cape Breton Corporation (ECBC), effective June 19, 2014. The economic and community development activities of ECBC and its associated budget have been transitioned over to the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency. Other ECBC activities such as real property holdings, environmental remediation of former mine sites, and human resources obligations of the former Cape Breton Development Corporation are now overseen by Public Works and Government Services Canada

Organizational Estimates

Figure 56. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Enterprise Cape Breton Corporation
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 120. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Enterprise Cape Breton Corporation
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
- Payments to the Enterprise Cape Breton Corporation 9,865,841 0 0 0
Total voted 9,865,841 0 0 0
Total budgetary 9,865,841 0 0 0

Highlights

Not applicable

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 121. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Enterprise Cape Breton Corporation
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
A competitive and sustainable Cape Breton economy.
Property Development 0 0 0
Commercial Development 0 0 0
Community Development 0 0 0
Policy and Advocacy 0 0 0
Environmental Stewardship 0 0 0
Human Resource Obligations 0 0 0
Regional Service Delivery 0 0 0
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 0 0 0
Funds not allocated to the 2016–17 Program Alignment Architecture 9,865,841 0 0
Total 9,865,841 0 0

Environment

Raison d'être

The Minister of Environment and Climate Change is responsible for this organization.

Environment is the lead federal department for a wide range of environmental and climate change issues. It plays a stewardship role in achieving and maintaining a clean environment by minimizing threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution; a safe environment by equipping Canadians to make informed decisions on weather, water and climate conditions; and a sustainable environment by conserving and restoring Canada's natural environment. The Department's program focus reflects that a clean environment and a strong economy go hand in hand.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 57. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Environment
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 122. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Environment
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 726,024,848 695,731,283 705,083,100 605,313,460
5 Capital expenditures 55,250,545 63,297,504 70,597,504 60,539,382
10 Grants and contributions 94,023,122 114,340,903 119,225,980 154,303,510
Total voted 875,298,515 873,369,690 894,906,584 820,156,352
Total Statutory 100,888,122 87,681,386 88,404,150 81,932,846
Total budgetary 976,186,637 961,051,076 983,310,734 902,089,198

Highlights

Compared with the 2015–16 Main Estimates, Environment's 2016–17 Main Estimates show a net planned spending decrease of

$59.0 million or 6.1% attributable to a decrease of $90.4 million in Operating, $2.8 million decrease in Capital, $40.0 million increase in Grants and contributions and $5.7 million decrease in the Employee Benefit Plan.

The major decreases are:

  • A decrease in funding of $90.9 million for the Clean Air Agenda;
  • A decrease in funding of $15.6 million related to the Meteorological Services of Canada Renewal;
  • A decrease in funding of $10.4 million for the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan; and,
  • A decrease in funding of $8.5 million for the Contaminated Sediment Remediation Projects.

These decreases are offset by increases related to the following programs:

  • An increase in funding for Sustainable Development Technology Canada for Sustainable Development Technology Fund of

$40.2 million;

  • An increase in funding of $12.8 million for the Species at Risk Act program;
  • An increase in funding of $10.7 million for the Federal Infrastructure initiative; and
  • Other small increases totalling a net amount of $ 2.7 million.

For further details on trends, please refer to the Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 123. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Environment
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Canadaʼs natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations.
Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat 140,408,483 122,779,285 137,912,691
Sustainable Ecosystems 72,619,888 91,480,613 88,026,739
Water Resources 92,453,058 95,770,859 80,035,023
Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – Wildlife 17,058,497 16,115,510 16,652,429
Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized.
Climate Change and Clean Air 121,061,134 122,872,074 97,030,449
Substances and Waste Management 86,779,805 85,149,099 74,912,985
Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – Pollution 42,309,866 37,560,222 34,672,528
Canadians are equipped to make informed decisions on changing weather, waterand climate conditions.
Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians 174,493,294 192,103,008 174,382,678
Weather and Environmental Services for Targeted Users 25,886,657 15,792,293 19,267,384
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 203,115,955 181,428,113 179,196,292
Total 976,186,637 961,051,076 902,089,198

Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments

Table 124. Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments - Environment
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Grants
Grant in support of The Natural Areas Conservation Program 10,000,000 22,500,000 22,500,000
Grants for the implementation of the Montreal Protocol on substances that deplete the ozone layer 2,525,717 2,800,000 2,800,000
Grant in support of Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians 35,000 44,000 44,000
Total Statutory 8,792,488 0 0
Contributions
Contribution to the Canada Foundation for Sustainable Development Technology 0 6,000,000 46,172,380
Contributions in support of Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat 24,774,134 29,427,064 30,119,314
Contributions in support of Sustainable Ecosystems 15,987,750 17,213,984 14,927,349
Habitat Stewardship Contribution Program 12,629,243 10,564,052 14,584,584
Contributions in support of Climate Change and Clean Air 9,459,133 8,141,572 5,497,653
EcoAction Community Funding Program 4,456,044 4,525,000 4,525,000
Contributions in support of the Science Horizons Youth Internship program under the Career Focus Program of the federal Youth Employment Strategy 2,999,744 3,069,000 3,069,000
Contributions in support of Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians 2,637,889 2,597,492 2,941,150
Assessed Contribution to the Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC) 3,271,685 2,930,000 2,767,818
Assessed contribution to the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) 2,296,265 2,167,785 2,167,785
Contributions in support of Substances and Waste Management 1,481,095 1,260,219 1,200,965
Contributions in support of Water Resources 989,500 604,595 469,158
Assessed contribution to the Convention on Wetlands of International Importance (Ramsar Convention) 171,370 206,140 206,140
Assessed contribution to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) 201,771 190,000 190,000
Assessed contribution to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) 106,782 100,000 121,214

Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario

Raison d'être

The Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario (FedDev Ontario) was established in 2009 to support growth in southern Ontario through the delivery of federal programs and services.

In 2013, FedDev Ontario's mandate was renewed for a second five-year term, from 2014–15 to 2018–19. Budget 2013 provided the Agency with $920 million in core funding for this five-year period, with a renewed commitment to strengthen the region's capacity for innovation, entrepreneurship and collaboration, and to promote the development of a strong and diversified southern Ontario economy.

The Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 58. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 125. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 26,659,973 25,859,077 25,859,077 25,753,625
5 Grants and contributions 74,386,300 186,239,502 182,239,502 205,479,871
Total voted 101,046,273 212,098,579 208,098,579 231,233,496
Total Statutory 3,056,870 3,153,140 3,153,140 3,214,356
Total budgetary 104,103,143 215,251,719 211,251,719 234,447,852

Highlights

FedDev Ontario estimates budgetary expenditures of $234.4 million in 2016–17. Of this amount, $231.2 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $3.2 million represents statutory funding and is provided for information purposes.

FedDev Ontario's planned spending in 2016–17 will support its strategic outcome by delivering its suite of programming and all associated internal support services. For 2016–17, FedDev Ontario anticipates expending $28.9 million in operating funds to support the investment of $205.5 million in transfer payment funding to strategic projects approved through its transfer payment programs.

Specifically, FedDev Ontario will continue to deliver its three core transfer payment programs in 2016–17: the Southern Ontario Prosperity Initiatives (SOPI); the Advanced Manufacturing Fund (AMF); and the Eastern Ontario Development Program (EODP). FedDev Ontario, like other regional development agencies, also plays an important role as a federal delivery agent for national programs, specifically the Community Futures Program (CFP), the Economic Development Initiative (EDI), the Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program and certain national infrastructure programs across the entire province. The Agency also delivers special federal programming such as the $8-million project to fund the revitalization of Toronto's Massey Hall and a $12-million grant for a remediation project in Brantford, Ontario.

FedDev Ontario provides a strong federal presence across southern Ontario and facilitates collaboration with a broad range of stakeholders. As a convenor and champion for the region, the Agency works with southern Ontario firms to identify opportunities to participate in defence procurement projects in support of the Industrial and Technological Benefits Policy and also operates Canada Business Ontario (part of the Canada Business Network), which helps entrepreneurs to gain access to government business information.

In total, FedDev Ontario is estimating an increase of $19.2 million or nine percent from its 2015–16 Main Estimates.

Significant year-over-year changes in funding are due to:

  • An increase of $22.2 million in funding for delivery of the new Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program (Budget 2015);
  • An additional $9.6 million for a grant to the City of Brantford to support the Brantford Greenwich-Mohawk Brownfield Remediation project;
  • A transfer of $8.6 million from the Southern Ontario Prosperity Initiatives to other government departments to support the establishment of the Canadian Centre for Aging and Brain Health Innovation ($6.0 million) and Canada's participation in the Thirty Meter Telescope ($2.6 million) announced in Budget 2015; and
  • A decrease of $3 million to the Southern Ontario Prosperity Initiatives and $1 million to the Advanced Manufacturing Fund.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 126. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
A Competitive Southern Ontario Economy.
Technological Innovation 9,298,340 91,786,705 92,081,080
Community Economic Development 27,689,452 41,264,851 66,896,145
Business Development 49,467,300 66,123,559 58,571,582
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 17,648,051 16,076,604 16,899,045
Total 104,103,143 215,251,719 234,447,852

Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments

Table 127. Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments - Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Grants
Grant to the Corporation of the City of Brantford 0 0 9,640,412
Contributions
Contributions for Southern Ontario Prosperity Initiatives 49,714,017 112,373,898 100,773,855
Contributions for the Advanced Manufacturing Fund 2,972,454 52,000,000 51,000,000
Contributions under the Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program 0 0 22,200,000
Contributions under the Community Futures Program 11,265,751 11,285,992 11,285,992
Contributions under the Eastern Ontario Development Program 9,600,000 9,600,000 9,600,000
Contributions under the Economic Development Initiative – Official Languages 834,078 979,612 979,612

Finance

Raison d'être

The Department of Finance Canada (Department) contributes to a strong economy and sound public finances for Canadians. It does so by monitoring developments in Canada and around the world to provide first-rate analysis and advice to the Government of Canada and by developing and implementing fiscal and economic policies that support the economic and social goals of Canada and its people. The Department also plays a central role in ensuring that government spending is focused on results and delivers value for taxpayer dollars. The Department interacts extensively with other federal organizations and acts as an effective conduit for the views of participants in the economy from all parts of Canada.

The Minister of Finance is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 59. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Finance
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Figure 60. Organizational Estimates - Non-budgetary - Finance
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory non budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 128. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Finance
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 119,941,036 102,971,668 107,424,574 90,740,545
5 Authority for amount by way of direct payments to the International Development Association pursuant to Bretton Woods and Related Agreements Act 0 1 1 1
Total voted 119,941,036 102,971,669 107,424,575 90,740,546
Total Statutory 85,563,213,780 89,543,425,443 87,091,957,830 89,373,051,964
Total budgetary 85,683,154,816 89,646,397,112 87,199,382,405 89,463,792,510
Non-budgetary
Total Statutory 80,735,156,755 0 0 0
Total non-budgetary 80,735,156,755 0 0 0

Highlights

Finance is estimating budgetary expenditures of $89.5 billion in 2016–17. Of this amount $89.4 billion or 99% represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information only. The remaining $90.7 million require approval by Parliament.

The 2016–17 Main Estimates of $89.5 billion is $182.6 million lower compared to the 2015–16 Main Estimates of $89.6 billion. This decrease is due to a net decrease of $170.4 million in statutory votes and a $12.2 million decrease in voted amounts.

The decrease of $170.4 million in statutory votes is mainly due to:

  • Interest on Unmatured Debt – A decrease of $2.3 billion due to a downward revision of interest rates by private sector economists for 2016–17, consistent with the 2015 Update of Economic and Fiscal Projections;
  • Other Interest Costs – A decrease of $536.0 million mainly due to a decline in the average Government of Canada long-term bond rate used to calculate interest on the public sector pension obligations pertaining to service pre-April 1, 2000;
  • Alternative Payments for Standing Programs – An increase in recoveries in the amount of $170.8 million as a result of an increase in the value of personal income tax points;
  • Additional Fiscal Equalization to Nova Scotia – A decrease of $63.3 million due to a decline in Nova Scotia's offshore oil and gas revenues. This program ensures that there is no reduction in combined Equalization and 2005 Offshore Accord Offset Payments relative to the previous Equalization formula (pre-2007);
  • Youth Allowance Recovery – An increase in recovery of $37.6 million as a result of an increase in the estimated value of personal income tax points;
  • Territorial Financing – A decrease of $24.7 million as a result of new and updated data used to calculate territorial expenditure requirements and revenue capacities entering the formula for Territorial Formula Financing;
  • Purchase of Domestic coinage – A decrease of $12.0 million largely due to the recently amended Royal Canadian Mint Act, which stipulates that the Mint can no longer anticipate profit with respect to the provision of circulation coins;
  • Additional Fiscal Equalization Offset Payment to Nova Scotia – A decrease of $3.5 million due to the decline in offshore revenues received by Nova Scotia. The Nova Scotia 2005 offshore arrangement guarantees that the provinceʼs offshore oil and gas revenues that enter the Equalization formula do not impact Equalization payments. Consequently, the province receives payments equal to the decline in Equalization due to these revenues;
  • Statutory Subsidies – An increase of $8.0 million is due to Newfoundland and Labrador's Term 29 payments under the Newfoundland Additional Financial Assistance Act;
  • Canada Social Transfer – An increase of $388.8 million reflecting the 3% annual increased funding commitment in the Jobs, Growth and Long-term Prosperity Act, 2012;
  • Fiscal Equalization – An increase of $539.1 million reflecting the 3.1% gross domestic product-based escalator being applied to the 2015–16 level; and
  • Canada Health Transfer – An increase of $2.1 billion reflecting the annual increased funding commitment in the Jobs, Growth and Long-term Prosperity Act, 2012. This program will increase by 6% per year until 2016–17, after which it will grow based on a 3-year moving average of nominal gross domestic product, with funding guaranteed to increase by at least 3% per year.

In these 2016–17 Main Estimates and ongoing, departmental operating expenditures and grants and contributions expenditures are consolidated into Vote 1 – Program Expenditures. This change provides a more efficient approach to the management of voted expenditures.

The decrease of $12.2 million in Vote 1, Program expenditures is due to a decrease in funding for:

  • Government advertising ($7.5 million);
  • Cooperative Capital Markets Regulatory System ($1.5 million);
  • Harbourfront Centre Funding Program ($3.0 million); and
  • Other program funding ($0.2 million)

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 129. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Finance
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
A strong economy and sound public finances for Canadians.
Transfer and Taxation Payment Programs 61,902,703,494 63,809,601,256 66,484,237,172
Treasury and Financial Affairs 23,600,697,770 25,726,000,000 22,878,000,000
Economic and Fiscal Policy Framework 124,886,930 70,864,539 60,440,111
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 54,866,622 39,931,317 41,115,227
Total 85,683,154,816 89,646,397,112 89,463,792,510
Table 130. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Non-budgetary - Finance
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
A strong economy and sound public finances for Canadians.
Transfer and Taxation Payment Programs 470,328,962 0 0
Treasury and Financial Affairs 80,264,827,793 0 0
Total 80,735,156,755 0 0

Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments

Table 131. Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments - Finance
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Contributions
Research and Policy Initiatives Assistance 0 35,000 35,000
Contribution to the Harbourfront Centre 5,000,000 3,000,000 0

Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada

Raison d'être

The Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC) is Canada's financial intelligence unit. The Centre exists to assist in the detection, prevention and deterrence of money laundering and the financing of terrorist activities, while ensuring the protection of personal information under its control. FINTRAC's financial intelligence and compliance programs strive to disrupt the ability of criminals and terrorist groups that seek to abuse Canada's financial system and to reduce the profit incentive of crime.

FINTRAC is an independent agency that operates at arm's length from the law enforcement agencies and other entities to which it is authorized to disclose financial intelligence. It reports to the Minister of Finance, who is in turn accountable to Parliament for the activities of the Centre. FINTRAC was established by, and operates within, the ambit of the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act (PCMLTFA) and its Regulations.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 61. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 132. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 46,417,795 44,954,660 48,922,420 51,042,501
Total voted 46,417,795 44,954,660 48,922,420 51,042,501
Total Statutory 4,986,635 5,495,520 5,517,524 5,654,561
Total budgetary 51,404,430 50,450,180 54,439,944 56,697,062

Highlights

FINTRAC's role is to facilitate the detection, prevention and deterrence of money laundering and terrorist activity financing by engaging in the following activities:

  • Receiving financial transaction reports and voluntary information on money laundering and terrorist activity financing in accordance with the legislation and regulations;
  • Safeguarding personal information under its control;
  • Ensuring compliance of reporting entities with the legislation and regulations;
  • Maintaining a registry of money services businesses in Canada;
  • Producing financial intelligence relevant to investigations of money laundering, terrorist activity financing and threats to the security of Canada;
  • Researching and analyzing data from a variety of information sources that shed light on trends and patterns in money laundering and terrorist activity financing; and
  • Enhancing public awareness and understanding of money laundering and terrorist activity financing.

In 2016–17, FINTRAC will receive an additional $0.4M for the implementation of legislative amendments and $5.9M to modernize its analytics system as identified in Budget 2014.

FINTRAC is headquartered in Ottawa, and its Montréal, Toronto and Vancouver regional offices have specific mandates related to compliance with the PCMLTFA.

For further details regarding FINTRAC, its operations and its use of funds, please refer to the 2016–17 Reports on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 133. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
A Canadian financial system resistant to money laundering and terrorist financing.
Financial Intelligence Program 20,873,133 21,083,994 27,127,113
Compliance Program 21,678,510 22,060,798 22,259,185
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 8,852,787 7,305,388 7,310,764
Total 51,404,430 50,450,180 56,697,062

Fisheries and Oceans

Raison d'être

Fisheries and Oceans supports strong economic growth in our marine and fisheries sectors and contributes to a prosperous economy through global commerce by supporting exports and advancing safe maritime trade. The Department supports the innovation needed for a knowledge-based economy through research in expanding sectors such as aquaculture and biotechnology. The Department contributes to a clean and healthy environment and sustainable aquatic ecosystems for Canadians through habitat protection, oceans management, and ecosystems research. A safe and secure Canada relies on the maritime security, safe navigation, presence on our waters, and effective search and rescue services that the Canadian Coast Guard provides. The Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 62. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Fisheries and Oceans
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 134. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Fisheries and Oceans
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 1,192,531,762 1,181,570,672 1,278,305,145 1,238,519,588
5 Capital expenditures 328,877,619 495,982,360 777,310,132 809,655,097
10 Grants and contributions 89,709,841 88,932,871 96,921,760 65,510,981
Total voted 1,611,119,222 1,766,485,903 2,152,537,037 2,113,685,666
Total Statutory 125,848,067 122,754,445 126,018,563 127,363,923
Total budgetary 1,736,967,289 1,889,240,348 2,278,555,600 2,241,049,589

Highlights

Fisheries and Oceans has three mandated strategic outcomes, which are:

  • Economically prosperous maritime sectors and fisheries;
  • Sustainable aquatic ecosystems; and,
  • Safe and secure waters.

Fisheries and Oceans is estimating budgetary expenditures of $2.2 billion in 2016–17. Compared to 2015–16, Main Estimates have increased by $351.8 million. Significant changes include:

  • An increase of $290.8 million related to the Federal Infrastructure Initiative;
  • An increase of $181.8 million related to the procurement of Canadian Coast Guard offshore fisheries science vessels;
  • An increase of $25.4 million related to the procurement of search and rescue lifeboats for the Canadian Coast Guard;
  • A decrease of $66.8 million related to light and medium-lift helicopters for the Canadian Coast Guard;
  • A decrease of $32.7 million related to the sunsetting of the Pacific and Atlantic Integrated Commercial Fisheries Initiatives; and,
  • A decrease of $23.3 million related to Canadian Coast Guard offshore oceanographic science vessel.

For additional information, please see the Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 135. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Fisheries and Oceans
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Safe and Secure Waters.
Fleet Operational Readiness 474,005,854 679,602,143 863,517,816
Shore-Based Asset Readiness 100,195,337 108,148,093 101,167,711
Marine Communications and Traffic Services 45,194,295 33,337,572 34,101,584
Search and Rescue Services 35,840,130 30,508,166 31,613,840
Hydrographic Products and Services 30,287,492 27,983,471 29,428,016
Canadian Coast Guard College 14,551,816 13,063,489 13,096,266
Maritime Security 7,320,573 8,477,162 8,491,010
Ocean Forecasting 17,201,935 8,476,473 8,463,792
Economically Prosperous Maritime Sectors and Fisheries.
Small Craft Harbours 104,489,712 114,501,031 277,650,414
Integrated Fisheries Management 136,798,429 132,058,128 128,176,269
Aboriginal Strategies and Governance 88,845,466 85,549,894 56,234,640
Marine Navigation 50,624,156 41,828,751 46,288,327
Salmonid Enhancement Program 30,938,311 29,421,364 29,458,464
Sustainable Aquaculture Program 24,747,548 27,854,324 27,951,814
International Engagement 14,848,021 12,105,833 14,010,930
Aquatic Animal Health 6,108,151 5,503,416 5,515,751
Biotechnology and Genomics 3,676,552 3,379,708 3,382,084
Territorial Delineation 1,574,650 1,593,377 1,625,067
Climate Change Adaptation Program 2,081,064 2,393,994 0
Sustainable Aquatic Ecosystems.
Compliance and Enforcement 106,007,941 102,911,820 103,320,201
Fisheries Protection 60,892,985 59,284,200 63,121,302
Oceans Management 43,144,082 46,666,258 40,202,708
Species at Risk 20,730,807 14,616,829 22,534,830
Environmental Response Services 18,887,268 16,965,722 17,926,048
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 297,974,714 283,009,130 313,770,705
Total 1,736,967,289 1,889,240,348 2,241,049,589

Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments

Table 136. Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments - Fisheries and Oceans
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Grants
Grant Program for the disposal of small craft harbours 840,400 500,000 500,000
Grants for the Disposal of Surplus Lighthouses 1,005,000 500,000 500,000
Grants to support organizations associated with research, development, management, and promotion of fisheries and oceans-related issues 95,459 238,000 238,000
Contributions
Contributions to support increased Native participation in commercial fisheries, cooperative fisheries management arrangements and consultations respecting Aboriginal fisheries agreements 48,248,062 49,075,415 27,002,530
Contributions under the Aboriginal Aquatic Resource and Oceans Management Program 19,397,085 18,752,936 16,435,706
Contributions to support the Recreational Fisheries Conservation Partnerships Program 8,615,130 10,000,000 10,000,000
Contribution agreements to permit the Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary (CCGA) Associations to carry out authorized activities related to maritime Search and Rescue (SAR) operations, SAR prevention and other safety related activities 5,021,000 5,021,000 5,521,000
Contributions to support the Academic Research Contribution Program for the support of academic research and development related to science priorities 1,563,538 2,839,228 2,839,228
Contribution to the Pacific Salmon Foundation 1,433,432 962,000 962,000
Contributions to support organizations associated with research, development, management, and promotion of fisheries and oceans-related issues 865,556 296,192 758,217
Contributions to support the Small Craft Harbours Class Contribution Program 2,384,379 500,000 500,000
Contribution to the Salmon Sub-Committee of the Yukon Fish and Wildlife Management Board for implementing responsibilities pursuant to comprehensive land claim settlements 240,800 248,100 254,300

Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development

Raison d'être

Under the leadership of the Minister of Foreign Affairs, the Minister for International Trade, and the Minister for International Development and la Francophonie, Global Affairs Canada (GAC) is responsible for the conduct of Canada's international relations, including foreign affairs, international trade and commerce, and international development. GAC advances Canada's values and interests internationally, delivers international programs, and administers Canada's international aid program to alleviate poverty in the developing world and provide humanitarian assistance. The department provides commercial and consular services to Canadians at home and abroad, and manages the government of Canada's global network of missions.

Note: Until the establishing legislation is amended, the legal name of the department for the purposes of Appropriation Acts remains Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 63. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Figure 64. Organizational Estimates - Non-budgetary - Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory non budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 137. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 1,517,360,409 1,451,334,915 1,529,597,443 1,458,048,856
5 Capital expenditures 207,347,828 103,546,437 129,236,529 124,444,220
10 Grants and contributions 3,607,883,948 3,573,409,668 3,938,481,338 3,529,676,551
15 Payments, in respect of pension, insurance and social security programs or other arrangements for employees locally engaged outside of Canada, or in respect of the administration of such programs or arrangements 52,235,785 50,779,000 54,484,724 50,779,000
20 Pursuant to subsection 12(2) of the International Development (Financial Institutions) Assistance Act, payments to international financial institutions – Direct payments 0 1 2 1
Total voted 5,384,827,970 5,179,070,021 5,651,800,036 5,162,948,628
Total Statutory 554,516,187 347,747,179 400,520,228 352,592,269
Total budgetary 5,939,344,157 5,526,817,200 6,052,320,264 5,515,540,897
Non-budgetary
Voted
L25 Pursuant to subsection 12(2) of the International Development (Financial Institutions) Assistance Act, payments to international financial institutions – Capital subscriptions 0 1 2 1
- Working capital advance – Loans and advances 1,822,876 0 0 0
- Working capital advance – Advances to posts abroad 7,324,965 0 0 0
Pursuant to subsection 12(2) of the International Development (Financial Institutions) Assistance Act, payments to international financial institutions – Issuance and payment of demand notes 0 0 0 0
Total voted 9,147,841 1 2 1
Total Statutory 57,455,271 45,146,540 45,471,873 3,098,450
Total non-budgetary 66,603,112 45,146,541 45,471,875 3,098,451

Highlights

Global Affairs Canada estimates budgetary expenditures of $5.5 billion in 2016-17. Of this amount, $5.2 billion requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $352.6 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

Significant items contributing to the net decrease of $11.3 million from the 2015-16 Main Estimates include:

  • A decrease of $130.1 million related to the Stabilization and Reconstruction Task Force and Global Peace and Security Fund; funding is scheduled to expire March 31, 2016, and is subject for renewal;
  • A decrease of $30.5 million related to the 2006 Softwood Lumber Agreement; funding is scheduled to expire March 31, 2016, and is subject for renewal;
  • An increase of $62.1 million in the cost of assessed contributions, mainly due to currency fluctuations resulting from the payment in the prescribed foreign currency of these contributions which represent Canada's treaty obligations and legal commitments to international organizations such as United Nations and World Health Organization;
  • An increase of $40.3 million for the foreign currency fluctuations incurred at missions abroad;
  • An increase of $24.0 million to implement the security projects to real property at missions abroad; and
  • An increase of $21.6 million for the relocation to the chancery for the combined missions to the European Union and to Belgium (Brussels).

For additional information, please refer to the department's Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 138. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
International Assistance and Poverty Alleviation - Poverty is reduced, and security and democracy are increased for those living in countries where Canada engages.
International Development 0 2,491,018,462 2,332,030,755
International Humanitarian Assistance 0 390,590,204 561,725,322
International Security and Democratic Development 0 377,802,527 237,453,939
Canadaʼs International Agenda - The international agenda is shaped to advance Canadian security, prosperity, interests and values.
Diplomacy, Advocacy, and International Agreements 1,030,998,272 905,984,385 949,769,188
Integrated Foreign Affairs, Trade, and Development Policy 86,002,990 74,932,448 80,118,760
Canadaʼs Network Abroad - The Department maintains a mission network of infrastructure and services to enable the Government of Canada to achieve its international priorities.
Mission Network Governance, Strategic Direction and Common Services 766,727,807 603,804,538 667,852,766
Management of Government of Canada Terms and Conditions of Employment Abroad 198,792,503 195,598,665 203,620,216
International Commercial and Consular Services for Canadians - Canadians are satisfied with commercial and consular services.
International Commerce 169,728,804 170,922,571 194,782,982
Consular Services and Emergency Management 52,028,661 45,337,728 52,012,000
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 256,272,063 270,825,672 236,174,969
Funds not allocated to the 2016–17 Program Alignment Architecture 3,378,793,057 0 0
Total 5,939,344,157 5,526,817,200 5,515,540,897
Table 139. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Non-budgetary - Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Canadaʼs Network Abroad - The Department maintains a mission network of infrastructure and services to enable the Government of Canada to achieve its international priorities.
Mission Network Governance, Strategic Direction and Common Services 9,147,841 0 0
International Assistance and Poverty Alleviation - Poverty is reduced, and security and democracy are increased for those living in countries where Canada engages.
International Security and Democratic Development 0 4,558,947 0
International Development 0 40,587,594 3,098,451
Funds not allocated to the 2016–17 Program Alignment Architecture 57,455,271 0 0
Total 66,603,112 45,146,541 3,098,451

Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments

Table 140. Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments - Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Grants
Grants for Multilateral Programming: Grants in support of development assistance, humanitarian assistance or disaster preparedness, for global operations, programs, projects, activities and appeals for the benefit of developing countries or territories or countries in transition 1,894,318,521 1,962,348,689 1,962,345,854
Grants for Partnerships with Canadians Programming: Grants for development assistance programs, projects and activities intended to support development for the benefit of developing countries or territories or countries in transition or to enhance the awareness, understanding, and engagement of Canadians with respect to development 19,982,998 23,900,000 38,900,000
Global Partnership Program for the destruction, disposal and securing of weapons and materials of mass destruction and related expertise 23,072,926 21,050,000 20,550,000
Grants in lieu of taxes on diplomatic, consular and international organizationsʼ property in Canada in accordance with terms and conditions approved by the Governor in Council 13,503,804 13,516,000 15,854,000
Grants for Bilateral Programming: Grants for cooperation with other donor countries for the benefit of developing countries or territories or countries in transition 0 9,900,000 9,900,000
Grants for the Anti-Crime Capacity Building Program 2,675,857 7,000,000 9,500,000
Grants for Counter-Terrorism Capacity Building Program 6,478,379 5,470,000 5,470,000
Grants in aid of academic relations 1,283,800 2,530,000 2,530,000
Annual host-country financial support for the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity 1,122,362 1,182,489 1,188,519
United Nations Voluntary Fund for Victims of Torture 0 60,000 60,000
United Nations Trust Fund on Indigenous Issues 0 30,000 30,000
Total Statutory 202,230 250,000 250,000
Contributions
Payments of Assessed Contributions to International Organizations:
United Nations peacekeeping operations (US$246,388,370) 271,004,489 267,121,802 313,561,622
United Nations Organization (US$96,000,000) 109,756,252 104,896,630 126,614,400
North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) – civil administration (17,160,398 Euro) 27,896,184 39,866,752 25,577,573
Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (13,377,308 Euro) 11,271,439 11,644,711 19,938,878
Food and Agriculture Organization (US$8,162,700) (5,930,956 Euro) 17,116,944 17,329,741 19,605,874
World Health Organization (US$7,138,726) (6,696,125 Swiss Francs) 15,501,963 15,758,116 18,607,036
International Atomic Energy Agency (9,796,800 Euro)(US$1,507,200) 14,416,706 14,437,258 16,589,976
International Labour Organization (11,705,611 Swiss Francs) 13,363,103 13,912,119 16,068,293
International Organization of La Francophonie (10,112,694 Euro) 12,758,343 13,780,272 15,073,146
Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (9,934,443 Euro) 13,197,717 14,144,026 14,807,287
United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (5,672,435 Euro) (US$4,279,205) 11,692,657 12,091,659 14,098,608
Organization of American States (US$8,762,438) 10,621,621 10,670,440 11,556,780
International Criminal Court (7,261,206 Euro) 8,249,884 9,187,684 10,822,827
World Trade Organization (5,434,900 Swiss Francs) 6,020,076 6,459,379 7,460,488
Commonwealth Secretariat (3,435,200 Pounds Sterling) 6,035,560 6,875,602 6,971,361
Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (2,347,383 Euro) (US$1,200,605) 4,143,485 4,597,807 5,082,252
Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on Agriculture (US$3,102,512) 4,125,517 3,598,302 4,091,903
Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (2,183,005 Euro) 2,798,821 3,228,404 3,253,769
International Civil Aviation Organization 2,414,895 2,382,785 2,382,785
Roosevelt Campobello International Park Commission (US$1,626,900) 1,903,941 1,777,551 2,145,719
Commonwealth Youth Program (789,750 Pounds Sterling) 1,338,123 1,495,887 1,602,711
International Energy Agency (956,718 Euro) 1,310,220 1,315,385 1,425,988
Commonwealth Foundation (690,365 Pounds Sterling) 1,201,889 1,311,939 1,401,020
Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (528,750 Euro) 757,873 645,705 788,102
Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Secretariat (US$81,316) (637,453 SGD) 683,181 583,102 706,327
Convention on Biological Diversity (US$483,084) 523,559 593,203 637,140
World Intellectual Property Organization (455,790 Swiss Francs) 539,929 541,706 625,663
World Customs Organization (382,686 Euro) 529,041 488,929 570,393
International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea (379,613 Euro) 497,215 539,986 565,813
International Maritime Organization (211,453 Pounds Sterling) 344,571 437,478 429,121
United Nations framework Convention on Climate Change (276,223 Euro) 756,692 830,127 411,710
International Seabed Authority (US$256,366) 276,530 253,797 338,122
Peace Implementation Council (190,133 Euro) 287,143 282,781 283,393
Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (US$191,601) 227,301 230,873 252,702
Non-proliferation, Arms Control and Disarmament (US$182,733) 222,594 115,989 241,006
Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal (US$175,642) 203,993 207,145 231,655
Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Centre for Education and Research (142,915 Euro) 234,283 205,198 213,015
The Vienna Convention and its Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer (US$156,159) 183,529 170,620 205,958
Rotterdam Convention on the Prior Informed Consent Procedure for Certain Hazardous Chemicals and Pesticides in International Trade (US$99,791) 123,159 121,697 131,614
Wassenaar Arrangement (72,382 Euro) 87,959 104,277 107,885
Secrétariat technique permanent des conférences ministérielles de l'éducation, de la jeunesse et des sports des pays d'expression française (21,364,039 CFA) (25,773 Euro) 82,806 83,668 86,698
Permanent Court of Arbitration (48,598 Euro) 61,505 69,777 72,436
International Commodity Organizations (28,578 Euro) 34,742 40,025 42,595
International Fact Finding Commission (11,202 Swiss Francs) 11,791 12,966 15,376
Contributions for Bilateral Programming: Contributions in support of development assistance, contributions for cooperation with countries in transition and contributions in support of regional or country specific development assistance programs, projects and activities for the benefit of developing countries or territories or countries in transition 717,584,838 454,285,336 440,728,986
Contributions for Partnerships with Canadians Programming: Contributions for development assistance programs, projects and activities intended to support development for the benefit of developing countries or territories or countries in transition or to enhance the awareness, understanding, and engagement of Canadians with respect to development 188,712,276 239,458,590 218,292,015
Contributions under the Global Partnership Program for the destruction, disposal and securing of weapons and materials of mass destruction and related expertise 14,973,760 42,440,000 42,940,000
Canada Fund for Local Initiatives 14,007,645 34,100,000 34,100,000
Global Commerce Support Program 5,496,262 6,955,855 17,955,855
Contributions for Multilateral Programming: Contributions in support of development assistance, humanitarian assistance or disaster preparedness, for global operations, programs, projects, activities and appeals for the benefit of developing countries or territories or countries in transition 13,181,942 13,400,000 9,051,550
Projects and development activities resulting from Summits of La Francophonie 8,300,000 8,000,000 8,000,000
Contributions for the Anti-Crime Capacity Building Program 3,167,148 5,601,782 7,092,625
Canadian International Innovation Program 2,588,040 0 5,852,500
Contribution for Counter-Terrorism Capacity Building Program 7,927,898 4,900,000 4,900,000
Contributions in Aid of Academic Relations 6,047,221 4,587,627 4,587,627
Annual Voluntary Contributions 1,502,800 3,450,000 3,450,000
Northern Dimension of Canadaʼs Foreign Policy 689,628 700,000 700,000

Governor General

Raison d'être

The Office of the Secretary to the Governor General (Office) provides support and advice to the Governor General of Canada in his/her unique role as the representative of The Queen in Canada as well as Commander-in-Chief. The Office assists the Governor General in carrying out constitutional responsibilities, in representing Canada internationally, and in encouraging excellence and achievement through the administration of the Canadian Honours System and in the granting of armorial bearings.

The Office also supports the Governor General in bringing Canadians together. It manages a visitor services program at both of the Governor General's official residences and oversees the day-to-day operations of these residences. The Office also provides support to former Governors General.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 65. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Governor General
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 141. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Governor General
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 17,954,982 17,165,126 18,958,134 20,034,516
Total voted 17,954,982 17,165,126 18,958,134 20,034,516
Total Statutory 2,906,058 2,965,991 3,035,283 3,110,918
Total budgetary 20,861,040 20,131,117 21,993,417 23,145,434

Highlights

The Office is estimating budgetary expenditures of $23.1 million in 2016–17. Of this amount, $20.0 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $3.1 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes only.

The Office's operating budget, as announced in Budget 2015, has been increased to include expenses to support and modernise the Canadian Honours system and bring it closer to all Canadians.

The increase in the statutory forecasts is the result of the Governor General's Act adjusting statutory payments paid to the current and former Governors General and an adjustment to the contributions to employee benefit plans

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 142. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Governor General
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
The Governor General, representing The Queen in Canada, is enabled to fulfill constitutional, state, ceremonial and public duties.
Governor General Support 14,693,687 13,981,917 16,253,434
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 6,167,353 6,149,200 6,892,000
Total 20,861,040 20,131,117 23,145,434

Health

Raison d'être

Health Canada regulates specific products and controlled substances, works with partners to support improved health outcomes for First Nations and Inuit, supports innovation and information sharing in Canada's health system to help Canadians maintain and improve their health, and contributes to strengthening Canada's record as a country with one of the healthiest populations in the world.

The Minister of Health is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 66. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Health
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 143. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Health
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 1,788,480,069 1,777,987,439 1,774,943,539 1,768,947,706
5 Capital expenditures 29,332,692 28,035,364 28,345,365 25,407,249
10 Grants and contributions 1,726,041,096 1,678,425,178 1,712,060,274 1,785,339,382
Total voted 3,543,853,857 3,484,447,981 3,515,349,178 3,579,694,337
Total Statutory 270,620,109 174,322,368 176,282,819 176,910,600
Total budgetary 3,814,473,966 3,658,770,349 3,691,631,997 3,756,604,937

Highlights

With authorities of $3.8 billion anticipated through the Main Estimates, Health Canada will continue improving the lives of all Canadians making this countryʼs population among the healthiest in the world as measured by longevity, lifestyle and effective use of the public health care system. Health Canada's authorities for 2016–17 have a net increase of $97.8 million from the previous year's Main Estimates.

Some important items to note which support these goals are the following:

  • Increases in funding for First Nations and Inuit Health for the continued implementation of the B.C. Tripartite Framework agreement, growth in First Nations and Inuit programs and services, and extension of Labrador Innu Health Programs;
  • An increase in funding to the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement, as announced in Budget 2015, in support of its efforts to implement, measure and spread innovative health care practices; and,
  • An increase in funding to establish a Thalidomide Survivors Contribution Program, to address the Government of Canada's 2015 commitment, for ongoing financial and health support payments to Canadian Thalidomide Survivors.

Once tabled in the House of Commons, additional information will be available in the departmental Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 144. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Health
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals receive health services and benefits that are responsive to their needs so as to improve their health status.
Supplementary Health Benefits for First Nations and Inuit 1,075,694,038 1,128,474,836 1,180,001,880
First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care 870,774,017 809,838,696 843,780,295
Health Infrastructure Support for First Nations and Inuit 640,190,204 635,463,846 683,792,972
Health risks and benefits associated with food, products, substances, and environmental factors are appropriately managed and communicated to Canadians.
Health Products 166,617,222 148,110,784 146,005,296
Substance Use and Abuse 69,339,368 86,731,215 87,797,766
Environmental Risks to Health 97,967,114 100,282,109 72,844,578
Food Safety and Nutrition 66,365,087 67,838,730 68,562,778
Pesticides 44,319,169 40,190,336 40,238,976
Consumer Product and Workplace Hazardous Materials 34,325,604 37,689,337 37,562,015
Radiation Protection 20,709,033 20,282,587 13,148,978
A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians.
Canadian Health System Policy 334,273,289 260,390,118 260,866,701
Official Language Minority Community Development 36,653,712 37,528,856 38,093,638
Specialized Health Services 13,650,940 19,133,053 18,685,517
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 343,595,169 266,815,846 265,223,547
Total 3,814,473,966 3,658,770,349 3,756,604,937

Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments

Table 145. Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments - Health
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Grants
Grant to support the Mental Health Commission of Canada 14,250,000 14,250,000 14,250,000
Total Statutory 87,956,664 0 0
Contributions
Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Infrastructure Support 611,949,625 598,167,682 645,276,337
Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care 641,124,657 570,922,419 621,858,728
Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Supplementary Health Benefits 191,378,390 202,486,815 210,928,523
Contribution to the Canadian Institute for Health Information 77,758,979 78,508,979 78,748,979
Contribution to the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer 47,500,000 47,500,000 47,500,000
Official Languages Health Contribution Program 35,835,074 36,400,000 36,400,000
Anti-Drug Strategy Initiatives 0 22,787,514 26,350,014
Health Care Policy Contribution Program 20,382,789 25,709,000 25,509,000
Territorial Health Investment Fund 26,190,000 23,000,000 20,000,000
Contribution to the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health 16,058,769 16,058,769 16,058,769
Contribution to the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement 0 0 12,000,000
Thalidomide Survivors Contribution Program 0 0 8,160,000
Contribution to the Canadian Patient Safety Institute 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000
Canada Brain Research Fund to Advance Knowledge for the Treatment of Brain Disorders 5,404,909 20,000,000 5,794,032
Canadian Blood Services: Blood Research and Development Program 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000
Contribution to strengthen Canadaʼs organs and tissues donation and transplantation system 3,580,000 3,580,000 3,580,000
Mood Disorders Society of Canada 1,999,990 550,000 325,000
Total Statutory 1,081,862 0 0

House of Commons

Raison d'être

The House of Commons is the elected assembly of the Parliament of Canada. The House has 338 Members who work on behalf of Canadians in four main areas – the Chamber, committees, caucus and their constituencies – and as representatives of Canada. Proudly supporting the House of Commons and its Members, the House Administration provides Members with the services, infrastructure and advice they need to carry out their work as legislators and representatives. The Speaker of the House of Commons is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 67. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - House of Commons
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 146. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - House of Commons
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 285,880,329 290,860,044 313,599,348 307,196,559
Total voted 285,880,329 290,860,044 313,599,348 307,196,559
Total Statutory 135,947,473 152,589,048 155,417,555 156,431,224
Total budgetary 421,827,802 443,449,092 469,016,903 463,627,783

Highlights

The budget increase is mostly attributable to increases in Membersʼ and House Officersʼ budgets.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 147. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - House of Commons
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Effective administrative and professional supportfor Members, both individually and collectively, in their roles as legislators and representatives of 338 constituencies, in the Chamber, in committee and in caucus.
Members and House Officers 245,268,531 269,774,379 300,362,470
House Administration 176,559,271 173,674,713 163,265,313
Total 421,827,802 443,449,092 463,627,783

Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments

Table 148. Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments - House of Commons
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Contributions
Payments to Parliamentary and Procedural Associations 989,696 938,549 938,549

Immigration and Refugee Board

Raison d'être

The Immigration and Refugee Board (IRB) is an independent, accountable administrative tribunal established by Parliament on January 1, 1989 to resolve immigration and refugee cases fairly, efficiently and in accordance with the law. The IRB ensures continued benefits to Canadians: by only accepting refugee claimants needing protection in accordance with international obligations and Canadian law; by contributing to the integrity of the immigration system, the safety and security of Canadians and upholding Canada's reputation of justice and fairness for individuals; and promoting family reunification. The IRB also contributes to the quality of life of Canada's communities by strengthening our country's social fabric and by reflecting and reinforcing core values that are important to Canadians. These include respect for human rights, peace, security and the rule of law.

The Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 68. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Immigration and Refugee Board
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 149. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Immigration and Refugee Board
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 107,060,930 99,542,732 101,028,352 100,834,047
Total voted 107,060,930 99,542,732 101,028,352 100,834,047
Total Statutory 12,689,103 13,166,759 13,383,959 13,668,619
Total budgetary 119,750,033 112,709,491 114,412,311 114,502,666

Highlights

The Immigration and Refugee Board (IRB) is estimating budgetary expenditures of $114.5 million in 2016–17. Of this amount,

$100.8 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $13.7 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require approval and are provided for information purposes.

The increase of $1.8 million from 2015–16 is mainly due to the following items:

  • An increase of $1.7 million in temporary funding for activities related to cases requiring the protection of information pursuant to Division 9 of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA);
  • An increase of $0.4 million in employee benefit plan costs; and
  • A decrease of $0.1 million representing funds transferred towards the 2016 Census of Population Program.

Additional information on IRBʼs operations is provided in the 2016–17 Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 150. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Immigration and Refugee Board
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Resolve immigration and refugee cases before the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada efficiently, fairly and in accordance with the law.
Refugee Protection 49,291,278 46,343,210 42,860,946
Refugee Appeal 10,865,389 13,725,196 16,219,236
Immigration Appeal 14,863,181 15,099,168 15,718,195
Admissibility Hearings and Detention Reviews 11,316,805 8,827,134 11,100,604
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 33,413,380 28,714,783 28,603,685
Total 119,750,033 112,709,491 114,502,666

Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Raison d'être

Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) supports Indigenous peoples (First Nations, Inuit and Métis) and Northerners in their efforts to:

  • improve social well-being and economic prosperity;
  • develop healthier, more sustainable communities; and
  • participate more fully in Canadaʼs political, social and economic development – to the benefit of all Canadians.

The Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs is responsible for this organization

Note: Until the establishing legislation is amended, the legal name of the department for Appropriation Acts remains Indian Affairs and Northern Development.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 69. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Indian Affairs and Northern Development
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Figure 70. Organizational Estimates - Non-budgetary - Indian Affairs and Northern Development
The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory non budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 151. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Indian Affairs and Northern Development
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Estimates To Date 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 1,141,408,972 1,069,154,628 1,457,615,561 658,200,538
5 Capital expenditures 39,030,056 35,946,145 40,547,664 41,432,179
10 Grants and contributions 6,319,998,924 6,936,151,589 7,165,968,297 6,652,765,968
Total voted 7,500,437,952 8,041,252,362 8,664,131,522 7,352,398,685
Total Statutory 191,215,186 146,165,506 148,777,614 153,153,455
Total budgetary 7,691,653,138 8,187,417,868 8,812,909,136 7,505,552,140
Non-budgetary
Voted
L15 Loans to native claimants 16,499,617 39,903,000 39,903,000 25,903,000
L20 Loans to First Nations in British Columbia 21,948,888 30,400,000 30,400,000 0
Total voted 38,448,505 70,303,000 70,303,000 25,903,000
Total non-budgetary 38,448,505 70,303,000 70,303,000 25,903,000

Highlights

INAC is estimating budgetary and non-budgetary expenditures of $7.5 billion in 2016–17. Of this amount, $7.4 billion requires approval by Parliament and the remainder represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information.

The net decrease in budgetary and non-budgetary spending of approximately $726.3 million or 8.8% over the 2015–16 Main Estimates, primarily reflects changes in the resource profile for targeted initiatives including (note that the major decreases listed below are primarily attributed to items that have sunset or have been reprofiled):

  • An increase of $140.0 million to support the First Nation Student Success Program and the Education Partnerships Program, and to support the repair and construction of on-reserve schools;
  • An increase of $107.0 million to meet increased demand for ongoing Indian and Inuit programs which reflects a 2% allowance for inflation and population growth and provides access to basic services such as education, housing, community infrastructure (water and sewage systems), and social support services;
  • A decrease of $403.2 million reflecting a decrease in the cash flow for the negotiation, settlement and implementation of specific and comprehensive claims (primarily a reprofile of funding to future years for specific claims reflecting the anticipated settlement level as well as the sunset of funding to support comprehensive claims and self-government negotiations across Canada);
  • A decrease of $281.7 million reflecting the reduced requirements for the continued implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement;
  • A decrease of $147.1 million reflecting the sunset of targeted funding for the assessment, management and remediation of federal contaminated sites; and
  • A decrease of $137.3 million reflecting the sunset of targeted funding for the First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan.

For further details on the department's plans and priorities, please see the 2016–17 Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 152. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Indian Affairs and Northern Development
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
The People – Individual, family and community well-being for First Nations and Inuit.
Education 1,788,854,310 1,779,502,873 1,855,472,918
Social Development 1,733,443,753 1,711,936,209 1,764,360,798
Residential Schools Resolution 492,880,678 441,605,934 165,991,965
First Nations Individual Affairs 28,426,563 25,732,113 28,911,620
The Government – Support good governance, rights and interests of Indigenous peoples.
Management and Implementation of Agreements and Treaties 749,933,655 740,282,191 806,628,418
Rights and Interests of Indigenous Peoples 173,531,547 868,880,226 487,447,240
Governance and Institutions of Government 422,226,591 389,416,006 397,170,892
The Land and Economy – Full participation of First Nations, Métis, Non-Status Indians and Inuit individuals and communities in the economy.
Infrastructure and Capacity 1,266,710,553 1,252,453,270 1,212,699,364
Community Economic Development 218,047,705 213,382,395 209,574,311
Indigenous Entrepreneurship 43,027,380 42,637,318 42,636,070
Strategic Partnerships 33,668,724 39,586,727 39,583,926
Urban Indigenous Participation 49,520,444 53,457,622 29,645,997
The North – Self-reliance, prosperity and well-being for the people and communities of the North.
Northern Governance and People 146,407,862 150,430,663 134,894,297
Northern Land, Resources and Environmental Management 212,493,747 195,493,907 58,614,753
Northern Science and Technology 40,827,871 48,961,314 47,822,067
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services 291,651,755 233,659,100 224,097,504
Total 7,691,653,138 8,187,417,868 7,505,552,140
Table 153. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Non-budgetary - Indian Affairs and Northern Development
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website
The Government – Support good governance, rights and interests of Indigenous peoples.
Rights and Interests of Indigenous Peoples 38,448,505 70,303,000 25,903,000
Total 38,448,505 70,303,000 25,903,000

Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments

Table 154. Listing of the 2016–17 Transfer Payments - Indian Affairs and Northern Development
  2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Main Estimates 2016–17 Main Estimates
Grants
Grants to implement comprehensive land claims and self-government agreements 415,905,951 444,682,118 470,925,141
Grants to First Nations to settle specific and special claims negotiated by Canada and/or awarded by the Specific Claims Tribunal 36,459,354 706,292,860 377,608,693
Grant for Band Support Funding 154,748,327 230,370,291 229,300,671
Grants to the Government of the Northwest Territories and the Government of Nunavut for health care of Indians and Inuit 52,256,000 53,301,000 54,367,000
Grant to the Miawpukek Indian Band to support designated programs 10,424,808 10,633,304 10,845,970
Grants to provide income support to on-reserve residents 9,394,115 10,000,000 10,000,000
Grants for the Political Evolution of the Territories, particularly as it pertains to Devolution 8,632,697 8,250,036 8,250,036
Grants to support First Nations and Inuit Post-Secondary Educational Advancement 1,047,102 1,500,000 1,500,000
Grants to participating First Nations and the First Nation Education Authority pursuant to the First Nations Jurisdiction over Education in British Columbia Act 0 600,000 600,000
Grant to the First Nations Finance Authority pursuant to the First Nations Fiscal and Statistical Management Act 500,000 500,000 500,000
Grants to British Columbia Indian bands in lieu of a per capita annuity 300,000 300,000 300,000
Grants to support First Nations Elementary and Secondary Educational Advancement 8,007 150,000 150,000
Grants to increase First Nations and Inuit Youth Participation in Education and Labour Market Opportunities 35,000 45,000 45,000
Total Statutory 89,533,240 55,988,925 67,717,287
Contributions
Contributions to support First Nations Elementary and Secondary Educational Advancement 1,370,659,613 1,371,530,321 1,435,744,670
Contributions to support the construction and maintenance of community infrastructure 1,103,841,614 1,121,408,108 1,091,038,543
Contributions to provide income support to on-reserve residents 991,939,516 1,014,725,872 1,034,663,082
Contributions to provide women, children and families with Protection and Prevention Services 678,553,838 672,053,368 704,594,372
Contributions to support First Nations and Inuit Post-Secondary Educational Advancement 331,538,650 342,885,217 349,306,107
Contributions to support the negotiation and implementation of Treaties, Claims and self-government agreements or initiatives 276,299,062 270,102,481 262,724,157
Contributions to support Land Management and Economic Development 177,363,950 172,059,931 178,933,159
Contributions to supply public services in Indian Government Support and to build strong governance, administrative and accountability systems 219,697,456 118,853,415 125,837,198
Contributions for emergency management assistance for activities on reserves 105,299,211 67,977,822 64,977,822
Contributions to support access to healthy foods in isolated northern communities 65,499,766 68,498,325 53,930,000
Contributions to increase First Nations and Inuit Youth Participation in Education and Labour Market Opportunities 49,660,015 36,376,000 41,376,000
Contributions to support the Aboriginal Economic Development Strategic Partnerships Initiative 24,183,110 31,700,000 31,700,000
Contributions for the purpose of consultation and policy development 15,468,247 26,250,569 28,795,000
Contributions to support the Urban Aboriginal Strategy 47,494,745 51,172,210