Ready Forces

Description

Field combat ready forces able to succeed in an unpredictable and complex security environment in the conduct of concurrent operations associated with all mandated missions. 

Planning highlights

Our success in achieving the missions assigned by the Government of Canada is directly related to our ability to provide first-class training and capabilities to our Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) members.

Readiness begins with the issuance of the Chief of the Defence Staff (CDS) Directive for CAF Force Posture and Readiness. This is the mechanism by which the CDS directs the CAF to organize, train and equip personnel to be ready to respond to Government of Canada direction and execute concurrent operations as outlined in Strong, Secure, Engaged (SSE).

Force Posture and Readiness direction ensures force elements (individual or collective units or capabilities) are trained in accordance with established readiness levels. Readiness levels are achieved through individual training (training individual CAF members), collective training (training teams to work together) and validation activities (assessments), equipment servicing and readiness management. Readiness levels will be achieved, in accordance with the managed readiness plan, through the preparation of equipment required for training and operations and the execution of individual and collective training. Added together, this will allow the CAF the flexibility to respond to various mission sets. Mission sets include defence diplomacy, collaborating with other government departments and agencies in support of domestic defence and security, rapid provision of humanitarian assistance and disaster relief, peace support operations and combat operations.

Our managed readiness programs are deliberately organized to ensure the CAF is trained and adequately equipped as a scalable, agile, responsive and interoperable force both domestically with civil authorities and other government departments, and internationally with allies and partners.

The CAF Joint Training Authority organizes and manages joint exercises and training to advance interoperability. They manage the Joint Managed Readiness Programme which ensures the readiness of the CAF to conduct concurrent operations through the participation and execution of specific Canadian and international exercises and training events.


JOINTEX - Exercise TRIDENT JUNCTURE

Photo: Sapper from 5th Combat Engineer Regiment, kneels in sentry mode during Exercise TRIDENT JUNCTURE, in Alvdal, Norway on 3 November 2018. 

Photo Credit: Master corporal Pat Blanchard, 2nd Division Canadian Army detachment Saint-Jean

Key Corporate Risk(s)

Two DND/CAF key corporate risks can be associated with the Ready Forces core responsibility. There is a risk that the CAF will not be able to meet its operational military personnel demand. There is also a risk that the CAF has insufficient force elements of appropriate readiness to respond to concurrent missions and assigned readiness levels. Many of the preventative and mitigating controls for these risks are articulated as activities of each Departmental Result below.

Departmental Result 2.1 – Canadian Armed Forces are ready to conduct concurrent operations

  • The CAF will generate and sustain high readiness naval, land, air and special operations forces and joint capabilities to meet Force Posture and Readiness levels directed by the CDS and the concurrent mission requirements of SSE. Throughout FY 2019-20, we will progress a number of initiatives to improve readiness, including:
    • Conduct joint and combined exercises, such as Operation NANOOK, JOINTEX, COALITION VIRTUAL FLAG, GLOBAL THUNDER, SCHRIEVER WARGAME, MAPLE RESOLVE, UNIFIED RESOLVE, CUTLASS FURY, VIGILANT SHIELD and GLOBAL ARCHER 2020, with other government departments and multinational allies to enhance integration and interoperability;
    • Integrate Command and Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance and operational and long term target setting and support within a Five Eyes environment;
    • Command and Control, and cooperation with Arctic nations, including the United States, in the conduct of Arctic missions or operations;
    • Enhance the preparedness of the CAF by assessing technology trends, threats and opportunities and by exploiting emerging technologies to include virtual Air, Maritime, Space and Cyber warfare environments for CAF and coalition combat training, testing and experimentation;
    • Participate in several CAF Cyber training activities in the interest of preparing to defend Canada, the continent and international interests from Cyber threats;
    • Deliver modern air and space power by experimenting, with CAF stakeholders, Command and Control constructs developed through the Canadian Space Operations Centre and other activities to employ, defend and protect space capabilities in support of operations described in SSE;
    • Re-align, modernize, and streamline the Defense Global Supply Chain to enable operations and improve both situational awareness and stewardship of resources; and
    • Expand Operational Support Hubs, facilitating the movement of people, materiel, equipment and supplies in far-reaching locations around the globe.
  • We will advance the integration of our space-based capabilities with the next generation of Canadian Earth observation satellites, known as the RADARSAT Constellation MissionFootnote xix set to launch in 2019. It will support whole-of-government surveillance needs including monitoring ice flows within Canada’s coastal waters; provide surveillance of Canada’s ocean approaches; monitor environmental conditions, such as floods and forest fires; and manage and map natural resources in Canada and around the world. The RADARSAT Constellation Mission will provide a worldwide situational awareness capability.
  • The Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) will integrate Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship (HMCS) Harry DeWolf, the first Arctic Offshore Patrol Ship, into the fleet. The Arctic Offshore Patrol Ship will be capable of navigating in sea ice up to one metre thick and will extend the RCN’s ability to operate in the Arctic. This will enhance the CAF’s situational awareness and contribute to maintaining Canadian sovereignty in the North. The Arctic Offshore Patrol Ship will also be capable of embarking a CH-148 Cyclone helicopter and will be used on a variety of missions at home and around the globe. The Arctic Offshore Patrol Ship will contribute to coastal surveillance, search and rescue, drug interdiction, humanitarian assistance and disaster relief operations and will be capable of integrating with a range of international partners. The acquisition of six ships will greatly increase the capacity of the RCN to deploy its vessels simultaneously, at home or abroad, enabling the Navy to use its fleet more effectively.
  • The Canadian Army (CA) is updating its Managed Readiness System to better enable readiness in support of SSE concurrent operational imperatives. An improved Managed Readiness System will allow the CA to more effectively execute national training and education programmes while supporting institutional tasks and maintaining force elements at the level of readiness outlined in the Force Posture and Readiness directive. The CA will reinforce the Army team by utilizing the Army Reserve. The added capabilities of the Army Reserve and including them in assigned mission tasks will help the CA meet SSE obligations while increasing attraction and retention.
  • The Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) will integrate new and replacement capabilities into the RCAF structure, including the interim fighter fleet, the CH-148 Cyclone (replacing the CH-124 Sea King), the CC-295 fixed-wing search and rescue aircraft. RCAF aircrew, search and rescue technicians, and maintenance personnel will be able to train in a new Search and Rescue Training Centre that will be established at 19 Wing Comox, British Columbia.
  • The Canadian Special Operations Forces Command remains at a very high readiness level to disrupt or respond to emerging crisis situations or threats to Canadians and Canadian interests. Further, the Canadian Special Operations Forces Command will contribute to the CAF’s ability to anticipate threats through the generation of forces designed to conduct discreet intelligence collection, surveillance and reconnaissance activities.

For more information, refer to the following websites:


Exercise MAPLE RESOLVE

Sapper from 5th Combat Engineer Regiment, kneels in sentry mode during Exercise TRIDENT JUNCTURE, in Alvdal, Norway on 3 November 2018.

Photo: A Tactical Armoured Patrol Vehicle (TAPV), a recently fielded CAF capability, travels along a road during Exercise MAPLE RESOLVE 2018 (Ex MR 18) in Wainwright, Alberta on 19 May 2018. 

Photo Credit: Master Corporal Malcolm Byers, Wainwright Garrison Imaging

Planned results

Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2015–16 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results 2017–18 Actual results
2.1 Canadian Armed Forces are ready to conduct concurrent operations
% of operations that are capable of being conducted concurrently
100% 31 March 2025
Not Available New indicator as of 2018-19 Not Available New indicator as of 2018-19 Not Available New indicator as of 2018-19
% of force elements that are ready for operations in accordance with established targets
100%
31 March 2025
Not Available New indicator as of 2018-19 Not Available New indicator as of 2018-19 Not Available New indicator as of 2018-19
Note: For more information about National Defence performance indicators, please visit GC InfoBaseFootnote xxix.

Departmental Result 2.2 – Military equipment is ready for training and operations

  • The development and sustainment of capabilities needed to undertake the operations and exercises that take place in Canada and around the world depend on having the necessary trained personnel as well as military equipment – aircraft, ships, vehicles and weapons – in good working condition and at a certain level of readiness. This means that once equipment is made available, it is maintained in serviceable or reliable condition for use by the CAF. Equipment maintenance and repair involves civilian and military personnel and private sector firms. Spending in this area makes a significant contribution to the Canadian economy every year.
  • The department will continue to assess the use and availability of maritime, land and aerospace fleets. While equipment will be made available for use by the different military environments through the Defence Acquisition Programs and the Equipment Support Program, the serviceability of equipment for training and operations is ensured by the Ready Forces Programs where minor repairs are addressed.
  • The availability and use of the various key equipment fleets of the CAF will continue to be monitored this year; this will ensure the readiness of our forces and the effective delivery of operations. Where the CAF cannot use key equipment because it is not available or serviceable, they may be less ready to safely conduct operations. As such, these factors are important in expressing the amount of risk being absorbed by the CAF as they conduct training and operations.
  • To achieve an 80% serviceability rate of its 13 key fleets by 2023, the CA will develop an improved Serviceability and Sustainment Dashboard in FY 2019-20 to better monitor serviceability rates and predict parts and maintenance needs. Additionally, the CA will continue with the implementation of the Canadian Army Equipment Readiness Programme, established in FY 2017-18 to ensure the serviceability of CA equipment is maintained at the highest level possible. The Canadian Army Equipment Readiness Programme ensures that CA equipment is properly tracked, sustained, and maintained throughout its lifecycle.

Planned results

Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2015–16 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results 2017–18 Actual results
2.2 Military equipment is ready for training and operations
% of maritime key fleets that are serviceable to meet training and readiness requirements
90% or greater*
31 March 2020
94%
89%
95%
% of land fleets that are serviceable to meet training and readiness requirements
70% or greater*
31 March 2020
Not Available New indicator as of 2018-19
Not Available New indicator as of 2018-19
Not Available New indicator as of 2018-19
% of aerospace fleets that are serviceable to meet training and readiness requirements
85% or greater*
31 March 2020
Not Available New indicator as of 2018-19
Not Available New indicator as of 2018-19
Not Available New indicator as of 2018-19
Notes:
  1. *A portion of the fleet will normally be subject to repairs due to the use of fleets and thus not be serviceable. As such, a target of 100% would not reflect a realistic goal. A healthy fleet should, however, reflect a low proportion of the fleet that is unserviceable in order to ensure that the appropriate level of training and readiness can be provided. Note that the concept of “serviceable” differs significantly between military environments due to the inherent differences across types of equipment.
  2. The RCN does not include vessels that are unavailable due to a scheduled maintenance period (such as Short Work Periods and Docking Work Periods) when calculating the percentage of vessels that are ready for training and operations. The indicator is calculated with the following formula: Total number of vessels in a key fleet x 365 days (minus all days spent in a scheduled maintenance period) divided by actual number of days those vessels were serviceable.
  3. In the Maritime context, the indicator refers to the aggregate number of serviceable vessels that comprise the key fleets. These fleets are the Halifax, Victoria, Kingston and Harry DeWolf classes.
  4. In the army context, the indicator refers to the aggregate number of equipment that comprise the land fleets.
  5. In the air force context, the indicator refers to the aggregate number of equipment that comprise the aerospace fleets.
  6. For more information about National Defence performance indicators, please visit GC InfoBaseFootnote xxx.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)

2019–20
Main Estimates
2019–20
Planned spending
2020–21
Planned spending
2021–22
Planned spending
9,558,448,134
9,672,587,363
9,666,787,230
9,703,979,451

Human resources (full-time equivalents) 

2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
2020–21
Planned full-time equivalents
2021–22
Planned full-time equivalents
46,016
46,116
46,136

Note: Financial, human resources and performance information for the National Defence’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBaseFootnote xxxi.

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