Funding: Canada Summer Jobs – Quality job placements

Quality job placements

Current status: Closed

Thank you for your interest in the Canada Summer Jobs program. The call for applications is now closed. Service Canada will inform you of the status of your application starting in April 2022.

2. Quality job placements

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What is a quality job placement

Through the Canada Summer Jobs program, the Government of Canada provides employers with wage subsidies to create quality job placements for youth in safe, inclusive and healthy work environments free of harassment and discrimination.

Your application should demonstrate the quality of your proposed job placement(s) through:

  • Youth investment - by paying youth above the minimum wage in your province or territory, or by committing to retain the youth as an employee beyond the period of the CSJ Agreement.
  • Supervision – by demonstrating how you will support the youth during their work placement through observing, evaluating, and providing feedback on job performance.
  • Mentoring – by demonstrating how your guidance will support the professional and career-development of the youth.
  • Skills development – by providing opportunities for youth to develop the skills needed for employment.
  • Health and safety practices – by demonstrating that you have implemented measures to ensure that your work environment is safe.
    • In the current context of COVID-19, employers are responsible for staying informed of provincial guidance on essential services and municipal, provincial and federal public health information, and following all necessary local health guidance.
  • Work environment policies and practices – by demonstrating that you have implemented measures to provide a work environment free of harassment and discrimination, including non-discriminatory hiring practices.

The following are examples of projects that meet the objectives of the program to provide quality work placements to youth, to provide youth with the opportunity to develop and improve their skills, and to support local and national priorities to improve access to the labour market for youth who face unique barriers.

Examples of quality projects

Example #1 - Youth who are early leavers of high school, not in employment, education or training

A local daycare plans to hire four youth with no prior job experience nor post-secondary education to work in the daycare centre over the summer months to care for children.

The youth will be tasked with planning, organizing and delivering a special summer-long project for the children. The youth will lead both a recreational and an educational piece that are not part of the normal day-to-day operations of the daycare. The recreational aspect will include an introduction to various summer sports and a competition over the course of several weeks.

Outcomes for the youth will be obtaining their first job experience through learning how to care for children. These youth would develop communication, organizational and collaboration skills through planning and developing a project to provide recreational and educational activities for participants. Those youth who had a successful experience, and are thinking of pursuing a career as an Early Childhood Educator, could be retained by the employer at the conclusion of the summer placement.

A project like this would receive additional assessment points as it responds to one of the program’s national priorities. See Section 4 Assessment Criteria for more information.

Example #2 - Black and other racialized youth

An organization that develops clean air technology seeks to hire a Black or other racialized youth to support ongoing research and development activities.

The organization intends to hire a visible minority youth studying environmental engineering to work as an assistant to an experienced engineer. The youth will support research and testing activities, and the experienced engineer will provide mentoring to support the youth’s career and skills development.

A project like this would receive additional assessment points as it responds to one of the program’s national priorities. See Section 4 Assessment Criteria for more information.

Example #3 - Youth with Disabilities

A not-for-profit organization that runs a summer camp for disabled youth is looking to hire camp counselors.

The counselors will plan and lead daily activities for campers and provide various supports to campers based on the individual needs of the youth. The counselors will be under the direct supervision of senior camp leaders on a daily basis. Supervision will include comprehensive health and safety training in advance of the camp session, as well as regular daily meetings to discuss concerns or issues. Each youth hired will also receive one-on-one mentoring throughout the summer.

A project like this would receive additional assessment points as it responds to one of the program’s national priorities. See Section 4 Assessment Criteria for more information.

Example #4 - Indigenous Youth

An Indigenous-led organization seeks to hire youth to support services to community members and to assist with Indigenous cultural awareness events taking place throughout the summer. To support these events, youth will assist with guided tours, storytelling, traditional dance performances and craft workshops. At the local office, youth will assist community members with resumé building. Youth will also work to connect Elders with children in the community so that children can learn about their culture and heritage. Outcomes for youth include experience in client service and community development and development of leadership, communication and teamwork skills.

A project like this would receive additional assessment points as it responds to one of the program’s national priorities. See Section 4 Assessment Criteria for more information.

Example #5 - Small Businesses and Not-For-Profit organizations that self-report as having leadership from groups that are underrepresented in the labour market

A local restaurant owned by an individual who self-reports as being from an underrepresented group plans to hire youth to assist with processing and delivering orders over the summer months.

The youth will work in small teams to plan and conduct deliveries. They will also be responsible for keeping accurate records. The youth will receive in-person training throughout their first week from their supervisor and then a senior staff member will be assigned as their mentor for the remainder of the placement. Included in the youth’s training will be direction for client service and the proper procedures for social distancing in a professional setting. Outcomes for the youth will be learning how to develop work plans as a team as well as gaining experience in client service through coordinating delivery drop-offs.

A project like this would receive additional assessment points as it responds to one of the program’s national priorities. See Section 4 Assessment Criteria for more information.

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