Preliminary Statistics – 2014 edition (2012 tax year)

The Preliminary Statistics presents data from individual income tax and benefit returns that were processed for the tax year two years prior to year of publication. For example, the 2014 edition of the tables analyze returns from the 2012 tax year, which generally had to be filed by the end of April 2013.

Preliminary Statistics explanatory notes

The Preliminary Statistics present data based on 2012 tax year returns. This represents about 95% of the expected number of returns to be filed for the 2012 tax year. The initial assessment values are used to produce the tables. Any changes to the assessment as a result of Agency or taxpayer initiated reassessments are not included in the Preliminary Statistics.

These Preliminary Statistics contain Tables 1 to 5. They use data from personal tax returns filed two years earlier. For example, the 2014 edition of the tables analyzes returns from the 2012 tax year, which generally had to be filed by the end of April 2013. All counts and amounts in this publication can be subject to revision.

Confidentiality procedures

To ensure the protection of taxfiler information, data have been suppressed where warranted. As well, counts are rounded to the nearest multiple of 10. For example, 104 would be rounded to 100 and 105 would be rounded to 110. Dollar amounts have been rounded to the nearest thousand in Tables 2 to 5, and to the nearest million in Table 1. Totals may not add up due to rounding or suppression.

Major changes to the 2014 Edition

The major changes for the 2012 tax year are listed below. For more details on these and other changes, see the areas outlined in the General Income Tax and Benefit Guide -2012.

Basic personal amount (line 300) - The amount has increased to $10,822.

Age amount (line 301) - The maximum amount has increased to $6,720.

Spouse or common-law partner amount (line 303) - The maximum amount has increased to $10,822.

Amount for an eligible dependant (line 305) - The maximum amount has increased to $10,822.

Canada Pension Plan (CPP) working beneficiaries contributions (line 308) - As of January 1, 2012, the rules for contributing to the CPP changed. The changes apply to you if you are an employee or self-employed, you are 60 to 70 years of age, and you are receiving a CPP or Quebec Pension Plan retirement pension. For more information, go to www.cra-arc.gc.ca/cpp.

Family caregiver amount - If you have a dependant with an impairment in physical or mental functions, you could be eligible for an additional amount of $2,000 in the calculation of certain non-refundable tax credits.

Major classification variables

The following variables are used in one or more of the tables in this publication:

  • Taxable or non-taxable classification
  • Income classification
  • Major source of income classification
  • Age and sex classification
  • Province or territorial classification

Taxable or non-taxable classification

A return is considered taxable when the sum of net federal tax, net provincial tax, CPP contributions payable on self-employment earnings, EI premiums payable on self-employment earnings, and social benefit repayment amounts was at least $2 and non-taxable when this sum was less than $2.

Some returns are classified as taxable even when the return showed a total income less than the allowable basic personal amount of $10,822. This happened for:

  • Individuals subject to the alternative minimum tax;
  • Returns filed by certain non-residents for income earned in Canada that's not subject to personal amounts;
  • Individuals who resided in Canada for only part of a tax year (these individuals paid tax on the income they earned during their period of residence in Canada, and as a result they are entitled to tax credits only for that period).
  • Individuals who had CPP or EI contributions payable on self-employment earnings.
  • Individuals who had to repay social benefits.

It is possible for individuals classified in the upper income ranges to use a variety of deductions and tax credits to achieve a non-taxable status. Among the deductions that can be used are: carrying charges (such as interest paid to earn investment income); business or farm losses of previous years; and allowable business investment losses. Tax filers can also use non-refundable tax credits - such as charitable donations, gifts to Canada or a province or territory, or dividend and foreign tax credits - to reduce their tax to zero.

Income classification

The income classes presented in the tables are based on the total income assessed. This corresponds to line 150 of the return and includes:

  • Employment income
  • Pension income
  • Investment income
  • Self-employment income
  • Income from certain other sources
  • Non-taxable income

Total income assessed may differ from the true economic income presented in other publications because it does not include certain non-taxable income and it may include grossed-up income such as income from eligible dividends which is the value plus 38%.

A detailed list of other forms of non-taxable incomes can be found in Item 30: Total income assessed.

Major source of income classification

Taxfilers do not report their type of work or occupation. These classification statistics are based on the major source of income classification as determined from the largest source of gross income.

For example, if a taxfiler earned a salary but received more income from investments, this taxfiler was classified as an investor, not as an employee.

For self-employment income, the gross income was used to determine the major source of income. In cases where the gross income was not available, the filer's net self-employment income was multiplied by a factor to arrive at an estimated gross income. This estimated gross income was only used to determine the largest source of income.

This list describes the majority of taxfilers who make up each of the nine major income classifications we use:

  • Employment - taxfilers employed by a business, institution, school, federal or provincial Crown corporation, or some form of government body.
  • Farming and fishing - self-employed taxfilers who earned their major source of income from either farming or fishing.
  • Professional income - self-employed taxfilers whose major source of income is professional fees (including accountants, doctors and surgeons, dentists, lawyers and notaries, engineers and architects, as well as entertainers, artists, etc.). We classify professionals who earn most of their income in the form of salaries are classified as employees. As a result, the number of professionals shown in the publication may be less than the number shown in professional directories.
  • Sales - taxfilers whose major source of earnings is commission income from self-employment.
  • Business proprietorship or partnership - taxfilers whose major source of income is business income.
  • Investment - taxfilers whose major source of income is interest, taxable dividends from Canadian corporations, taxable capital gains, and other investment income.
  • Pension - taxfilers whose major source of income is pension or split pension income.
  • Benefit - taxfilers whose major source of income is employment insurance, social assistance payments, Universal Child Care Benefits, workers' compensation benefits, and net federal supplements.
  • Other - taxfilers whose major source of income is alimony, RRSP income, registered disability savings plan income or other unspecified income.

Age and sex classification

The taxfiler's age is determined using the reported year of birth on page 1 of the return. Individuals with no reported date of birth are included in the total.

The sex of the taxfiler is determined from information on file with the Agency (information provided by the Social Insurance Registry). Individuals with no reported sex are included in the total.

Provincial or territorial classification

Province or territory of residence - used in table 5 - refers to the province or territory in which the taxfiler resided on December 31, 2012, as indicated in the T1 General Income Tax and Benefit Return.

Province or territory of taxation - used in Table 1 - refers to the province or territory in which provincial or territorial tax is payable. It is possible for a taxfiler to reside in one province or territory of Canada, but all or part of their income for the year was earned and can be allocated to a permanent establishment outside that province or territory, or outside Canada. Such individuals are referred to as "multiple jurisdictional" filers. In Table 1, multiple jurisdiction filers are assigned to the province in which they have allocated the highest percentage of their net income. In cases where it is not possible to determine to which province they have allocated the highest percentage of their net income, they are assigned to their province of residence as indicated on page 1 of the T1 General Income Tax and Benefit return.

Description of items

  • Number of returns
  • Income items
  • Deduction items
  • Non-refundable tax credits
  • Tax payable

Number of returns

Item 1: Number of taxable returns

This is the number of taxable returns as outlined in the Taxable or non-taxable classification description.

Item 2: Number of non-taxable returns

This is the number of non-taxable returns as outlined in the Taxable or non-taxable classification description.

Item 3: Total number of returns

This item is the total number of returns.

Income items

Employment income

Item 4: Employment income (before deductions) - Line 101 of the return, less commissions on line 102

This item refers to income from wages and salaries, taxable allowances and benefits, bonuses and directors' fees, etc.

Item 5: Commissions - Line 102 of the return

This item refers to the income an employee received based on a percentage of sales. Some people may be paid by commission only, while others may receive a fixed salary as well as a percentage of sales.

Item 6: Other employment income - Line 104 of the return

This item includes tips and occasional earnings, net research grants, clergy's housing allowance, foreign employment income, income-maintenance insurance plans (wage-loss replacement plans), veterans' benefits, certain GST/HST and QST rebates, royalties, amounts received under a supplementary unemployment benefit plan (guaranteed annual wage plan), taxable benefits for premiums paid for a group term life-insurance plan, employee profit-sharing plan amounts, medical premium benefits, amounts for the Wager Earner Protection Program.

Pension income

Item 7: Old Age Security pension - Line 113 of the return

This is the amount of income from the Old Age Security pension plan (box 18 of the T4A(OAS) slip).

Item 8: Canada Pension Plan (CPP) or Quebec Pension Plan (QPP) benefits - Line 114 of the return

This is the amount of CPP or QPP benefits (box 20 on the T4A(P) slip). This item also includes death and disability benefits, and child benefit, if received by a child of a deceased or disabled contributor.

Item 9: Other pensions or superannuation - Line 115 of the return

In addition to income from registered pension plans, this item includes income from registered retirement income funds, deferred profit-sharing plans, foreign pensions, etc.

Item 10: Elected split-pension amount - Line 116 of the return

Amount of elected split-pension amount from line E of Form T1032, Joint Election to Split Pension Income.

Income from other sources

Item 11: Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB) - Line 117 of the return

An eligible individual responsible for the care of a child under 6 years of age, is eligible to receive $100 per month for each qualified dependant.

Item 12: Employment Insurance and other benefits - Line 119 of the return

This is the amount of benefits from the Employment Insurance Plan (box 14 on the T4E slip).

Item 13: Taxable amount of dividends (eligible and other than eligible) from taxable Canadian corporations - Line 120 of the return

This is the total dividend value, plus a 38% gross-up for the eligible dividends and a 25% gross-up for the dividends other than eligible dividends. A dividend tax credit is also available.

Item 14: Interest and other investment income - Line 121 of the return

This item includes interest, foreign interest or dividend income, etc.

Item 15: Net partnership income: limited or non-active partners only - Line 122 of the return

This is the share of the net business income or loss from limited partnerships.

Item 16: Registered Disability Savings Plan (RDSP) Income - Line 125 of the return

This item includes the registered disability savings plan income, the amount shown in box 131 of the T4A slip.

Item 17: Net rental income - Line 126 of the return

This is rental income after expenses.

Item 18: Taxable capital gains - Line 127 of the return

This amount represents 50% of the capital gains realized in 2012.

Item 19: Support payments received - Line 128 of the return

This is the taxable part of support payments received.

Item 20: RRSP income - Line 129 of the return

This item refers to income from an RRSP.

Item 21: Other income - Line 130 of the return

This item contains the following incomes reported on line 130 of the return:

  • Scholarships, fellowships, bursaries, and artists' project grants;
  • Apprenticeship incentive grant;
  • Apprenticeship completion grant;
  • lump-sum payments from pensions and deferred profit-sharing plans when leaving a plan;
  • Retiring allowances (severance pay);
  • Death benefits (other than Canada Pension Plan or Quebec Pension Plan death benefits)
  • Other kinds of income (see the General Income Tax and Benefit Guide - 2012 for more details).

Income from self-employment

Self-employment income presented here corresponds to net income, i.e., the gross income, less any adjustments and expenses incurred.

Item 22: Net business income - Line 135 of the return

This item is the income from businesses and active partnerships. A business is an activity intended to carry on for profit.

Item 23: Net professional income - Line 137 of the return

This refers only to income from independent practice, such as earnings by self-employed accountants, doctors, dentists, and lawyers. However, when a professionally qualified person is employed by a company, government, or institution, this individual's income is included in Item 4: Employment income (before deductions).

Item 24: Net commission income - Line 139 of the return

This item shows net commission income for self-employed people such as real estate agents who are working in sales and earning commissions.

Item 25: Net farming income - Line 141 of the return

Self-employed farmers, including beekeepers, tree farmers, etc., report their income on this line.

Item 26: Net fishing income - Line 143 of the return

This item shows the net income from self-employed people fishing as boat owners or crew members, or fishing from shore.

Non-taxable income

Item 27: Workers' compensation benefits - Line 144 of the return

This is the amount of compensation paid in respect to an injury, disability, or death to an employee, or surviving spouse/common-law partner, under the law of Canada or a province or territory. These amounts are shown on a T5007, Statement of Benefits slip.

Item 28: Social assistance payments - Line 145 of the return

This item shows the social assistance payments made to beneficiaries or third parties as reported on a T5007, Statement of Benefits slip.

Item 29: Net federal supplement - Line 146 of the return

This is the net amount of any Allowance, Allowance for the survivor, or Guaranteed Income Supplement received in the tax year, box 21 on the T4A(OAS) slip.

Note

A deduction may be claimed for the sum of Items 27, 28, and 29 at line 250 of the return.

Total income assessed

Item 30: Total income assessed - Line 150 of the return

This item contains the amount reported on line 150 of the return, or the total of Items 4 to 29. This item does not include non-taxable income from the following:

  • any GST/HST credit or Canada Child Tax Benefit payments, as well as those from related provincial or territorial programs;
  • child assistance payments and the supplement for handicapped children paid by the province of Quebec;
  • compensation received from a province or territory for a victim of a criminal act or a motor vehicle accident;
  • lottery winnings;
  • most gifts and inheritances;
  • amounts paid by Canada or an ally (if the amount is not taxable in that country) for disability or death due to war service;
  • most amounts received from a life insurance policy following someone's death;
  • most payments of the type commonly referred to as strike pay received from a union; and
  • most amounts received from a Tax-Free Savings Account (TFSA).

Note

Income earned on any of the above amounts (such as interest earned from the investment of lottery winnings) is taxable.

Some parts of total income assessed are in gross amounts, while others are in net amounts. For example, eligible dividend income is grossed-up to represent 138% of such income. Interest and investment income are also gross figures since carrying charges are not deducted (i.e., netted out). On the other hand, taxable capital gains are net amounts because only 50% of the gains realized in 2012 are reported.

Deduction items

Deductions from total income assessed

Item 31: Registered Pension Plan (RPP) contributions - Line 207 of the return

This item reports deductions from salaries for registered pension plans.

Item 32: RRSP deduction - Line 208 of the return

This is the amount deducted for registered retirement savings plans. It is reported on line 208 of the return. The reported amount does not include eligible RRSP transfers.

Item 33: Deduction for elected split-pension amount - Line 210 of the return

This item represents the elected split-pension amount that spouses or common-law partners have jointly elected to split (line E of Form T1032).

Item 34: Annual union, professional, or like dues - Line 212 of the return

This item includes:

  • annual dues for membership in a trade union or an association of public servants;
  • professions board dues required under provincial or territorial law;
  • professional or malpractice liability insurance premiums or professional membership dues required to keep a professional status recognized by law; and
  • parity or advisory committee (or similar body) dues required under provincial or territorial law.

Note

Not included are initiation fees and special assessments, licenses or charges for any purpose other than the organization's ordinary operating costs.

Item 35: Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB) repayment - Line 213 of the return

This item represents repayment amounts shown in box 12 of the RC62 slip.

Item 36: Child care expenses - Line 214 of the return

This item shows the child care expenses reported on line 214 of the return.

The maximum that a taxfiler could claim was the lesser of:

  • Part A - the child care expense payment
  • Part B - two-thirds of the taxfiler's earned income
  • Part C - $7,000 for each child under 7 and for whom the disability amount could not be claimed; $10,000 for each child for whom the disability amount could be claimed; and $4,000 for each child aged 7 to 16.

Note

There are other steps to this calculation, depending on the individual's net income, and whether or not they were enrolled in an educational program in 2012.

Item 37: Disability supports deductions - Line 215 of the return

This item represents the expenses paid for personal attendant care and other disability supports expenses, that no one has claimed as medical expenses (line 330 and line 331), that allowed the taxfiler to earn income or pursue an education. This includes income from employment or self-employment or grants received for conducting research.

Item 38: Business investment loss - Line 217 of the return

This is the allowable business investment loss in 2012 from line D of Chart 6 of Guide T4037, Capital Gains.

Item 39: Moving expenses - Line 219 of the return

This item represents moving expenses paid in 2012 for individuals who moved in order to obtain employment, run a business or study full time at an educational institution offering post-secondary courses; the move must have brought the taxfiler at least 40 kilometers closer to their new work or school.

Item 40: Support payments made - Line 220 of the return

This item represents only the deductible amount of support payments for a spouse or common-law partner, or for a child in 2012.

Item 41: Carrying charges and interest expenses - Line 221 of the return or according to the Schedule 4 calculation

The following carrying charges and interest paid to earn income from investments can be claimed:

  • fees to manage or take care of investments (other than administration fees paid for registered retirement savings plan or registered retirement income fund), including safety deposit box charges;
  • fees for certain investment advice or for recording investment income;
  • fees paid to have someone complete a return, but only if the taxfiler has income from a business or property, accounting is a usual part of the operations of their business or property, and did not use the amounts claimed to reduce the business or property income reported;
  • most interest paid on money borrowed for investment purposes, but generally only as long as it is used to try to earn investment income, including interest and dividends. However, if the only earnings the investment can produce are capital gains, the interest paid cannot be claimed.

Item 42: Deduction for CPP or QPP contributions on self-employment and other earnings - Line 222 of the return

This item represents half of the total Canada Pension Plan or Quebec Pension Plan contributions, if any, from Schedule 8. The taxfiler can claim an amount for the other half on line 310 on Schedule 1.

Item 43: Deduction for PPIP premiums on self-employment income - Line 223 of the return

This item represents the provincial parental insurance plan (PPIP) premiums paid by residents of Quebec with a net self-employment income on lines 135 to 143 of $2,000 or more; or total employment income (including employment income from outside Canada) and net self-employment income of $2,000 or more.

Item 44: Exploration and development expenses - Line 224 of the return

This item represents deductions for investments in a petroleum, natural gas, or mining venture in 2012, without active participation.

Item 45: Other employment expenses - Line 229 of the return

This item includes deductions for certain expenses incurred by the taxfiler to earn employment income.

Item 46: Clergy residence deduction - Line 231 of the return

This is a calculated deduction available to a member of the clergy for his or her residence. See Form T1223, Clergy Residence Deduction for more information.

Item 47: Other deductions - Line 232 of the return

This item includes allowable amounts not deducted anywhere else on the return. The most common deductions claimed on line 232 are:

  • Income amounts paid back
  • Legal fees
  • Depletion allowances
  • Certain unused RRSP contributions made after 1990 that were refunded in 2012
  • Excess parts of a direct transfer of a lump-sum payment from an RPP to RRSP or RRIF that was withdrawn and included in lines 129 or 130 of the 2012 return.

Item 48: Total Deductions before adjustment - Line 233 of the return

This item is the total for Items 31 to 47.

Item 49: Social benefits repayment - Line 235 of the return

Employment Insurance premiums have to be repaid in whole or in part if there is an amount in box 15 of the taxfiler's T4E slip, the rate in box 7 is 30% and the amount on line 234 of the taxfiler's return, minus any UCCB (line 117 or 125), plus any deduction on line 213 and/or for a repayment of registered disability savings plans income included on line 232, is more than $57,375.

Old Age Security pension (line 113) or net federal supplements (line 146) have to be repaid in whole or in part when the net income before adjustments (line 234) minus line 117 and 125, plus any deduction on line 213 and/or for a repayment of registered disability savings plans income included on line 232, is more than $69,562.

Item 50: Net income after Adjustment - Line 236 of the return

This item is the result of subtracting social benefits repayment and total deductions before adjustment from total income (Items 48 and 49 subtracted from Item 30).

Deductions from net income

Item 51: Canadian Forces personnel and police deduction - Line 244 of the return

This is the deductions claimed for certain members of the Canadian Forces and Canadian police services, deployed outside Canada on a high-risk or current moderate-risk operational mission. This amount can be found in box 43 on the T4 slip.

Item 52: Employee home relocation loan deduction - Line 248 of the return

Generally, an employee home relocation loan is a loan received by virtue of a prior, current or future office or employment when the taxfiler has moved from their former residence to another residence in Canada to start employment at the new work location.

Item 53: Security options deductions - Line 249 of the return

This item is the total of the amounts shown in boxes 39 and 41 of the T4 slip. In addition, if the taxpayer disposed of securities for which they had previously deferred the taxable benefit they may claim 50% of the amount from line 4 of Form T1212, Statement of Deferred Security Options Benefits. The taxfiler may be electing, in 2012, for the special relief in respect of gains from a disposition of eligible securities on which he or she elected in a previous year to defer the security option benefits. In these cases, the amount the taxfiler can claim on line 249 may be more than 50% of line 4 of Form T1212, Statement of Deferred Security Options Benefits.

Item 54: Other payments deduction - Line 250 of the return

Generally, the total amount from line 147 of the return can be deducted. This includes: line 144, Workers' compensation benefits; line 145, Social assistance payments; and line 146, Net federal supplements.

Item 55: Limited partnership losses of other years - Line 251 of the return

This item represents limited partnership losses in previous years that have not already been deducted.

Item 56: Non-capital losses of other years - Line 252 of the return

This item is the amount of the unapplied non-capital losses reported on 2005 to 2011 returns and/or any unapplied farming and fishing losses reported on 2002 to 2011 returns that have been applied in 2012.

Item 57: Net capital losses of other years - Line 253 of the return

This item is the amount of net capital losses of previous years that have not already claimed, within certain limits. For more information, see Guide T4037, Capital Gains.

Item 58: Capital gains deduction - Line 254 of the return

The taxfiler may be able to claim a capital gains deduction for gains realized on the disposition of qualified small business corporation shares, qualified farm property, and qualified fishing property. For more information, see Guide T4037, Capital Gains.

Item 59: Northern residents deductions - Line 255 of the return

This item represents the total northern residents deductions, which is the sum of the residency deduction for having lived in a prescribed zone and the travel deduction for taxable travel benefits received from employment in a prescribed zone, as calculated on form T2222, Northern Residents Deduction.

Item 60: Additional deductions - Line 256 of the return

These include:

  • Income exempt under a tax treaty. For example, foreign income such as support payments received from a resident of another country, reported at line 128.
  • Earned income and pension benefits given to a religious order by members who have taken a vow of perpetual poverty.
  • Net employment income reported by employees of prescribed international organizations, such as United Nations.
  • Adult basic education tuition assistance, a deduction for the amount of qualifying assistance shown in box 21 for slip T4E can be claimed.

Note

Under the Canada-U.S. tax treaty, a deduction equal to 15% of the U.S. social security benefits can be claimed, including U.S. medicare premiums, included in the income on line 115.

Item 61: Restricted Farming/Fishing losses of prior years

This item is the sum of the amount of farming/fishing losses of prior year applied in 2012 and the gross amount of a farm loss subject to the section 31 restrictions.

Item 62: Total deductions (from net income) - Line 257 of the return

This item is the sum of Items 51 to 61.

Item 63: Taxable income assessed - Line 260 of the return

Federal income tax brackets
Taxable income Tax
$42,707 or less 15%
$42,707 to $85,414 22% plus $6,406
$85,414 to $132,406 26% plus $15,802
Over $132,406 29% plus $28,020

Non-refundable tax credits

Individuals are entitled to claim certain non-refundable tax credits in calculating taxes payable for a taxation year. These credits reduce the amount of income tax an individual owes. If the total of these credits is more than the income tax the individual would otherwise owe for the year, the individual will not receive a refund for the difference.

Non-refundable tax credits are calculated by multiplying a total or single dollar amount by the lowest tax rate. The amounts shown in the tables are the full amounts before applying the rate. If a taxfiler became or ceased to be a resident of Canada for income tax purposes during 2011 they may have to reduce their claim for the amounts on lines 300, 301, 303, 305, 367, 306, 363, 364, 365, 369, 313, 314, 315, 318, 324, 326, and 332.

Item 64: Basic Personal Amount - Line 300 of Schedule 1 of the return

For 2012, this amount is $10,822.

Item 65: Age amount - Line 301 of the Schedule 1 of the return

Taxfilers who were 65 years or older in 2012 and whose net income was less than $78,684 may be allowed to claim an age amount up to a maximum of $6,720.

Item 66: Spouse or common-law partner amount - Line 303 of Schedule 1 of the return

This amount can be claimed by a taxfiler who supported their spouse or common-law partner at any time in the year and their spouse's net income was less than $10,822.

Note

If you have a dependant with impairment in physical or mental functions, you may be eligible to claim an additional amount of $2,000 in this line.

Item 67: Amount for eligible dependant - Line 305 of Schedule 1 of the return

The taxfiler may be able to claim this amount if, at any time in the year, he or she met all of the following conditions at once:

  • He or she did not have a spouse or common-law partner or, if he or she did, he or she were not living with, supporting, or being supported by that person;
  • He or she supported a dependant in 2012; and he or she lived with the dependant (in most cases in Canada) in a home that he or she maintained. He or she cannot claim this amount for a person who was only visiting him or her. In addition, at the time he or she met the above conditions, the dependant also must have been either:
    • His or her parent or grandparent by blood, marriage, common-law partnership, or adoption;
    • Or his or her child, grandchild, brother, or sister by blood, marriage, common-law partnership, or adoption and either under 18 years of age or mentally or physically impaired.

Note

If you have a dependant with impairment in physical or mental functions, you may be eligible to claim an additional amount of $2,000 in this line.

Item 68: Amount for children under 18 - Line 367 of Schedule 1 of the return

Taxfilers can claim $2,191 for each of their children (or their spouse or common-law partner's children) who are 18 years of age or under at the end of the year.

Note

If you have a dependant with impairment in physical or mental functions, you may be eligible to claim an additional amount of $2,000 in this line.

Item 69: Amount for infirm dependants age 18 or older - Line 306 of Schedule 1 of the return

Taxfilers can claim an amount up to a maximum of $6,402 which include the $2,000 family caregiver amount for each dependant child or grandchild only if that child or grandchild had impairment in physical or mental functions and was born in 1994 or earlier.

Item 70: Canadian Pension Plan (CPP) or Quebec Pension Plan (QPP) contributions through employment - Lines 308 of Schedule 1 of the return.

This is the amount, up to a maximum of $2,306.70 paid into the Canada Pension Plan or Quebec Pension Plan by employees. It does not include taxfilers aged 71 and over because they do not contribute.

Item 71: CPP or QPP contributions on self-employment and other earnings - Line 310 of Schedule 1 of the return

For self-employment and other earnings, this item represents the other half of the total Canadian Pension Plan (CPP) or Quebec Pension Plan (QPP) contribution from Schedule 8. (The other half is claimed on line 222 of the return.)

Item 72: Employment Insurance premiums through employment - Line 312 of Schedule 1 of the return.

This is the amount, up to a maximum of $839.97, deducted as Employment Insurance premiums and withheld by the employer. This does not include any overpayment by the employer.

Item 73: Employment Insurance premiums on self-employment and other eligible earnings

Under new Employment Insurance (EI) measures that have been in effect since January 2012, self-employed individuals can choose to pay EI premiums be eligible to receive EI special benefits (see schedule 13).

Item 74: Provincial parental insurance Plan (PPIP) premiums paid - Line 375 of Schedule 1 of the return

This represents the amount of premiums paid by the residents of Quebec to the PPIP, shown in box 55 of the T4 slip. The maximum amount that the taxfiler can claim is $368.94.

Item 75: PPIP premiums payable on employment income - Line 376 of Schedule 1 of the return

This represents the premiums paid by the residents of Quebec, from line 16 of Schedule 10 of the return, with employment income (including employment income outside of Canada) of more than $2,000 and one T4 slip with a province of employment other than Quebec in box 10. The maximum amount that the taxfiler can claim is $368.94.

Item 76: PPIP premiums payable on self-employment income - Line 378 of Schedule 1 of the return

This represents the premiums paid by the residents Quebec, from line 10 of Schedule 10 of the return. The maximum amount that the taxfiler can claim is $368.94.

Item 77: Volunteer firefighters’ amount – Line 362 of Schedule 1 of the return

Volunteer firefighters are eligible to claim an amount of $3,000 if:

  • They were a volunteer firefighter during the year; and
  • Completed at least 200 hours of eligible volunteer firefighting services with one or more fire departments in the year.

Item 78: Canada Employment Amount - Line 363 of Schedule 1 of the return

Employees are eligible to claim an employment amount. This amount is the lesser of:

  • $1,095; and
  • The total of the income reported on lines 101 and 104 of the return.

Item 79: Public transit amount - Line 364 of Schedule 1 of the return.

An amount can be claimed for the cost of monthly public transit passes, passes of longer duration, and certain passes of shorter duration. Public transit includes local buses, streetcars, subways, commuter trains or buses, and local ferries.

Item 80: Children's fitness amount - Line 365 of Schedule 1 of the return

This item represents the fees paid in 2012 by the taxfiler to register his or her child or his or her spouse or common-law partner's child in a prescribe program of physical activity. This credit can be claimed to a maximum of $500 per child.

The taxfiler can claim an additional amount of $500 for a child that qualifies for the disability amount and is under 18 years of age.

Item 81: Children’s arts amount – Line 370 of Schedule 1 of the return

A maximum amount of $500 per child can be claimed for the fees paid in 2012 relating to the cost of registration of membership in a prescribed program of artistic, cultural, recreational, or developmental activity. The child must have been under 16 years of age or under 18 years of age if eligible for the disability amount at the beginning of the year in which an eligible art expense was paid.

Item 82: Home buyers' amount - Line 369 of Schedule 1 of the return

An amount of $5,000 can be claimed for the purchase of a qualifying home if the taxfiler or his or her spouse or common-law partner acquired a qualifying home, and if the tax filer did not live in another home owned by the tax filer or their spouse or common-law in the year of acquisition or any of the four preceding years (first-time home buyer).

Note

Taxfilers eligible for the disability amount or those buying the home for the benefit of a related person who is eligible for the disability amount, do not need to be first-time home buyers to claim this amount.

Item 83: Adoption expenses - Line 313 of Schedule 1 of the return

This represents the claimed amount for eligible adoption expenses related to the adoption of a child who is under 18 years of age. The maximum claim for each child is $11,440.

Item 84: Pension income amount - Line 314 of Schedule 1 of the return

An amount up to $2,000 can be claimed by taxfilers with eligible pension, superannuation or annuity payments on lines 115, 116 and/or 129 of the return.

Item 85: Caregiver amount - Line 315 of Schedule 1 of the return

Taxfilers may be allowed to claim a caregiver amount up to a maximum of $4,402 for each dependant. Each dependant must have been one of the following individuals:

  • The taxfiler's or his or her spouse's or common-law partner's child or grandchild; or
  • The taxfiler's spouse's or common-law partner's brother, sister, niece, nephew, aunt, uncle, parent, or grandparent who was resident in Canada. This amount cannot be claimed for a person who was only visiting.

In addition, each dependant must meet all of the following conditions. The person must have:

  • Been 18 years of age or older at the time he or she lived with the taxfiler.
  • Had a net income less than $19,435 in 2012.
  • Been dependant due to mental or physical impairment, or if he or she is the taxfiler's or taxfiler's spouse or common-law partner's parent or grandparent, born in 1947 or earlier.

Note

If you have a dependant with impairment in physical or mental functions, you may be eligible to claim an additional amount of $2,000 in this line.

Item 86: Disability amount (for self) - Line 316 of Schedule 1 of the return

This amount can be claimed if the taxfiler has had an impairment in physical or mental functions that is severe and prolonged during 2012. They may be able to claim $7,546 if they meet certain conditions and with certification from a qualified practitioner.

Item 87: Disability amount transferred from a dependant - Line 318 of Schedule 1 of the return

This amount represents all or part of the taxfiler's dependant's disability amount from line 316 if he or she resided in Canada at any time in 2012 and depended on the taxfiler for all or some on the basic necessities of life (food, shelter, or clothing).

In addition, one of the following situations has to apply:

  • The taxfiler claimed an amount on line 305 for that dependant, or the taxfiler could have if they did not have a spouse or common-law partner and if the dependant did not have any income (see line 305 for conditions).
  • The dependant was the taxfiler's or the taxfiler's spouse's or common-law partner's parent, grandparent, child, grandchild, brother, sister, aunt, uncle, niece, or nephew, and the taxfiler claimed an amount on line 306 or 315 for that dependant, or could have if the dependant had no income and had been 18 years of age or older in 2012.

Item 88: Interest paid on student loans - Line 319 of Schedule 1 of the return

This is the amount for the interest paid on a loan made to the taxfiler under the Canada Student Loans Act, the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act, or similar provincial or territorial government laws for post-secondary education in 2012 or the preceding five years.

Item 89: Tuition, education, and textbook amount - Line 323 of Schedule 1 of the return

This is item represents eligible tuition fees and the education and textbook amounts.

Item 90: Tuition, education, and textbook amount transferred from a child - Line 324 of Schedule 1 of the return

This item represents eligible tuition fees and the education and textbook amounts transferred from a student. A student may transfer up to $5,000, minus the amount that he or she uses (even if there is still an unclaimed part), to his or her parent or grandparent.

Item 91: Amounts transferred from spouse or common-law partner - Line 326 of Schedule 1 of the return

When a taxfiler is entitled to certain credits that aren't required to reduce his or her federal income tax to zero, these amounts can be transferred to the return of his or her spouse. The taxfiler can transfer the following:

  • age amount
  • amount for children born in 1995 or later
  • pension income amount
  • disability amount
  • tuition, education and textbooks amounts.

Item 92: Allowable amount of medical expenses - Line 332 of Schedule 1 of the return

This is the total allowable medical expenses reported on lines 330 and 331 of the return. This includes the allowable medical expense amount for the filer, his or her spouse or common-law partner and his or her dependant children born in 1995 or later and the allowable amount of medical expenses for other dependants.

Item 93: Total tax credits on personal amounts - Line 338 of the Schedule 1 of the return

This is 15% of the total credit amounts from Items 64 through 92.

Item 94: Allowable charitable donations and government gifts - Line 340 of Schedule 9 of the return

This amount is allowable charitable donations and government gifts: 75% of the taxfiler's net income, plus 25% of the sum of gifts of depreciable property and gifts of capital property, or the total amount of eligible charitable donations and government gifts reported on line 1 of Schedule 9, whichever is less.

Item 95: Eligible cultural and ecological gifts - Line 342 of Schedule 9 of the return

This item represents the eligible amount of cultural and ecological gifts. The total eligible amount claimed for these types of gifts are not limited to a percentage of net income.

Item 96: Total tax credit on donations and gifts - Line 349 of Schedule 1 of the return

This item is the sum of Lines 346 and 348 of Schedule 9. Where:

  • Line 344 = the sum of Items 94 "Allowable charitable donations and government gifts" and 95 "Eligible cultural and ecological gifts".
  • Line 345 = $200 or the amount from Line 344, whichever is less.
  • Line 346 = 15% of Line 345.
  • Line 348 = 29% of Line 344 minus Line 345.

Item 97: Total federal non-refundable tax credits - Line 350 of Schedule 1 of the return

This item is the sum of Item 93, "Total tax credits on personal amounts" and Item 96 "Total tax credit on donations and gifts".

Tax payable

Item 98: Federal dividend tax credit - Line 425 of Schedule 1 of the return

This is 15.0198% of the taxable amount of eligible dividends included on line 120 for taxfilers who received eligible dividends or 13.3333% of the taxable amount of dividends reported on line 180 for taxfilers who received dividends other than eligible.

Item 99: Overseas employment tax credit - Line 426 of Schedule 1 of the return

A taxfiler may be able to claim this credit if he or she was a resident or a deemed resident of Canada at any time in the year and he or she had employment income from certain kinds of work in another country.

Item 100: Minimum tax carryover - Line 427 of Schedule 1 of the return

If the taxpayer paid minimum tax on any of his or her 2005 to 2011 tax returns but doesn't have to pay minimum tax for 2012, he or she may be able to claim credits against his or her taxes for 2012 for all or part of the minimum tax paid in those years. See Form T691, Alternative Minimum Tax.

Item 101: Basic federal tax - Line 429 of Schedule 1 of the return - Line 429 of Schedule 1 of the return

This amount refers to the tax on taxable income assessed, less items 98 to 100.

Item 102: Federal foreign tax credit - Line 405 of Schedule 1 of the return

This credit is for foreign income or profits taxes paid on income received from outside Canada and reported on the taxfiler's Canadian tax return. See Form T2209, Federal Foreign Tax Credits. Note that the taxfiler may have deducted an amount on line 256 for income that is not taxable in Canada under a tax treaty. In that case, that income, or any tax withheld from it, is not in the foreign tax credit calculation.

Item 103: Federal political contribution tax credit - Line 410 of Schedule 1 of the return

This amount refers to the total contributions the taxfiler or their spouse or common-law partner paid during 2012 to a registered federal political party or a candidate for election to the House of Commons. The eligible amount is the amount by which the fair market value of the monetary contribution exceeds any advantage that the taxfiler or their spouse or common-law partner received or will receive for making it. If total political contributions are $1,275 or more, the maximum that can be claimed is $650 on line 410.

Item 104: Investment tax credit - Line 412 of Schedule 1 of the return

The taxfiler may be eligible for this credit if any of the following apply. The taxfiler:

  • bought certain new buildings, machinery, or equipment and they were used in certain areas of Canada in qualifying activities such as farming, fishing, logging, manufacturing, or processing;
  • have unclaimed credits in the last 10 years;
  • have an amount shown in box 41 of your T3 slips;
  • have an amount shown in box 107 or 128 of your T5013 or T5013A slips;
  • have an amount shown in box 128 of your T101 slips;
  • have a partnership statement that allocates to him or her an amount that qualifies for this credit;
  • have an investment in a mining operation that allocates certain exploration expenditures to him or her; or
  • employs an eligible apprentice in his or her business.

The taxfiler can claim an investment tax credit if he or she carry on a business and create one or more new child care spaces for children of his or her employees and other children. See Form T2038(IND), Investment Tax Credit (Individuals).

Item 105: Labour-sponsored funds tax credit - Line 414 of Schedule 1 of the return

The taxfiler may be able to claim this credit if he or she became the first registered holder to acquire or irrevocably subscribe to and pay for an approved share of the capital stock of a prescribed labour sponsored venture capital corporation (LSVCC) from January 1, 2012, to March 1, 2013. The allowable credit cannot be more than 15% of the net cost, to a maximum of $750 per year. The unused 2011 credit, in whole or in part, can be claimed in 2012.

Item 106: Alternative minimum tax payable

Minimum tax limits the tax advantage a taxfiler can receive in a year from certain incentives. A taxfiler has to pay minimum tax if it is more than the federal tax calculated in the usual manner. When calculating the taxable income for this tax, a basic exempt amount of $40,000 is allowed. This Item represents the additional taxes paid in tax year 2012 that are eligible for the minimum tax carryover. The whole amount of this Item is already included in Item 101, Basic federal tax.

Item 107: Net federal tax - Line 420 of Schedule 1 of the return

This item represents basic federal tax (item 101) less items 102 to 105, and less the federal logging tax credit. It also includes the sum of the Working Income Tax Benefit (WITB) advance payments received and the Additional tax on registered education savings plan (RESP) accumulated income payments.

Item 108: CPP contribution payable on self-employment and other earnings - Line 421 of Schedule 1 of the return

This item represents the Canada Pension Plan contributions for self-employed and other earnings.

Item 109: Employment Insurance premiums payable on self-employment and other eligible earnings - Line 430 of Schedule 1 of the return

This is the amount of the EI premiums that self-employed taxfilers who chose to pay EI premiums was required to pay for 2012. It is the same amount reported at Item 73. Refer to Schedule 13 of the return.

Item 110: Social benefits repayment - Line 422 of Schedule 1 of the return

This is the social benefits to be repaid from Item 49.

Item 111: Net provincial or territorial tax - Line 428 of Schedule 1 of the return

See Form 428 to determine the provincial or territorial tax rates, and the Revenue Québec Website for the Québec tax rates.

Item 112: Total tax payable - Line 435 of the return

This is the total of the amounts of Net federal tax (Item 107), Canada Pension Plan contributions payable on self-employment earnings (Item 108), Employment Insurance premiums payable on self-employment and other eligible earnings (109), Social benefits repayment (110), and Provincial or territorial tax payable (Item 111).

Description of preliminary tables

For a detailed list and explanation of the changes in this year's data, please see Major changes to the 2014 edition.

Preliminary Tables 2 through 5 report figures for 112 items grouped under total income, net income, taxable income, non-refundable tax credits, tax payable and total payable. In all of these tables, the 112 items remain the same; only the classification variables differ. A detailed description of each item appears in Description of items.

For more information on classification variables, please see Major classification variables.

For each table, both the number of taxfilers and the respective dollar amounts are shown. In some cases, the total of the figures in the table may not match the total shown, due either to rounding or to editing for confidentiality purposes. For an explanation of the confidentiality procedures please refer to: Confidentiality procedures.

Preliminary Basic Table 1 - General statement by province and territory of taxation

This is the only table that provides data based on the province or territory of taxation instead of province or territory of residence. This table presents tax data by province or territory and also for returns from outside Canada.

Multiple jurisdiction filers have been assigned to the province in which they allocated the highest percentage of their net income. In cases where it was not possible to determine to which province they had allocated the highest percentage of their net income, they were assigned to their province of residence as indicated on page 1 of the T1 General Income Tax and Benefit Return. For more information, see Provincial or territorial classification.

The column headings are:

  • number of returns
  • total income assessed
  • total deductions
  • taxable income assessed
  • total non-refundable tax credits
  • net federal tax
  • net provincial tax payable
  • total net tax payable

Preliminary Basic Table 2 - Returns by total income class

This table presents information based on total income assessed. The table begins with the grand total. Income groupings providing figures for various income levels beginning with "$5,000 and under" up to the "$250,000 and over" income grouping follow this grand total.

Preliminary Basic Tables 3 - Returns by major source of income

This table covers returns for nine broad major-source-of-income groups. The table begins with a grand total. There are nine broad major-source-of-income groupings follow this total. For a description of the source of income groupings, please see Major source of income.

Preliminary Basic Tables 4 - Returns by age and sex

This table presents information by age and sex. The table begins with a grand total. Following this total, 13 age groups, beginning with the under-20 age group and ending with the 75-and-over age group are presented. The grand total includes taxfilers whose age or sex is not stated. For details on the age and sex classification, please refer to: Age and sex classification.

Preliminary Basic Tables 5 - Returns by province and territory

This table classifies tax returns according to the province or territory of residence listed on the taxfiler's return. The table begins with a grand total and is followed by the provinces and territories. For details on the province of residence classification, please refer to Provincial or territorial classification.

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