Guide for Convention Refugees and Humanitarian-Protected Persons Abroad (IMM 6000)

As of May 1, 2018, new forms and guides have come into effect for the Private Sponsorship of Refugees (PSR) Program. In order to accommodate those who have already completed the old versions of the forms, previous versions of the forms will continue to be accepted until June 1, 2018.

Old versions of the Schedule 2–Refugees Outside Canada [IMM 0008 SCHEDULE 2] will continue to be accepted until December 31, 2018. Please note that applications submitted with incorrect versions of the forms will be returned to you without processing.

This application kit explains the application process for refugees seeking to resettle in Canada. It includes an instruction guide and the forms you need to fill out.

Use this guide if you are a refugee currently residing abroad and are being sponsored by the federal government or private sponsors. Read this guide completely before you fill out your forms.

This is not a legal document.

You can also request this publication in another format.

Symbols used in this guide

This guide uses these symbols to draw your attention to important information:

Required step

What you must do to have your application processed.

Important information

Important information that you need to know to avoid delays or other problems.

Get more information

Where to get more information.

Steps to resettle in Canada as a refugee

Step 1: Make sure you are eligible to come to Canada as a refugee

To be eligible you, the Principal Applicant (PA), and your family members must meet the following requirements:

  1. be referred by a:
    • refugee referral organization such as the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR); or
    • a private sponsor;
  2. meet the definition of Convention Refugee Abroad Class or Country of Asylum Class (Humanitarian-Protected Persons Abroad);
  3. show that you have no durable solution; and
  4. pass medical, security and criminality checks.

1. Be referred by a refugee referral organization or by private sponsors

If you do not have a private sponsor or have not been referred by a designated referral organization, at this point, you are not eligible for resettlement as a refugee to Canada and this guide does not apply to you.

If you have a private sponsor in Canada, they should have contacted you to complete the forms included in this guide.

If you have been referred by a designated referral organization, the IRCC office overseas should have contacted you to complete the forms included in this guide.

2. Meet the definition of Convention Refugee Abroad Class or Country of Asylum Class (Humanitarian-Protected Persons Abroad)

Convention Refugees Abroad Class

The word “Convention” refers to the United Nations Convention relating to the Status of Refugees.

  • You are a Convention Refugee Abroad if you:
    • are afraid of persecution because of your race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group or political opinion; and
      • are outside Canada;
      • are outside your country of nationality and unable or, because of your fear, unwilling to obtain the protection of your country; or
      • if you have no country of nationality, are outside your country of former habitual residence (home country) and unable or, because of your fear, unwilling to return to that country.

Country of Asylum Class (Humanitarian-Protected Persons Abroad)

The Country of Asylum Class is Canada’s response to the resettlement needs of people in refugee-like situations who do not qualify as Convention Refugees.

  • You are a member of the Country of Asylum Class if you:
    • are seriously and personally affected by civil or armed conflict or a massive violation of human rights in your country of nationality or habitual residence (home country); and
      • are outside Canada;
      • are outside your country of nationality and unable or, because of your fear, unwilling to obtain the protection of your country; or
      • if you have no country of nationality, are outside your country of former habitual residence (home country) and unable or, because of your fear, unwilling to return to that country.

3. Show that you have no durable solution

Durable solutions

When considering an application for resettlement in Canada, a Migration Officer must be satisfied that there is no reasonable prospect, within a reasonable period of time, for the refugee applicant to obtain another durable solution.

There are three types of durable solutions:

Voluntary repatriation

Voluntary repatriation occurs when refugees voluntarily return to their country of nationality or habitual residence. For voluntary repatriation to be possible, the situation in the country of origin must have changed in a lasting and meaningful way that enables the refugees to return safely.

Local integration

Local integration is a long-lasting solution to a refugee’s situation. It is more than the granting of safe conditions of asylum. Local integration allows refugees to participate broadly in the host society.

Resettlement in a country other than Canada

An offer of resettlement to a country (other than Canada).

4. Pass medical, security and criminality checks

You and your family members included in your application must do a medical exam by a doctor chosen by the IRCC office overseas. IRCC will also perform background and security checks for all applicants who wish to immigrate to Canada. This includes checks into any past criminal behaviour, violations, infractions, etc. We will not contact organizations or individuals if it puts you or your family in danger.

Common questions about eligible family members

Who is the principal applicant?

If there is only one person applying for permanent residence, that person is by default the principal applicant. When a family applies for permanent residence together, one family member must be the principal applicant. The principal applicant is usually the head of family.

Who can be included as family members?

Under the Canadian immigration system, a family includes:

  • the principal applicant (PA);
  • the PA’s spouse or common-law partner;
  • the PA’s dependent child;
  • the dependent child of the PA’s dependent child;
  • the dependent child of the PA’s spouse/common-law partner; and
  • the dependent child of the PA’s spouse/common-law partner’s dependent child.

See subsection 1(3) of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations (IRPR) for the legal definition of the word “family member”.

Important informationAll family members must be declared in the application, even if they are not accompanying the PA to Canada.

What is the difference between an accompanying family member and a non-accompanying member?

Accompanying family member: A family member who plans to come to Canada at the same time as the PA.

Non-accompanying family member: A family member who has been separated from the family and is not able to, or choose not to, accompany the PA to Canada when the application was processed.

Why do I need to list non-accompanying family members?

Failing to declare a family member may result in the refusal of your application. Declaring family members is also important for family reunification. Under the One Year Window (OYW) provision, the PA can apply to bring their non-accompanying family members to Canada for up to one year after their arrival in Canada, but only if they were declared on the application before the PA left for Canada.

For more information about OYW provision, see the OYW Application Guide (IMM 5578).

Family members

Your family members include your spouse or common-law partner, your dependent children and any children that are their dependent children.

Spouse

Refers to either of the two persons (opposite or same sex) in a marriage legally recognized in the country in which it took place, as well as in Canada.

Important information

Proxy, telephone, fax, internet and similar forms of marriage where one or both parties were not physically present are no longer considered as valid spousal relationships under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations. For more information, consult Operational Bulletin 613.

 
Common-law partner

Refers to a person who is living in a conjugal relationship with another person (opposite or same sex), and has done so continuously for a period of at least one year. A conjugal relationship exists when there is a significant degree of commitment between two people.

This can be shown with evidence that the couple share the same home, support each other financially and emotionally, have children together, or present themselves in public as a couple.

Common-law partners who have been in a conjugal relationship for at least one year but are unable to live together or appear in public together because of legal restrictions in their home country or who have been separated for reasons beyond their control (for example, civil war or armed conflict) may still qualify and should be included on the application.

Dependent children

We assess your child’s eligibility as a dependant based on how old they were at a specific point in time, called the lock-in date; this is normally the date on which your application was received by IRCC. To see if your child qualifies as a dependant, we consider the age of your child on the lock-in date, even though your child’s age may change during processing.

Your child or the child of your spouse or common-law partner can be considered a dependent child if that child meets the requirements below on the lock-in date:

  • They’re under 22 years old, and
  • They don’t have a spouse or common-law partner

Children 22 years old or older qualify as dependants if they meet both of these requirements:

  • They have depended on their parents for financial support since before the age of 22, and
  • They are unable to financially support themselves because of a mental or physical condition

With the exception of age, dependants must continue to meet these requirements until we finish processing your application.

Not sure if your child is a dependant? Check if your child qualifies by answering a few questions.

Dependent child of a dependent child

Refers to children of dependent children of the applicant and those of the spouse or common-law partner, if applicable.

What does other family members mean?

You cannot include other relative in your application other than those who meet the definition of family member.

If you want to come to Canada with other family members (over age children, siblings, parents, cousins, etc.), these persons require a separate application. They must apply on their own, they must be refugees in their own right and they must meet all statutory requirements.

If other family members are being sponsored, ask your sponsors to list both the PA and the other family members in each other’s Linked/Multiple Sponsorship Undertakings on the Sponsorship Undertaking form. If we know about these linked applications, we will do our best to try and process them at the same time.


Step 2: Use the document checklist and gather your documents

Assemble all your documents as listed below and arrange them in this order. The first page should be the Generic Application Form for Canada (IMM 0008) and so on. For PSR applications, incomplete applications will be returned to your sponsors without being processed.

Do not submit original documents when only a copy is required.

Note that if you submit original documents, most likely, they will not be returned to you.

All forms must be hand signed by you and your family members (if applicable). We do not accept typed signatures.

  1. Generic Application Form for Canada (IMM 0008) (PDF, 731 KB). This form is used by a principal applicant who wants to immigrate to Canada as a permanent resident.

    Completed, dated and signed only by you, the principal applicant.

  2. Additional Dependants / Declaration Form (IMM 0008DEP) (PDF, 434 KB) (if applicable). This form is used if you have more than 5 dependants listed on the IMM 0008 form. Note this includes non-accompanying family members.

    Completed, dated and signed by you, the principal applicant.

  3. Schedule A: Background/Declarations (IMM 5669) (PDF, 776 KB). This form is used by IRCC to obtain detailed information regarding your past and your family members’ past such as education, previous addresses, employment, etc.

    Completed, dated and signed by you, the principal applicant and each of your family members who are 18 years of age or older (including those who are non-accompanying). If a non-accompanying family member cannot submit this form, explain why on a separate piece of paper.

    stop signYou must use the version (October 2018) provided with this application guide. Do not use other versions available on our website.

  4. Schedule 2: Refugees Outside Canada Form (IMM 0008 Schedule 2) (PDF, 2.13 MB). This form is where you and your family members describe what events led you/them to seek protection as a refugee.

    Completed, dated and signed by you, the principal applicant and each of your family members who are 18 years of age or older (including those who are non-accompanying). If a non-accompanying family member cannot submit this form, explain why on a separate piece of paper.

  5. Proof of Refugee Status – Refugee Status Determination Document

    **For Groups of Five and Community Sponsors only**

    To be sponsored as a refugee by a Group of Five or a Community Sponsor, you, as the PA, must already have been granted refugee status by the UNHCR or the government in your country of residence; whichever is authorized to do so. You must submit a copy of a document showing valid proof of refugee recognition by the UNHCR or a foreign state with your application.

  6. Photos

    Provide one (1) photo of yourself and each of your family members taken in the last six (6) months. The name and date of birth of the person must be printed clearly on each photo. Follow the instructions provided on the Permanent resident photograph specifications.

  7. Identity and Civil Status Documents – when possible

    Copy of birth, marriage, divorce, annulment, separation or death certificates, and national identity card (etc.) must be provided for you and your family members.

  8. Children’s information – when possible

    If the child is from a previous relationship, you must provide:

    • proof of custody for children under the age of 18;
    • proof that children may legally travel to Canada; or
    • a statutory declaration that the remaining parent authorizes their child to immigrate to Canada.
  9. Background Documents – when possible

    Copy of any document to support your and your family members’ answers to questions in the Schedule A – Background/Declaration form (IMM 5669), such as military records, membership cards or any documents showing your association or involvement in any social, political, vocational or cultural organizations.

  10. Travel documents and passports – when possible

    Copy of passports or travel documents for you and your family members. If you live in a country other than your country of nationality, include a copy of your visa/residence permit for that country.

Translation of documents

You must send the following for any document that is not in English or French, unless otherwise stated on your document checklist:

  • the English or French translation; and
  • an affidavit from the person who completed the translation (see below for details); and
  • a certified copy of the original document.

Translations may be done by a person who is fluent in both languages (English or French and the unofficial language).

If the translation isn’t done by a member in good standing of a provincial or territorial organization of translators and interpreters in Canada, you must submit an affidavit swearing to the accuracy of the translation and the language proficiency of the translator. A certified translator will provide both a certified translation and certified copies of the original documents.

The affidavit must be sworn in the presence of:

In Canada:

  • a notary public
  • a commissioner of oaths
  • a commissioner of taking affidavits

Authority to certify varies by province and territory. Consult your local provincial or territorial authorities.

Outside of Canada:

  • a notary public

Authority to administer oaths varies by country. Consult your local authorities.

small exclamation warning signImportant information: Translations must not be done by the applicants themselves nor by members of the applicant’s family. This includes a parent, guardian, sibling, spouse, common-law partner, conjugal partner, grandparent, child, aunt, uncle, niece, nephew and first cousin.

Note: An affidavit is a document on which the translator has sworn, in the presence of a person authorized to administer oaths in the country where the translator is living, that the contents of their translation are a true translation and representation of the contents of the original document. Translators who are certified in Canada don’t need to supply an affidavit.

Step 3: Fill in your forms

Important informationIt is a serious offence to give false or misleading information on these forms.

Important informationWhen filling out all the necessary forms, be complete and accurate. If a section does not apply to you, then, write “Not Applicable” or “N/A”. If you need more space for any section, print out another page with the appropriate section, complete it and submit it with your application.

Generic Application Form for Canada (IMM 0008)

This form must be completed by:

  • you, the principal applicant

You must answer all questions on this form unless indicated otherwise.

Required stepYou must fill this form out on a computer, as the Generic Application Form for Canada (IMM 0008) MUST have a 2D barcode. Make sure that:

  • as you enter information on the IMM 0008 online you complete all mandatory fields in order to “Validate” the form and create the 2D barcode.
  • once the form has been filled out, you validate the IMM 0008 by clicking the “Validate” button on the last page.

Note that validation does not mean that the form is submitted to us, it means that a 2D barcode will be generated and printed on the IMM 0008.

If you make a change to one page of a form after printing, you must click the “Validate” button again and reprint the entire form again so that the barcode will capture all the changes.

If the barcode is missing or cannot be machine read properly for any reason, for PSR applications, the application may be returned to your sponsor without being processed.

Application Details

Question 1

From the list, select Refugee

Question 2

From the list, select Outside Canada - Refugee

Question 3

Write the total number of family members included in your application. This includes yourself and all your family members regardless of whether they plan to accompany you to Canada or not.

Question 4

Language preference

From the list, select your preferred language for:

  1. correspondence (all correspondence you will receive from us must be in English or French);
  2. interview (if you select English or French, an interpreter will not be required); and
  3. interpreter requested (necessary if you do not select English or French for the interview).
Question 5

If you are a privately sponsored refugee, you must plan to reside in the same city/community as your sponsor because they will help you integrate into Canadian society.

If you are a government assisted refugee, you will be destined by IRCC to a location in Canada that is best suited to accommodate you.

From the list select the:

  1. Province/Territory
  2. City/Town
Question 6

If you plan to live in the Province of Quebec a “Certificat de Sélection du Québec” (CSQ) will need to be obtained for you. For GAR applicants, select “No”. If you are selected for resettlement to the province of Quebec, the IRCC office will make the arrangements during the process for you.

Principal Applicant’s Personal Details

The Principal Applicant must answer the following questions:

Question 1

Enter your family name (surname or last name) as shown on your passport, travel or identity document.

Enter all of your given name(s) (first, second or more) as shown on your passport, travel or identity document. Do not use initials.

Question 2

Check the box to tell us if you have ever used any other names other than the ones you listed in question 1. This could be your:

  • birth name;
  • maiden name;
  • married name;
  • nickname, etc.

If you checked “Yes”, tell us your nicknames/alias in the family name and given name(s) fields.

Question 3

If you know your Unique Client Identifier number (UCI), enter it here. This is an 8 or 10 digit number you can find on previous visas or visa refusal letters. If you do not know your UCI, leave this space blank. If this is your first immigration application with us, you will not have a UCI.

Question 4

From the list, select your sex (male, female or unknown).

In the future, we will be introducing an "X" in the gender field. Until this becomes available, you may request a supporting document (free of charge) that will state that your sex is unspecified. You can request this document once your application has been approved and you have received your immigration document. Find out how to request this document with X.

If your passport or travel document has a sex designation other than male (M) or female (F): On your application forms, identify the sex you would like displayed (M or F) until the X can be issued. The sex chosen (M or F) on your application will be the sex printed on your document.

Question 5

Enter your height in either centimetres or feet and inches.

Question 6

From the list, select your eye color.

Question 7

Enter your complete date of birth. If you do not know your complete date of birth, use a “*” (star sign/asterisk) to fill in the spaces for the unknown year, month or day. For example, if you do not know your date and month of birth you can indicate it as */*/1967.

Question 8

Enter your place of birth, including the city/ town. From the list, select your country of birth.

Question 9

Citizenship(s)

  1. From the list, select your country of citizenship.
  2. If you are a citizen of more than one country, select your other countries of citizenship.

Stateless means only persons who are not recognized as a citizen of any country. If you are a citizen of a country, even if you choose not to live there or are afraid of persecution, you are still a citizen of that country and must enter that as your citizenship.

Question 10

From the list, select your country of residence.

If you are “out-of-status” (have no immigration status in your country of residence):

  • for “Status”, select Other;
  • for “Other”, type in Out of status;
  • in the “From” box, enter when you arrived in your country of residence regardless of when you became out of status; and
  • leave the “To” box blank.
Question 11

If you have been to Canada in the past, enter the date of your last entry to Canada.

Enter the place you last entered Canada (example: Toronto airport or Lacolle border crossing).

Question 12

Check the box to tell us if you have lived in any country other than your country of citizenship or your current country of residence for more than six (6) months in the past five (5) years.

If you checked “Yes”, for each country select:

  • the name of the country you lived in;
  • your immigration status for the time you were in that country; and
  • the dates (from – to) you were living in that country.
Question 13
  1. From the list, choose your current marital status:

    Annulled Marriage
    This is a marriage that is legally declared as not valid.
    Common-Law
    This means that you have lived continuously with your partner in a marital-type relationship for a minimum of one (1) year.
    Divorced
    This means that you are officially separated and have legally ended your marriage.
    Legally Separated
    This means that you are married, but no longer living with your spouse.
    Married
    This means that you and your spouse have had a ceremony that legally binds you to each other. Your marriage must be legally recognized in the country where it was performed and in Canada.
    Single
    This means that you have never been married and are not in a common-law relationship.
    Widowed
    This means that your spouse has died and that you have not re-married or entered into a common-law relationship.
  2. Enter the date (year, month and day) you were married or you entered into your current common-law relationship.
  3. Enter the family name(s) and given name(s) of your current spouse or common- law partner.
Question 14

Check the box to tell us if you have ever been married or in a common-law relationship. If you checked “Yes”, provide the following details for your previous spouse/common-law partner:

  • Family name(s);
  • Given name(s);
  • Type of relationship:
    • Common-law or
    • Married
  • Dates (from – to) you were in the relationship with your previous spouse/common-law partner; and
  • Date of birth.

Contact Information

Question 1

Enter your current mailing address (where information should be mailed) by typing the following information:

  • Post Office Box (P.O. Box) number, if applicable. If you do not have a post office box, provide when possible:
  • Apartment (Apt.) or Unit number
  • Street number (No.)
  • Street name
  • City/Town
  • Country
  • Province/State
  • Postal code/zip code
  • District
Question 2

Check the box to tell us if your residential address (where you live) is the same as your mailing address. If “No”, provide when possible:

  • Apartment (Apt.) or Unit number
  • Street Number (No.)
  • Street Name
  • City/Town
  • Country
  • Province/State
  • Postal Code/zip code
  • District
Question 3

Check the box to tell us if the telephone number is from Canada/the United States (US) or any other country.

From the list, select the type of telephone:

  • Residence (home)
  • Cellular (cell/mobile)
  • Business (work)

Enter your telephone number including the country code and area/regional codes.

If you have an extension number, enter it after your phone number under “Ext. (extension)”

Required stepTo ensure your file can be processed in a timely fashion, it is important to us to be able to community directly with you. If your phone number changes, notify IRCC as soon as possible.

Question 4

If you have a second telephone number, enter it here. Providing more methods of contact will help make sure we can contact you with information about your application.

Question 5

If you have a fax number, enter it here.

Question 6

Enter your e-mail address, for example: name@provider.net

Required stepIt is highly recommended for you to provide a personal email address as email is the primary method of communication for us. If for exceptional reasons, you cannot provide a personal email address, you must explain why on a separate page and attach it to the Generic Application form for Canada (IMM 0008). If you do not provide an email address, processing of the application will be delayed.

If your e-mail address changes, notify IRCC as soon as possible.

Passport

Question 1

Check the box to tell us if you have a valid passport or travel document. If you don’t have one or cannot obtain one, you must check the “No” box.

If you do not have a passport or travel document and are unable to obtain one, you must tell us on your forms. In this situation, we will provide you with a travel document so you can be resettled to Canada.

Question 2

If you checked “Yes”, provide your passport or travel document number.

Question 3

From the list, select the country that issued your passport or travel document.

Question 4

Enter the date your passport or travel document was issued.

Question 5

Enter the expiry date of your passport or travel document.

National Identity Document

Question 1

Check the box to tell us if you have a valid identity document from any country. If you have more than one, please use the one from your country of origin.

Question 2

If you checked “Yes”, provide your identity document number.

Question 3

From the list, select the name of the country that issued your identity document.

Question 4

Enter the issue date of your identity document.

Question 5

Enter the expiry date of your identity document.

Education/Occupation Detail

Question 1

From the list, select your highest level of education.

None
No education.
Secondary or less
High school diploma obtained after elementary school and before college, university, or other formal training.
Trade / Apprenticeship certificate / Diploma
Diploma completed in a specific trade, such as carpentry or auto mechanics.
Non-university certificate / Diploma
Training in a profession that requires formal education but not at the university level.
Post-secondary – No degree
Post-secondary studies at a college or university but no degree earned.
Bachelor’s degree
Academic degree awarded by a college or university to those who completed an undergraduate curriculum; also called a baccalaureate.
Post Graduate – No degree
Post Graduate studies at a college or university but no degree earned (for example, Master or PhD).
Master’s degree
Academic degree awarded by a graduate school of a college or university. You must have completed a Bachelor’s degree before a Master’s degree can be earned.
Doctorate – PhD
Highest university degree. Normally, you must have completed a Master’s degree before a PhD can be earned.
Question 2

Enter the total number of years of formal education that you have completed, including elementary and secondary school.

Question 3

Enter your current occupation. If you are unemployed, write down “unemployed”.

Question 4

Enter your intended occupation in Canada.

Language Details

Question 1

This question is not used for selection purposes. From the list, select your first (native) language. This is the language that you learned at home during your childhood and that you still understand. If your native language is not in this list, select “Other”.

  1. If your native language is not English or French, select which one you would most likely use:
    • English
    • French
    • Neither
  2. From the list, select whether you are able to communicate in English and/or French:
    • English
    • French
    • Both
    • Neither

Dependent(s) i.e. your family members

All questions in this section are about your family members that meet the IRCC definition (see above). You must include all family members below who are not already permanent residents or Canadian citizens:

To add a new dependent to the application, click the “Add Dependent” button, located at the bottom of the page. To remove a dependant from the application, click the “Remove Dependent” button.

If you have more than five (5) family members, complete the following form for each additional family member:

Dependent’s Personal Details

Questions 1-9

Questions 1 to 9 are the same as the questions you answered for yourself. See the previous instructions to help you answer the questions for your dependent(s).

Question 10

From the list, select your dependent’s relationship to you, the principal applicant:

Question 11
  1. Check the box to tell us if your dependent will accompany you to Canada.
  2. If you answered “No”, explain why your dependent is non-accompanying.
Question 12

From the list, select the type of dependent.

Type A
A dependent child is under the age of 22 and single.
Type C
A dependent child is 22 years of age or older, has depended substantially on the financial support of a parent since before the age of 22, and is unable to provide for himself or herself because of a medical condition. If you select “Type C”, you must include documents that confirm the medical condition of your child.
Questions 13 – 17

Questions about education, occupations and language are the same as the questions you answered for yourself. Please see the previous instructions to help you answer these questions for your dependent(s).


Consent and Declaration of Applicant

Follow these instructions to make sure your form is filled out properly.

  1. Fill in the section:
    1. Write your name in the space provided.
    2. Check the box to tell us if you agree that the information in this application related to your intended occupation, education and work experience may be shared with prospective employers to help them in hiring workers.
    3. Print the forms and sign and date in the spaces provided. If you are less than 18 years of age, your form must be signed by one of your parents or a legal guardian. By signing, you certify that you fully understand the questions asked, and that the information you have provided is complete, truthful, and correct. If you do not sign, the application will not be processed.
  2. Once you have completed the form, click on the “Validate” button located at the top or bottom of the form. This will generate a barcode page or pages (see image below).

    Sample Barcodes

  3. Print all pages of your application form. If you make a change to one page of the form after printing, you must click on the “Validate” button again and reprint all pages of the form again so that the barcode will capture all changes when scanned.
  4. When you are preparing your application package, place the barcode page(s) on the top of the IMM 0008 application form.

Schedule A – Background/Declaration (IMM 5669)

This form must be completed by:

  • you, the principal applicant;
  • your spouse or common-law partner (whether accompanying you to Canada or not); and
  • your dependent children aged 18 years or older (whether accompanying you to Canada or not).

You can download, save and fill out the form on a computer.

Reminder: When filling out all the necessary forms, be complete and accurate. If a section does not apply to you, then, write “Not Applicable” or “N/A”. If you need more space for any section, print out another page with the appropriate section, complete it and submit it with your application.

Question 1

Enter your full family name (surname or last name) as shown on your passport, travel or identity document.

Enter all of your given name(s) (first, second or more) as shown on your passport, travel or identity document. Do not use initials.

Question 2

Name in native language/script

Enter your name in your native language or script (Arabic, Cyrillic, Chinese, Farsi, Korean, Japanese characters or Chinese commercial/telegraphic code, etc.).

Question 3

Date of birth

Enter your date of birth. If you do not know your complete date of birth, use a “*” (star sign/asterisk) to fill in the spaces for the unknown year, month or day. For example, if you do not know your date and month of birth you can write it as */*/1967.

Question 4

Provide your father’s personal details including his:

  • Family name (surname or last name);
  • Given name(s);
  • Date of birth;
  • Town/ City of birth;
  • Country of birth; and
  • Date of death (if applicable).
Question 5

Provide your mother’s personal details including her:

  • Family name (surname or last name);
  • Given name(s);
  • Date of birth;
  • Town/ City of birth;
  • Country of birth; and
  • Date of death (if applicable).
Question 6

Answer each question by checking the appropriate box.

If you answered “Yes” to one or more of these questions, you must provide explanation in the space provided. If you need more space, attach a separate sheet of paper.

For questions 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12, when answering:
  • do not use abbreviations.
  • do not leave gaps in time.
  • do not skip time periods. You must account for all time periods.
Question 7

Enter the number of years of formal education you have completed at each of the levels indicated.

Provide the details about each secondary and post-secondary educational institution you attended, including the:

  • period of time that you attended the institution;
  • type of certificate or diploma issued; and
  • field of study.

If no diploma was issued, write “N/A (Not Applicable)”.

Question 8

Provide the details of your personal history since the age of 18, or the past 10 years, whichever is most recent.

Start with the most recent information.

If you were working:

  • under “Activity”, enter your occupation or job title;
  • make sure you provide a specific job title; and
  • if your title does not clearly reflect your job, provide a brief list of your duties.

If you were not working:

  • explain what you were doing (unemployed, studying, travelling, retired, in detention, etc.).

If you were outside your country of nationality, enter your status in that country.

Question 9

If you were or still are a member of an association or organization, enter the name(s) here. This includes:

  • political organizations
  • social organizations
  • youth or student organizations
  • trade unions
  • professional associations

If you were not a member of an association or organization, do not write “N/A (Not Applicable)”. Instead, write: “I have never been a member of an organization or association”.

Question 10

Enter any government positions you have held in the past such as:

  • Civil servant
  • Judge
  • Police officer
  • Employee in a security organization

Include:

  • the name of the country and the level of jurisdiction (examples: national, regional or municipal);
  • the name of the department or the branch you worked for; and activities and/or positions that you held.

If you did not hold any government positions, write “N/A (Not Applicable)”.

Question 11

Give complete details about your military or paramilitary service including mandatory/compulsory service. Provide the details of your military or paramilitary service for each of the countries whose armed forces you served in.

If you were not in any military or paramilitary service, write “N/A (Not Applicable)”.

Question 12

Enter the residential addresses where you have lived since your 18th birthday or the past 10 years, whichever is most recent. Do not use P.O. box addresses. Be as specific as possible.

Declaration of applicant

Read all of the statements in all sections carefully. Sign and date in the boxes provided. By signing, you certify that you fully understand the questions asked, and that the information you have provided is complete, truthful, and correct. If you do not sign, the application will not be processed.

Interpreter declaration: Leave this section blank

Solemn declaration: Leave this section blank

Features


Schedule 2 – Refugees Outside Canada (IMM 0008 Schedule 2)

This form must be completed by:

  • you, the principal applicant;
  • your spouse or common-law partner (whether accompanying you to Canada or not), and;
  • your dependent children aged 18 years or older (whether accompanying you to Canada or not).

You can download, save and fill out the form on a computer.

General Application Information

Check the box to tell us if you are:

  • the principal applicant; or
  • a family member.

Write your:

  • Family name
  • Given name(s)
  • Date of birth.
  • Unique Client Identifier (UCI) or file number (if you know).

Parts A and B: CASE NARRATIVE & IMMIGRATION STATUS AND SETTLEMENT ABILITIES

For parts A & B, read the questions carefully and provide as much information as possible. Providing precise information will make it easier for us to process your application.

Part C: ADDITIONAL FAMILY INFORMATION

You must list all family members on this form even if they are not accompanying you to Canada, are deceased, presumed deceased or their whereabouts are unknown.

If the family member is deceased, type “deceased” in the “present address and e-mail address” box.

If the family member’s location is unknown, type “unknown” in the “present address and e-mail address” box.

Question 8

Family information

Provide the following information for yourself, your spouse (if applicable), your mother and father. Enter their:

  • name
  • relationship
  • date of birth
  • city/town and country of birth
  • marital status
  • present address
  • e-mail address
Question 9

Children

You must list the following information for all of your children. Enter their:

  • name
  • their relationship to you (e.g. daughter, son, step-daughter, adopted son)
  • date of birth
  • city/town and country of birth
  • marital status
  • present address
  • e-mail address
Question 10

Brothers and sisters

Provide the following information for all your brothers and sisters. Enter their:

  • name
  • relationship to you (sister, brother, step-sister, step-brother, etc.)
  • date of birth
  • city/town and country of birth
  • marital status (including common-law relationships) and
  • present address
  • e-mail address
Question 11

Relatives in Canada

Provide the following information for all any relatives you have in Canada. Enter their:

  • name
  • relationship to you (aunt, uncle, brother, sister, cousin, etc.)
  • telephone number
  • current city and province of residence
  • e-mail address

This information is used for GAR applicants to help in matching them with a destination in Canada.

Part D: CONSENT AND DECLARATION

Question 12
  1. Tell us if someone helped you complete your application. This includes anyone who helped you answer the questions.

    If you answer “Yes”, write the name of the individual or organization that helped you.

  2. Tell us if you paid this person or organization to help you complete your form.
Question 13

Declaration of applicant

Read the declaration, sign and date. If you do not sign, the application will be returned to you.

Use of a Representative (IMM 5476) - optional

A representative is someone who provides advice, consultation, or guidance to you at any stage of the application process. If you appoint him or her as your representative by filling out this form, it means that you give your representative permission to do business on your behalf with Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) and the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA). A representative may be paid or not paid and must be declared. Learn how to appoint a representative.

Note that, for PSR applications, we strongly recommend that your sponsors be your representatives for your permanent residence application.


Step 4: Submit the Application

Privately Sponsored Refugees (PSR): Generally, your sponsor will submit your application on your behalf to the Resettlement Operations Centre in Ottawa (ROC-O) of IRCC.

Government Assisted Refugees (GAR): After your case is referred by the UNHCR or another referral organization, the IRCC office overseas will tell you how to submit your completed forms directly to their office.


What Happens Next?

Phase 1 - PSR: Assessment of Sponsor

ROC-O will assess your sponsoring group’s application to make sure it is complete and to ensure your sponsors meet the requirements of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA). If the application is complete, a case file number (beginning with the letter “G”) will be assigned to your application.

If the sponsorship is approved, you and your sponsors will be advised and your application will be forwarded to the IRCC office overseas responsible for your country of residence. To find out which IRCC office processes applications from your country of residence, see Visa offices outside Canada.

If the sponsorship is refused, the entire application will be refused, you and your sponsors will be advised and we will not process your application further. Your application will not be returned to you.

Phase 1 - GAR: Assessment of Referral and request for forms

After your case is referred by a designated referral organization, the IRCC office overseas will tell you how to submit your completed forms directly to their office.

When your forms are received at the IRCC office overseas, you will be emailed a letter of confirmation. This letter will confirm that your application has been received and will have your assigned file number (beginning with the letter “G”). If you have not included an e-mail address you may not receive this letter.

Phase 2: Eligibility Assessment

You are eligible when it is determined that you meet:

  • the convention refugee definition; or
  • country of asylum class definition

Applications are assessed on a case by case basis. Once your application is ready to be assessed, a Migration Officer will review your application to determine if you are eligible.

In addition, we may assess your ability to resettle successfully in Canada. We will consider:

  • if you have relatives or a sponsor in the community where you plan to live in Canada
  • your ability to speak or learn to speak English and/or Frenchv
  • your potential for employment based on your education, skills and work experience and
  • your resourcefulness and other similar characteristics that will help you adapt to life in Canada.

At this stage, a Migration Officer may determine that enough information is available to make a decision or, they may ask for you and all accompanying family members to come for an interview. If you are selected for an interview, we will contact you with the date, time and location and will tell you which documents to bring. You and your accompanying family members must provide biometrics (fingerprint and a live photograph) at interview.

Phase 3: Admissibility Assessment

You are admissible to be resettled to Canada when you pass:

  • medical exam;
  • security checks; and
  • criminality checks.

Once you are found eligible, you, your spouse, and each of your dependent children must have a medical exam by a doctor chosen by the IRCC office overseas. The doctor will tell you which tests are required. We will provide you with the instructions when the time comes. You must not complete a medical exam until we tell you to. You should not pay for your medical exam. The payment of the medical exam is paid for by the Government of Canada. If a doctor asks for you to pay money, please report this to the IRCC office overseas. Reporting such an incident will not affect processing of your application and will help ensure the integrity of the resettlement program.

Before we issue a visa, we do background and security checks for all applicants who wish to immigrate to Canada. This includes checks into any past criminal behaviour, violations, infractions, etc. We will not contact organizations or individuals if it puts you or your family in danger. All applicants are required to disclose any criminal past, including charges, on their IMM 0008 and Schedule A (IMM 5669) forms. If you do not disclose this information, regardless of how serious the charge, infraction or conviction is, your application may be refused.

Phase 4: Final stage

Once you have satisfied the Migration Officer that you are eligible and are not inadmissible, your file can be finalized. If you are privately sponsored, you will be destined to the city and province where your sponsor resides. If you are sponsored by the government, IRCC will determine the province and city where you will be resettled. The IRCC office, in cooperation with partners (IOM, UNHCR, etc.) will then arrange for your transportation and advise your sponsor and settlement services of your arrival. You will be contacted with your travel arrangements once completed. Depending on your country of nationality and residence, we may ask you to submit your passport or provide you with a travel document. Some countries require that exit permits be obtained prior to departure. Costs, processing times and procedures for exit permits vary greatly. The IRCC office overseas will provide you with more information at this stage.

Things that delay processing

The following may delay processing:

  • missing or out of date contact information (phone number, e-mail address)
  • you failing to inform us of changes in family composition in a timely manner
  • delay by your sponsorship group in adding a new family member to your undertaking
  • your application is incomplete or there are gaps or missing information in your application
  • there is a criminal, security or medical problem which is identified during the examination
  • obtaining exit permits
  • you send e-mails/letters without mentioning your file number
  • you submit unclear photocopies of documents
  • you send documents without a certified English or French translation
  • we need to consult with other offices in Canada and overseas
  • you do not provide photos that meet specifications

Phase 5: Arrival in Canada

If you are approved to be resettled in Canada, help is available to make your adjustment to life in Canada easier as a newcomer.

After you arrive, you will receive a general orientation to life in Canada that will cover:

  • basic life skills
  • language training
  • housing
  • learning about the Canadian transportation system
  • educational services
  • grocery shopping
  • banking
  • how to start your search for employment
  • other parts of everyday life

Other Information

1. Fees/loans and travel documents

Fees

There are no fees for refugee applications. Sponsors are not allowed to ask you to pay for your own resettlement to Canada or for you to transfer money to Canada for your sponsorship. Sponsorship Agreement Holders are permitted to request for you to reimburse them for up to $250 per application for reasonable processing fees. If you have concerns that a group is asking you to pay money to be sponsored, please contact an IRCC office and they will be able to provide you with information on whether or not this is allowed.

Immigrant loans

You may be eligible for financial assistance to cover costs associated with your resettlement to Canada. If you need a loan, ask an IRCC officer for more information.

2. Updating your contact information

  • During the application process, you must advise IRCC of any change in your or your family member’s contact information (address phone number, new e-mail address, etc.). We must have up to date contact information for you in order to contact you when required. You can do this by completing the Case Specific Inquiry tool.

3. Checking application status

Once your application has been received and reviewed by IRCC, you can check its status on-line.

4. Current processing times

Processing times can change. You can check current processing times on the Application processing times webpage.

5. Protecting your information

Your personal information is:

  • available to IRCC and the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) employees who need to see it to provide the services to you; and
  • not disclosed to other organizations except as permitted under the provisions of the Privacy Act or the Citizenship Regulations.

Get more informationFor more information about the protection of your data, visit the Help Centre.

6. Need help?

If you need help, you can find answers to your questions by visiting the Help Centre.

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