Medical exams for visitors, students and workers

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Who needs a medical exam

If you plan to stay for 6 months or less

You generally don’t need a medical exam, unless you plan to work in certain jobs.

Jobs for which you need a medical exam

You may need a medical exam because of the type of job you want to do in Canada.

Examples of such jobs are:

  1. Jobs that bring you into close contact with people, such as:
    • workers in the health sciences field
    • clinical laboratory workers
    • patient attendants in nursing and geriatric homes
    • medical students admitted to Canada to attend university
    • medical electives and physicians on short-term locums
    • teachers of primary or secondary schools, or other teachers of small children
    • domestics
    • workers who give in-home care to children, the elderly and the disabled
    • day nursery employees and
    • other similar jobs
  2. Agricultural workers who’ve visited or lived in one of these countries for more than 6 months during the past year.

If you plan to stay for more than 6 months

You need a medical exam if you meet any of these criteria:

If you need a medical exam, the visa office will tell you what to do next.

Who can do your exam

You must see a doctor on the list of panel physicians. Your own doctor can’t do the medical exam.

The panel physician doesn’t make the final decision about your medical exam. We make that decision. If there’s a problem with your medical exam, we’ll contact you in writing.

Find a panel physician to perform your exam.

When to get your medical exam

You can either get your medical exam before or after you apply, depending on the program you’re applying for.

Read the instruction guide for your program to find out when to get your exam.

Getting an exam before you submit your application

You have the option of getting an upfront medical exam. To get one, contact a panel physician directly.

You can get one if you apply to:

  • visit (including parent and grandparent super visa)
  • work
  • study

You can’t get an upfront medical exam if you’re applying to sponsor your spouse, partner or child. Wait for our instructions before going for your medical exam.

Getting an exam after you submit your application

We’ll send you instructions on how to get your medical exam done. You must go for your medical exam within 30 days of receiving these instructions.

If you don’t follow these instructions, we may refuse your application.

What to bring

When you go to your appointment for the medical exam, you must bring:

  • proper identification (at least one document with your photograph and signature, such as a passport, driver’s licence or national identity card)
  • eye glasses or contact lenses, if you wear them
  • any medical reports or test results that you have for any previous or existing medical conditions
  • the Medical Report form (IMM 1017E), if you don’t have an up-front medical exam
    • we’ll send you this form
  • a list of your current medications

You also have to bring 4 recent photographs if the panel physician doesn’t use eMedical. Contact the panel physician before your appointment to find out.

If you’re referred for an x-ray or other tests, you may be asked to present your identification again when you go for those tests.

What you need to pay for

You must pay all fees related to the medical exam when you’re there, including:

  • the fee for the doctor or radiologist
  • any special tests, investigations or treatment needed
  • any specialists you need to see

If we refuse your application after your medical exam, we won’t refund those fees.

Refugees and asylum seekers are exempt from paying the fees.

What to expect during your exam

Only an approved panel physician can do a complete medical exam for immigration reasons.

When you arrive

The panel physician or clinic staff will ask you for identification to confirm your identity. If you’re referred for an x-ray or other tests, you may be asked to present your identification again when you go for those tests. Your picture will also be taken for our records.

Medical history questionnaire

The doctor will fill out a medical history questionnaire with you. This questionnaire is about any previous or existing medical conditions. They’ll also ask you about any medications you’re taking.

It’s important to tell the panel physician about any previous or existing medical conditions. Processing your medical exam could take longer if you don’t.

Physical examination

You’ll undergo a physical exam.

The doctor or medical clinic staff will:

  • weigh you
  • measure your height
  • check your hearing and vision
  • take your blood pressure
  • feel your pulse
  • listen to your heart and lungs
  • feel your abdomen
  • check how your limbs move
  • look at your skin

The doctor or medical clinic staff won’t examine your genitals or rectal area. These parts of the body aren’t required for the immigration medical exam.

The doctor may need to examine your breasts. If they do, they will:

  • provide you with an explanation of why and how the examination is being done

Other possible tests

Depending on your age, you may be asked to do chest x-rays and laboratory tests at the clinic or a laboratory. This is routine screening and the doctor will discuss any abnormal results with you.

You may be referred to a specialist for more testing, depending on the results of your medical exam. We ask that you complete this request as soon as possible to avoid delays in the processing of your medical examination.

Right to have a chaperone

You have the right to a chaperone at any time during the medical exam.

You may:

  • ask the medical clinic to have a staff member in the room
  • stop the exam at any time to ask questions about what the doctor is doing
  • stop the exam and ask for a chaperone, even if you refused one at first

If you have questions or feel uncomfortable with a part of the exam, please ask the panel physician to stop and tell them about your concerns.

After your exam is done

Once the exam is done, the physician will send us the results. The doctor will give you a document confirming that you had a medical exam.

Whether you took an upfront exam or not, keep a copy of the print out given to you by the panel physician as proof of your immigration medical exam.

If you’re unsatisfied with how the panel physician or panel radiologist did your medical exam, you may:

We welcome all compliments, comments or observations through our feedback form.

When to send your medical exam results

Whether you took an upfront exam or not, the doctor will send us the results.

Keep a copy of any document or print out given to you by the panel physician as proof of your immigration medical exam.

If you took an upfront medical exam

You must include a copy of the IMM 1017B Upfront Medical Report form that the doctor gave you after your exam. If the doctor works with eMedical, they’ll give you an information sheet print out.

You must attach that form to your paper application. If you apply online, you must upload that form before you can submit your application.

If you took a medical exam after you submitted your application

There is no further action required on your part.

How long your medical results are good for

Your medical exam results are good for 12 months only.

If you don’t come to Canada as a visitor, student or worker within that time, you may need to do another exam.

Getting a copy of your medical exam

If you want a copy of your medical exam, please ask the doctor when you’re there.

Medical reports and x-rays for the medical exam become our property. We cannot return them to you.

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