Details on sub-programs - Departmental Results Report 2017-2018

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List of abbreviations

AAP
Athlete Assistance Program
CATF
Canada Arts Training Fund
CAVCO
Canadian Audio-Visual Certification Office
CCI
Canadian Conservation Institute
CCR
Canada's Capital Region
CCSF
Canada Cultural Spaces Fund
CHIN
Canadian Heritage Information Network
CMF
Canada Media Fund
CPERB
Cultural Property Export Review Board
CPTC
Canadian Film or Video Production Tax Credit
CRA
Canada Revenue Agency
CRTC
Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission
DRR
Departmental Results Report
DVD
Digital video disc
INDEM
Canada Travelling Exhibitions Indemnification Program
IPTV
Internet Protocol Television
LGs
Lieutenant Governors
MAP
Museums Assistance Program
MCP
Movable Cultural Property Program
SCP
State Ceremonial and Protocol
TBD
To be determined
TV5
French-language national television network
TV5MONDE
French-language international television network
VOD
Video on demand
YEC
Youth Exchanges Canada
YFC
Youth Forums Canada

Sub-program 1.1.1: Canada Arts Presentation Fund

The Canada Arts Presentation Fund gives Canadians access to a variety of professional artistic experiences in their communities. It provides financial assistance to Canadian not-for-profit organizations that professionally present arts festivals or performing arts series, as well as their support organizations. The Canada Arts Presentation Fund also supports emerging presenters and presenter support organizations whose activities target underserved communities or artistic practices. The goal is to allow Canadians from all regions of the country to engage in and value a variety of professional artistic experiences. This Sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants under the Canada Arts Presentation Fund and Contributions under the Canada Arts Presentation Fund.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
38,736,833 40,667,025 1,930,192
Human resources (full-time equivalents (FTEs))
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
65.9 62.9 -3.0
Performance measurement
Expected result Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18
Arts presenter organizations offer a variety of professional artistic experiences to Canadians. Degree to which, on a scale* of 1 to 5, performance measurement framework targets are achieved that illustrate the variety of disciplines for professional artistic experiences offered by recipients of the Canada Arts Presentation Fund. 5 March 31, 2018 5 5 5
Canadians, including those in underserved communities across Canada, have access to a variety of professional artistic experiences. Degree to which, on a scale* of 1 to 5, performance measurement framework targets are achieved that illustrate the type of underserved communities reached by recipients of the Canada Arts Presentation Fund. 5 March 31, 2018 5 5 5

*The performance indicator scale of 1 to 5 is detailed as follows: 1 = 0 – 24% met, 2 = 25-49% met, 3 = 50 – 79% met, 4 = 80 – 99% met, 5 = 100% +.

Sub-program 1.1.2: Canada Cultural Spaces Fund

The Canada Cultural Spaces Fund seeks to improve the physical conditions for the arts and heritage related to creation, presentation, preservation and exhibition. The Sub-program also aims to increase and improve access for Canadians to performing arts, visual arts, media arts, and to museum collections and heritage exhibitions. To achieve these objectives, the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund provides financial assistance in the form of grants and contributions for infrastructure projects for professional, not-for-profit arts and heritage organizations, as well as municipal and provincial governments and agencies with a mandate for arts and heritage, and equivalent Indigenous peoples' organizations. The goal is to provide Canadians in all regions, including underserved communities, with access to new or improved arts and heritage spaces in their communities for creation, presentation, preservation and exhibition. This Sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants under the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund and Contributions under the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
113,377,079 109,625,609 -3,751,470
Human resources (full-time equivalents (FTEs))
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
59.9 55.3 -4.6
Performance measurement
Expected result Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18
Arts and heritage organizations in a variety of communities have resources to build and improve facilities and infrastructure. Minimum number of new or improved arts and heritage facilities supported by the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund. 80 March 31 2018 106 237* 191
Minimum percentage of infrastructure and specialized equipment projects supported by the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund that target an underserved community. 40 March 2017 56 60 57

* CCSF did not count feasibility studies, as they do not improve facilities. Also, these figures are much larger due to the Budget 2016 investment of funds.

Sub-program 1.1.3: Canada Arts Training Fund

The Canada Arts Training Fund (CATF) contributes to the development of Canadian creators and future cultural leaders of the Canadian arts sector by supporting the training of artists with high potential through institutions that offer training of the highest caliber. It provides financial assistance to Canadian not-for-profit institutions that specialize in delivering focused, intensive and practice-based arts studies. These schools offer professional training at the highest level in disciplines such as dance, theatre, circus arts, visual arts and music (opera, orchestral), etc. It also provides financial support to training in Indigenous and ethnocultural artistic practices. Canadians and the world benefit from high-quality artistic achievements by Canadian artists trained in Canada at institutions funded through the Sub-program. This Sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Contributions under the Canada Arts Training Fund.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
24,523,234 23,781,974 -741,260
Human resources (full-time equivalents (FTEs))
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
9.0 8.3 -0.7
Performance measurement
Expected result Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18
Graduates of arts training institutions have professional careers in Canada and internationally. Minimum percentage of arts graduates of institutions supported by the Canada Arts Training Fund that are employed professionally in their field in Canada or abroad. 75 March 31, 2018 80 86 79
Minimum percentage of employers who rate graduates of institutions supported by the Canada Arts Training Fund as being well prepared for professional careers. 80 March 31, 2018 91 91 91

* CCSF did not count feasibility studies, as they do not improve facilities. Also, these figures are much larger due to the Budget 2016 investment of funds.

Sub-program 1.1.4: Canada Cultural Investment Fund

The Canada Cultural Investment Fund helps arts and heritage organizations build and diversify their revenue streams, improve their business practices, and assists them in being better rooted and recognized in their communities. This is achieved through three components. The Endowment Incentives component provides grants to match private sector funds raised on behalf of professional, not-for-profit arts organizations. The Strategic Initiatives component provides financial assistance to projects that strengthen business practices of multiple partner organizations. The Limited Support to Endangered Arts Organizations is a rarely used component which allows the federal government to partner with other levels of government and the private sector to help an arts organization move from near bankruptcy to sustainability if they have an appropriate business strategy. This Sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants under the Canada Cultural Investment Fund and Contributions under the Canada Cultural Investment Fund.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
25,271,766 23,597,851 -1,673,915

The difference is mainly due to reallocations to various programs due to new priorities.

Human resources (full-time equivalents (FTEs))
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
15.6 13.4 -2.2
Performance measurement
Expected result Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18
Arts and heritage organizations demonstrate sound organizational, administrative and financial health. Average number of tools developed by recipients of Strategic Initiatives funding to strengthen the business practices of arts and heritage organizations. 6 March 31, 2018 28 25 45
Minimum dollar amount, in millions, raised through private-sector donations by arts organizations applying to and eligible for Endowment Incentives component. 20 March 31, 2018 17.7 21.4 28.6

In 2017-18, more than 75% of the 12 projects approved were of national or provincial scope, several of which were large scale.
This led to an unusually large number of tools being created.

Sub-program 1.1.5: Harbourfront Centre Funding Program

The Harbourfront Centre Funding Program is a single-recipient program that provides operating funding to the Harbourfront Centre. The Harbourfront Centre creates cultural and artistic events and activities to enliven, educate and entertain the public on Toronto's waterfront. Its mission is to nurture the growth of new cultural expression, stimulate Canadian and international interchange and provide a dynamic, accessible environment for the public to experience the marvels of the creative imagination. This Sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Contribution to the Harbourfront Centre.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
5,088,360 5,072,242 -16,118
Human resources (full-time equivalents (FTEs))
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
0.7 0.6 -0.1

*The Harbourfront Centre Funding Sub-program was transferred from the Department of Finance to the Department of Canadian Heritage in 2016–17.
**Funding for this Sub-program will be sunsetting on March 31st, 2019.

Performance measurement
Expected result Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18
Visitors to the Toronto waterfront engage and participate in the arts and culture through Harbourfront Centre programming Minimum number of annual attendees to events and activities offered by Harbourfront Centre TBD March 31, 2018 n/a 3,462,908 3,474,150
Number of events and activities offered by Harbourfront Centre TBD March 31, 2018 n/a 4641 4225

Sub-program 1.2.1: Broadcasting and Digital Communications

The Broadcasting and Digital Communications Sub-program provides advice on the overall legislative, policy and regulatory framework for broadcasting and digital communications in Canada, including advice on the Broadcasting Act. Objectives of the Broadcasting Act include, among other things, ensuring that Canadian programming is created and that Canadians have access to it. The Program conducts monitoring, research and analysis of emerging trends, of industry performance and of the needs and interests of Canadians to provide evidence-based policy advice. It is responsible for policy development and advice to ensure a responsive legislative and policy framework in support of Canada's broadcasting and digital communications sector and the role it plays in enriching the cultural, political, social and economic fabric of Canada.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
5,688,187 5,723,504 35,317
Human resources (full-time equivalents (FTEs))
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
46.0 45.2 -0.8
Performance measurement
Expected result Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18
Decision makers are well-informed on issues related to the overall legislative, policy and regulatory framework for broadcasting and digital communications in Canada. Policy advice is provided, including advice in support of petitions to the Governor-in-Council in respect of Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) broadcasting licensing decisions, by legislative deadlines, or as required. Targets are not applicable Ongoing 100 100 100

Sub-program 1.2.2: Canada Media Fund

The Canada Media Fund is funded by the Government of Canada and the cable, satellite distributors and Internet Protocol Television (IPTV). It supports the creation of digital content across multiple platforms such as television, wireless devices or the Internet. The Canada Media Fund focuses investments on the creation of content Canadians want, and harnesses the opportunities provided by new technologies to deliver content to Canadians where and when they want it. Organizations supported by the Canada Media Fund include, but are not limited to, Canadian television and digital media production companies. Canadians as consumers of convergent programs and creators of leading-edge content and applications represent the ultimate target group. Indigenous communities, official language minority communities and other diverse language groups are also targeted by specific production funding envelopes. This Sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Contributions under the Canada Media Fund.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
135,142,119 135,083,019 -59,100
Human resources (full-time equivalents (FTEs))
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
7.4 7.2 -0.2
Performance measurement
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18
Innovative Canadian content and software applications are created for commercial potential or public use. Minimum number of innovative Canadian content and software application projects supported by the Canada Media Fund. 60 October 2018 108 104 96
Canadians watch or interact with Canada Media Fund-supported television programs or digital convergent content. Number of hours viewed (in millions of hours annually) for Canada Media Fund-funded English-language television productions. 1,660 October 2018 2,148 2,190 1,966
Number of hours viewed (in millions of hours annually) for Canada Media Fund-funded French-language television productions. 980 October 2018 1,314 1,364 1,352

*The data reflects results from the previous year, because the CMF reports its data each year in the fall. Results for 2017-18 will be available on October 31, 2018.

Sub-program 1.2.3: Film and Video Policy

The Film and Video Policy Sub-program supports the overall federal policy, legislative and regulatory framework for the audiovisual sector, fostering the creation of a range of film and video productions and access to Canadian content by Canadian and international audiences. The Film and Video Policy Sub-program also implements Canada's Policy on Audiovisual Treaty Coproduction by renegotiating existing coproduction treaties and negotiating new ones.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
1,650,139 1,731,342 81,203
Human resources (full-time equivalents (FTEs))
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
13.2 15.1 1.9
Performance measurement
Expected result Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18
Canadian feature films are accessible in Canada and abroad. Market share (percentage) of Canadian feature film views in various markets (e.g. cinemas, DVD rentals/sales, and conventional, specialty and pay television, VOD). 5 December 2020 5.3 8.2 n/a*
Film and video policies support the production of a range of Canadian audiovisual content. Total budget (in billions of dollars) of Canadian film and television productions (including Canadian share of co-productions). 2.5 December 2020 3 2.9 n/a*
Audiovisual treaty coproduction negotiations are advanced with key priority countries. Number of treaty negotiations that are underway with foreign partners. 8 March 2020 9 7 9

*Results available early 2019-20.

Sub-program 1.2.4: Film or Video Production Tax Credits

The Canadian Audio-Visual Certification Office (CAVCO) administers, with the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), the following refundable tax credit programs to support the film and television production industry in Canada: 1) The Canadian Film or Video Production Tax Credit (CPTC), which encourages the creation of Canadian programming and the development of an active domestic independent production sector. It is available to Canadian production companies for productions qualified as Canadian content; qualified productions must meet specific criteria for key creative personnel and production costs. The CPTC is available at a rate of 25 percent of the qualified labour expenditure; and 2) The Film or Video Production Services Tax Credit (PSTC), which encourages the employment of Canadians by taxable Canadian or foreign-owned corporations with a permanent establishment in Canada. The PSTC is equal to 16 percent of salary and wages paid to Canadian residents or taxable Canadian corporations for services provided to the production in Canada.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
-129,295 -837,821 -708,526

Negative numbers presented in the DRR represent a surplus or, as for CAVCO, revenues. CAVCO is a full vote-netted cost center and it collects user fees from clients. As its planned and actual revenues were higher than its expenditures, CAVCO generated revenues in 2016–17.

Human resources (full-time equivalents (FTEs))
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
44.7 50.0 5.3
Performance measurement
Expected result Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18
Canadian content film and television productions receive certification from Canadian Heritage. Number of Canadian film or television productions supported through the Canadian Film or Video Production Tax Credit. 1,000 March 2020 1,211 1,172 n/a*
Non-Canadian content film and television productions using Canadian production services receive accreditation from Canadian Heritage. Number of foreign and Canadian film and television productions shot in Canada that received a Film or Video Production Services Tax Credit. 180 March 2020 319 375 n/a*

*Results available early 2019-20.

Sub-program 1.2.5: Canada Music Fund

The Canada Music Fund supports the activities of Canadian music creators, artists and entrepreneurs aimed at increasing the creation of and access to a diversity of Canadian music for audiences everywhere by enhancing the sector's ability to compete in domestic and international markets. This support is delivered through the following components: 1) Music Entrepreneur, which provides funding to Canadian music entrepreneurs as well as for not-for-profit national service organizations in support of the creation, publishing, production, distribution or and marketing of Canadian music, including touring related activities; 2) New Musical Works, which provides funding to Canadian music artists and entrepreneurs for the creation, publishing, production, distribution or marketing of Canadian music, including touring related activities, music showcases and business development activities; 3) Collective Initiatives, which provides funding to Canadian not-for-profit organizations as well as music entrepreneurs in support of a diverse range of collective activities aiming to enhance the visibility and accessibility of Canadian music; and 4) Canadian Music Memories, which provides funding for the preservation of Canada's musical heritage for future generations. This Sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants under the Canada Music Fund and Contributions under the Canada Music Fund.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
28,223,078 29,197,690 974,612
Human resources (full-time equivalents (FTEs))
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
15.2 16.0 0.8
Performance measurement
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18
A range of Canadian music is produced by Canada Music Fund recipients. Number of Canadian music releases that were supported by the Canada Music Fund. 400 March 2020 546 502 518
Canadian music supported by the Canada Music Fund is accessed in Canada and abroad. Percentage of domestic market share of albums by Canada Music Fund supported artists. 12 March 2020 13.4 8.0* 9.2*
International unit sales, in millions, of Canada Music Fund supported music. 1 March 2020 0.4 0.6 0.3

*Note that the data source for the market share calculations changed in 2016. Comparisons with prior years is therefore not advised.

Sub-program 1.2.6: Canada Book Fund

The Canada Book Fund supports the activities of Canadian book publishers and other sectors of the book industry to ensure access to a broad range of Canadian-authored books. This support is delivered through the following streams of funding: 1) Support for Publishers, which provides funding distributed primarily through a formula that rewards success in delivering content that Canadians value. This funding contributes to the ongoing production and marketing of Canadian-authored books by offsetting the high costs of publishing in Canada and building the capacity and competitiveness of the sector; 2) Support for Organizations, which provides funding to develop the Canadian book industry and the market for its products by assisting industry associations and related organizations to undertake collective projects offering broad benefits to the industry and, ultimately, to readers everywhere. This Sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants under the Canada Book Fund and Contributions under the Canada Book Fund.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
40,543,608 41,276,819 733,211
Human resources (full-time equivalents (FTEs))
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
32.2 29.8 -2.4
Performance measurement
Expected result Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18
Readers everywhere have access to a broad range of Canadian-authored books produced by Canada Book Fund recipients. Number of new Canadian-authored titles published by Canada Book Fund recipients. 6,000 March 2020 6,973 6,533 6,401
Readers everywhere consume a broad range of Canadian-authored books supported by the Canada Book Fund. Value, in millions of dollars, of domestic and international sales of Canadian-authored titles by Canada Book Fund recipients. 350 March 2020 373 366 371

Sub-program 1.2.7: Canada Periodical Fund

The Canada Periodical Fund supports the activities of Canadian magazine and non-daily newspaper publishers and organizations to ensure that Canadians have access to diverse Canadian magazines and non-daily newspapers. The Fund is delivered through the following components: 1) Aid to Publishers, which provides formula funding to Canadian print magazines and non-daily newspapers for publishing activities, such as distribution, content creation, online activities and business development; 2) Business Innovation, which provides funding to print magazines and digital periodicals for business development and innovation projects; and 3) Collective Initiatives, which provides funding to Canadian magazines and non-daily newspaper organizations for industry-wide projects to increase the overall sustainability of the Canadian magazine and non-daily newspaper industries. This Sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants under the Canada Periodical Fund and Contributions under the Canada Periodical Fund.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
78,969,763 78,911,784 -57,979
Human resources (full-time equivalents (FTEs))
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
41.1 36.7 -4.4
Performance measurement
Expected result Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18
A range of Canadian periodicals supported by the Canada Periodical Fund is produced. Number of funded titles published by Canada Periodical Fund recipients. 750 March 2020 811 790 799
Canadian periodicals supported by the Canada Periodical Fund are accessed by Canadian readers. Number of copies, in millions, of funded titles distributed to Canadians per year. 150 March 2020 190 170 140

Sub-program 1.2.8: Copyright and International Trade Policy

Copyright and International Trade Policy supports the development of a consistent and predictable copyright framework that enables an efficient marketplace as well as serves the interests of Canadians. This is achieved through the delivery of policies and initiatives aimed at fostering the development of a Canadian copyright regime responsive to changes in the domestic and international environments. Copyright and International Trade Policy also encourages the understanding and application of Canadian copyright laws, regulations and mechanisms. In addition, Copyright and International Trade Policy supports the development of Canada's positions pertaining to copyright and cultural trade policy in international negotiations. This is achieved notably through the delivery of expert advice to Canada's negotiators aimed at ensuring an effective representation of Canadian cultural interests and policy in all international trade negotiations by maintaining flexibility to carry out our cultural policy objectives.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
5,394,356 6,194,351 799,995
Human resources (full-time equivalents (FTEs))
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
37.6 37.4 -0.2
Performance measurement
Expected result Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18
Decision makers are well-informed on issues related to the overall policy and regulatory framework for copyright and international trade. Provision of policy advice by mandated deadlines and as required. Targets are not applicable Ongoing n/a n/a n/a

Sub-program 1.2.9: Cultural Sector Investment Review

The Minister of Canadian Heritage has been responsible for reviewing and approving investments by foreign investors in the cultural sector, in accordance with the Investment Canada Act (the Act) and Regulations, since 1999. The purpose of the Act is "to provide for the review of significant investments in Canada by non-Canadians in a manner that encourages investment, economic growth and employment opportunities in Canada." The Cultural Sector Investment Review Branch administers the Act (Annual Report on the Administration of the Investment Canada Act), as it pertains to acquisitions or to the establishment by non-Canadians of cultural businesses in Canada. Such businesses include those involved in the publication, distribution or sale of books, magazines, periodicals, newspapers or music in print or machine readable form. Also covered are the businesses involved in the production, distribution, sale or exhibition of film or video products or audio or video music recordings. The mandate of the Cultural Sector Investment Review is to apply the Act to such cultural investments to ensure they generate net benefit to Canada.*

* Quarterly listings of all completed applications and notifications of investments are available on Canadian Heritage's website.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
840,755 657,185 -183,570
Human resources (full-time equivalents (FTEs))
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
6.4 5.7 -0.7
Performance measurement
Expected result Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18
Foreign investments in the Canadian cultural sector are of net benefit to Canadians. Percentage of investment proposals filed with Canadian Heritage compliant with requirements of the Investment Canada Act. 100 March 31, 2018 100 100 100
Percentage of foreign investor commitments respected relating to the creation or production of Canadian cultural products as per the Investment Canada Act. 100 March 31, 2018 100 100 100
Percentage of foreign investor commitments respected relating to the sale, distribution or exhibition of Canadian cultural products as per the Investment Canada Act. 100 March 31, 2018 100 100 100

Sub-program 1.2.10: TV5

TV5 supports the international TV5 partnership with France, Fédération Wallonie-Bruxelles, Switzerland, Québec and Canada. TV5 enables Canadian productions to be presented around the world through TV5MONDE. Moreover, through TV5 Québec Canada, it provides Canadians with access to a rich diversity of programming from the international Francophonie. This Sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants to TV5MONDE and Contributions to TV5 Québec Canada.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
11,314,950 11,484,247 169,297

The grant to TV5MONDE is paid in euros. Therefore, the estimated cost is difficult to forecast in Canadian dollars since it is affected by the exchange rate at the time of the transaction.

Human resources (full-time equivalents (FTEs))
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
3.6 4.6 1.0
Performance measurement
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18
Canadian content is part of TV5MONDE's international programming. Percentage of Canadian content broadcast on TV5MONDE. 7 March 31, 2018 9.72 9.86 12.04
Canadians have access to the diversity of the international Francophonie through TV5 Québec Canada. Number, in millions, of Canadian households with access to TV5 Québec Canada. 9 September 2018 10.3 10.7 10.4
Maximum percentage of TV5 Québec Canada programming originating from the international Francophonie (except Canada). 85 September 2018 81 81.2 82.2

Sub-program 1.3.1: Museums Assistance Program

The Museums Assistance Program (MAP) supports heritage institutions and workers in the preservation and presentation of heritage collections. MAP provides financial assistance to Canadian museums and related institutions for activities that facilitate Canadians' access to our heritage, foster the preservation of Canada's cultural heritage, including the preservation of representative collections of Indigenous cultural heritage, and foster professional knowledge, skills and practices related to key museum functions. In support of the Youth Employment Strategy, MAP helps heritage organizations create summer employment and internship opportunities for Canadian youth through the heritage components of Young Canada Works. MAP also provides grants through the Movable Cultural Property Program to assist designated institutions in acquiring cultural property threatened with export or available on international markets. This Sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants under the Museums Assistance Program and Contributions under the Museums Assistance Program.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
17,914,842 22,046,078 4,131,236
Human resources (full-time equivalents (FTEs))
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
22.6 21.6 -1.0
Performance measurement
Expected result Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18
Heritage organizations have gained skills in key museum functions. Percentage of recipients reporting a positive impact on key museum functions. 90 March 31, 2018 95 100 100
Heritage organizations have access to resources to preserve heritage. Percentage of recipients reporting a positive impact on heritage preservation. 90 March 31, 2018 100 100 100
Heritage organizations provide opportunities for Canadians to access heritage. Number of venues providing exhibitions and other programming products/activities. 90 March 31, 2018 113 156 132

Sub-program 1.3.2: Canada Travelling Exhibitions Indemnification Program

Through the Canada Travelling Exhibitions Indemnification Program (INDEM), established pursuant to the Canada Travelling Exhibitions Indemnification Act, the Government of Canada assumes potential liability for loss or damage to objects in eligible travelling exhibitions. The Program's objectives are to increase Canadians' access to Canadian and international heritage through the circulation of artefacts and exhibitions in Canada, and to provide eligible Canadian heritage institutions with a competitive advantage when competing with foreign institutions for the loan of prestigious international exhibitions. Eligibility criteria and liability limits for the Government are defined in the Act and its Regulations. To be approved for indemnification, exhibitions and hosting facilities must meet assessment standards. Once approved, the Sub-program issues contractual indemnity agreements that must be co-signed by the Owner and the Crown. This is not a grants and contributions program. Indemnification is a contingent liability as it provides compensation for damage or loss only if they occur.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
410,839 333,790 -77,049
Human resources (full-time equivalents (FTEs))
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
3.0 3.1 0.1
Performance measurement
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18
Opportunities are created for Canadians to access major travelling exhibitions presenting Canadian and international cultural heritage. Number of exhibition venues. 11 March 31, 2018 16 6 4
Number of provinces in which venues are located. 5 March 31, 2018 5 5 3
Number of visitors to indemnified venues. 700,000 March 31, 2018 1,424,781 946,371 805,208

Sub-program 1.3.3: Canadian Heritage Information Network

The Canadian Heritage Information Network (CHIN) is a special operating agency of the Department of Canadian Heritage. CHIN serves as a national centre of expertise to museums and other heritage institutions across Canada, enabling them to connect with each other and their audiences through digital technologies. CHIN is an international leader in the creation, management, presentation and preservation of digital heritage content. It provides Canada's not-for-profit heritage sector with research, products, services and fora that support skills and career development. CHIN delivers much of this support through its website for heritage professionals and volunteers.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
2,636,323 1,707,000 -929,323
Human resources (full-time equivalents (FTEs))
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
11.6 12.3 0.7
Performance measurement
Expected result Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18
Canadian Heritage Information Network's learning and collaborative opportunities are used by Canadian and international heritage institutions and workers. Number of online visits to Canadian Heritage Information Network's resources for heritage professionals and volunteers. 650,000 March 31, 2018 1,084,306 1,153,800 1,130,684

Sub-program 1.3.4: Canadian Conservation Institute

The Canadian Conservation Institute (CCI) is a special operating agency within the Department of Canadian Heritage. CCI supports heritage institutions and professionals in conserving Canada's heritage collections so they can be made accessible to current and future generations. This mission is achieved through research, expert services, professional development and information (web site and publications). CCI has expertise in conservation science, treatment of heritage objects and works of art, preventive conservation and heritage interiors. Its primary clients are approximately 2,000 heritage institutions in Canada such as museums, archives, libraries, and historic sites, as well as public authorities with heritage collections. Unique in Canada, CCI is considered a leader in the international conservation community and frequently establishes partnerships and collaborative relationships to undertake joint projects related to research and knowledge dissemination with Canadian and international institutions.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
11,391,897 12,410,924 1,019,027
Human resources (full-time equivalents (FTEs))
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
68.3 76.9 8.6
Performance measurement
Expected result Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18
The Canadian and international heritage community has access to the results of Canadian Conservation Institute's research and development activities. Ratio of Canadian Conservation Institute articles published in Canadian and international professional and peer-reviewed journals to number of full-time equivalent conservation scientists.* 0.7 March 31, 2018 0.7 0.9 1.6
Canadian and international heritage institutions and workers use Canadian Conservation Institute learning materials online. Number of users of Canadian Conservation Institute learning materials online. 300,000 March 31, 2018 163,600 444,509 570,177
Canadian Conservation Institute expert services are used by heritage institutions to preserve their collections. Number of heritage institutions that benefit from Canadian Conservation Institute expert services. 150 March 31, 2018 106 107 103

* The ratio is equivalent to the number of articles published in professional or peer-reviewed journals over the number of conservation scientists divided by 2, since CCI scientists spend only 50% of their time on research.

Sub-program 1.3.5: Movable Cultural Property Program

The Movable Cultural Property Program (MCP) administers the Cultural Property Export and Import Act which aims to preserve heritage of outstanding significance and national importance in Canada so that it is accessible in public collections. MCP regulates export and upholds Canada's treaty obligations to discourage illicit traffic of cultural property. MCP allows for a system of tax incentives to encourage the donation or sale of cultural property to designated institutions. MCP designates institutions and public authorities to be eligible to apply for grants and certification of cultural property. Designation assesses an organization's implementation of the environmental standards and professional practices necessary to ensure long-term preservation of, and access to, cultural property.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
1,059,066 1,716,961 657,895
Human resources (full-time equivalents (FTEs))
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
9.7 11.3 1.6
Performance measurement
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18
Designated organizations have opportunities to acquire significant cultural property. Number of certified objects/collections donated/sold by a private interest to a designated organization. 5,000 March 31, 2018 6,608 6,608 1,129*
Percentage of notifications sent to designated organizations within 10 calendar days for objects available for purchase as a result of an export delay set by the Review Board. 100 March 31, 2018 n/a 100 100
Cultural property illegally imported into Canada is identified and the mechanism for its return is initiated. Percentage of referrals from the Canada Border Services Agency and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police that are successfully resolved within 90 days of receipt. 100 March 31, 2018 81 81 94

* Lower number (provided to HG by Cultural Property Export Review Board) may be due to a change in CPERB's methodology for calculating what constitutes an object versus what constitutes a collection (which can have 100s or 1000s of objects in it)

Sub-program 2.1.1: Celebration and Commemoration Program

The Celebration and Commemoration Program provides funding through grants and contributions to non-governmental and community organizations for community-based activities organized during the Celebrate Canada period, from June 21 to July 1. These activities celebrate National Aboriginal Day on June 21, Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day on June 24, Canadian Multiculturalism Day on June 27 and Canada Day on July 1. Funding is also available for commemorations with a national scope that commemorate and celebrate nationally significant historical figures, places, events, and accomplishments. The activities that are funded build pride, promote participation in celebrations and commemorations and strengthen understanding of shared history. This Sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants in support of the Celebration and Commemoration Sub-program and Contributions in support of the Celebration and Commemoration Sub-program.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
115,969,320 135,266,944 19,297,624
Human resources (full-time equivalents (FTEs))
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
100.0 79.8 -20.2
Performance measurement*
Expected result Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18
Canadians participate in commemorations and celebrations of national significance. Number of participants at celebration and commemoration events/activities. 7,500,000 March 31, 2018 10,000,000 12,567,057 14,293,708
Canadians across Canada have opportunities to participate in community events that are open to the public and free of charge. Number of community events held across Canada during the Celebrate Canada period (June 21 to July 1). 1,700 March 31, 2018 1,815 1,744 1,672

* Additional participation targets set for Canada 150th Anniversary of Confederation are included in the Canada 150 Horizontal Initiatives table in the 2017-18 Departmental Plan, on the Plans and Reports - Canadian Heritage page.

Sub-program 2.1.2: Capital Experience

The objective of the Capital Experience Program is to foster the pride of Canadians in Canada's Capital Region (CCR) through activities for the general public in the CCR. Capital Experience organizes activities in the following sectors: major events and celebrations (e.g. Canada Day and Winterlude), commemorations, interpretation and promotion of sites and symbols of national significance, representation of the provinces and territories in the Canada's Capital Region, public art, youth activities and visitor services. Another objective of Capital Experience – achieved through messages and outreach activities using both traditional and new media to promote the Canada's Capital Region to Canadians across the country – is to improve awareness of the Canada's Capital Region as a destination where people can experience Canada's heritage, culture and achievements.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
11,557,768 22,559,248 11,001,480
Human resources (full-time equivalents (FTEs))
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
79.3 85.8 6.5
Performance measurement
Expected result Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18
Canadians who visit Canada's Capital Region gain a sense of attachment to the National Capital Region and national pride. Percentage of participants in Canada Day in Canada's Capital Region who agreed that the celebrations help increase their sense of pride about being Canadian. 70 March 31, 2018 74 74 67

Sub-program 2.1.3: State Ceremonial and Protocol

State Ceremonial and Protocol (SCP) provides authoritative information on Canada's national symbols such as the National Flag. SCP responds to public inquiries related to commercial use of symbols, rules for flying the flag, flag etiquette and the use of Royal images. SCP is the centre of expertise for domestic protocol and procedures and provides information and advice to provincial and territorial government protocol offices. SCP manages national ceremonies, including State funerals, installation of a new Governor General, the Canada Day Noon Show and Royal Tours. SCP is responsible for managing the half-masting of the National Flag of Canada, including policy development, in collaboration with other departments. SCP manages federal responsibilities related to Lieutenant Governors (LGs) by providing salaries to LGs, delivering annual grants to help fund LGs' operating costs, providing advice for special events, and providing LGs with information on their roles and responsibilities. This Sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Grants to the Lieutenant Governors of the provinces of Canada.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
5,439,687 7,759,214 2,319,527
Human resources (full-time equivalents (FTEs))
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
19.1 19.6 0.5
Performance measurement
Expected result Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18
Canadians participate in national ceremonial events (i.e. State Funerals, Installation of Governor General, Royal Tours, Canada Day ceremony on Parliament Hill). Percentage of venue capacity filled for national ceremonial events. 95 March 31, 2018 95 95 95

Sub-program 2.1.4: Canada History Fund

The Canada History Fund encourages Canadians to learn about Canada's history, civic life, and public policy. The Fund provides funding through agreements in support of the development and/or enhancement of learning materials, the organization of learning and developmental experiences, and the establishment and maintenance of networks. Through various partnerships within government and through key national history and civics sector organizations and post-secondary educational institutions, the Fund gives Canadians opportunities to enhance their understanding of Canada, thus building an informed and engaged citizenry. This Fund uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants in support of the Canada History Fund and Contributions in support of the Canada History Fund.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
5,097,370 5,050,791 -46,579
Human resources (full-time equivalents (FTEs))
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
7.3 6.0 -1.3
Performance measurement
Expected result Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18
Canadians enhance their knowledge of Canada's history, civics and public policy. Percentage of Canadians reached by the Canada History Fund who have enhanced their knowledge of Canada's history, civics, and/or public policy. 75 March 31, 2019 n/a n/a n/a

Sub-program 2.1.5: Exchanges Canada Program

The Exchanges Canada Program provides grants and contributions in support of youth participation initiatives that allow young Canadians to learn about Canada, create linkages with each other and better appreciate the diversity and shared aspects of the Canadian reality. The Program supports not-for-profit organizations to provide Canadian youth with a range of exchange and forum activities to strengthen their sense of belonging to Canada and therefore their sense of Canadian identity. The Program has two components: Youth Exchanges Canada (YEC) and Youth Forums Canada (YFC). YEC funds reciprocal homestay exchanges for youth, and also includes the Summer Work / Student Exchange sub-component, which provides summer job opportunities for 16 and 17 year-olds in their second official language. YFC enables young Canadians to connect with one another through forums, study sessions and workshops on a range of relevant topics. This Sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants in support of Innovative Youth Exchange Projects and Contributions in support of the Exchanges Canada Initiative.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
19,688,855 19,992,973 304,118
Human resources (full-time equivalents (FTEs))
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
15.6 13.4 -2.2
Performance measurement
Expected result Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18
Young participants enhance their knowledge and understanding of Canada. Percentage of participants who report enhanced knowledge and understanding of Canada.* 75 March 31, 2019 84 87 82
Young participants connect and create linkages with one another. Percentage of participants who report having created new ties with other young Canadians as a result of the exchange.* 75 March 31, 2019 92 92 90
Young participants enhance their appreciation of the diversity and shared aspects of the Canadian experience. Percentage of participants who report having a better understanding of what Canadians have in common.* 75 March 31, 2019 85 84 80

* Results reported are from previous fiscal year.

Sub-program 2.1.6: Youth Take Charge

The objective of the Youth Take Charge Program is to strengthen youth attachment to Canada through engagement in the fields of history and heritage, civic engagement and youth service, arts and culture, and economic activities. The Program provides grants and contributions to eligible organizations in support of youth-led projects involving youth generally aged 7 to 30, which demonstrate the ability to strengthen attachment to Canada while addressing one or more of the above-mentioned thematic areas. It is expected that the Program will increase awareness among youth participants of the importance of being an active and engaged citizen; will increase relevance of youth-serving organizations to youth; and will increase youth engagement in communities. These outcomes will, in the long-term, lead to increased youth attachment to Canada and an increased sense of shared Canadian identity among youth. The Program is also responsible for managing an annual matching grant payment to the Michaëlle Jean Foundation. This Sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants in support of the Youth Take Charge Program and Contributions in support of the Youth Take Charge Program.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
2,131,857 5,968,612 3,836,755
Human resources (full-time equivalents (FTEs))
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
7.4 6.1 -1.3
Performance measurement
Expected result Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18
Youth have a sense of attachment to Canada. Percentage of youth participants who report having a greater sense of attachment to Canada.* 55 March 31, 2019 71 69 81**
Youth have a sense of shared Canadian identity. Percentage of youth participants who report having a sense of shared Canadian identity.* 60 March 31, 2019 83 81 93**

* Results reported are from previous fiscal year.
**The post-participation survey was simplified in April 2016, therefore 2017-2018 results are not directly comparable to previous years.

Sub-program 2.2.1: Human Rights Program

The Human Rights Program contributes to increasing the respect for, and awareness and enjoyment of human rights in Canada. It also seeks to inform and support enhanced domestic implementation of international human rights instruments in Canada. The Program manages federal-provincial/territorial consultations on human rights issues, coordinates interdepartmental consideration of treaty body recommendations and those arising from Canada's Universal Periodic Reviews, prepares Canada's reports to the United Nations on domestic implementation of international human rights obligations, provides policy advice in developing Canada's positions on emerging human rights issues and promotes human rights instruments through the dissemination of human rights information. The Program seeks to strengthen and maintain one of the core values relating to Canadian identity – the respect for human rights – by addressing barriers to active participation that arise from a lack of awareness, understanding and access to rights.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
4,824,603 2,314,103 -2,510,500
Human resources (full-time equivalents (FTEs))
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
9.1 15.3 6.2
Performance measurement
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18
Federal, provincial and territorial governments are engaged in activities supporting the implementation of international human rights treaty obligations. Number of opportunities for provincial and territorial governments to contribute to reporting on Canada's international human rights obligations and to participate in related intergovernmental discussions. 24 March 31, 2018 24 32 32
Rate of participation of provincial and territorial governments contributing to reporting on Canada's international human rights obligations and attending related intergovernmental discussions. 78 March 31, 2018 80 87 74.5
Canadians have access to information on human rights issues in Canada, including the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and applicable international human rights instruments. Number of visits on the Human Rights Program website. 75,000 March 31, 2018 231,852 148,280 428,066

Sub-program 2.2.2: Building Communities Through Arts and Heritage

The Building Communities Through Arts and Heritage Program provides grants and contributions in support of local festivals, community anniversaries and capital projects. Funding is made available to stakeholders presenting arts and heritage festivals and events that emphasize local engagement. Its objective is to engage citizens in their communities through performing and visual arts as well as through the expression, celebration and preservation of local historical heritage. The Program has three components: 1) Local Festivals supports recurring festivals that involve the whole community and give opportunities to local artists and artisans to engage in their communities and/or celebrate local history and heritage; 2) Community Anniversaries supports one-time commemorations through activities that celebrate a major anniversary (100 years and then increments of 25 years) of a significant local person or event; and 3) Legacy Fund supports tangible, lasting capital projects that commemorate or celebrate a major anniversary (100 years and then increments of 25 years) of a significant local person or event. This Sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants in support of the Building Communities Through Arts and Heritage Program and Contributions in support of the Building Communities Through Arts and Heritage Program.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
23,030,899 22,765,202 -265,697
Human resources (full-time equivalents (FTEs))
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
60.3 58.5 -1.8
Performance measurement
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18
Citizens across the country are engaged in their communities through local arts and heritage. Average number of volunteer hours per project.* 2,750 March 31, 2019 3,919 3,485 4,942
Average number of local artists, artisans and heritage performers per project.* 85 March 31, 2019 142 134 156
Local organizations carry out local festival, community anniversary and/or legacy projects in their communities. Number of communities reached per year.* 420 March 31, 2019 466 432 441

*Results reported are from previous fiscal year.

Sub-program 2.2.3: Aboriginal Peoples' Program

The Aboriginal Peoples' Program (APP) focuses primarily on strengthening cultural identity, encouraging the full participation of Indigenous peoples in Canadian life, and supporting the continuation of Indigenous cultures and languages as living elements of Canadian society. APP programming incorporates Indigenous cultures and languages into community-driven activities designed to strengthen cultural identity. The APP provides investments that help to support the efforts of Indigenous communities to develop and deliver innovative and culturally appropriate projects, under initiatives such as the Aboriginal Languages Initiative, Northern Aboriginal Broadcasting, Scholarships and Youth Initiatives, Territorial Language Accords, National Aboriginal Day, and the National Aboriginal Achievement Awards. This Sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants to the Aboriginal Peoples' Program and Contributions to the Aboriginal Peoples' Program.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
21,398,746 37,117,307 15,718,561
Human resources (full-time equivalents (FTEs))
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
23.8 34.3 10.5
Performance measurement
Expected result Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18
Engaged as an integral part of Canadian society, Indigenous peoples embrace and share their languages and cultures with other Canadians. Number of participants who are engaged in Indigenous language and cultural activities.* 3,250 March 31, 2018 6,309** 5,177** 4,074*
Indigenous individuals and groups are engaged in activities that strengthen Indigenous languages and cultures, and support community engagement. Number of projects funded that incorporate Indigenous languages and cultures, and support community engagement.* 100 March 31, 2018 149** 112** 105*

*Results reported are from previous fiscal year.
**Most recent results due to improvements in reporting.

Sub-program 2.2.4: Canada 150 Federal Secretariat

This The Canada 150 Federal Secretariat is responsible for coordinating and providing oversight for the whole-of-government approach to the 150th anniversary of Confederation. It supports federal institutions in the implementation of this one-time initiative. It is also responsible to engage non-governmental organizations, other levels of government and the private sector to develop projects throughout the country. Finally, the Sub-program coordinates outreach and marketing activities to sustain engagement of Canadians.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
27,067,935 5,293,457 -21,774,478
Human resources (full-time equivalents (FTEs))
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
33.9 39.2 5.3

*Funding for this Sub-program will be sunsetting in March 31st, 2019.

Performance measurement
Expected result Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18
Engagement of different sectors of Canadian society increase the reach of Canada 150 and help establish the role of the Government of Canada, through the Canada 150 Federal Secretariat as the leader for Canada 150. Minimum number of partners that are involved in the Canada 150 Initiative through facilitation efforts of the Canada 150 Federal Secretariat. 75 March 31, 2018 8 98 98*

*In 2017-18, the Canada 150 Federal Secretariat met and exceeded its target in facilitating partnerships across the country with a wide variety of public, private and not-for-profit organizations. (Facilitation efforts are ongoing, total results are still to come)

Sub-program 2.2.5: Multiculturalism Program

The objectives of the Multiculturalism Program are to build an integrated, socially cohesive society; to improve the responsiveness of institutions to the needs of a diverse population; and to engage in discussions on multiculturalism, integration and diversity at the international level. The Program provides grants and contributions to organizations for projects and events that enhance intercultural/interfaith understanding, civic memory and pride, respect for core democratic values, and participation in society and the economy. It undertakes public outreach and promotion activities that are designed and delivered to engage Canadians on multiculturalism issues. The Program's ongoing public outreach and promotional activities include Asian Heritage Month, Black History Month, various web-based resources, and other initiatives. The Program is designed to implement requirements set out in the Canadian Multiculturalism Act, including the development of the Annual Report on the Operation of the Canadian Multiculturalism Act, which is tabled in Parliament. The Program's international engagement supports Canada's participation in agreements such as the International Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Racial Discrimination, and in institutions that address multicultural issues globally. This Sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants in support of the Multiculturalism Program and Contributions in support of the Multiculturalism Program.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
15,966,722 15,979,499 12,727
Human resources (full-time equivalents (FTEs))
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
41.3 55.7 14.4
Performance measurement
Expected result Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18
Canadians engage in and appreciate the value of a multicultural society Number of Canadians engaged in projects/events TBD March 31, 2018 n/a n/a 551,939
Canadians have access to the information or tools to engage on multicultural issues Number of visits on the Multiculturalism Program website TBD March 31, 2018 200,000 * 63,051* 34,716
Federal institutions are supported in meeting their obligations under the Canadian Multiculturalism Act Number of support or outreach activities provided to federal institutions ≥ 5 March 31, 2018 5* 4* 7

*Most recent results due to improvements in reporting.

Sub-program 2.3.1: Development of Official-Language Communities Program

Pursuant to section 43 of the Official Languages Act, the Development of Official-Language Communities Program fosters the vitality of Canada's English- and French-speaking minority communities and enables them to participate fully in all aspects of Canadian life. The Program has three components. Through grants and contributions, the Community Life component supports the provision of activities and services for official-language minority communities by non-profit community organizations in various fields, particularly arts, culture, heritage, and youth. Through intergovernmental contribution agreements, this component also supports the provision of minority-language services by provincial and territorial governments. Through intergovernmental contribution agreements, the Minority-Language Education component supports the provision of provincial and territorial educational programs and activities in the minority official-language, at all levels of education. Through a contribution agreement with an independent public entity, the Language Rights Support component provides access to mechanisms to foster the advancement and clarification of constitutionally-guaranteed language rights. This Sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants to the Development of Official-Language Communities Sub-program and Contributions to the Development of Official-Language Communities Sub-program.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
244,978,753 240,952,601 -4,026,152
Human resources (full-time equivalents (FTEs))
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
101.1 97.9 -3.2
Performance measurement
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18
Members of official-language minority communities have access to programs and services in their language, in their communities. Percentage of official-language minority community members who live within 25 km of an arts and culture organization offering minority-language services. 85 March 31, 2018 89.8 89.8 89.8
Percentage of official-language minority community members who live within 25 km of a local or regional community development organization offering minority-language services. 85 March 31, 2018 86 86 86
Percentage of official-language minority community members who live within 25 km of an elementary minority-language school or a secondary minority-language school. 95 March 31, 2018 97 97 97

Note: In 2017, the Language Rights Support Program (LRSP) will conclude its activities, which will then be assumed by a renewed Court Challenges Program.

Sub-program 2.3.2: Enhancement of Official Languages Program

Pursuant to section 43 of the Official Languages Act, the Enhancement of Official Languages Program helps Canadians gain a better understanding and appreciation of the benefits of linguistic duality, as well as an awareness of the constitutionally-guaranteed language rights. The Program has three components. Through grants and contributions and grants to non-profit organizations, the Promotion of Linguistic Duality component supports activities and projects to enhance official languages and unite Canadians, enhance the French language and culture in Canada, and increase the provision of services in both official languages from non-governmental organizations. As well, through intergovernmental contribution agreements, the Second-Language Learning component supports the provision of provincial and territorial programs and activities related to learning English and French, as second official languages, among young Canadians. Through a contribution agreement with an independent public entity, the Language Rights Support component supports the provision of information and awareness activities among Canadians, especially those living in official-language minority communities, of language rights and the mechanisms for exercising those rights. This Sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants to the Enhancement of Official Languages Sub-program and Contributions to the Enhancement of Official Languages Sub-program.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
115,281,287 120,665,027 5,383,740
Human resources (full-time equivalents (FTEs))
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
25.3 25.3 0.0
Performance measurement
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18
Canadians have a better understanding of and appreciation for the benefits of linguistic duality. Percentage of Canadians who have a working knowledge of the second official language. 15 March 31, 2018 17.5 17.5 17.9
Percentage of the population that recognizes that linguistic duality in Canada is a source of cultural enrichment. 60 March 31, 2018 65 65 66

*Recent data comes from the 2016 Census (practical knowledge only) and the 2016 Survey on Linguistic duality. Data are collected every five years.
Note: In 2017, the Language Rights Support Program (LRSP) will conclude its activities, which were assumed by a renewed Court Challenges Program.

Sub-program 2.3.3: Official Languages Coordination Program

The Official Languages Coordination Program contributes to the horizontal coordination of all Government of Canada official languages activities. Pursuant to section 42 of the Official Languages Act, the Department supports federal institutions, including Canadian Heritage, by coordinating the implementation of the government's commitment to the development of official-language minority communities, and promotes the full recognition and use of English and French in Canadian society. The Department also coordinates the implementation of the Roadmap for Canada's Official Languages 2013–18: Education, Immigration, Communities, a horizontal governmental strategy on official languages.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
3,207,087 2,686,893 -520,194
Human resources (full-time equivalents (FTEs))
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
22.6 20.7 -1.9
Performance measurement
Expected result Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18
Federal institutions report appropriately (on a three-year cycle) on the results of their activities for the benefit of official-language minority communities and for the promotion of official languages. Percentage of federal institutions, including all partners of the Roadmap for Canada's Official Languages 2013–18, that report (on a three year cycle) their results for the implementation of section 41 of the Official Languages Act, to produce the Annual Report on Official Languages. 100 March 31, 2018 100 100 100
Federal institutions are supported in the implementation of their official languages initiatives and obligations. Percentage of federal institutions reporting satisfaction with the work accomplished by the Interdepartmental Relations and Accountability Directorate. 75 March 31, 2019 91 85 85

Sub-program 3.1.1: Hosting Program

The Hosting Program is a key instrument in the Government of Canada's overall approach to sport development in Canada and aims to enhance the development of sport excellence and the international profile of sport organizations by providing assistance for the hosting of the Canada Games and international sport events in Canada. The Hosting Program offers Canada-at-large a planned and coordinated approach to realizing direct and significant benefits, from bidding and hosting projects in the areas of sport development, economic, social, and cultural and community impacts, across a broad range of government priorities. This Sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Contributions for the Games' Hosting Sub-program.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
25,986,159 29,088,336 3,102,177
Human resources (full-time equivalents (FTEs))
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
53.2 69.6 16.4
Performance measurement
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18
Canadian athletes, coaches and officials have opportunities to participate at sport events in Canada funded by Sport Canada. Number of Canadian athletes, coaches and officials participating at funded events. 6,000 March 31, 2018 8,231 6,901* 14,161*
Number of Canadian athletes from under-represented groups participating at funded events. 3,550 March 31, 2018 320 199* 4,201

*The higher participation rate in funded events in 2017-2018 is due to the hosting of the Canada Games, the North American Indigenous Games and the Arctic Winter Games.

Sub-program 3.1.2: Sport Support Program

The Sport Support Program is the primary funding vehicle for initiatives associated with the delivery of the Government of Canada's commitments to the Canadian Sport Policy. Funding is aimed at developing athletes and coaches at the highest international levels; providing sound technically-based sport programming for all athletes; increasing the number of Canadians from all segments of society involved in sport; and advancing Canadian interests and values in Canada and abroad. This funding is provided to eligible organizations in support of programming that supports the goals of the Canadian Sport Policy. This Sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Contributions for the Sport Support Sub-program.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
151,743,078 156,945,297 5,202,219
Human resources (full-time equivalents (FTEs))
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
41.7 21.3 -20.4
Performance measurement
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18
Canadians have access to quality sport programs and services. Number of Canadians participating in sport through organizations or initiatives funded by Sport Canada. 7,800,000 March 31, 2018 5,578,092 7,087,795 7,058,187
Percentage of funded sport organizations that have maintained or increased their overall organizational performance. 100 March 31, 2018 100 89 96

Sub-program 3.1.3: Athlete Assistance Program

The Athlete Assistance Program contributes to the pursuit of excellence through its support for improved Canadian athlete performances at major international sporting events, enabling athletes to combine their sport and academic or working careers while training intensively in pursuit of world-class performances. To this end, the Program identifies and supports athletes already at or having the potential to be in the top sixteen in the world in their sport. This Sub-program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Grants to the Athlete Assistance Sub-program.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017-18 Planned spending 2017-18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
28,651,647 33,408,255 4,756,608
Human resources (full-time equivalents (FTEs))
2017-18 Planned 2017-18 Actual 2017-18 Difference (actual minus planned)
4.0 3.0 -1.0
Performance measurement
Expected result Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved Actual results 2015-16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results 2017-18
Canadian athletes access academic opportunities. Number of currently and formerly carded athletes using tuition grants (including deferred tuition). 750 March 31, 2018 679 699 773
Canadian high performance athletes are optimally prepared to achieve podium level performance at Olympic and Paralympic Games and the respective sports' Senior World Championships. Number of athletes receiving AAP funding who have achieved a top 8 finish at the Olympics, Paralympics, or World Championships. 325 March 31, 2018 294 419 311*

*In 2017-2018, there was no Senior World Championships in summer team sports, as well as in some individual sports. In addition, only 8 of 25 Paralympic sports had Senior World Championships, and only 36 of 53 Olympic/Non-Olympic sports held Senior World Championships.

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