Defence Team

Description

Recruit, develop and support an agile and diverse Defence Team, within a healthy workplace free from harmful behaviour; support military families; and meet the needs of all retiring military personnel, including the ill and injured. Strengthen Canadian communities by investing in youth.

Results

People are at the core of everything the Defence Team has done to ensure Canada is strong, secure, and engaged in the world. All of our success has come as a result of having healthy, resilient, well-trained, and motivated personnel supported by talented and dedicated defence civilians working within the Department of National Defence (DND). This integrated civilian-military Defence Team has been and continues to be the heart of our institution.

We have taken significant strides in ensuring that the entire Defence Team has the care, services, and support it requires and have continued to work towards eliminating harassment and discrimination in the workplace. We have improved attraction efforts in order to recruit talented, motivated Canadians who reflect the broad range of cultural, linguistic, gender, age, and other unique attributes which will contribute directly to our efforts to develop a deeper understanding of our increasingly complex world. We have made good on our most important commitment: investing in our people.

The Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) has maintained its commitment not only to its members, but to their families as well. As our people continue to serve in complex and challenging environments, with varying threat levels, both at home and abroad, we have consistently delivered essential programs and services to give our troops comfort, knowing that their families are being looked after.

National Defence has a long and proud history of supporting youth through the Cadet and Junior Canadian Rangers programs and remained committed to strengthening support and expanding the reach of these important programs. We initiated the process to update the 2005 version of the Queen’s Regulations and Orders for the Canadian Cadet Organizations. Although updates are expected to take a couple of years to complete, the initiation of the process demonstrates the department’s commitment to these programs that are a fundamental responsibility of the CAF and will ensure the required regulations and orders are up to date and strategically aligned within the organization.

Experimentation

Defence related experimentation activities are outlined in this report under Core Responsibility 4 – Future Force Design.

Key Corporate Risk(s)

One DND/CAF key corporate risk can be associated with the Defence Team core responsibility. That is: there is a risk that the CAF and DND will not have the right military and civilian personnel, in the right numbers, with the right competencies, at the right place and at the right time. As the department grows into new military and corporate capabilities to meet the evolving expectations of the military and corporate environments, there is a continued risk that we will not be able to staff the positions in a timely manner in order to effectively engage and deliver the growing breadth of efforts. This risk is prevented and mitigated through the activities of each Departmental Result below.

Departmental Result 3.1 – Canadian Armed Forces is growing towards its end state of 101,500 personnel

  • The department reduced the time to enroll in the CAF by reforming all aspects of military recruiting. As directed in Strong, Secure, Engaged (SSE), and Operation GENERATION, the recruiting and training capacity review was completed and the implementation of new alignment initiatives commenced. Changes to the applicant reliability screening and medical screening processes have decreased recruiting timelines for certain applicants.
  • The department continued to engage in comprehensive campaigning using traditional television and print advertisements targeting priority occupations, as well as hosting occupation-specific recruiting events and participating in job fairs and career events across Canada. This included the continued use of the forces.ca immersive website, along with a suite of digital attraction tools including mobile apps and virtual 360-degree videos to showcase the career opportunities offered by the CAF. It is of paramount importance to ensure the right message was and is being delivered to talented, motivated, and qualified Canadians, including those within employment equity groups, to improve awareness of priority occupations.
  • To increase the number of recruits that could be trained at the Canadian Forces Leadership and Recruit School, the Basic Military Officer Qualification course was reduced from 14 weeks to 12 weeks and the Basic Military Qualification course was reduced from 12 weeks to 10 weeks. Work is ongoing on a number of initiatives in order to shorten the time when a member is employable and deployable in their occupation.
  • In June 2019, the Royal Military College Saint-Jean received accreditation for the delivery of a university program in International Studies. The Royal Military College Saint-Jean continued to staff approved civilian and military positions towards the achievement of a Return to University Status. As of 31 March 2020, 18% of the intended 33 civilian positions were still not filled due to staffing delays and a shortage in the availability of specialty teachers.
  • The development of a comprehensive CAF Retention Strategy continued in FY 2019-20 with the aim to keep our talented people in uniform with a welcoming and healthy work environment. The project timeline was modified to reflect changes in priorities of work and current global reality. Strategy design began in summer 2019 followed by the approval process in January 2020. The Chief of the Defence Staff (CDS) approval was expected in fall 2020 however, this will have to be revisited due to COVID-19 and its impacts to DND/CAF.


Results achieved

Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2019–20
Actual results
2018–19
Actual results
2017–18
Actual results
3.1 Canadian Armed Forces is growing towards its end state of 101,500 personnel* % of Regular force positions that are filled 95 - 100 % 31 March 2026 96.50% 99.23% 98.7%
% of Reserve force positions that are filled** 95 - 100% 31 March 2026
81.47%*** 77.09% Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
% of occupations with critical shortfalls 0 - 5% 31 March 2020
17.90%**** 16.5% Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19

Notes:

* Departmental Result of 101,500 personnel represents the CAF Regular Force and the Reserve Force. The Reserve Force represents Primary Reserves.

** Although the ultimate target is 30 000 Average Paid Strength (APS) for the Primary Reserve, the anticipated planned growth for FY 2019-20 was to reach a level of 28 650 APS, as noted in the Human Resources – Reserve Force Personnel section of this report. The Departmental Plan 2020-21 notes that the anticipated growth for 2022-23 is set to attain a level of 29 550 APS as we continue to strive for the ultimate Primary Reserve level of 30 000.

*** The target is an aspirational target with a date to achieve target of 31 March 2026.

**** There has been an increase in the total number of trade occupations (from 103 to 106) in FY 2019-20 and an increase in the number of occupations with critical shortfalls (from 17 to 19) as a result of new trades being implemented and requiring growth. Without the changes brought by the new trade occupations, the result would have been of 16.5% again in FY 2019-20.

For more information about the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces’ performance indicators, please visit GC InfoBase.

Departmental Result 3.2 – The health and well-being of the Defence team is well supported

  • Investing in CANSOFCOM’s Health and Wellness strategy (Optimizing Performance Force and Family) which promotes resilience, enhances performance and sets the conditions for optimal rehabilitation through programs across four core domains: physical; psychological; spiritual; and family.
  • A Strategic Initiating Directive to modernize the Canadian Forces Health Services Group structure was developed in FY 2019-20. Once approved, it will enable the work necessary to create or make significant adjustments to, formation or unit level organizations.
  • The Canadian Forces Health Services Resource Management Committee held regular meetings in FY 2019-20 to prioritize personnel demands and support decision-making on in-year resource re-allocation as required. As well, the Terms of Reference were under development for the next integrated governance body to be created - the Canadian Forces Health Services Capability Development Council.
  • Under SSE Initiative 26 Grow the Medical Services Branch to support transition care, Canadian Forces Health Services improved support to ill and injured CAF members who may be undergoing transition through the creation of health care positions that provide occupational therapy services to help members return to work, enhanced Case Management support, and the provision of medical advice and support services to the CAF transition group. To address SSE Initiative 17 Removing Barriers to Care, work was undertaken to develop a survey to let members identify their perceived barriers to care. Preliminary work with health services personnel provided significant insight to their perceived barriers to their own care and continues to help inform the CAF-wide survey development.
  • Canadian Forces Health Services continued to modernize its structure, governance and development of operational capabilities in support of SSE 15 Augment Canadian Armed Forces Health Services. They successfully increased the number of personnel in life saving surgical occupations, damage control resuscitation/forward aeromedical evacuation and other clinical occupations that support operations. They have increased capacity at the Canadian Forces Health Services Training Centre to augment health services throughput to positively influence clinical care delivery capacity at the tactical level of the organization.
  • In FY 2019-20, the CAF Transition Group continued to develop tools, policies and procedures that will enable it to provide professional, standardized and personalized support to all CAF members as they transition to post-military life. A key development was the introduction of a twelve-step Initial Transition Process that came into effect 1 April 2019. This interim process mandates that members and their families are provided a window of time, tools, education, training, and support from their chain of command to explore potential retention options or confirm that they are ready to transition.
  • At Transition Centres across Canada, the focus remained on meeting the ongoing needs of ill and injured CAF members, their families, and the families of the fallen. CAF Transition Group Headquarters led continued advancement in policy, training, tools, and procedures. Capability development focused on the continuation of the Borden Transition Trial, evolving to encompass all personnel transitioning out of the CAF from Canadian Forces Base Borden. An aggressive program of staffing of new positions across Canada took place in order to ensure that personnel are in place to deliver expanded programs and services in the future. Finally, the CAF Transition Group continued to lead a deliberate research program on transition to better understand the challenges faced by transitioning members and their families and to enable evidence-based decisions.

Picture shows an army pack with an army camo jacket and beret on top on the road

  • The Total Health and Wellness of the Civilian Workforce has continued to be enhanced through a vast array of programs, services and tools:
  • The Office of Disability Management, which provides support to ill, injured and impaired employees and their managers, opened two new regional offices in Montreal and Valcartier;
  • The Employee Assistance Program (EAP) launched LifeWorks, a new and innovative well-being digital platform that combines modern employee assistance and wellness programs into a holistic solution accessible anytime. Introduced for the Executive Community and their families as a one-year pilot project, feedback and data analysis on usage will inform the modernization strategy of EAP services for DND employees;
  • The EAP also reinstated LifeSpeak, a web-based service that offers DND employees and their families’ free confidential access to hundreds of short informative videos by experts on everyday issues; and
  • Additional mental health and well-being training opportunities were also provided to employees through a variety of in-person and virtual workshops, on-line courses, and participation to major events/activities involving the Defence Team Mental Health Co-champions and subject matter experts.
  • The Defence Team Workplace Well-being Survey was administered for the first time in 2018. Once the data was analyzed, an internal website was used as the mechanism to communicate the results in FY 2019-20. Going forward, the intent is to administer the Defence Team Workplace Well-being Survey every three years.

Results achieved

Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2019–20
Actual results
2018–19
Actual results
2017–18
Actual results
3.2 The health and well-being of the Defence team is well supported % of military personnel who are medically fit for their occupation To be determined
by 31 March 2021
To be determined
by 31 March 2021
89.84% 90.51% Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
% of military personnel who feel that the Canadian Armed Forces provides a reasonable quality of life for themselves and their families To be determined
by 31 March 2021
To be determined
by 31 March 2021
56.70% 53.20% Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
% of Canadian Armed Forces members who report a high level of workplace well-being To be determined
by 31 March 2021
To be determined
by 31 March 2021
71.50% 64.30% Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
% of civilian employees who describe the workplace as psychologically healthy To be determined
by 31 March 2021
To be determined
by 31 March 2021
79% 59% Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19

For more information about the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces’ performance indicators, please visit GC InfoBase.

Departmental Result 3.3 – The Defence team reflects the values and diversity of Canadian society

  • During FY 2019-20, DND/CAF continued to work towards the full implementation of the recommendations from the 2015 External Review Authority Report, also referred to as the External Review Authority by former Justice Deschamps. Specifically, while we made progress on implementing all the recommendations, by 31 March 2020, Defence has succeeded in implementing the following recommendations:
    • Recommendation #1: Acknowledge the problem and undertake to address it;
    • Recommendation #3: Establish a Centre of Accountability;
    • Recommendation #4: Allow independent reporting without triggering a formal complaint process;
    • Recommendation #5: Develop definitions;
    • Recommendation #7: Simplify the harassment process;
    • Recommendation #8: Allow victims of sexual assault to request transfer of the complaint to civilian authorities;
    • Recommendation #9: Assign responsibility for providing, coordinating and monitoring victim support to the support centre; and
    • Recommendation #10: Assign to the centre, in coordination with other CAF subject matter experts, responsibility for the development of the training curriculum, and for monitoring training on matters related to inappropriate sexual conduct.
  • DND/CAF has also undertaken activities with respect to Recommendation #2 ‘Establish Culture Change Strategy’ and Recommendation #6 ‘Develop unified policy approach (in a single policy using simple language)’ for which progress has been encouraging and full implementation is expected in the near future.
  • For more information about the recommendations, please visit the External Review into Sexual Misconduct and Sexual Harassment in the Canadian Armed Forces – Recommendations page.
  • In FY 2019-20, the Sexual Misconduct Response Centre (SMRC) undertook a number of initiatives to ensure victims and survivors have access to the full range of services. These include:
    • Launching a Response and Support Coordination program to establish a consistent approach to supporting CAF members affected by sexual misconduct. Coordinators help affected members navigate systems and processes by providing support, information, referrals, case coordination, advocacy and other practical assistance;
    • Establishing the Sexual Assault Centre Contribution Program, which provides funding to projects proposed by sexual assault centres in communities with a significant CAF presence. The program encourages collaboration between community-based civilian service providers and CAF-linked service providers in communities. The expected outcome is that survivors in the wider CAF community are better able to cope with the effects of sexual assault and are better supported to access the support services they need. This includes anyone associated with the CAF, including family members, civilian employees, contractors and others impacted by the CAF presence in their community; and
    • Initiating work on a national-level strategy and action plan for strengthening CAF services and supports for survivors by, for example, setting standards for training and service provision as well as addressing gaps in the continuum of services.
  • The CAF continued to enhance its understanding of sexual misconduct in the CAF through research, data and analysis. Specifically, the CAF supported the release of the second Statistics Canada Survey on Sexual Misconduct in the Canadian Armed Forces, 2018 and the CAF released the 2019 Sexual Misconduct Incident Tracking Report which presents sexual misconduct data from 2016 to 2019.
  • We continued to implement SSE Initiative 21 being open and transparent with Canadians and members of the CAF about progress on addressing sexual misconduct.
  • The CAF Employment Equity Plan and Diversity Strategy continued to guide the way forward, identifying ways to strengthen the CAF where all members are encouraged to contribute the full breadth of their diverse knowledge and skills. The strategic objectives are being reviewed on a cyclical basis to ensure continued relevance and inform strategic direction for CAF policies, programs and processes addressing diversity and inclusion.
  • The 2015-20 Employment Equity Plan continued to guide CAF successful implementation of key Employment Equity needs. Moderately impacted by the COVID-19 response, an Employment Systems Review that will identify objectives and Employment Equity gaps for the 2021-26 Employment Equity Plan has been initiated.
  • The Diversity and Inclusion Strategy for the Executive Community has demonstrated progress that addresses employment equity and diversity gaps at the most senior levels of the department, particularly via recruitment and talent management initiatives. In FY 2019-20 the department:
    • Led and undertook a variety of initiatives that demonstrate progress in diversity and inclusion. A Human Resources Policy Framework was developed that inserts GBA+ and Diversity elements into our policies, programs and initiatives, and to ensures alignment with Treasury Board Secretariat policies;
    • Incorporated employment equity as well as GBA+ into all elements of executive recruitment and staffing to minimize bias and promote inclusion;
    • Ensured that employment equity considerations remained first and foremost for the recruitment and selection of executives. This included active advertising and promotion of job opportunities through various social media forums to ensure diverse talent was reached; and
    • Focused on various Executive Leadership Development Programs and courses, which have resulted in increased representation rates, in two of the four minority groups (Women and Visible Minorities) at the Executive Level.
  • Additionally, the department implemented the following actions, via our human resources management practices to demonstrate progress on diversity and inclusion:
    • Introduced a directive to increase diversity and inclusion in the Civilian Workforce;
    • Developed a micro-aggression toolkit to raise awareness on micro-aggression and to respond to micro-aggression related inquiries. Focus continued to be placed on preventing harassment and discrimination, and ensuring a work environment that is harassment-free; and
    • Addressed diversity and inclusion consistently at various events such as executive town halls and executive orientation.
  • DND/CAF continued to implement key priorities received from recently compiled diversity and inclusion evaluations. Guided by the 2020 Defence Team Human Resources Strategy, strengthened governance has been implemented to lead and synchronize diversity and inclusion coordination. Educational tools on diversity and inclusion topics, such as micro-aggression and unconscious bias, were provided to Formations/Bases/Wings.
  • The recently completed Employment System Review preliminary report identified the need for more transparency and oversight to ensure manager adherence to human resources policies and guidelines with regard to employment equity, diversity and inclusion. Challenges cited include: gender bias; security clearance requirements; recognition of foreign credentials; informal networks; and professional development opportunities. In order to remove these barriers, the following actions were implemented:
    • Used targeted staffing to increase representation;
    • Created selection boards that met diversity criteria and inclusive screening process;
    • Promoted bias training that focused on unintentional bias;
    • Tracked the number of employees and managers who have completed diversity and inclusion training;
    • Created the opportunity for employees to request a mentor from diversity groups;
    • Encouraged hiring managers to use more inclusive recruitment methods; and
    • Applied GBA+ to policies and practices.
  • Opportunities to support diversity and inclusion throughout the recruitment process were identified, including:
    • Promoted the prequalified pools of the Public Service Commission’s Indigenous Student Employment Opportunity and Students with Disabilities Inventory throughout DND;
    • Engaged with Indigenous organizations at post-secondary institutions when conducting post-secondary outreach and recruitment across Canada;
    • Ensured that targeted staffing for Indigenous professionals is available;
    • Developed and delivered presentations about Indigenous recruitment considerations as part of a broader Indigenous Working Group; and
    • Added diversity and inclusion questions to the annual Staffing Measurement Framework surveys for managers and human resources officers to reinforce accountability for providing advice on employment equity, diversity and inclusion.

Results achieved

Departmental Results Departmental Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2019-20
Actual results

2018-19
Actual results
2017-16
Actual results
3.3 The Defence team reflects the values and diversity of Canadian society % of the Defence team that self-identify as a woman* 25.1% CAF or greater 31 March 2026
CAF: 16.0%** CAF: 15.7%* CAF: 15.6%
39.1% Civilians or greater Civilians: Results Not Available*** Civilians: 40.4% Civilians: 40.0%
% of the Defence team that self-identify as a visible minority* 11.8% CAF or greater 31 March 2026 CAF: 9.40%** CAF: 8.7% CAF: 8.4%
8.4% Civilians or greater Civilians: Results Not Available*** Civilians: 8.9% Civilians: 7.8%
% of the Defence team that self-identify as an indigenous person* 3.4% CAF or greater 31 March 2026 CAF: 2.80% ** CAF: 2.8% CAF: 2.8%
2.7% Civilians or greater Civilians: Results Not Available*** Civilians: 3.4% Civilians: 3.1%
% of the Defence team that self-identify as victims of harassment* To be
determined by
31 March 2021
To be
determined by
31 March 2021
CAF: 16.70% CAF: 17.7% Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
Civilians: 14% Civilians: 16%
% of the Defence team that self-identify as victims of discrimination* Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
To be determined
by 31 March 2021
CAF: 11.80% CAF: 14.9% Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
Civilians: 7% Civilians: 7%
Annual number of reported incidents of Harmful and Inappropriate Sexual Behaviour in the Defence Team To be determined
by 31 March
2021
To be determined
by 31 March 2021
356 356 Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
Number and type of actions taken in response to reported Harmful and Inappropriate Sexual Behaviour incidents by the Defence Team To be determined
by 31 March
2021
To be determined
by 31 March 2021
Results Not Available**** 256 Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
% of Defence Team members who have attended a town hall or training session related to Harmful and Inappropriate Sexual Behaviour (Operation HONOUR) To be determined
by 31 March
2021
To be determined
by 31 March 2021
CAF : 84%***** Results Not Available Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19

Notes:

* The separate CAF and Civilians results and targets are published in the above table where available. However, the results published on GC InfoBase will be the combined targets and results, containing both CAF and Civilians, as a result of reporting system limitations.

** The CAF maintains ambitious and realistic efforts, communicated through strategies and supported by ongoing initiatives, to increase representation rates as we move toward the target set for 2026.

*** The data for this indicator, provided by an organization external to National Defence, was not available at the time of the production of this report.

**** Results Not Available. This indicator has not been effective and may be misleading in representing Defence efforts regarding both the amount and nature of suitable responses and actions taken to reflect the needs of each situation. The indicator is being revisited.

***** Training related to sexual misconduct has been incorporated into all facets of CAF training, including at recruit school and in leadership training at all levels. In addition, a formal course “Respect in the CAF” has been developed, with over 11 000 members attending from 1 April 2018 to 29 February 2020. Members who have completed this course receive a course qualification, which can be accurately tracked and will be reported in the 2021-2022 DRR. The information provided is focused on the CAF member participation in Operation HONOUR town halls and training sessions as efforts for civilian members are delivered in different formats which would not allow a valid integration of data. For this reason, the department is looking to adjust the indicator in the future and measure efforts more specifically.

For more information about the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces’ performance indicators, please visit GC InfoBase.

Departmental Result 3.4 – Military families are supported and resilient

  • In November 2018, the CDS decision to formalize Military Family Resource Centre (MFRC) governance was announced. In spite of COVID-19 restrictions, the Governance Formalization Action Plan continued to move forward with regard to the key areas identified in the Comprehensive Military Family Plan. Within this framework, the work of the 20 working groups had been streamlined to focus on key elements necessary to serve military families immediate and ongoing needs in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic and the compounding impact of the military lifestyle. The MFRC Governance Formalization Phase One and Action Plan was finalized and disseminated to MFRCs in June 2019 and a Governance Forum was held with all MFRCs in September 2019. The Action Plan for 2019-2021 was discussed, formalized, a work plan updated and subsequently disseminated.
  • Through the Military Spousal Employment Network, two virtual career fairs were hosted to connect national employers with military spouses actively looking for employment opportunities, as well as online learning training sessions.
  • The Military Spouse Employment Initiative (MSEI), first launched in October 2018, hosts an open inventory on the public service jobs platform for spouses of military members to have greater access to meaningful work within the federal government as their families are relocated across Canada and internationally. In FY 2019-20, the inventory was expanded to include more career fields such as language teachers, health services, procurement, trades and services, in addition to policy officers, and was opened up to all government departments. From April 2019 to March 2020, 123 hires have been made within and outside the department.
  • Work was conducted with Kids Help Phone to develop a dedicated Crisis Text Line for children and youth of military families that is scheduled to launch in the spring 2020. In addition, work progressed to secure a contract with a virtual care provider to deploy telemedicine services to military families during COVID-19, with a planned launch in mid-May 2020.
  • Within the framework of the Comprehensive Military Family Plan, and in light of COVID-19 restrictions, virtual care options for military families were triaged, staged and developed in FY 2019-20. Implementation will commence in FY 2020-21.

Picture shows a bunch of hands overlapping one another

Results achieved

Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2019–20
Actual results
2018–19
Actual results
2017–18
Actual results
3.4 Military families are supported and resilient % of Canadian Armed Forces families that feel they meet the challenges of military life To be determined
by 31 March 2021
To be determined
by 31 March 2021
87.60%* 87.60% Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19
% of Canadian Armed Forces members who are satisfied with the overall support their family receives from the Canadian Armed Forces To be determined
by 31 March 2021
To be determined
by 31 March 2021
67.40% 71% Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19

Notes:

* This is the same result reported last year. The next Quality of Life Survey is planned for administration in 2021, with results to be available in 2022.

For more information about the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces’ performance indicators, please visit GC InfoBase.

Departmental Result 3.5 – Youth in Canada are provided with experience and opportunities that enable a successful transition to adulthood

Our Cadets and Junior Canadian Rangers Youth Program continued to be provided directly to Canadian youths and represents the largest federally sponsored youth program in Canada. In FY 2019-20, the department:

  • Promulgated the Communications Strategy for Cadets and Junior Canadian Rangers for 2019-22. This strategy provides direction and guidance for strategic communications activities in support of the Cadet and Junior Canadian Rangers (JCR) programs, ensuring alignment with the communications activities of the Cadet Leagues, as well as the strategic priorities and communications policies and programs of the Government of Canada, DND and the CAF;
  • Launched the Regional Growth Management Toolkit, an evidenced-based and bottom-up growth planning approach and support tool designed to help corps/squadrons build and sustain enrolment numbers, identify strategies for attraction and retention in their communities, and inform growth management and planning at the regional level;
  • Conducted the Departmental Evaluation of the Cadets and Junior Canadian Rangers (Youth Program). The evaluation examined the relevance, effectiveness and efficiency of the Cadet and JCR program, with a particular focus on the structure, governance, resources and supporting partnerships that enable the successful delivery of the program;
  • Promulgated the scientific letters and drafted the scientific reports related to the research on the status of former cadets. This contributed to the validation of the Cadet Program by informing the department on the status of former Cadets, their feelings about program’s effectiveness, and changes in personal growth and skill acquisition attributable to their program experience. Coordination and tracking of similar research in the United Kingdom was also initiated; What is the Social Impact Resulting from the Expenditure on the Cadet Forces;
  • Conducted trial participation for Royal Canadian Air Cadets to attend the Civil Air Patrol Cadet Officer School. The curriculum, delivered through academic instruction, seminars, experiential learning and leadership opportunities, focuses on leadership, communication, character, airspace and cyberspace, strategic thinking, and administration; and
  • Conducted a trial participation for Royal Canadian Army Cadets to attend the United States Army Cadet Command and the College Options Foundation annual championship Junior Reserve Officer Training Course – Leadership and Academic Bowl. The College Options Foundation is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to enriching the academic development of high school students and assisting them in their preparation for higher education.

Note: All student recruitment results have been included in the Internal Services section of this report.


The CAF is ready

Cadets of Basic Aviation and Technology Aerospace went on a trip to the Mobile Support Equipment Maintenance Work point to check out how to maintain vehicles.

A CH-148 Cyclone helicopter pilot, sits at the controls of the aircraft prior to take-off from Standing NATO Maritime Group 2 (SNMG2) flagship, HMCS HALIFAX during Exercise DOGU AKDENIZ 19, in the Eastern Mediterranean, as part of Operation REASSURANCE on 14 November 2019.

Photo: MS Dan Bard, Canadian Forces Combat Camera


Results achieved

Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2019–20
Actual results
2018–19
Actual results
2017–18
Actual results
3.5 Youth in Canada are provided with experience and opportunities that enable a successful transition to adulthood % of the target Canadian youth population that participates in Cadets and Junior Canadian Rangers 2% or greater 31 March 2020 2.06% 2.05% Not Available
New indicator as
of 2018-19

For more information about the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces’ performance indicators, please visit GC InfoBase.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)

2019–20
Main Estimates

2019–20
Planned spending

2019-20
Total authorities
available for use
2019-20
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2019-20
Difference
(Actual spending minus Planned spending)
3,282,108,597 3,330,329,750 3,442,200,546 3,365,827,143 35,497,393

Human resources (full-time equivalents) 

2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
2019–20
Actual full-time equivalents

2019–20
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
20,243 20,407 164

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces’ Program Inventory, including explanation of significant variances, is available in the GC InfoBase.

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