Canadian Panel Member Guide to Immigration Medical Examinations 2020

An introduction to the immigration medical examination process

A program administered by IRCC

Immigration, Refugees, and Citizenship Canada’s (IRCC) Migration Health Branch administers and delivers Canada’s medical screening program for people who want to visit or immigrate to Canada.

If someone applies to stay in Canada, they need to meet a set of criteria, including medical standards for admissibility. To be considered admissible, an applicant must not create a danger to public health or public safety, and must not create excessive demand on Canada’s healthcare or social services.

A network of panel members and regional offices

IRCC relies on a network of panel members – physicians and radiologists – to conduct immigration medical examinations (IMEs) on people applying to live here.

Panel members practising in Canada and overseas work with one of four IRCC regional medical offices to report the medical findings of the IMEs they carry out. Our offices are located in Ottawa, Canada; London, UK; Manila, Philippines; and New Delhi, India.

Who needs an IME?

Many criteria go into the decision about whether someone coming to Canada needs an IME, including how long they plan to stay, their type of visa application and where they have lived or travelled. In most situations, visa and migration officers determine who requires an IME before the applicant sees a panel physician.

Some people applying to stay in Canada will contact your clinic to get an appointment for an upfront medical exam. Others have files already created electronically, which you will use as the basis for performing an IME.

If you have questions about which category applies to an applicant, contact your Regional Medical Office (RMO).

What this guide tells you

This guide provides comprehensive information for panel members, including:

Leveraging eMedical

IRCC has implemented an electronic, web-based processing system called eMedical for performing and reporting on IMEs.

eMedical is an information technology project among Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the USA that saves processing time, improves the integrity of the examination program, and provides many other benefits. Panel members working in countries where eMedical is implemented must use it to complete and transmit all IMEs.

A small number of panel members do not have access to eMedical. Those who work with a paper-based system will find key information about how to conduct an IME in Part 2 of this guide.

Check back for new information

The process for medically screening immigrants, and the immigration process itself, are subject to change. IRCC will update this guide as needed, and the updates will override the text they replace. This means the online version of the panel member guide is guaranteed to be the most current. Your RMO will also send you new information as it becomes available.

Please consult our list of acronyms, initialisms and definitions for clarification as you read this guide.

Visit IRCC’s website for more information on Canada’s immigration program.

Section 1: General guide for panel members

Your work as a panel member

Becoming a panel member

Thank you for considering becoming a panel member. If you are reading this section of the guide, you have likely been contacted by IRCC about participating in the immigration medical examination (IME) system and you’re looking for additional information about the application process.

If this is the case, to conduct IMEs on behalf of IRCC, ensure that you have submitted the following:

  1. a series of forms that IRCC has provided:
    • application form
    • consent to share information
    • consent to use eMedical where available
    • acknowledgment of having read this guide
    • acceptance of designation
  2. all required documents, such as proof of professional license and certification
  3. IRCC’s orientation about the IME process, which includes reading and understanding this guide and participating in discussions with IRCC Migration Health Branch personnel
  4. all steps of IRCC’s IME training, including eMedical training, either individually or through a group activity

Panel members are not authorized to perform IMEs for IRCC during the orientation phase.

Getting your unique identifier and login

Once IRCC has received all your forms and documents, your regional medical office (RMO) will review your application and, if your status is approved, send you a unique identifier number (P number). Your P number enables IRCC to perform quality assessments of your work.

The unique identifier starts with the letter “P” followed by eight or more digits (e.g. P12345678). Your unique identifier will be embedded electronically in each IME or chest x-ray you submit through eMedical. (Paper-based clinics, please see our special set of instructions.)

Your unique identifier should be included in all your correspondence with IRCC.

eMedical user identification

All eMedical users will have a unique login ID and password to access the system. The eMedical login information is linked electronically to your unique identifier.

You must not share your eMedical login ID with any other person or let anyone else use it to submit IMEs or chest x-rays. It is the responsibility of the panel physician and panel radiologist to ensure all of the material entered into eMedical is accurate before submitting the IME. (Paper-based clinics, please see our special set of instructions.)

Panel member designation is not permanent

IRCC’s migration officials and medical officers regularly consult each other on how many panel members are needed in a given location. When you are designated as a panel member, you do not have permanent status, and completing the designation process does not create a contractual relationship with IRCC. This has several implications:

A summary of your responsibilities

Panel members are authorized to perform IMEs, arrange for diagnostics and investigations, and complete IME forms. You do not have the authority to assess or determine whether the medical conditions of applicants are grounds for health admissibility to Canada. More specifically, you may not give applicants an opinion on their medical admissibility. That decision rests with Canadian migration officers.

Panel members performing IMEs should ensure that they meet IRCC’s performance service standards and that there are no conflicts of interest in providing services. You are also required to help prevent fraud and abuse of Canada’s immigration laws, submit to performance evaluations, follow proper procedures for absences, and use English or French in your communications with IRCC.

For all applicants, the Canadian IME will include an examination by a panel member and a medical assessment by IRCC. Sometimes, applicants can be asked to undergo further medical evaluation to ensure compliance with Canada’s Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations.

The assessment of whether or not a client is admissible on health grounds is largely based on findings reported in the IME, but it can include information unknown to panel members.

Here are your general responsibilities, organized according to your role in the IME process.

All panel members

As a panel member, you must do the following:

Panel physicians

As a panel physician you must do the following:

Chief radiologists

As a chief radiologist, you must do the following:

Nominated radiologists

Nominated radiologists are panel members who have been nominated by the chief radiologist at their clinic to help conduct IMEs. Your chief will have verified that you are a specialist in radiology, that your license is valid and that you are registered to work in the country where you practice. Your personal information will have been transmitted to your RMO to obtain a unique identifier, or “P” number for you to use.

As a nominated radiologist, you are responsible for managing your caseload and submitting chest x-rays for IMEs in a timely manner.

Chief and nominated radiologists

Both of these groups must do the following:

Using eMedical

eMedical is a web-based system used by IRCC for electronically recording and transmitting IMEs. eMedical is also used by the Australian Department of Home Affairs, Immigration New Zealand, and the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It is available around the globe with a few exceptions; therefore, all panel members must submit IME results via eMedical whenever possible.

In rare cases where a panel member is unable to use eMedical (no internet signal, no computer available due to crisis, etc.), your RMO will consider allowing you to submit paper-based IME results. (Paper-based clinics, please see our special set of instructions.)

Where eMedical is available, all panel members must:

Performance guidelines and expected timelines

Here are IRCC’s service standards for IME activities. Panel physicians are expected to perform roughly 80 percent of these activities within the timelines set out in the table below. If you are unable to meet these standards, you should notify your RMO. You may be asked to provide a justification for the delay. These standards also apply to when you are forwarding material you receive after the original IME is complete.

Activities Time frame (in calendar days)
Appointment with panel physician 10 days; for upfront medicals, within 2 business days
Appointment with panel physician in cases where the applicant is furthered 10 days
Obtain lab results 7 days after date of the exam
Obtain x-ray results 7 days after date of the exam
Submission of the IME to RMO by the panel physician 10 days of date of the exam
Responding to correspondence from RMO 48 hours
Forwarding inactive immigration medical files to the RMO Paper-based: 8 week old IMEs
eMedical users: Files are auto deleted after 365 days of inactivity
Notifying the responsible RMO of any change in practice location or contact information At least 14 days before the change takes place
Notifying the responsible RMO of any absence of 7 days or more At least 14 days’ notice, (preferably by email)
Being available for provision of performance and technical information related to the IME process (e.g. quality assurance visits, annual audits) 7 days’ notice

If you are not available for IME activities

If you plan to be unavailable for IMEs for more than seven calendar days, you must inform your RMO. Here are the rules that apply to your absences:

Please note that you are required to keep your contact information updated in the system.

Using a locum tenens

As panel member, you may ask your RMO to approve a locum tenens for your clinic if:

Here is the process for requesting a locum tenens:
  1. Contact your RMO to get approval. (Your RMO can consider your request before you send documentation.)
  2. Send your RMO the name and contact information for the locum tenens you want, as well as a copy of the locum’s medical registration and licence.
  3. Send your RMO a statement from your proposed locum saying that they have read this guide and agree with the standards and requirements it defines. Note that before you recommend a particular physician or radiologist as your locum tenens, you must be satisfied that they have the qualifications and experience to perform IMEs, and that they understand the reporting procedures and are aware of any updates issued by eMedical or IRCC’s Migration Health Branch.
  4. If your RMO approves the request, it will send you a written response by letter or email. You can then tell your locum that they have been authorized.

    You must give your RMO at least 14 days’ notice, preferably by email, for every period of time where the locum will be acting on your behalf, or where a locum is required to temporarily increase capacity in the clinic. This gives the RMO time to activate the locum’s eMedical account. You also need to specify an end date for the locum.

  5. IRCC will provide your locum tenens with a unique identifier.
    • The locum will get their own password for eMedical. You must not share your password with the locum.
    • The system will be updated with appropriate information about your locum, and their eMedical account will have a specific end date that aligns with the dates approved by your RMO.
    • If you are terminated by IRCC, this will automatically cancel prior approvals for your locums.

Referring applicants to consultants and specialists

Panel physicians must ensure that any consultants or specialists they refer applicants to are registered, certified or licensed by national regulatory bodies. All consultants and specialists must also be aware of IRCC’s requirements for the IME, particularly about verifying the applicant’s identity.

All consultants and specialists must send reports directly to the applicant’s panel physician. They must not send reports to panel physicians through the applicant. Consultants, specialists and facilities that provide supplemental tests need to understand that the request for additional information is for a medical evaluation for Canadian immigration purposes – and not intended for therapeutic purposes or to establish medical fitness to fly.

If you relocate your practice

If you become a panel member and relocate your practice, you must tell your RMO because your designation is related to where you work. If you relocate, you may lose your designation as a panel physician. Once IRCC has assessed its requirements in your new location, it will let you know whether it needs you as a panel member there. You will have an opportunity to respond.

As a panel member, you must ensure IRCC has up-to-date documentation throughout the relationship. If your license or other certification expires, you must send the updated documents to IRCC. If you fail to do so you could be removed from the IME network.

Ethical conduct and conflicts of interest

As a panel member, you are expected always to conduct yourself ethically. When you conduct an IME for an applicant, you must carry out your professional obligations with competence, integrity and loyalty – the same way you do with all your patients.

You must also ensure that the people you employ and associate with in your practice meet these requirements. In conducting IMEs, you must:

Here are some of the more specific ways in which you are expected to behave:

If the following issues or events arise, you must notify your RMO as soon as possible:

IRCC reserves the right to suspend a panel member’s designation after an investigation has been completed by a medical or regulatory authority.

Equal rights for all applicants

The principle of equal rights applies to all applicants that a panel member encounters, regardless of their:

Canada protects the rights and privacy of an individual to identify in the gender of their choice and express their gender and sexual orientation freely. As a panel member, you are required to show the same respect and privacy for IRCC applicants.

This includes using proper gender pronouns and preferred names when addressing an applicant. Outside of IME procedures, you should never disclose an applicant’s medical information, including gender expression and sexual orientation.

Accommodating cultural and other needs

Some applicants may ask for special accommodation during the IME due to personal or cultural sensitivities. As good practice, you should routinely offer to have a chaperone present when you are examining a client. Patient consent is always necessary for a chaperone to be present.

Female applicants may be uncomfortable with a male examiner (and vice versa), in which case you should either offer to have a chaperone present during the examination or make alternate arrangements that preserve the integrity of the IME.

Preferably, the chaperone should be a trained health professional familiar with the examination so they can confirm it was appropriately conducted. If that is not possible, you can use non-medical staff. In some cases, it may be reasonable for you to suggest that the patient choose a person to bring to the examination.

Overall, you should accommodate personal and cultural sensitivities, while keeping in mind that IME standards must be respected. When you make an accommodation, record on the examination form the type of accommodation you provided and the roles other people played who may have been present during the IME.

Should you not be comfortable examining a client for any reason – due to a conflict of interest, dispute, religious reason, personal belief, etc. – it is your responsibility to tell the applicant and your RMO.

Using Canada’s official languages

English and French are the official languages of Canada and, as a panel member, you must be able to communicate verbally and in writing in at least one of them. You must also complete the IME in one of the official languages. Other things to keep in mind:

Employing a medical interpreter

When you perform an IME, you may find yourself examining an applicant who does not speak one of Canada’s official languages – or any language you speak. In these cases, you will need an interpreter.

IRCC recommends that applicants use the services of a professional interpreter. However, an interpreter can be a friend, a relative of the applicant or any other person. The person acting as an interpreter:

Administrative instructions

IRCC’s Migration Health Branch has put together this list of administrative instructions to guide you in various situations – from how to advertise your services to how to handle complaints from applicants.

Guidelines for managing records

All the forms, documents and results of investigations involved in completing IMEs are the property of IRCC. You can access the IME for 365 days after you submit it.

Panel members who perform IME-related activities must follow the procedures and guidelines here for copies and files as well as for original documents and information:

Advertising your services

You may wish to advertise your IME services outside your clinic by using a website, or electronic or printed material. If you do this, the following rules apply:

How to communicate and where to send your questions

Regional medical offices

You will have regular contact with your RMO about medical and non-medical issues. Regional medical offices for all business issues, questions and comments about immigration medical cases and examinations, and about the immigration medical program. Your RMO will also update you on IME processes from time to time.

Questions and information about specific cases should always include identification details, such as the IME, unique medical identifier number (UMI) or unique client identifier number (UCI), along with the applicant’s date of birth. To protect applicants’ confidentiality and personal information, information requests should not identify them by name.

eMedical systems support

If you have questions about eMedical (regarding user functionality, adding or removing users, submitting exams, etc.) you can:

For all other inquiries related to eMedical – issues with system glitches, unscheduled outages, etc. – contact the eMedical systems support team.

Canadian government officials and third parties

The Privacy Act says that you should never provide information about a specific case over the phone, private email or other means if you cannot verify the identity of the other person. Even acknowledging that you have a file on a specific applicant can constitute a breach of their privacy. If you have any doubts, consult with your RMO.

The media

The media may become interested in the IME of a particular individual and contact you for information. You must never provide the media with information about a particular case – or any confidential information about the immigration system or an applicant.

Refer all requests for comment or information to your RMO.

Remember that, as a third-party physician, you are doing IMEs on behalf of the Government of Canada. This means that all IMEs and their contents belong to the Government of Canada and not to you. Never grant a request from a third party – including a lawyer – for a copy of an IME. Instead, direct parties making requests like these to the Government of Canada’s online service for access to information or personal information.

Applicants

Applicants may have questions about the immigration process, particularly when RMO officials ask for additional medical information or investigations.

Although you can explain what the requested information means from a general medical point of view, you are not authorized to explain or justify any immigration reason for these requests. You should simply explain that the request came from the RMO, that you are only a contact person between RMO and the applicant, and that the applicant can contact their migration office for more information.

Specific questions about the IME process could include the following:

Applicants can find many answers to their questions by reading IRCC’s website or by using IRCC’s help centre. These tools include the phone numbers applicants can use to contact the IRCC help line, and the forms to submit web enquiries about immigration applications. Some applicants can also use their ‘myCIC’ web account to ask questions.

You should never direct applicants in the following ways:

Ensure that your staff is aware of these instructions.

Charging and collecting fees for IMEs

All applicants, except those eligible for the Interim federal Health Program, are responsible for paying all fees and costs associated with their IME. These fees include the following:

You may also charge reasonable fees for:

Rules associated with charging fees:

Quality assurance, incidents and complaints

Clear and transparent procedures for quality assurance, responding to complaints and resolving problems improve IRCC’s service to applicants and the overall integrity of the immigration medical program.

Our quality assurance regime

IRCC’s Migration Health Branch conducts regular quality assurance and quality control exercises, and its officers will occasionally visit panel members to ensure they are meeting IRCC’s IME performance guidelines.

When your RMO asks, you should make yourself and your staff available for evaluation, monitoring, training, quality assurance, training activities and onsite visits. Your RMO will usually give you seven days’ notice. Migration officers may also conduct administrative visits to panel sites on the behalf of the RMO.

When an RMO requests, you must provide, in a timely fashion, all the forms and documents they have asked to review (e.g. panel member appointment forms, quality assurance activities). The procedure for completing the IME is spelled out in this guide and your performance in this regard will also be evaluated.

Your RMO will evaluate all complaints and incidents related to your performance conducting IMEs.

If an incident occurs during the IME process

If you have a disagreement with an applicant during an IME, or confusion arises or an event occurs that might compromise client service, you should report the incident to your RMO, providing full details. Here are some examples of incidents you should report:

Email your respective RMO regarding the situation. Reports to your RMO should include:

What happens when someone complains about you?

Complaints are common in any client service procedure. Applicants, the people representing them and other people outside IRCC may make complaints about the IME and its related services. IRCC personnel may also make critical comments or notify RMOs about errors, performance issues, or other situations of concern regarding the IME and the services panel members provide.

If someone makes a complaint against you or your clinic, you may receive a letter of concern from your RMO. If this happens, you must comply with the instructions and timeframes indicated in the letter, including replying by the date that your RMO indicates. If you expect your reply to take longer, you should notify your RMO.

IRCC’s Migration Health Branch will carefully consider your opinions and viewpoints – as well as those of the person making the complaint – when they review a complaint or concern.

Resolution process for complaints and performance issues

If you engage in misconduct or poor performance, you may lose your designation as a panel member. Here are some examples of situations where you or your clinic staff are performing poorly:

Resolving issues

Your RMO will address minor incidents or performance deficiencies by sending you a letter outlining the steps you must take to correct the issue. This could include additional training.

For serious or repeated administrative or clinical issues – such as harassment, allegations of sexual misconduct or illegal activities – the RMO can suspend you, issue a letter summarizing the facts that gave rise to the complaint and provide you with an opportunity to reply.

While your panel member designation is suspended, you must stop all IME activities related to taking on new applicants. Your RMO will tell you how you should work with applicants you are already seeing.

If you are suspended, your RMO will conduct an assessment once it has received your reply. If your response is deemed satisfactory, your RMO will inform you of its decision and potentially reinstate you with appropriate recommendations. Alternatively, your designation could be permanently terminated.

If you are terminated

IRCC has complete authority over the management of the panel member network. The number of panel members that we require may change if demand for IMEs shrinks in your area. If you are terminated for operational reasons, your RMO will notify you in writing at least 30 days in advance.

However, if your designation is terminated because of performance deficiencies or complaints, the termination is effective on the date of your RMO’s notification letter.

If you retire or wish to resign

Panel members may retire or ask to be removed from the panel network at any time. Send written notification to your RMO, including the date you expect your activities will end.

The Immigration Medical Examination

This section provides panel members who use eMedical with information they need to complete IME and associated forms.

Panel members using a paper-based system should refer to our supplementary section in this guide. IRCC has redesigned IME paper forms to ensure they are consistent with eMedical IMEs.

General information about the IME

The IME consists of a medical history, physical examination, age-specific laboratory tests and age-specific chest x-ray.

Usually, routine, age-specific laboratory and radiologic tests include:

A medical examination includes any or all of the following:

Panel members may request additional lab tests for an applicant younger than the recommended age based on an applicant’s individual risk factors.

It also be necessary to screen applicants below the ages indicated. See IRCC's technical instructions for more information.

How do I determine what examinations are required?

eMedical provides a questionnaire for all applicants. Depending on their answers, eMedical may populate the form with additional questions and possibly instruct you to send the applicant for consultation with a specialist.

As the panel physician, you are never required to decide on a course of treatment or additional tests. Once you submit the applicant’s IME, a medical officer working with your RMO will decide if additional tests are required and notify you through eMedical. Alternatively, instructions may be provided by your RMO before eMedical prompts have been updated. Instructions from your RMO supersede any prompts from eMedical.

Verifying an applicant’s identity and preventing fraud

It is essential that you identify applicants throughout the IME process to ensure the person undergoing the IME is the same person applying for entry to Canada, and that there is no substitution at any time during the lifecycle of the IME. An applicant’s identity is confirmed through a process of verifying the applicant’s photographs and identity documents.

Required documents

The applicant must submit a passport or other identification document acceptable for the Canadian IME. IRCC strongly prefers that applicants submit passports. This includes new passports and passports expired for no more than a year.

Other approved identification documents include the following:

If an applicant does not have approved identification

If an applicant does not provide an approved identification document, they must provide an alternative form of identification. You should not turn such applicants away, and you should conduct the IME as long as the applicant presents some form of identification.

If the applicant provides identification that is not approved, you must report “identity concern” in the eMedical system.

Important: To ensure the integrity of the IME process, the applicant must use the same identity document for all components of the IME, including laboratory, radiology and specialist referrals. Please inform applicants accordingly.

If you have an identity concern

If you cannot confirm that the person who has arrived for an IME is the person on the ID documents being presented, you should report that as an ID concern. In all cases except upfront medicals, biodata and information extracted from the applicant’s visa application will already appear in eMedical. You should compare this information with what the client attending the IME is presenting.

You should not report as an ID concern any minor differences in the eMedical information and the ID document such as misspelling of names, minor errors in date of birth or differences in validity dates.

If the applicant provides personal details that seem inconsistent with the information on the identity documents they submit, you must identify the concern in the eMedical system. For paper-based IMEs, report your concern on the IMM 1017: Medical Report – Client Biodata and Summary form.

Scan the identity document you are concerned about and attach a copy to the health case in the IME. You should then complete the IME according to customary procedures. The document will be submitted to IRCC once you have completed the IME.

IRCC will investigate your concern about the applicant’s identity.

Client Consent and Declaration

(See our sample Client Consent and Declaration form in Appendix II.)

All applicants must complete the Client Consent and Declaration form. If the applicant is under 16 years of age or is unable to legally provide consent (e.g. if they have reduced mental capacity), a legal guardian or parent may provide consent on the applicant’s behalf.

The eMedical Client Consent and Declaration form includes the following:

If an applicant does not give consent, you cannot carry out the IME and you must notify your RMO.

Other important details:

Medical Report – Client Biodata and Summary (IMM 1017)

(See our sample IMM 1017 form in Appendix III.)

IRCC has implemented one standard form, the Medical Report – Client Biodata and Summary (IMM 1017), for all immigration categories. This form displays information such as:

Excessive demand exempt (EDE) applicants

EDE applicants are people who cannot be deemed inadmissible on the grounds that they would place an excessive demand on publicly funded Canadian health and social services. EDE applicants include refugees, refugee claimants, individuals with protected person status, and certain clients in the family classes.

However, EDE clients are assessed for:

Non-EDE applicants

Non-EDE applicants are assessed for:

Refugee overseas applicants

Refugee overseas applicants are automatically assessed as EDE. Panel physicians must complete and submit the Resettlement Needs Assessment Form (IMM 5544) for overseas refugees.

IRCC typically issues the Medical Report – Client Biodata and Summary (IMM 1017) form with the applicant’s information and immigration information sections completed.

Applicants who have been issued a Medical Report – Client Biodata and Summary (IMM 1017) must present the form to your clinic when they arrive for their IMEs. The form will include two applicant identifiers: IME number and UCI number. (Note: This form may not include a client photo).

Upfront Medical Report – Client Biodata and Summary (IMM 1017B upfront)

(See our sample IMM 1017B upfront form in Appendix III.)

An upfront medical is an IME performed when an applicant reports to a panel physician with no paper Medical Report – Client Biodata and Summary (IMM 1017) or file in the eMedical system. Upfront medical examinations are generally permitted for students, visitors and workers who are applying to be temporary residents of Canada.

Only certain applicants are permitted to undergo an upfront medical. When it is not possible to confirm whether an applicant is permitted an upfront medical, you should perform one and indicate that the applicant is a “worker”. Please note that all members of an application should be identified under the same category. Therefore, if the principal applicant (say, the mother) is a worker, all children on the application should also be identified as workers.

These exams do not apply to family members being sponsored by a permanent resident of Canada. Whenever IRCC makes changes to the rules about individuals who can undergo an upfront medical, panel physicians are notified by their RMO.

Here is the procedure for doing upfront medical exams:

Panel physicians must ensure that they provide the applicant with proof that they have completed their upfront medical examination. For eMedical, the proof is the “Information Sheet” letter that gets printed. Applicants must include this proof when they submit their visa application.

If the applicant has received instructions for further examinations, you do not need to repeat or submit a new IME; you should simply remind the applicant to provide the migration office with proof of the upfront medical examination.

Since an IME is valid for 12 months, you should remind applicants to submit their visa application along with proof that they have completed their upfront medical examination well before the expiration date; otherwise, the client may have to undergo a second IME.

Medical Report (501 Medical examination)

You will use the applicant’s medical report to assess their medical condition. The medical report may be completed by clinic staff or the applicant, but you as the panel physician must review it to confirm the information.

You must provide details along with all “Yes” answers to medical history questions. IRCC requires the following information:

You must either provide this information in the comments section or attach a report to the IME.

The following table lists additional requirements when the answers to medical report questions show abnormality – whether the IME is completed in eMedical or on paper. See IRCC's technical instructions for more information.

Medical history questions
Question Related TI IMM type Requirements if “yes” in eMedical
Tuberculosis (TB), treatment for tuberculosis Tuberculosis TI EDE and non-EDE clients Lateral CXR & AP CXR if ‹11 years old, Chest x-ray examination
Close household or work contact with tuberculosis (within last 5 years) Tuberculosis TI EDE and non-EDE clients IGRA or TST, lateral CXR & AP CXR if ‹11 years old, Chest x-ray examination
Prolonged medical treatment and/or repeated hospitalization for any reason, including a major operation or mental illness N/A EDE and non-EDE clients Medical report, if available when IME is submitted or if RMO requests
Psychological/psychiatric disorder (including major depression, bipolar disorder or schizophrenia) Psychiatric conditions TI Obtain x-ray results Report from psychiatrist, psychologist or treating physician (attach all existing results and reports from labs and previous specialists)
History of HIV HIV TI EDE and non-EDE clients HIV, CXR, Hepatitis B and C, syphilis, IGRA or TST regardless of age, and HIV specialist report including CD4 count, HIV viral load, and when antiretroviral medications will be needed
An abnormal hepatitis B or C blood test Hepatitis / Liver disease TI EDE and non-EDE clients HIV, CXR, Hepatitis B and C, syphilis, regardless of age
Cancer or malignancy in the last five years Cancer or Malignancy TI non-EDE clients Oncology report
Diabetes Diabetes, hypertension, chronic renal or cardiac diseases TI non-EDE clients Screen for signs or symptoms and presence of end-organ damage.
Heart condition including coronary disease, hypertension, valve or congenital disease Diabetes, hypertension, chronic renal or cardiac diseases TI non-EDE clients Screen for signs or symptoms (including blood pressure) and presence of end-organ damage. Serum creatinine, regardless of age
Blood condition (including thalassemia) N/A non-EDE clients Check for history of admission.
Kidney or bladder disease Diabetes, hypertension, chronic renal or cardiac diseases TI non-EDE clients Urinalysis, serum creatinine (eGFR if abnormal); regardless of age
An ongoing physical or intellectual disability affecting current or future ability to function independently or be able to work full-time (including autism or developmental delay) Psychiatric conditions TI and Cognitive impairment in adults TI EDE and non-EDE clients Activities of daily living (ADL) if > 5 years old, Chart of Early Childhood Development (CECD) if < 5 years old, consult TI for complete requirements
Addiction to drugs or alcohol Psychiatric conditions TI EDE and non-EDE clients Only if the RMO requests – a psychiatrist’s, psychologist’s or treating physician’s report that specifically comments on previous threatening behaviour and if there is evidence of IV drug use, HIV, hepatitis B and C, regardless of age. The report must also specifically address if it is reasonably likely the client will exhibit future behaviour that might be a threat to the client or others.
Prescribed pills or medication (excluding oral contraceptives, over- the-counter medication and/or natural supplements) N/A EDE and non-EDE clients List relevant medications and mention the indication
For female clients:
a) Are you pregnant?
N/A EDE and non-EDE clients N/A
b) If yes, what is the expected date of delivery? N/A N/A eMedical generates this Pregnancy Deferral Letter.
c) If yes, do you wish to defer your chest x-ray at this time? N/A N/A N/A
Physical examination

As the panel physician, you must complete the physical examination. You must provide details of all abnormal findings during the physical examination. IRCC requires the following information:

You may enter this information in the comments section or attach a report to the IME in eMedical.

The following table lists additional requirements when the answers to physical examination questions show abnormality. See IRCC's technical instructions for more information.

Table: Physical examination
Physical examination Related TI IMM type Requirements if “yes” in eMedical
Was a chaperone offered? Genital, Gynecological and rectal examination TI; Breast examination TI EDE and non-EDE clients Non applicable. A chaperone should be offered to everyone.
Ear/nose/throat/mouth N/A EDE and non-EDE clients N/A
Hearing Hearing impairment or deafness TI EDE and non-EDE clients N/A
Eyes (including fundoscopy) N/A EDE and non-EDE clients N/A
Best distance visual acuity (with or without correction) N/A EDE and non-EDE clients N/A
Blood pressure (clients ≥ 15 years of age) Normal readings
  • <150 systole and
  • <90 diastole
Diabetes, hypertension, chronic renal or cardiac diseases TI EDE and non-EDE clients Repeat blood pressure
Repeated blood pressure (clients ≥ 15 years of age) Normal readings
  • <150 systole and
  • <90 diastole
Diabetes, hypertension, chronic renal or cardiac diseases TI non-EDE clients Screen for signs or symptoms (including blood pressure) and presence of end-organ damage serum creatinine regardless of age
Cardiovascular system Diabetes, hypertension, chronic renal or cardiac diseases TI non-EDE clients Serum creatinine, regardless of age,
Respiratory system Tuberculosis TI EDE and non-EDE clients If signs of TB: CXR, HIV, screen for hepatitis B and C, regardless of age
Nervous system: sequelae of stroke or cerebral palsy, other neurological disabilities Debilitating conditions, Activities of daily living, and/or Developmental milestones: Chart of early childhood development TIs EDE and non-EDE clients Complete Activities of daily living, Development milestone: Chart of early childhood development and/or an assessment of cognitive functioning forms
Mental and cognitive state Cognitive impairment, Activities of daily living, and/or Developmental milestones: Chart of early childhood development TIs EDE and non-EDE clients ADL if > 5 years old, CECD if < 5 years old, consult TI for complete requirements
Intellectual ability Cognitive impairment, Activities of daily living, and/or Developmental milestones: Chart of early childhood development TIs EDE and non-EDE clients ADL if > 5 years old, CECD if < 5 years old, consult TI for complete requirements
Developmental milestones (clients ≤ 5 years of age) Developmental milestones: Chart of early childhood development TI EDE and non-EDE clients Complete Developmental milestones: Chart of early childhood development form
Gastrointestinal system Hepatitis/liver disease TI EDE and non-EDE clients N/A
Musculoskeletal system Debilitating conditions TI and Activities of daily living TI EDE and non-EDE clients Complete activities of daily living if > 5 years old, CECD if < 5 years old
Skin and lymph nodes Cancer and HIV TI EDE and non-EDE clients Screen for skin cancer, leprosy, surgical scars, tattoos and piercings. Inspect/palpate neck, axilla and groin for lymphadenopathy
Evidence of substance abuse (e.g. venous puncture marks) Psychiatric conditions TI EDE and non-EDE clients Complete psychiatrist’s report and, if evidence of IV drug use HIV, hepatitis B and C screening, regardless of age
Endocrine system (such as evidence of complications from diabetes) Diabetes, hypertension, chronic renal and cardiac diseases TI non-EDE clients If diabetes is present, proceed with screening.
Are there any physical or mental conditions that may prevent this person from attending a mainstream school, obtaining full-time employment or living independently now or in the future? Psychiatric conditions and Cognitive impairment TI EDE and non-EDE clients ADL if > 5 years old, CECD if < 5 years old, consult TI for complete requirements
Breast examination Genital, gynecological and rectal examination TI EDE and non-EDE clients Investigate (e.g. ultrasound, mammogram, specialist report)
Laboratory Requisition and Report

eMedical will generate laboratory requisitions with applicant biodata and a photograph already printed on them. The system will also generate mandatory tests according to the applicant’s age and clinical findings.

Staff must document any identity concerns in eMedical. In such cases, laboratory testing may continue, and the panel physician will report the concerns to IRCC for follow up.

Urinalysis

A urinalysis is mandatory for all clients five years of age or older.

Refer to the Diabetes, hypertension, chronic renal or cardiac diseases TI for detailed recommendations on screening.

Syphilis serology

Syphilis is significantly prevalent in many regions of the world. You must pay special attention during the IME for all clients that have risk factors for syphilis, particularly those originating from areas with a high prevalence of syphilis.

Syphilis screening is required for all clients 15 years of age and older undergoing an IME. You must also request syphilis testing for clients below the age of 15 with any of the following risk factors:

The evaluation consists of a medical history, physical examination and laboratory tests. You are required to report:

Symptoms are non-specific and it is entirely possible to go through the early stages of the infection without knowing about it.

See IRCC's technical instructions for more information – in particular, the syphilis TI.

If you see positive syphilis serology results from an applicant, you must:

IRCC requires the following treatment information:

To prove that treatment has been provided to the applicant, you may either include proof of treatment information in the general supporting comments of the syphilis test section or attach a report to the IME in eMedical.

HIV serology

HIV screening is required for all clients 15 years of age or older undergoing an IME. Panel physicians must also request HIV screening for clients below the age of 15 with any of the following risk factors (TB high-risk group, refer to TB TI):

You should also do the following:

You can find detailed information about how to manage pre- and post-test counselling in International Organization for Migration (IOM) Guide for HIV Counsellors: IOM HIV Counselling in the Context of Migration Health Assessment.

For all clients with positive HIV testing, panel physicians must provide a completed (signed and dated) IMM 5728: Acknowledgement of Post-test Counselling form, available in Appendix III.

Chest X-Ray Requisition and Report

Routine posterior-anterior chest x-rays (CXRs) are mandatory for applicants 11 years of age or older. If a chest x-ray is required for a child less than 11 years old, an anteroposterior view is mandatory. A panel physician should request a CXR, regardless of age, if the medical questionnaire reveals a history of tuberculosis infection or treatment in applicants or their close contacts.

The CXR must be examined for:

The CXR must contain the following information:

Applicants must bring their IME number, UMI number and UCI number with them to undergo their CXR. Panel radiology clinic staff will use these numbers or the applicant’s name and passport number to retrieve the applicant’s health case in eMedical.

If an applicant is pregnant for the CXR

There may be cases where an applicant is not pregnant for the IME, but is pregnant for the x-ray examination. If an applicant is pregnant and elects to proceed with the CXR examination with adequate pelvic lead shielding, there are no changes to the CXR procedures.

If the client chooses to defer her CXR because of pregnancy:

CXR indicating active tuberculosis

When a panel radiologist indicates suspected active TB in the applicant’s CXR, they notify the panel physician. As the panel physician, you must do the following:

For all confirmed, active pulmonary TB cases, you must also:

Panel Physicians should notify the RMO as soon as possible if IMEs have already been completed and submitted for family members who require contact tracing.

As a result of contact tracing, applicants discovered to have latent TB should be reviewed by a local TB specialist to determine if treatment is recommended.

See IRCC's technical instructions for more information.

Radiology grading

Before submitting the CXR, the radiologist must provide a grading for the image.

Panel Radiologist Declaration

The radiologist declaration confirms the following:

Important information:

Submitting CXRs

Resettlement Needs Assessment (Exam 948 in eMedical)

When an applicant is being processed as a refugee overseas, the migration office issues a Medical Report: Client Biodata and Summary (IMM 1017) with the IMM category of “refugee overseas”.

In such cases, the Resettlement Needs Assessment is included in the medical instructions sent to the applicant by a migration office as part of the IME.

The form is available electronically under section 948 in eMedical. Panel physicians must complete this section for all applicants in the refugee overseas category. Please note that, for privacy reasons, this form must only indicate the anticipated services for the applicant and not provide medical information or a diagnosis.

See IRCC's technical instructions under Resettlement Needs Assessment for detailed instructions on how to complete the form.

Pregnant Client – X-Ray Deferred

If the client chooses to defer her chest x-ray (CXR) because of pregnancy, the following steps apply:

If the applicant is undergoing an upfront medical examination, then the applicant must be given a copy of the form Upfront Medical Report – Client Biodata and Summary (IMM 1017B upfront) so they can submit it with their visa application before undergoing the post-partum CXR.

Additional forms for the IME

See Appendix III for samples of the following additional forms:

Additional information for submitting IME forms

IME grading: Grade A or Grade B

Before you submit the IME, you must provide a grade for it. The system will automatically provide an IME grade based on your reported findings:

Panel physician declaration

The panel physician’s declaration is provided electronically. It confirms the following:

Furtherance process

RMOs may need more information to complete their medical assessment. They get this through the furtherance process. Furtherance might create additional costs for the applicant, including additional tests and specialist evaluation.

As the panel physician who did the original IME, you are responsible for the following:

Here are the next steps of the process:

Panel members who work in Canada

This section of the guide provides information, instructions and reference material for panel members operating in Canada. It does not apply to panel members who perform Canadian IMEs in other countries.

Providing primary care for IME applicants

If you are asked to provide treatment to an applicant or provide a medical opinion outside the IME, you should make sure the applicant understands the different duties and responsibilities of a third-party physician (i.e. a panel physician) versus a treating physician. For example, if you recommend a treatment that is not mandatory for immigration purposes, the applicant must understand this.

The provincial and territorial medical licensing authorities give doctors guidance on the difference between a treating and third-party physician. Applicants should also understand that any medical services not related to the IME or covered under the Interim Federal Health Program do not involve IRCC.

Providing services in Canada’s official languages

IRCC is committed to providing applicants in Canada with service in their preferred official language: English or French. If your clinic cannot provide service in the applicant’s official language of choice, you should refer them to the nearest panel physician who can. If no such physician exists nearby, you should ask the applicant to contact IRCC’s Call Centre at 1-888-242-2100, or consult IRCC’s website.

Protection of personal information

Several Canadian statutes protect people’s personal information. They include:

As a panel physician, you must follow these laws when you collect, use, disclose, retain and dispose of people’s personal information. It is critical, for example, to collect and store personal information in a way that protects it from unauthorized disclosure.

The laws of other jurisdictions where information is collected may also apply to your treatment of applicants’ personal information.

To comply with legislation, the IME forms sometimes require applicants to consent to the disclosure of their personal health information to third parties.

Panel physicians in Canada can get advice from their professional organizations or regulating bodies on how to apply the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA) and provincial or territorial privacy legislation, as well as how to properly manage personal information.

Take a closer look at PIPEDA.

Refugee determination system in Canada

Refugee claimants – more appropriately called “asylum seekers” – are individuals who, after they arrive in Canada, make a formal claim to an IRCC or Canada Border Services Agency officer asking for Canada’s protection.

Under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA), all people seeking asylum must get an IME. They are referred for an IME when they make their claim. The IME forms and requirements for asylum seekers are the same as for other immigrants. They are given medical instructions and a list of panel physicians. They must undergo their IME within 30 days following their claim for asylum.

Immigrants are examined to identify medical conditions that might affect their admissibility to Canada under IRPA. Asylum seekers fall under the excessive demand exempt (EDE) category. This means they are examined primarily to identify conditions that might pose risks to public health and public safety; however, any additional services required by IRCC's technical instructions may also be provided.

Asylum seekers who have been granted protected person status by the Canadian authorities are entitled to health care under the Interim Federal Health Program (IFHP) until they become eligible for provincial or territorial health care coverage. This means their first IME is covered. If they must undergo a second IME, it is not covered under the IFHP.

Your duty to report tuberculosis

Individuals whose IME shows they have inactive tuberculosis are placed under medical surveillance in Canada. The Public Health Liaison Unit (formerly known as the Medical Surveillance Unit) reports such cases to the appropriate provincial or territorial public health authorities.

However, as a panel physician, you are also required to notify the appropriate provincial or territorial public health authorities of such cases according to the laws of the province where you practice.

At no time should routine investigation or management of active or suspected active tuberculosis be deferred or delayed because of immigration medical activities. If you cannot contact an applicant suspected of having an active notifiable infectious disease such as tuberculosis, you should immediately inform the IRCC Migration Health Branch.

The Interim Federal Health Program (IFHP)

IFHP for panel members working in Canada

The IFHP provides limited, temporary coverage of health care benefits in Canada to groups not eligible for provincial or territorial health insurance, such as resettled refugees, refugee claimants, victims of human trafficking and individuals detained under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act.

IFHP covers the costs of services and products to eligible beneficiaries in Canada as indicated in the IFHP benefit grids. It is important to note that, in Canada, the IFHP only covers the cost of one IME and related tests.

The IFHP’s claims administrator, Medavie Blue Cross, adjudicates and pays claims for the program.

Panel members must register with IFHP

A panel member or any service provider assisting with IME-related tests must register as an IFHP Provider and comply with the terms and conditions of Medavie Blue Cross.

Please refer to the IFHP Benefit Grid – IME and IME tests available on the Medavie Blue Cross website for more information on the services, diagnostic tests, and the maximum dollar amount.

Verifying IFHP eligibility
  1. Eligibility documents

    There are three types of documents that show that an individual may be eligible under IFHP in Canada. Individuals must show one of these documents to their health care provider at each visit:

    • Refugee Protection Claimant Document (RPCD)
    • Interim Federal Health Certificate (IFHC)
    • Acknowledgement of Claim and Notice to Return for Interview letter (AOC)
  2. Confirm eligibility with Medavie Blue Cross

    Panel physicians must confirm with Medavie Blue Cross that the individual’s coverage is active before the examination is carried out. It is important to note that it takes two business days for the IFHP eligibility to be reflected in the Medavie Blue Cross system. However, beneficiaries are still eligible during this two-day period. When an IFHP client asks for your services within two business days of the date on the IFHP eligibility documents, you must:

    • review the “effective date” on the eligibility document to confirm that it is within the two business-day period
    • provide the services and delay submitting the invoice to Medavie Blue Cross until the coverage has been updated in their system
Additional information

Please see the IFHP Information Handbook for Health Care Professionals (PDF, 7MB) for more information. The handbook is available on the Medavie Blue Cross website, where you can find the IFHP Benefit Grids and more information about the IFHP, including:

IFHP for panel members working overseas (pre-departure medical services)

On April 1, 2017, the IFHP was expanded to cover certain pre-departure medical services (PDMS) for Canada-bound resettled refugees before they come to Canada.

The claims administrator for the IFHP, Medavie Blue Cross, administers claims submitted by health care providers and secondary care providers such as hospitals, laboratories and specialists who have provided services to individuals eligible for PDMS. More information on PDMS is available on the Medavie Blue Cross website.

Groups and individuals eligible for PDMS

The following are eligible for PDMS:

Registering for PDMS

Panel members – whether or not they are affiliated with the International Organization for Migration (IOM) – should register with the IFHP through Medavie Blue Cross.

IOM-affiliated panel members must register with the IFHP; however, they will receive reimbursements for their services directly from IOM. They are not required to submit the claims for reimbursements to Medavie Blue Cross.

Non-IOM affiliated panel members are required to register with the IFHP and claim reimbursement for their services directly from Medavie Blue Cross.

To learn more about the registration process, see the IHFP Handbook for Pre-Departure Medical Services (PDMS) Providers (PDF, 5.1 MB).

PDMS coverage and benefits

The scope of the IFHP PDMS coverage is limited to:

Please see the IFHP Benefit Grid for PDMS (PDF, 357 KB) for a list of eligible services and additional information.

Pre-departure vaccination services

Panel physicians affiliated with the International Organization for Migration (IOM), can provide certain vaccination services covered by the IFHP to eligible individuals. This service is voluntary and does not impact their application for resettlement to Canada.

Immunizations can be provided only in countries where the IOM has the capacity to deliver vaccinations. The Immunization Manual (1.5 MB) contains more information including:

Medical support in transit

The costs related to medical support in transit (medical attendant and/or medical devices) are covered by the IFHP. A prior approval request (PDF, 178 KB) must be sent to the IFHP Unit (IRCC.IFHP-PFSI.IRCC@cic.gc.ca) with the provider’s Regional Medical Office (RMO) in cc. The request must include clinical information and recommendations for medical support in transit with detailed medical services, devices or products required and expected cost.

If approved, an IFHP officer will sign and return Part 1 (administrative) of the form to the requestor. For more information or questions, please contact IRCC.IFHP-PFSI.IRCC@cic.gc.ca.

You can find the Medical Support in Transit Form (PDF, 5.1 MB) (prior approval request) on the web site of the IFHP Claims Administrator Medavie Blue Cross.

Outbreak response

When a communicable disease outbreak occurs in a refugee camp, the IFHP will reimburse services and products related to the following:

The costs related to the management and control of an outbreak are covered by the IFHP. A prior approval request must be sent to the RMO as soon as an outbreak is identified by the PP/IOM. Please note that the request will also be reviewed by the IFHP Unit to ensure compliance with the IFHP Policy. The request must include the following information:

Location and description

Provide a short description of population demographics and a description of the area/facility where the outbreak has occurred (i.e. camp, region, province, country, etc.)

Confirmation of an outbreak

Your description should include the following:

Ongoing action (capacity)

Provide a brief description of the current response and capacity, including the investigations done and control measures taken (human, medical, etc.)

Proposed response

What should be done to control this outbreak? Propose the control activities and supplies needed (medicines, materials) and the expected cost per individual, including:

For claims-related instructions please consult the provider handbook.

Verifying IFHP eligibility for PDMS services

It is your responsibility as a panel physician to confirm an individual’s eligibility to the IFHP before services are rendered. This is an important aspect of protecting the integrity of the program.

Non-IOM affiliated providers must complete the following procedures:

IOM-affiliated providers will do the following procedures to confirm an individual’s eligibility:

Important: If you have questions related to an individual’s eligibility, please contact Medavie Blue Cross at CIC_Inquiry@medavie.bluecross.ca, including the individual’s UCI and the benefit code.

For more information, please see the PDMS provider handbook (PDF, 5.1 MB).

Claim submission guidelines for in-Canada or overseas services

You have up to six months after providing your services to submit invoices to either the IOM or Medavie Blue Cross. When you submit claims for IMEs and related tests, you must use current IFHP benefit codes, which you can find in IFHP Benefit Grid – IME and IME tests available on the Medavie Blue Cross website (for panel members working in Canada) or the Benefit Grid for PDMS (PDF, 357 KB) (for panel members working overseas).

Here are some key elements of IFHP’s fee policy:

Section 2: Supplementary Information

Instructions for completing paper-based IMEs

This section provides panel members who use a paper-based system with information they need to complete IME and associated forms.

Panel members using eMedical should refer to The Immigration Medical Examination section of this guide.

IME paper forms have been redesigned to ensure they are consistent with eMedical IMEs.

General information about the IME

The IME consists of a medical history, physical examination, age-specific laboratory tests and age-specific chest x-ray.

Usually, routine, age-specific laboratory and radiologic tests include:

A medical examination includes any or all of the following:

Panel members may request additional lab tests based on an applicant’s individual risk factors.

It also be necessary to screen applicants below the ages indicated. See IRCC's technical instructions for more information.

How do I determine what examinations are required?

As the panel physician, you are never required to decide on a course of treatment or additional tests for an applicant. Your regional medical office (RMO) will contact you with the specifics of the applicant’s case and the medical examinations they require. You must follow the technical instructions for all tests and procedures.

Getting your unique identifier and login

Once IRCC has received all your forms and documents, your RMO will tell you that you are approved as a panel member. You will get a unique identifier number (P number), which enables IRCC to perform quality assessments of your work.

The unique identifier starts with the letter “P” followed by eight or more digits (e.g. P12345678).

For panel members or their locum tenens performing a paper-based IME, the unique identifier, along with their name, must be clearly readable on the front page of each Medical Report – Client Biodata and Summary (IMM 1017) as well as on the “Laboratory Requisition and Report” and “Chest X-Ray Requisition Report” sections of the IMM 5419: Medical Report form.

The panel member or their locum tenens must clearly indicates their name, the P number, the city and the country in all correspondence with IRCC. For example:

Each photo attached to the Medical Report – Client Biodata and Summary (IMM 1017) must be signed to confirm the identity of the applicant. Make sure that each IME is signed properly. In cases where the IMEs are not properly signed, the RMO can refuse them and return the IMEs to the panel physician’s office.

Panel radiologists may embed this information on the chest x-ray along with other required information about the client.

For IMEs sent by mail or courier, the value on any customs declaration should state “No commercial value”.

Reporting contact information and absences
Guidelines for managing paper records

Original documents and information related to an IME must be forwarded by the panel physician or a trusted employee to their RMO by regular mail or commercial courier and must never be given to the applicant or their representative for delivery to the RMO.

You are encouraged to give a copy of the IME to the applicant (or their guardian) unless there is a strong reason to not do so (e.g. information from a different applicant is found within the IME or releasing the information would reasonably lead to another person or entity being subject to significant inappropriate behaviour by the client.

You must keep copies and records of files for two years or longer if required by your local medical regulatory authority. Remember, you can access the IME in eMedical for only 365 days after submitting the case.

Fees for IMEs

If you are completing a paper-based IME that must be mailed to the RMO, you should discuss the method and cost of sending the documents with the applicant beforehand.

Verifying an applicant’s identity

It is essential that you identify applicants throughout the IME process to ensure the person undergoing the IME is the same person applying for entry to Canada, and that there is no substitution at any time during the lifecycle of the IME. An applicant’s identity is confirmed through a process of verifying the applicant’s photographs and identity documents.

Obtain photos of the applicant

What to do with the photos:

If you have an identity concern

If you cannot confirm that the person who has arrived for an IME is the person on the ID documents being presented – or if the applicant provides personal details that seem inconsistent with the information on the identity documents they submit – you should report that as an ID concern.

Attach photocopies of the identification document in question to the IME and submit it to IRCC.

IRCC will investigate your concern about the applicant’s identity.

Required documents

The applicant must submit a passport or other identification document acceptable for the Canadian IME. IRCC strongly prefers that applicants submit passports. This includes new passports and passports expired for no more than a year.

Other approved identification documents include the following:

If an applicant does not have approved identification

If an applicant does not provide an approved identification document, they must provide an alternative form of identification. You should not turn such applicants away, and should conduct the IME as long as the applicant presents some form of identification.

If the applicant provides identification that is not approved, or if you have doubts about the authenticity of the document presented, you must report your concern on the Medical Report – Client Biodata and Summary form (IMM 1017). A copy of the identity document of concern should be attached to the IME.

Important: To ensure the integrity of the IME process, the applicant must use the same identity document for all components of the IME, including laboratory, radiology and specialist referrals. Please inform your clients accordingly.

Client Consent and Declaration

(See our sample Client Consent and Declaration form in Appendix II.)

All applicants must complete the Client Consent and Declaration form. If the applicant is under 16 years of age or is unable to legally provide consent (a child, because of reduced mental capacity, etc.), a legal guardian or parent may provide consent on the client’s behalf.

The Client Consent and Declaration form for paper-based IMEs includes the following:

The steps your clinic and staff must take:

Medical Report: Client Biodata and Summary (IMM 1017)

(See our sample IMM 1017 form in Appendix III.)

IRCC has implemented one standard form, the Medical Report – Client Biodata and Summary (IMM 1017), for all immigration categories. This form displays information such as:

Excessive demand exempt (EDE) applicants

EDE applicants are people who cannot be deemed inadmissible on the grounds that they would place an excessive demand on publicly funded Canadian health and social services. EDE applicants include refugees, refugee claimants, individuals with protected person status, and certain clients in the family classes.

However, EDE clients are assessed for:

Non-EDE applicants

Non-EDE applicants are assessed for:

Refugee overseas applicants

Refugee overseas applicants are automatically assessed as EDE. Panel physicians must complete and submit the Resettlement Needs Assessment Form (IMM 5544) for overseas refugees.

IRCC typically issues the Medical Report – Client Biodata and Summary (IMM 1017) form with the applicant’s information and immigration information sections completed.

Applicants who have been issued a Medical Report – Client Biodata and Summary (IMM 1017) must present the form to your clinic when they arrive for their IMEs. The form will include two applicant identifiers: IME number and UCI number. (Note: This form may not include a client photo).

Here are the steps you should take as a paper-based clinic:

Upfront Medical – Client Biodata and Summary (IMM 1017B upfront)

(See our sample IMM 1017B upfront form in Appendix III.)

An upfront medical is an IME performed when an applicant reports to a panel physician with no paper Client Biodata and Summary (IMM 1017) or file in the eMedical system. Upfront medical examinations are generally permitted for students and workers who are applying to be temporary residents of Canada.

Only certain applicants are permitted to undergo an upfront medical.

These exams do not apply to family members being sponsored by a permanent resident of Canada. Whenever IRCC makes changes to the rules about individuals who can undergo an upfront medical, panel physicians are notified by their RMO.

When you complete this form, you must use the IMM 1017B upfront paper forms that have been provided to you. They are pre-populated with a UMI number and a barcode.

Here are the steps your clinic and staff must take:

Note: It is very important to ensure the correct page goes to the client and the correct page goes to your RMO:

Panel physicians must ensure they provide the applicant with proof that they have competed their upfront medical examination. For paper-based upfront medicals, it is the top page of the Upfront Medical Report – Client Biodata and Summary (IMM 1017B upfront) form. Applicants must include this proof when they submit their visa application.

Since an IME is valid for 12 months, you should remind applicants to submit their visa application along with proof that they have completed their upfront medical examination well before the expiration date; otherwise, the client may have to undergo a second IME.

Medical Report (IMM 5419)

You will use the applicant’s medical report to assess their medical condition. The medical report may be completed by clinic staff or the applicant, but you as the panel physician must review it to confirm the information.

You must provide details along with all “Yes” answers to medical history questions. IRCC requires the following information:

You must either provide this information in the comments section or attach a report to the IME.

The following table lists additional requirements when the answers to medical report questions show abnormality – whether the IME is completed in eMedical or on paper. Refer to IRCC's technical instructions for more information.

Medical history questions
Question Related TI IMM type Requirements if abnormal
Tuberculosis (TB), treatment for tuberculosis Tuberculosis TI EDE and non-EDE clients Lateral CXR & AP CXR if <11 years old, Chest x-ray examination
Close household or work contact with tuberculosis (within last 5 years) Tuberculosis TI EDE and non-EDE clients IGRA or TST, lateral CXR & AP CXR if <11 years old, Chest x-ray examination
Prolonged medical treatment and/or repeated hospitalization for any reason, including a major operation or mental illness N/A EDE and non-EDE clients Medical report, if available when IME is submitted or if RMO requests
Psychological/psychiatric disorder (including major depression, bipolar disorder or schizophrenia) Psychiatric conditions TI EDE and non-EDE clients Report from psychiatrist, psychologist or treating physician (attach all existing results and reports from labs and previous specialists)
History of HIV HIV TI EDE and non-EDE clients HIV, CXR, Hepatitis B and C, syphilis, IGRA or TST regardless of age, and HIV specialist report including CD4 count, HIV viral load, and when antiretroviral medications will be needed
An abnormal hepatitis B or C blood test Hepatitis / Liver disease TI EDE and non-EDE clients HIV, CXR, Hepatitis B and C, syphilis, regardless of age
Cancer or malignancy in the last five years Cancer or Malignancy TI non-EDE clients Oncology report
Diabetes Diabetes, hypertension, chronic renal or cardiac diseases TI non-EDE clients Screen for signs or symptoms and presence of end-organ damage.
Heart condition including coronary disease, hypertension, valve or congenital disease Diabetes, hypertension, chronic renal or cardiac diseases TI non-EDE clients Screen for signs or symptoms (including blood pressure) and presence of end-organ damage. Serum creatinine, regardless of age
Blood condition (including thalassemia) N/A non-EDE clients Check for history of admission.
Kidney or bladder disease Diabetes, hypertension, chronic renal or cardiac diseases TI non-EDE clients Urinalysis, serum creatinine (eGFR if abnormal); regardless of age
An ongoing physical or intellectual disability affecting current or future ability to function independently or be able to work full-time (including autism or developmental delay) Psychiatric conditions TI and Cognitive impairment in adults TI EDE and non-EDE clients ADL if > 5 years old, CECD if < 5 years old, consult TI for complete requirements
Addiction to drugs or alcohol Psychiatric conditions TI EDE and non-EDE clients Only if the RMO requests – a psychiatrist’s, psychologist’s or treating physician’s report that specifically comments on previous threatening behaviour and if there is evidence of IV drug use, HIV, hepatitis B and C, regardless of age. The report must also specifically address if it is reasonably likely the client will exhibit future behaviour that might be a threat to the client or others.
Prescribed pills or medication (excluding oral contraceptives, over- the-counter medication and/or natural supplements) N/A EDE and non-EDE clients List relevant medications and mention the indication
For female clients:
a) Are you pregnant?
N/A EDE and non-EDE clients N/A
b) If yes, what is the expected date of delivery? N/A N/A N/A
c) If yes, do you wish to defer your chest x-ray at this time? N/A N/A Attach IMM 5733 Instructions for Pregnant Client – X-Ray Deferred
Physical Examination

As the panel physician, you must complete the physical examination. You must provide details of all abnormal findings during the physical examination. IRCC requires the following information:

You may enter this information in the comments section or attach a report to the IME.

The following table lists additional requirements when the answers to physical examination questions show abnormality. See IRCC's technical instructions for more information.

Table: Physical Examination
Physical examination Related TI IMM type Requirements if abnormal
Was a chaperone offered? Genital, Gynecological and rectal examination TI; Breast examination TI EDE and non-EDE clients Non applicable. A chaperone should be offered to everyone.
Ear/nose/throat/mouth N/A EDE and non-EDE clients N/A
Hearing Hearing impairment or deafness TI EDE and non-EDE clients N/A
Eyes (including fundoscopy) N/A EDE and non-EDE clients N/A
Best distance visual acuity (with or without correction) N/A EDE and non-EDE clients N/A
Blood pressure (clients ≥ 15 years of age)
Normal readings
  • <150 systole and
  • <90 diastole
Diabetes, hypertension, chronic renal or cardiac diseases TI EDE and non-EDE clients Repeat blood pressure
Repeated blood pressure (clients ≥ 15 years of age)
Normal readings
  • <150 systole and
  • <90 diastole
Diabetes, hypertension, chronic renal or cardiac diseases TI non-EDE clients Screen for signs or symptoms (including blood pressure) and presence of end-organ damage serum creatinine regardless of age
Cardiovascular system Diabetes, hypertension, chronic renal or cardiac diseases TI non-EDE clients Serum creatinine, regardless of age,
Respiratory system Tuberculosis TI EDE and non-EDE clients If signs of TB: CXR, HIV, screen for hepatitis B and C, regardless of age
Nervous system: sequelae of stroke or cerebral palsy, other neurological disabilities Debilitating conditions, Activities of daily living, and/or Developmental milestones: Chart of early childhood development TIs EDE and non-EDE clients Complete Activities of daily living, Development milestone: Chart of early childhood development and/or an assessment of cognitive functioning forms
Mental and cognitive state Cognitive impairment, Activities of daily living, and/or Developmental milestones: Chart of early childhood development TIs EDE and non-EDE clients ADL if > 5 years old, CECD if < 5 years old, consult TI for complete requirements
Intellectual ability Cognitive impairment, Activities of daily living, and/or Developmental milestones: Chart of early childhood development TIs EDE and non-EDE clients ADL if > 5 years old, CECD if < 5 years old, consult TI for complete requirements
Developmental milestones (clients ≤ 5 years of age) Developmental milestones: Chart of early childhood development TI EDE and non-EDE clients Complete Developmental milestones: Chart of early childhood development form
Gastrointestinal system Hepatitis/liver disease TI EDE and non-EDE clients  
Musculoskeletal system Debilitating conditions TI and Activities of daily living TI EDE and non-EDE clients Complete activities of daily living if > 5 years old, CECD if < 5 years old
Skin and lymph nodes Cancer and HIV TI EDE and non-EDE clients/td> Screen for skin cancer, leprosy, surgical scars, tattoos and piercings. Inspect/palpate neck, axilla and groin for lymphadenopathy
Evidence of substance abuse (e.g. venous puncture marks) Psychiatric conditions TI EDE and non-EDE clients Complete psychiatrist’s report and, if evidence of IV drug use HIV, hepatitis B and C screening, regardless of age
Endocrine system (such as evidence of complications from diabetes) Diabetes, hypertension, chronic renal and cardiac diseases TI non-EDE clients If diabetes is present, proceed with screening.
Are there any physical or mental conditions that may prevent this person from attending a mainstream school, obtaining full-time employment or living independently now or in the future? Psychiatric conditions and Cognitive impairment TI EDE and non-EDE clients ADL if > 5 years old, CECD if < 5 years old, consult TI for complete requirements
Breast examination Genital, gynecological and rectal examination TI EDE and non-EDE clients Investigate (e.g. ultrasound, mammogram, specialist report)
Laboratory Requisition and Report

Here are the general instructions for completing this report:

Laboratory staff must do the following:

Urinalysis

A urinalysis is mandatory for all clients five years of age or older.

Refer to the Diabetes, hypertension, chronic renal or cardiac diseases TI for detailed recommendations on screening.

Syphilis serology

Syphilis is significantly prevalent in many regions of the world. You must pay special attention during the IME for all clients that have risk factors for syphilis, particularly those originating from areas with a high prevalence of syphilis.

Syphilis screening is required for all clients 15 years of age and older undergoing an IME. You must also request syphilis testing for clients below the age of 15 with any of the following risk factors:

The evaluation consists of a medical history, physical examination and laboratory tests. You are required to report:

Symptoms are non-specific and it is entirely possible to go through the early stages of the infection without knowing about it.

See IRCC's technical instructions for more information – in particular, the syphilis TI.

If you see positive syphilis serology results from an applicant, you must:

IRCC requires the following treatment information:

To prove that treatment has been provided to the applicant, you may either include proof of treatment information in the general supporting comments of the syphilis test section or attach a report to the IME.

HIV serology

HIV screening is required for all clients 15 years of age or older undergoing an IME. Panel physicians must also request HIV screening for clients below the age of 15 with any of the following risk factors (TB high-risk group, refer to TB TI):

You should also do the following:

You can find detailed information about how to manage pre- and post-test counselling in International Organization for Migration (IOM) Guide for HIV Counsellors: IOM HIV Counselling in the Context of Migration Health Assessment.

For all clients with positive HIV testing, panel physicians must provide a completed (signed and dated) IMM 5728: Acknowledgement of Post-test Counselling form, available in Appendix III.

Chest X-Ray Requisition and Report

Routine posterior-anterior chest x-rays (CXRs) are mandatory for applicants 11 years of age or older. A panel physician should request a CXR, regardless of age, if the medical questionnaire reveals a history of tuberculosis infection or treatment in applicants or their close contacts.

The CXR must be examined for:

Information to include on the CXR

The panel physician must enter the applicant’s personal information on the chest x-ray (CXR) requisition form:

If an applicant is pregnant for the CXR

There may be cases where an applicant is not pregnant for the IME, but is pregnant for the x-ray examination. If an applicant is pregnant and elects to proceed with the CXR examination with adequate pelvic lead shielding, there are no changes to the CXR procedures.

If the client chooses to defer her CXR because of pregnancy:

If the applicant is undergoing an upfront medical examination, then the applicant must be given a copy of the form Upfront Medical Report – Client Biodata and Summary (IMM 1017B upfront) so they can submit it with their visa application before undergoing the post-partum CXR.

CXR indicating active tuberculosis

A panel radiologist who indicates suspected active TB in the client’s CXR must notify the panel physician immediately. The radiologist sends the CXR and report to the panel physician, and the panel physician then submits it to IRCC along with the results of your examination. As the panel physician, you must also do the following:

For all confirmed active pulmonary TB cases, you must also:

As a result of contact tracing, applicants discovered to have latent TB should be reviewed by a local TB specialist to determine if treatment is recommended.

See IRCC's technical instructions for more information.

Radiology grading

Radiologists must provide a radiology grade based on their reported findings.

Panel Radiologist Declaration

Radiologist declarations are provided in writing on the radiology report and include the panel radiologist’s name, signature, number and the date of the CXR report.

Submitting CXRs

Resettlement Needs Assessment (IMM 5544)

When an applicant is being processed as a refugee overseas, the migration office issues a Medical Report: Client Biodata and Summary (IMM 1017) with the IMM category of “refugee overseas”.

In such cases, the Resettlement Needs Assessment (IMM 5544) is included in the medical instructions sent to the applicant by a migration office as part of the IME.

As the panel physician, you must complete the Resettlement Needs Assessment IMM 5544 along with the IME and send them both.

Pregnant Client – X-Ray Deferred (IMM 5733)

If the client chooses to defer her Chest x-ray (CXR) because of pregnancy, the following steps apply:

See the sample Instructions for Pregnant Client − X-Ray Deferred (IMM 5733) form in Appendix III.

If the applicant is undergoing an upfront medical examination, then the applicant must be given a copy of Upfront Medical Report – Client Biodata and Summary (IMM 1017B upfront) form for them to submit with their visa application prior to undergoing the post-partum CXR.

Additional Forms for paper-based IMEs

Additional information for submitting forms

IME grading: Grade A or Grade B

Before you submit the IME, you must provide a grade for it based on your reported findings:

Panel physician declaration

The panel physician’s declaration is provided in writing on the Medical Report (IMM 1017) and includes your name, signature, number and the date of the IME submission.

Furtherance process

RMOs may need more information to complete their medical assessment. They get this through the furtherance process. Furtherance might create additional costs for the applicant because the panel physician involved cannot be employed at the clinic where the initial IME was completed.

Here is what is involved in the furtherance process:

NOTE: If a furtherance is issued on paper it cannot be completed in eMedical.

Legislation related to the Immigration Medical Examination

Immigration is a shared federal/provincial responsibility. As a panel member, you should be aware of the following three pieces of legislation – in particular how they relate to the administration of IMEs, your responsibilities for protecting the personal information of applicants and how an applicant can be denied admission on health grounds.

The Immigration and Refugee Protection Act

The Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA) is a federal act. One of its objectives is to ensure that the movement of people into Canada contributes to the country’s cultural, social, and economic interests, and affirms its humanitarian commitments while protecting the health, safety and security of Canadians.

IRPA and its accompanying regulations set out the medical requirements for applicants who want to come to Canada as temporary or permanent residents. The legislation also sets out the grounds on which a person may be found to be inadmissible to Canada – including inadmissibility on health grounds.

A foreign national can be found inadmissible on health grounds if their medical condition:

Take a closer look at IRPA.

The Privacy Act

The purpose of this legislation is to protect the privacy of people’s personal information when it is collected, retained, used and disclosed by government, and provide individuals with the right to access their personal information.

Many aspects of the Privacy Act apply to your work as a panel member – in particular your responsibility to protect the information of the applicants you examine.

Take a closer look at the Privacy Act.

Collection of panel members’ personal information under IRPA

IRCC’s Migration Health Branch is responsible for administering the department’s medical screening program. This includes managing panel members who perform IMEs in Canada and abroad. As part of the medical screening program, the branch collects and creates personal information about panel members, including your:

The Access to Information Act

The Access to Information Act gives every Canadian citizen, permanent resident, individual or corporation in Canada the right to request access to records, in any format, held by a government institution, subject to certain exceptions.

Take a closer look at the Access to Information Act.

Find out how to request access to information or personal information.

It is not necessary for applicants to use these acts to get a copy of their own IME. As a panel physician, you are authorized to give them a copy if they ask.

Acronyms, Initialisms and Definitions

The following list provides definitions for acronyms and technical terms found in this guide:

ADL:
Activities of daily living
Biodata:
Information that establishes each client’s identity
CECD:
Chart of Early Childhood Development
IRCC:
Immigration, Refugees, and Citizenship Canada
Chief radiologist:
Licensed radiologist designated by IRCC to perform, grade and submit chest x-rays for Canada’s immigration medical examinations (IMEs).
Client:
A foreign national seeking to enter or remain in Canada who may be required to submit to an IME (in accordance with the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act and its regulations).
Clinic staff:
Persons who are working in the panel member’s clinic and may be involved in the immigration medical examination process.
CXR:
Chest x-ray
ED:
Excessive demand – a type of demand placed by a client on Canadian health or social services.
EDE:
Excessive demand exempt refers to specified groups of IRCC clients who are not denied entry or permission to stay in Canada because their medical condition may create an excessive demand.
ELISA:
Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, also known as enzyme immunoassay, which is one of the types of blood tests used to screen for HIV infection.
eMedical:
An online application that provides a paperless process for electronic recording, transmission and storage of immigration medical examination results.
Furthered cases:
Cases that require additional supplemental information.
GAF:
Global assessment of functioning
Guardian:
A person who looks after and is legally responsible for someone who is unable to manage their own affairs, especially an incompetent or disabled person or a child.
Guide:
This guide is the standard reference for the orientation and training of panel members. All panel members must ensure that they remain familiar with it and with related departmental instructions, including interim changes and updates provided by IRCC.
HIV:
Human immunodeficiency virus
IFHP:
Interim Federal Health Program – a program funded by IRCC that provides limited, temporary coverage of costs related to health screening and care for specific categories of people, including protected persons, refugee claimants (asylum seekers in Canada), rejected refugee claimants in Canada, certain persons detained under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act and other specified groups.
IGRA:
Interferon gamma release assay. A blood test that is a screening test used to determine if a client has latent (inactive) tuberculosis.
IMA:
Immigration medical assessment – the medical opinion made by Migration Health Branch concerning an IRCC client’s health admissibility to Canada as defined under immigration legislation.
IME:
Immigration medical examination – the examination conducted by panel members. The results of these examinations are sent to IRCC regional medical offices via eMedical (or exceptionally by courier/post) who then provide an IMA.
IME number:
Immigration medical examination number – a unique number assigned to a specific IME.
IMM 1017:
An IME form containing the client’s biodata, IME grading and panel physician declaration.
IMM 5419:
An IME form containing the client’s medical history, physical examination findings, laboratory, chest x-ray requisition results and the client’s consent and declaration.
IMM 5544:
Supplemental medical and resettlement needs assessment form providing information on special accommodations a refugee may require to settle in Canada.
IOM:
The International Organization for Migration, an intergovernmental organization that became a related organization of the United Nations in 2016.
IRCC:
Immigration, Refugees, and Citizenship Canada. The Canadian federal government department that has primary responsibility for managing the entry into Canada of foreign nationals.
IRPA and IRPR:
Immigration and Refugee Protection Act and the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations (IRPR). Canadian legislation setting out the requirements for entry to Canada by foreign nationals. This legislation determines requirements to enter Canada including requirements for an IME. View the Act and regulations.
LFT:
Liver function test – a laboratory test used to evaluate liver function.
locum tenens:
Medical practitioners who replace panel physicians for a short period while they are on vacation, taking training or unable to provide service for other reasons.
LTBI:
Latent tuberculosis infection – sometimes referred to as ‘inactive tuberculosis’.
Nominated radiologist:
Licensed radiologist nominated by a chief radiologist located in the same radiology clinic to perform, grade and submit chest x-rays for Canada’s IMEs.
Panel clinic:
A clinic where designated physicians and/or radiologists conduct IMEs.
Panel member:
A general term that refers to a panel physician, panel radiologist or panel laboratories or specialists authorized by IRCC to perform IME related activities.
Panel physician:
A licensed medical doctor designated by IRCC to perform, grade and submit IMEs. Designated medical practitioner (DMP) was the previously used term.
P number:
A unique identifier given to specific panel members issued by IRCC’s Migration Health Branch.
Protected person – In Canada:
A person in Canada who according to Canada’s Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, is a person who has been determined to be either (a) a convention refugee or (b) a person in need of protection (including, for example, a person who is in danger of being tortured if deported from Canada).
PTB:
Pulmonary tuberculosis
PTC:
Post-test counselling
Radiologist:
For IRCC purposes, this refers to both chief and nominated radiologists.
Refugee overseas:
A person overseas who has been determined to be a convention refugee or a person in similar circumstances. A convention refugee is a person who meets the refugee definition in the Geneva Convention signed in 1951 relating to the status of refugees and the protocol to that convention signed in New York in 1967.
RMO:
RMO stands for regional medical office. These offices contain IRCC employees who are responsible for providing Canadian immigration medical services in a specific region. In 2019, there were four RMOs, located in Ottawa, London, New Delhi and Manila.
TB:
Tuberculosis.
TIs:
Technical instructions – the instructions for completion of the IME.
TST:
Tuberculin skin test. One screening test that can be used to determine if a person might have latent (inactive) tuberculosis infection.
UCI:
Unique client identifier. A unique number assigned to a client used for internal IRCC identification purposes.
UFM:
Upfront medical. An IME done prior to IRCC assigning a specific IME number to a client. Only certain IRCC clients can use UFM procedures.
UMI:
Unique medical identifier. A unique number used to associate to a specific upfront medical.
VDRL:
Venereal Disease Research Laboratory test, a blood test used to diagnose syphilis.
Visa Officer:
Any IRCC employee who under Canadian legislation has the delegated authority to make decisions/recommendations on visa issues. Previously the term visa officer referred to IRCC employees outside of Canada and migration officers referred to IRCC employees in Canada.

Section 3: Appendices

Appendix I: How to contact us

In Canada

For general inquiries about the Interim Federal Health Program (IFHP), please contact the IFHP team:

Migration Health Branch
Immigration, Refugees, Citizenship Canada
300 Slater Street, 7th Floor
Ottawa, ON K1A 1L1
Email: IRCC.IFHP-PFSI.IRCC@cic.gc.ca

To register as an Interim Federal Health Program service provider, and for inquiries about eligibility, benefits, claim requests or for general information, please contact the Medavie Blue Cross IFHP provider inquiry team:

IFHP Medavie Blue CrossTM
644 Main St., P.O. Box 6000
Moncton, NB E1C 0P9
Website: https://www.medaviebc.ca
Customer Service Centre: 1-888-614-1880
Email: CIC_Inquiry@medavie.bluecross.ca
Fax for inquiries: 506-867-4651
Fax for claims submissions: 506-867-3841

Send paper-based IME and other documents that cannot be uploaded to eMedical to:

Operations Directorate
Integrated Medical Processing Network Division
Migration Health Branch
Immigration, Refugees, Citizenship Canada
300 Slater Street, 7th Floor
Ottawa, ON K1A 1L1

eMedical systems support

For service in English

Contact the Australian Department of Home Affairs via the “Contact Us” tab in the eMedical system.

For service in French

Email IRCC at: IRCC.MHBeMedical-eMedicalDGMS.IRCC@cic.gc.ca

This email is monitored from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Canadian Eastern Time, Monday to Friday, excluding statutory holidays.

For critical incidents

Contact IT support immediately.

Telephone: +61-2-6264-0400

Email: ITSupport@homeaffairs.gov.au

Critical incidents include the following:

Note: This service is provided by the Australian Department of Home Affairs 24 hours a day, seven days a week, in English only.

For enquiries regarding medical clinical issues

Panel members should continue to direct all immigration medical exam-related enquiries to their regional medical office.

Regional medical offices

Your RMO is your point of contact for attaining your status as a panel member, submitting IME results and reports, and all other matters regarding your work as a panel physician or radiologist.

London

Overseas Regional Medical Office
Canadian High Commission
Canada House – Trafalgar Square
London SW1Y 5BJ
United Kingdom
Email: LDNPPMD@international.gc.ca

Manila

Overseas Regional Medical Office
Canadian Embassy
Level 7, Tower 2, RCBC Plaza
6819 Ayala Avenue
Makati City 0707
Philippines
Fax: +632-843-1103
Email: MANILMC-MD@international.gc.ca

New Delhi

Overseas Regional Medical Office
High Commission of Canada
7/8 Shantipath, Chanakyapuri
New Delhi 110021
India
Fax: +91-11-41782020
Email: Delhi-mc@international.gc.ca

Americas

Ottawa Regional Medical Office
Migration Health Branch
Immigration, Refugees, Citizenship Canada
300 Slater Street
Ottawa, ON Canada K1A 1L1
Fax: +1-613-941-2179
Email: IRCC.MHBPMInquiries-RenseignementsMPDGMS.IRCC@cic.gc.ca

Appendix II: Client Consent and Declaration

Sample of Client Consent and Declaration

Appendix III: Forms

IMM 1017: Medical Report – Client Biodata and Summary

Sample of IMM 1017: Medical Report – Client Biodata and Summary<

IMM 1017B upfront: Upfront Medical Report – Client Biodata and Summary

Sample of IMM 1017B upfront: Upfront Medical Report – Client Biodata and Summary Page 1 Sample of IMM 1017B upfront: Upfront Medical Report – Client Biodata and Summary Page 2

IMM 5419 Medical Report

Sample of IMM 5419 Medical Report Page 1 Sample of IMM 5419 Medical Report Page 2 Sample of IMM 5419 Medical Report Page 3 Sample of IMM 5419 Medical Report Page 4 Sample of IMM 5419 Medical Report Page 5 Sample of IMM 5419 Medical Report Page 6

IMM 5725: Activities of Daily Living (ADL)

Sample of IMM 5725: Activities of Daily Living (ADL) Page 1

IMM 5728: Acknowledgment of HIV Post-Testing Counselling

Sample of IMM 5728: Acknowledgment of HIV Post-Testing Counselling

IMM 5733: Instructions for Pregnant Client − X-Ray Deferred

Sample of IMM 5733: Instructions for Pregnant Client − X-Ray Deferred

IMM 5734: Specialist’s Referral Form

Sample of IMM 5734: Specialist’s Referral Form

IMM 5738: Chart of Early Childhood Development (CECD)

Sample of IMM 5738: Chart of Early Childhood Development (CECD) Sample of IMM 5738: Chart of Early Childhood Development (CECD) Sample of IMM 5738: Chart of Early Childhood Development (CECD)

Appendix IV: List of immigration medical examination technical instructions

A) TIs related to process changes resulting from eMedical implementation

B) TIs related to conditions of significance

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