Manual of Drill and Ceremonial | Chapter 10 Guards, sentries and escorts

A-DH-201-000/PT-000

How mounted or dismounted guards should form and move for ceremonies. Diagrams show correct positions.

SECTION 1 GENERAL

INTRODUCTION

  1. A guard is a body of troops concerned with the physical security of property or the security and honour of a dignitary. The strength of a guard is dependent on its task. For ceremonial purposes, it may be either:
    1. a guard of honour, which is mounted for a dignitary (Section 2);
    2. an entrance or departure guard, which may be mounted in lieu of a guard of honour for an arriving or departing dignitary (Section 3); or
    3. a quarter guard (originally a quarters, barrack or camp guard, including a household guard for dignitaries such as the Governor General as head of state), which is mounted for a barrack, camp or building, but may also be used to pay compliments to a visiting dignitary (Section 4).
  2. As a guide, a guard of honour is mounted:
    1. on state occasions;
    2. to formally receive a Commonwealth or foreign general officer when making an official visit to Canada; and
    3. when it is desirable to provide a ceremonial welcome to Canadian dignitaries on very formal occasions, but a unit review is not appropriate or possible.
  3. On other occasions, including family visits by Colonels-in-Chief, it is more normal to mount and call out a quarter guard if a ceremonial reception is desired.
  4. An escort, other than an escort for or to a Colour (see chapters 8 and 9), is a body of mounted or dismounted troops concerned with the security and honour of a dignitary on the move. The strength of an escort is dependent on its task. Escorts are manpower-intensive and are now rarely used except for funerals (see Chapter 11) and, except in that context, are not discussed further in this manual.

COLOURS

  1. Colours may be carried by an escort, guard of honour or household guard.

PARADE FORMAT

  1. Guards will normally parade in two ranks, in line, with shoulder to shoulder dressing. However, the guard commander may vary this formation if necessary to fit the circumstances. For example, if the dimensions of the parade ground or space so dictate, a guard of honour may form up in column of divisions or sections. Since the strength of a guard is related to its task, the numbers on parade are more important than the formation adopted.
  2. Guards shall pay compliments in review order (see Chapter 9, Section 2, paragraphs 13 to 17). Colours may be marched on parade directly into position in review order for guards of honour and household guards formed up in line, or for those in column of divisions when the officers are already in review order.

SECTION 2 GUARDS OF HONOUR

GENERAL

  1. Guards of honour are mounted for distinguished personages and general officers in accordance with instructions issued in A-DH-200-000/AG-000, Honours, Flags and Heritage Structure of the CF soon to becomeA-DH-200-000/AG-000; The Heritage Structure of the CAF, Chapter 13, Annex A.
  2. A 100-person royal or state guard of honour is composed of:
    1. one major;
    2. two captains or lieutenants;
    3. one master warrant officer;
    4. one warrant officer;
    5. two sergeants; and
    6. 96 corporals/privates.
  3. A 50-person or general guard of honour is composed of:
    1. one captain;
    2. two captains or lieutenants;
    3. one master warrant officer;
    4. one warrant officer;
    5. two sergeants; and
    6. 48 corporals/privates.
  4. If it is not practicable to provide a guard of honour of the strength as indicated above, the numbers may be reduced, provided that the reduction will not affect the honours to which the visiting personage is entitled. If numbers must be reduced by more than one-quarter, the commander should consider mounting a quarter guard in lieu.
  5. On some occasions when a guard of honour would be appropriate but the unit’s actual strength is too small to mount one, and the commander does not wish to mount a quarter guard in lieu, consideration should be given to parading the entire unit for review. Depending on the circumstances, the review ceremony could be abbreviated.

GUARD FORMATIONS

  1. The guard shall form up in two divisions, as per company drill (Figure 10-2-1). The warrant and senior non-commissioned officers shall take posts in order of seniority as the:
    1. right marker;
    2. left marker;
    3. right marker of the left division; and
    4. left marker of the right division.
  2. Divisions of the larger guard may each be subdivided into two sections for ease of manoeuvre.
  3. If a band is in attendance, it should be positioned in the centre rear of the guard of honour, but, if space does not permit this, the band may be positioned on a flank.
  4. The band may be a military band, corps of drums (bugles), or pipes and drums. If both a military and other band are available, they may be combined, but only the military band will play for salutes.
  5. When individual movements are required of each division, words of command will be given by the division commanders in the same manner as for company drill.

FALLING IN THE GUARD

  1. The master warrant officer shall fall in the guard as for company drill, with division left markers acting as platoon warrant officer/non-commissioned officers. The master warrant officer shall turn the guard over to the guard commander, who shall fall in the officers. The Colour or flags shall then be marched on, with compliments, as appropriate.
  2. When the guard arrives opposite the centre of the dais, it shall be halted, turned to the front and formed into two ranks from three. The guard then shall open order and right (inwards) dress. Dressing shall be shoulder to shoulder, with no spaces left between divisions or sections, or between divisions and any Colour or flag party. Officers and Colours shall take post in review order. The guard shall then be stood at ease while awaiting the arrival of the personage for whom it has been mounted.
  3. If the fall-in takes place in front of the dais and no march on is required, the guard may fall in, in two ranks, in review order.

MOUNTING THE GUARD OF HONOUR

  1. When the personage for whom the guard of honour is mounted arrives, the guard commander shall order GUARD OF HONOUR, ATTEN – TION; and SHOULDER – ARMS.
  2. When the personage has taken position on the dais, the guard commander shall give the command GUARD OF HONOUR, ROYAL (STATE) (GENERAL) SALUTE, PRESENT – ARMS. The band shall commence playing on the last movement of the present arms.
  3. The guard commander next orders SHOULDER – ARMS; and ORDER – ARMS, and then marches to the personage, salutes, states his rank and name, and the name of the unit/base/station providing the guard of honour, and inquires if the personage wishes to inspect the Guard.
  4. The Colours remain at the carry whenever the guard of honour orders arms.

INSPECTION

  1. If the personage wishes to inspect the guard of honour, the inspection will be carried out as if the guard is a single unit rather than by divisions. Unless the personage expresses a personal wish to do otherwise, only the front of each rank is inspected, the personage proceeding right to left along the front rank and left to right along the rear rank. The inspecting party shall be as follows:
    1. the honoured personage, shall be nearest the guard and the rank being inspected, otherwise the personage shall be on the guard commander’s right;
    2. the guard commander, beside the personage; and
    3. in certain instances, the personage may have already been met and greeted officially by another dignitary, such as a Canadian Cabinet Minister for visiting foreign ministers. In such a case, the host dignitary might accompany the personage, walking immediately behind, with any fourth member of the entourage behind the guard commander. If the personage is Her Majesty The Queen, she has expressed her pleasure that only the guard commander will accompany her on an inspection.

Figure 10-2-1 Guard of Honour Formations

  1. When the personage arrives at the right flank to begin the inspection, the band shall commence playing appropriate music.
  2. The Colour or National Flag is saluted on the march normally during the inspection of the front rank, i.e., the guard commander, with sword at the carry, turns head and eyes towards the Colour or National Flag.
  3. Bands providing accompanying music for the ceremony are not usually inspected, nor conductors introduced, unless the visiting personage specifically requests.
  4. On completion of the inspection of the guard of honour, the band shall cease to play and the guard commander shall accompany the visiting personage directly back to the dais, salute and return to his original position.

DISMOUNTING AND DISMISSAL

  1. The guard may remain mounted if the personage carries out the scheduled activity at that location. For example, a guard of honour mounted for the Governor General at Parliament for the Speech from the Throne may remain mounted while the Governor General enters Parliament and delivers the speech; if the wait is lengthy, the troops may be stood at ease or even temporarily moved off the inspection location.
  2. When its duty as a guard of honour is completed, either after the scheduled activity or immediately after the inspection, the guard shall pay departing compliments to the honoured personage. The guard commander shall order SHOULDER – ARMS; and GUARD OF HONOUR, ROYAL (STATE) (GENERAL) SALUTE, PRESENT – ARMS. The band will commence playing on the final drill movement. Upon completion of the salute, the guard commander shall order SHOULDER – ARMS.
  3. The guard shall normally wait for the personage to depart before being marched off and dismissed. If the personage will be remaining in location and circumstances warrant, the guard may be marched past the visiting personage in either column of divisions (sections) or column of route as it leaves its place of duty.

SECTION 3 QUARTER GUARDS AND SENTRIES

GENERAL

  1. In peacetime, quarter guards are usually mounted for ceremonial rather than functional purposes. The quarter guard may also be used to pay compliments to visiting dignitaries when insufficient personnel prevent the mounting of a guard of honour.

DEFINITIONS

  1. Sentry Post. The location at which a single or double sentry is posted.
  2. Sentry Station. The position where the sentry stands in front of his sentry box when not patrolling his beat.
  3. Grand Rounds. The visits to a guard made by the Senior Duty Officer during his tour of duty. The guard is turned out and inspected by him.
  4. Visiting Rounds. The visits to a guard made by the Duty Officer during his tour of duty. The guard is turned out and inspected by him.

COMPOSITION OF GUARDS

  1. The strength of a quarter guard shall be dependent upon the number of single or double posts to be manned during a normal 24-hour period of duty. Each sentry remains on post for a period of two hours at four-hour intervals, and one or two spare members are provided (see Table 10-3-1).
  2. Guards mounted for the purely ceremonial purpose of paying compliments to visiting dignitaries — that is, “ceremonial quarter guards” — shall be formed with the strength to man two posts with double sentries, that is, a total of 17 personnel.
  3. In order to transmit the audible signals detailed in paragraphs 30 to 32, ceremonial sentries shall be armed with the C7 rifle only.
Table 10-3-1 Composition of Quarter Guards

Serial

Numéro

Number of Posts

Nombre de postes

Double Sentries

Postes doubles

Single Sentries

Postes simples

Spares

Suppléants

Trumpeter/ Bugler

Trompette ou clairon

Guard commander

Commandant de la garde

Guard Second in Command

Commandant adjoint de la garde

Total Strength

Effectif total

1 3 18 - 2 1 1 1 23
2 2 12 - 2 1 1 1 17
3 1 6 - 1 1 1 1 10
4 3 - 9 1 1 1 1 13
5 2 - 6 1 1 1 1 10
6 1 - 3 1 1 1 1 7
  1. The ceremonial quarter guard commander, a sergeant, is assisted by a second in command, usually the corporal of the guard, who is responsible for posting the sentries. The members of the guard are corporals and privates. In accordance with CAF custom, a trumpeter/bugler shall be included to sound official calls.

NOTE

In situations where the unit mounting the guard is organized and uniformed as a Scottish or Irish unit, and is authorized as pipe band, a piper may be ordered to augment the quarter guard to provide musical support other than official calls.

DUTIES OF THE GUARD

  1. Duties of the guard shall be published in unit standing orders. Orders are to be read out loud to each sentry when being posted. These orders shall include:
    1. the reasons for which he is posted;
    2. the extent of his beat;
    3. the position of neighbouring posts; and
    4. any special orders not contained in unit standing orders.
  2. A sentry with protective as well as ceremonial duties shall challenge suspicious persons or those approaching without clear authority to pass. The sentry shall port arms and carry out the normal tactical sequence of HALT; ADVANCE ONE AND BE RECOGNIZED; and password if needed. If permission to pass is granted, the sentry shall pay any appropriate compliments.

COMPLIMENTS

  1. The guard shall be turned out (paragraphs 48 to 59):
    1. for armed parties, including armoured fighting vehicles;
    2. to pay compliments between reveille and retreat to general officers;
    3. to pay compliments once a day between reveille and retreat to the commanding officer;
    4. for grand rounds and visiting rounds;
    5. at reveille and retreat for inspection by the guard commander; and
    6. as directed by unit standing orders.
  2. The guard shall not be turned out for unarmed parties.
  3. Compliments shall be made as follows:
    1. General Officers. The guard shall be turned out and present arms. Sentries shall present arms.
    2. Senior Officers (Colonels, Lieutenant-Colonels and Majors). The guard shall present arms. Sentries shall present arms.
    3. Junior Officers (Captains and Lieutenants). The guard shall shoulder arms and the guard commander shall salute at the shoulder. Sentries shall be at the shoulder.
    4. Armed Parties
      1. To a battalion or equivalent, or a battery of artillery with its guns, the guard shall present arms.
      2. To less than the above, the guard shall shoulder arms and the guard commander shall salute if applicable.
  4. Sentries in sentry boxes shall pay compliments simply by coming to attention.
  5. Sentries shall shoulder arms on hearing a national anthem. If in the vicinity of a guard which is presenting arms, they shall present arms in time with the guard.
  6. A sentry patrolling his beat shall attempt to complete his patrol and halt at his station before paying compliments.
  7. When a sentry is visited by a duty officer, the sentry shall salute and state his post number, i.e., “Post No. 1, Sir”.
  8. When both the old and new guard are on parade together, and it is necessary to pay compliments, words of command will be given to both by the senior rank on parade or in the case of both guards being commanded by persons of equal rank, by the commander of the old guard until the relief of sentries is complete, then by the new guard commander.

SENTRY DRILLS

  1. When teaching sentry drills, verbal commands shall be prefixed with “AS A SENTRY”. This indicates that several drill movements are being combined. The commands shown in this article are used for training sentries. The signals used as commands by double sentries are detailed in paragraphs 30 to 32.
  2. A sentry normally takes station one full pace directly in front of his sentry box. He may take up a position inside the sentry box in inclement weather, both sentries on a double post working together.
  3. When at his station and in his sentry box, a sentry stands at ease.
  4. When on his beat, a sentry:
    1. marches with normal cadence in quick time at the shoulder arms;
    2. turns outwards when turning at the end of his beat; and
    3. stops marching only at his station.

Figure 10-3-1 Sentry Post with Double Sentries

  1. On the command AS A SENTRY, TO THE FRONT – SALUTE, a sentry:
    1. standing at ease at his station comes to attention, shoulders arms, salutes, orders arms and stands at ease, observing a standard pause between each movement; and
    2. patrolling his beat returns to his station, halts, turns to the front, salutes, orders arms, and stands at ease, observing a standard pause between each movement.
  2. On the command AS A SENTRY, PRESENT – ARMS, the action detailed in paragraph 24 is carried out, except that the sentry presents arms instead of saluting at the shoulder.
  3. On the command AS A SENTRY, TO THE RIGHT (LEFT), QUICK – MARCH, a sentry at his station comes to attention, shoulders arms, turns to the right (left), and steps off in quick time. A standard pause is observed between each movement. If in the sentry box, after coming to attention the sentry shall take one full pace forward out of the box and continue as detailed above.
  4. On the command AS A SENTRY, ABOUT – TURN, given as the left foot is forward and on the ground, a sentry shall halt, turn outwards to the right (left), turn to the right (left) again to face the direction from which he came and step off in quick time in the new direction. A standard pause shall be maintained between all movements. Trained service personnel may turn about on the march; practice is necessary since all turns are outwards and thus some are left-about.
  5. On the command AS A SENTRY, STAND AT – EASE, a patrolling sentry halts at his station, turns to face the front, orders arms and stands at ease. A standard pause is observed between each movement. If returning to position within the sentry box, after ordering arms the sentry shall take one full pace backwards and stand at ease.

DOUBLE SENTRIES

  1. A double sentry consists of two sentries patrolling the same post (Figure 10-3-1). All their movements shall be executed together, taking the time from the senior (right hand) sentry. The senior is in command of the Post.
  2. The senior sentry gives hand or audible signals to ensure coordinated drill movements by both sentries. The junior sentry shall give the signals only when an officer approaches the post from the left.
  3. Hand signals are used by patrolling sentries. The signal is given when the sentries are facing each other, as the right foot is forward and on the ground, is repeated as the right foot comes to the ground again and the halt is executed on the next left foot. The hand signals, given with the left hand, are:
    1. one finger extended — stand at ease;
    2. two fingers extended — salute; and
    3. whole open hand extended — present arms.
  4. Audible signals are used by sentries when stationary. The signals are given by tapping the rifle butt on the ground. The following signals are used, when the sentry is standing at ease:
    1. at his station:
      1. one tap — to the right (left) quick march,
      2. two taps — salute,
      3. three taps — presents arms, and
      4. four taps — one pace step back march.
    2. in his sentry box:
      1. two taps — attention or stand at ease,
      2. four taps — one pace forward march; and
    3. about to be relieved: one tap — shoulder arms.

FORMING UP THE GUARD

  1. The guard shall fall in under command of the corporal of the guard, in a convenient area (Figure 10-3-2).
  2. After the guard has been inspected by the corporal of the guard, it is then marched to the parade ground, the corporal marching in the rear. The sergeant shall proceed independently to the parade ground while the guard is being inspected.
  3. On arrival at the parade ground, the guard is halted at a pre-arranged position and remains at the shoulder arms.

Figure 10-3-2 Guard Formed up under the Corporal of the Guard

  1. The corporal reports to his sergeant and then falls in on the left of the front rank. The sergeant, in turn, reports to the duty sergeant and then falls in on the right flank of the guard (Figure 10-3-3).
  2. The duty sergeant reports to the chief warrant officer (CWO) and then marches to a position six paces to the right of the guard sergeant, orders the guard to order arms and stand at ease. He turns to the front and stands at ease. The CWO then moves to a position 24 paces in front of the guard sergeant and turns, facing him.
  3. Under some circumstances, there may be more than one guard; for example, a battalion’s duties for the next 24-hour period might include a household guard, a quarter guard for the barracks and a picquet (such as a fire picquet). In that case, they shall parade in that order of precedence, normally in column, and the duty sergeant shall wait until all are present before reporting to the CWO. Company drill shall be used where applicable. The guards, when ordered to their duties shall take independent routes after they march past the adjutant as noted in Table 10-3-2, items 30 to 33.

GUARD MOUNTING

  1. The procedure for guard mounting is detailed in Table 10-3-2:
Table 10-3-2 Guard Mounting
No. Command By Action Remarks
1 GUARD COMMANDER(S) (or Sergeant(s), non-commissioned officer(s) for Guard if household guards are to be subsequently commanded by officers; see No. 29) CWO The Guard Commander (Gd Comd) and the Duty Sergeant (Sgt) come to attention. The Gd Comd shoulders arms and, with the Duty Sgt, marches forward 15 paces and halts. The Gd Comd orders arms. Both remain at attention. The CWO moves forward and inspects the Gd Comd and returns to his position, nine paces in front of and facing the Gd Comd. Only household guards (see paragraphs 63 to 69) are commanded by officers.
2 GUARD COMMANDER, FOR INSPECTION EXAMINE  – ARMS CWO The Gd Comd acts as ordered. The CWO inspects the Gd Comd’s rifle and returns to his position, as in Item 1.
3 GUARD COMMANDER, EASE – SPRINGS CWO The Gd Comd eases springs.
4 GUARD COMMANDER, ORDER – ARMS CWO The Gd Comd orders arms. If more than one guard or detachment is paraded for inspection, commanders will be ordered to adopt duties distance.
5 GUARD COMMANDER, STAND AT – EASE CWO The Gd Comd and Duty Sgt stand at ease. The CWO turns to his right and marches to a position nine paces in front and centre of where the guard will fall in, halts and turns left.
6 GUARD, FALL – IN CWO The Gd Comd, Duty Sgt, bugler and guard come to attention. The Gd Comd and guard shoulder arms. The guard and bugler march forward 15 paces and halt with the bugler one pace to the right of the Gd Comd (see Figure 10-3-4). The band, when present for ceremonial guards, takes up a position 24 paces to the right and in line with the guard.
7 GUARD, ORDER – ARMS CWO The guard orders arms. -
8 GUARD, OPEN ORDER – MARCH CWO The guard acts as ordered. -
9 GUARD, RIGHT – DRESS CWO The Gd Comd stands steady. The guard dresses to the right. The bugler dresses on the Gd Comd. The Duty Sgt turns left and dresses each rank of the guard normally.
10 GUARD, EYES – FRONT CWO All act as ordered. The Duty Sgt returns to his original position.
11 GUARD WILL FIX BAYONETS – FIX CWO Guard fixes bayonets. The Gd Comd and the Duty Sgt stand fast.
12 GUARD BAYO – NETS CWO As ordered. -
13 GUARD, ATTEN – TION CWO As ordered. The Adjutant (Adjt) positions himself two paces in rear of the CWO. The CWO turns about, salutes and reports the guard present and ready for inspection to the Adjt. Upon being ordered to fall in the CWO salutes, and marches to the rear of the Adjt, passing on his right. The Adjt takes two paces forward and the CWO, by a series of wheels, position himself three paces in rear of the Adjt. Upon the CWO’s halting, after a standard pause, the Adjt and CWO step off together, inspect the guard and return to their original position. During inspection the band, if present, will play appropriate music.
14 GUARD WILL UNFIX BAYONETS – UNFIX Adjt Guard unfixed bayonets. The Duty Sgt and Gd Comd stand fast.
15 BAYO – NETS Adjt As ordered.
16 GUARD, ATTEN – TION Adjt As ordered. -
17 GUARD, FOR INSPECTION, EXAMINE  – ARMS Adjt The guard acts as ordered. The Gd Comd shoulders arms, his rifle having been previously inspected. The Adjt and CWO step off together, inspect the guard’s rifles and return to their original position.
18 GUARD, EASE – SPRINGS Adjt Guard eases springs. -
19 GUARD, ORDER – ARMS Adjt Guard orders arms. The Gd Comd orders arms from the shoulder arm position. Having been found ready for duty, the guard will be addressed as the “new guard” from this point in the ceremony.
20 NEW GUARD WILL FIX BAYONETS – FIX Adjt Guard fixes bayonets. Gd Comd and Duty Sgt stand fast.
21 BAYO – NETS Adjt As ordered. -
22 NEW GUARD, ATTEN – TION Adjt As ordered. -
23 NEW GUARD, SHOULDER – ARMS Adjt As ordered. -
24 NEW GUARD, CLOSE ORDER – MARCH Adjt As ordered. -
25 NEW GUARD, RIGHT – DRESS Adjt As ordered. As in Item 9.
26 NEW GUARD, EYES – FRONT Adjt As ordered. As in Item 10.
27 CHIEF WARRANT OFFICER, DISMISS THE DUTY SERGEANT Adjt The CWO acknowledges this order by saluting, the Adjt returning the salute. The CWO may be addressed by rank, name or appointment.
28 DUTY SERGEANT, DIS – MISS CWO The Duty Sgt turns to his right, salutes, steps off, wheels to his right and marches off the parade ground. The Adjt acknowledges the salute.
29 GUARD COMMANDER, TAKE – POST or GUARD COMMANDER(S) FALL – IN (if officers are to command guards) Adjt 1.   The Gd Comd and the Corporal (Cpl) of the guard step off together, in quick time, wheel outwards, the Gd Comd moving to a position three paces in centre rear of the guard. The Cpl of the guard, marching in rear of the Gd Comd, moves into the Gd Comd’s former position as right guide of the guard.
2.   If guards are commanded by officers, their place will be three paces in front of the centre of their guards, and the non-commissioned officers will not change posts. Officers draw swords on the Adjt’s command “FALL – IN”.
As the Gd Comd and the Cpl of the guard move into new positions, the Adjt and CWO turn left and march to a point nine paces clear of the right flank of the guard and turn about (see Figure 10-3-5). At the same time, the band, if present, moves to a position 20 paces in front of the guard.
30 NEW GUARD, TO YOUR DUTIES, BY THE RIGHT, QUICK – MARCH Adjt The guard and band step off together, the band playing. -
31 NEW GUARD, EYES – RIGHT Guard Comd The bugler and the right hand non-commissioned officer of the guard look to their front, the remainder look to the right, Gd Comd saluting as with a rifle. (If an officer commands the guard, the sword will be held at the carry and the head and eyes turned to the right; non-commissioned officers will not salute with rifles.) The Adjt salutes until the guard has cleared his front.
32 NEW GUARD, EYES – FRONT Guard Comd All act as ordered. The Adjt moves off the parade ground, accompanied by the CWO, to await the subsequent arrival of the old guard (see paragraph 40).
33 The new guard marches to the guard room to relieve the old guard. The guard shall march in line, forming to change direction if possible; if not, in file.
34 STAND BY THE – GUARD Sentry of the Old Guard - See paragraphs 48 to 59. The guard may fall in according to routine timings.
35 GUARD, TURN – OUT Sentry of the Old Guard As ordered. The guard turns out on the double at the port, bayonets fixed, and falls in at the open order, shouldering arms and dressing automatically. The bugler falls in one pace to the right of the Old Guard Comd.
36 NEW GUARD – HALT New Guard Comd New guard halts. When the ground permits, the new guard is halted 15 paces opposite the old guard facing it. When this is not possible, the new guard is positioned six paces on the left and in line with the old guard, facing the same direction. Sentries within hearing of the Old Guard Comd, conform to the actions of their guard during the relief. The band takes up its position clear of the ground to be occupied by the guards during the relief and plays appropriate music.
37 NEW GUARD, OPEN ORDER – MARCH New Guard Comd As ordered. -
38 NEW GUARD, RIGHT – DRESS New Guard Comd Guard dresses to the right, the right flank personnel maintaining their head and eyes to the front. The Guard Comd or the Guard Warrant Officer/Sgt if the guard is commanded by an officer, steps off and positions himself six paces to the right of the front rank, halts and turns left. The Cpl of the guard, unless already on the left flank, steps off and, by a series of wheels, proceeds around the rear of the guard, passing on the right of the Guard Comd to his original position one pace to the left of the front rank. The guard is dressed.
39 NEW GUARD, EYES – FRONT New Guard Comd The guard act as ordered. The Guard Comd or Warrant Officer/Sgt moves to his position one pace to the right of the front rank of the guard.
40 OLD GUARD, TO THE NEW GUARD, PRESENT – ARMS Old Guard Comd Old guard presents arms. -
41 NEW GUARD, TO THE OLD GUARD, PRESENT – ARMS New Guard Comd New guard present arms. The bugler of the new guard sounds the “General Salute”.
42 OLD GUARD SHOULDER – ARMS Old Guard Comd Old guard shoulders arms. -
43 NEW GUARD SHOULDER – ARMS New Guard Comd New guard shoulder arms. -
44 OLD GUARD, ORDER – ARMS Old Guard Comd Old guard including comd, orders arms. -
45 NEW GUARD, ORDER – ARMS New Guard Comd New guard, including Comd, orders arms. The Old Guard Comd then states the number of sentries posted, e.g. two by day, four by night. The New Guard Comd repeats the number of sentries posted. Household Guard comds may exchange keys.
46 OLD GUARD, STAND AT – EASE Old Guard Comd Old guard stands at ease. The Old and New Guard Comds then shoulder arms, step off and position themselves three paces in front and centre of their guards, the Old Guard Comd facing the front, the New Guard Comd facing his guard.
47 NEW GUARD, AS A GUARD – NUMBER New Guard Comd The new guard numbers off from front to rear, starting at the right flank, as shown in Figure 10-3-6. The New Guard Comd then tells off his guard by reliefs, e.g. Nos. 1 to 4 first relief, etc.
48 MARCH OFF FIRST RELIEF, REMAINDER STAND AT – EASE New Guard Comd Nos. 1 to 4 (or as detailed for First Relief) remain at attention; the remainder stand at ease. Following this command, the Old and New Guard Comds turns towards and move off to handover the guard room. The Cpl of the new guard shoulders arms and places himself three paces in front and centre of the new guard and remains at the shoulder.
49 FIRST RELIEF, SHOULDER – ARMS New Guard Cpl First Relief shoulder arms. The Cpl of the Old Guard who will guide the relief to its posts, steps off and positions himself one pace to the right flank of the first relief. The Cpl of the New Guard steps off and positions himself three paces in front and centre of the first relief.
50 FIRST RELIEF, MOVE TO THE RIGHT IN FILE, RIGHT – TURN New Guard Cpl First Relief turns right. -
51 FIRST RELIEF, QUICK – MARCH New Guard Cpl The Relief steps off and the new guard Cpl moves one pace to the left of the last number. The old guard Cpl leads the first relief to No. 1 post by the most direct route.
52 RELIEF – HALT New Guard Cpl The relief halts. The old guard sentry shall come to attention and shoulder arms as the relief approaches.
53 NO. 1 SENTRY, TAKE – POST New Guard Cpl The new sentry then steps off and position himself one pace on the left of the old sentry and turns about. Both Cpls move to a position in front of the sentries. The old guard cpl reads the sentry’s orders and ensures they are understood.
54 SENTRIES – PASS New Guard Cpl The old sentry steps off directly ahead and, by a series of wheels, positions himself in rear of the relief. As the old sentry steps off, the new sentry takes post by taking two paces right close. The Cpls return to their former positions and carry on as detailed in Nos. 51 to 54 inclusive, until all posts are relieved.
55 When all sentries are posted, the guard Cpls change positions; the old guard Cpl assuming command.
56 OLD SENTRIES, QUICK – MARCH Old Guard Cpl As ordered. The old sentries return to the guard room location. The new guard Cpl, acting on his commands, will lead the old sentries back by the most direct route.
57 OLD SENTRIES – HALT Old Guard Cpl The old sentries are halted between the two guards. The old sentries are then turned to face the same direction as the old guard.
58 OLD SENTRIES, FALL – IN Old Guard Cpl The old sentries and the two Cpls turn right and, after a standard pause, move to their positions with their respective guards, order arms and stand at ease. The old sentries fall in on the left of the old guard and the two Cpls on the left of their respective guards.
59 When the handover between the Guard Comds and the posting of the first relief are completed, the Guard Comds fall in on the right of their respective guards. The band, if in attendance, will move to a position so that it can precede the old guard when it marches off.
60 OLD GUARD, ATTEN – TION Old Guard Comd The old guard comes to attention. -
61 NEW GUARD, ATTEN – TION New Guard Comd The new guard comes to attention. -
62 OLD GUARD, SHOULDER – ARMS Old Guard Comd The old guard shoulders arms. -
63 NEW GUARD, SHOULDER – ARMS New Guard Comd The new guard shoulders arms. If officers are not in command of the guards, following the completion of the shoulder, the Old Guard Comd and Cpl step off and position themselves as detailed in No. 29.
64 OLD GUARD, CLOSE ORDER – MARCH Old Guard Comd The old guard moves to close order. -
65 OLD GUARD, CHANGE DIRECTION RIGHT (LEFT), RIGHT (LEFT) – FORM; QUICK – MARCH; FOR – WARD Old Guard Comd The old guard acts as ordered. This procedure will be used when guards are opposite each other.
65a Other circumstances - - If the old guard is in line it may be marched off directly to the front or in other circumstances, it may be turned to the right and, after stepping off, execute two left wheels and marched across the frontage of the new guard. In all cases, the band, if present, commences to play on the command “MARCH”. If local custom dictates, the old guard may depart in slow time, changing into quick time when clear of the guardroom or gate.
66 NEW GUARD TO THE OLD GUARD, PRESENT – ARMS New Guard Comd The new guard, including the Guard Commander, present arms. -
67 OLD GUARD, EYES – RIGHT (LEFT) Old Guard Comd The Old Guard Comd salutes, the remainder turn their head and eyes to the right (left). -
68 OLD GUARD, EYES – FRONT Old Guard Comd As ordered. See paragraph 40.
69 NEW GUARD, SHOULDER – ARMS New Guard Comd The new guard shoulders arms. -
70 NEW GUARD, CLOSE ORDER – MARCH New Guard Comd The new guard moves to close order. If the guard is commanded by an non-commissioned officer, the Guard Comd and Cpl take post. The Guard Comd moves the guard to the position vacated by the Old Guard and explains the procedure for turning out. This and other orders are reviewed. The same information will be explained to the First Relief when they come off sentry duty.
71 GUARD, TO THE GUARD ROOM, DIS – MISS Guard Comd The guard acts as ordered. If an officer is present, guard members will all salute at the shoulder. The old guard having departed, the new guard is simply referred to as the “guard”.

Figure 10-3-3 Guard Formed up Ready for Mounting

Figure 10-3-4 Guard Mounting (No. 6)

Figure 10-3-5 Guard Mounting (No. 29)

Figure 10-3-6 Guard Mounting (No. 47)

  1. After the new guard is mounted, the old guard marches to the parade ground and occupies the position formerly occupied by the new guard during the inspection by the adjutant. When halted in this position, the guard commander orders his guard to order arms and open order and right dress.
  2. If the guard commander is not an officer, the commander moves to a position six paces to the right of the front rank, halts and turns left. The corporal moves to his position on the left of the front rank. The guard is dressed.
  3. The guard commander will order eyes front, and report to the adjutant, who by then is in position in front of the guard. Simultaneously, unless the guard commander is an officer, the corporal of the guard shoulders arms and moves in rear of the guard to take post on the right of the front rank. The old guard is inspected by the adjutant in the same manner as for the new guard, except that the guard commander accompanies the adjutant during the inspection. The adjutant does not order the guard to fix bayonets. After the inspection, the adjutant marches off the Colours and falls out the officers if applicable (i.e., for household guards), or orders the non-commissioned officer guard commander to take post. The adjutant marches to a point clear of the right flank of the guard.
  4. The adjutant orders the warrant officer and sergeant of the guard or guard commander to march the guard to the company area and dismiss it. The guard commander proceeds as ordered, marching past the adjutant and giving an EYES – RIGHT and EYES – FRONT.

POSTING AND RELIEVING SENTRIES

  1. Sentries shall be posted or relieved by the corporal of the guard as detailed in Table 10-3-2, Nos. 49 to 56 inclusive, excluding the actions of the old guard corporal. The sentry’s orders will be read by the corporal of the guard.
  2. Reliefs are inspected at the guard room prior to being posted.
  3. When a sentry is to be posted at a new post which does not yet have a sentry, the sentry is halted when at a point five paces in front of the station. On the command TAKE – POST, the sentry marches five paces, halts at his station and turns about.
  4. When relieved, sentries are marched to the guard room, halted and inspected by the corporal who will then order TO THE GUARD ROOM, DIS – MISS. The sentries act as ordered.

TURNING OUT THE GUARD

  1. The sentry on the post nearest the guard room warns the guard commander and the guard of the approach of persons for whom the guard will turn out (see paragraphs 12 to 19) by calling STAND BY THE GUARD. The guard prepares to turn out.
  2. If the sentry is on beat when he calls the warning, he completes the tour of his beat and then calls GUARD, TURN – OUT.
  3. The guard turns out at the double at the port, bayonets fixed, forms up at the open order, rifles at the shoulder and dresses automatically. The senior warrant officer or Sergeant of the guard does not fix his bayonet.
  4. Sentries within hearing distance of the guard commander halt at their stations and act on the guard commander’s orders.
  5. Guards mounted for the purely ceremonial purpose of paying compliments to visiting dignitaries may post their sentry outside the guard room. If the guard room area or main gate site does not have sufficient space for the ceremony, the guard may be formed up at a location deemed suitable. In this case the instructions in paragraphs 48 to 50 above do not apply and the guard is simply positioned in line prior to the arrival of the dignitary.
  6. The guard commander orders GUARD, GENERAL (ROYAL) SALUTE, PRESENT – ARMS as the dignitary arrives in front of the guard. For purely ceremonial guards, a position approximately 10 paces in front (centre) of the guard may be marked or a low dais may be erected for this purpose.
  7. The guard commander orders SHOULDER – ARMS and reports the guard ready for inspection from his position on the right flank. If the dignitary wishes to inspect, he will step off at this time; the guard commander will remain at his position unless requested by the dignitary to accompany him. If the dignitary does not wish to inspect, he will say so. (It is usual for a non-military dignitary to arrive in company with a member of the unit being visited, who will brief the dignitary on this procedure beforehand as a matter of common courtesy.)
  8. If the dignitary chooses to inspect the guard and asks the guard commander to accompany him, the guard commander will be on the dignitary’s right for the front rank and on his left for the rear rank.
  9. On completion of the inspection, the dignitary returns to the reviewing position or dais. If the guard commander has accompanied him, the guard commander returns to his position on the right flank of the guard.
  10. The guard commander orders GUARD, GENERAL (ROYAL) SALUTE, PRESENT – ARMS and SHOULDER – ARMS. The dignitary then leaves the area.
  11. A dignitary passing a working guard at the entrance to a barracks or other location, may choose to acknowledge the compliment without stopping. In this case, the guard then completes its compliment normally after the dignitary has passed by.
  12. If the guard is turned out for rounds, the duty officer may choose to inspect the guard room, cells, etc. If so, he shall request the guard commander to accompany him.

DISMISSING THE GUARD

  1. After the dignitary or duty officer departs, the guard commander orders TO THE GUARD ROOM, DIS – MISS. The guard acts as ordered.
  2. Purely ceremonial guards formed up in other locations, as noted in paragraph 52, may simply be dismissed if appropriate.
  3. The duty officer may also request the guard commander to dismiss the guard after the inspection.

HOUSEHOLD GUARDS

  1. Household guards parade and work in the same manner as quarter guards, except as noted below.
  2. Since household guards are mounted for a dignitary, their composition and size will be dependent on the dignitary’s rank in the same manner as for guards of honour (see Table 10-2-1), rather than the number of posts to be manned. When the dignitary is not present at the household, the size of the guard may be reduced, so long as it is not reduced below that required to man the posts.
  3. Household guards, like guards of honour, shall be commanded by officers and shall carry Colours if appropriate for the unit concerned. For units possessing a stand of Colours, only one Colour shall be carried: the Queen’s Colour for Royal, Vice-Regal and Head of State guards when the dignitary is actually present in the household; and the Command/College/Regimental Colour on other occasions.
  4. Household guards shall be mounted as detailed in Table 10-3-2. New guard officers shall be fallen in and old guard officers fallen out by the adjutant at the appropriate time in the ceremony.
  5. If both the new and old guards are found by the same unit which possess a stand of Colours, each guard may carry a Colour. To ensure that the guard on duty holds the appropriate Colour, they may have to be exchanged at the time of relief along with keys, duty lists, etc.

Figure 10-3-7 Quarter Guard after Being Turned out

  1. Once the new guard has taken up its duties and turned in to the guard room, the Colour shall be lodged with the junior officer of the guard. Junior non-commissioned officers or other selected members of the guard shall act as Colour escorts; when not escorting the Colour, they shall be positioned in one file of the guard.
  2. The guard will turn out in a size commensurate with the rank of the person being honoured. Standing orders shall detail the size of the guard or guard detachment, in each case.

SECTION 4 - CEREMONIAL ARRIVAL AND DEPARTURE GUARDS

GENERAL

  1. Ceremonial arrival guards may be mounted to line on entrance, stairway or corridor for dignitaries entering a building, or the last few meters of a departing dignitary’s exit route. They shall not be mounted when a guard of honour has been ordered for the occasion.
  2. Ceremonial arrival and departure guards may be armed or unarmed.

CEREMONIAL ARRIVAL GUARD

  1. Guards may be positioned to line a building’s entrance, stairway or corridor for any personage to whom a quarter guard would turn out in a normal context (see Section 3, paragraph 11).
  2. Ceremonial arrival guards shall be sized for their task. If the space to be lined is suitable, its composition is that of a ceremonial quarter guard (see Section 3, paragraph 7). Fewer personnel can be used if space is limited, i.e., when lining a short stairway. If alerts and salutes are to be sounded, the bugler/piper should be stationed near the doorway or entrance. If a band is present or no alerts or salutes are to be sounded, the bugler/piper may be omitted.
  3. Ceremonial arrival guards are normally only provided on state occasions, i.e., at Rideau Hall, the Governor General’s residence in Ottawa, for a reception for a visiting head of state or for investiture.

DEPARTURE GUARD

  1. A departure guard may be mounted to pay final compliments to a military or civilian dignitary leaving by air, sea, rail or motor car. Departure guards shall only be mounted for personages entitled to a guard of honour (Table 10-2-1).
  2. The composition of a departure guard is that of a ceremonial quarter guard (see Section 3, paragraph 7) commanded by a junior officer and assisted by a sergeant, less the bugler/piper; that is, one junior officer, one sergeant and 14 corporals and privates.

POSITIONING THE GUARD

  1. The guard shall be formed up in two ranks and marched to the site.
  2. Upon arrival, the guard shall be halted in position or, for stairways and corridorss, along the length of the passageway in pre-arranged positions or as for street lining (see Chapter 12).
  3. For a vehicle or other doorway, the guard shall be halted so that the front rank is in line with the right side of the doorway. For a departure guard at an aircraft, alignment is with the right side of the boarding ramp and no closer to the aircraft than the wing tip (see Figure 10-4-1). The guard commander shall then order GUARD ADVANCE, LEFT – TURN; REAR RANK, STAND – FAST; FRONT RANK, THREE PACES FORWARD – MARCH; and FRONT RANK, ABOUT – TURN.
  4. The guard shall then be dressed by the commander ordering REAR RANK RIGHT, FRONT RANK LEFT – DRESS. The marker and the right-hand individual of the rear rank will ensure they are directly opposite each other. For a departure guard at an aircraft, the right-hand individual of the rear rank will ensure that the ranks are positioned outside the aircraft’s wing tip.
  5. After the command GUARD, EYES – FRONT has been given, the guard, if carrying arms, shall be given the command ORDER – ARMS and then stood at ease to await the arrival of the personage for whom the guard has been mounted.
  6. For a ceremonial arrival guard, the guard commander shall take post nearest the entrance on the right hand side of the dignitaries as they enter. The second in command shall take post on the opposite flank and opposite side. If a ceremonial arrival guard is maintained in place to pay compliments when the dignitaries leave the building, the commander and second in command shall change sides to place the former on the right hand side of the dignitaries as they leave.
  7. For a departure guard, the guard commander shall take post on the right flank of the rear rank, i.e., on the right hand side of the departing personage; the sergeant on the opposite flank of the front rank, nearest the personage’s arrival point, facing in the opposite direction from the commander.
  8. The band, if in attendance, should be positioned in the most suitable location.
  9. For a departure guard, the following flags shall be flown from two staffs as shown in Figure 10-4-1:
    1. the National Flag of Canada; and
    2. either the national flag of the departing personage’s country or, if the latter is not applicable, the Canadian Armed Forces Ensign or a command flag in accordance with the instructions in A-AD-200-000/AG-000, Honours, Flags and Heritage Structure of the CF soon to becomeA-DH-200-000/AG-000; The Heritage Structure of the CAF, Chapter 13, Annex A.

Figure 10-4-1 Departure Guard

COMPLIMENTS

  1. For a ceremonial arrival guard mounted to honour a number of personages, e.g., at an investiture, clear instructions must be given to the guard commander on the levels of compliments to be paid to the different arriving personages. That is, when the guard is to be ordered to stand at ease, at attention and, if armed, when arms are to be shouldered or presented (for swords, the carry, recover or salute).
  2. For a personage entitled to full compliments on arrival or departure, when the vehicle carrying the personage comes to a stop, the guard commander shall bring the guard and band to attention and proceed as follows:
    1. With Arms. The guard commander shall order SHOULDER – ARMS and as the personage approaches to proceed without pause through the guard, GUARD, PRESENT – ARMS. The band shall softly play appropriate music. When the personage has passed through the guard, the guard commander shall order, GUARD, SHOULDER – ARMS.
    2. Without Arms. After the guard and band has been ordered to attention, the band shall softly play appropriate music. As the personage proceeds through the ranks, the guard commander only shall salute. The salute shall be terminated then the personage has passed through the guard, and the band shall then cease playing.
  3. The words of command for a ceremonial arrival guard lining an interior stairway or corridor shall only be loud enough to be heard by the guard. Pre-arranged signals may be used in lieu.

DISMISSING THE GUARD

  1. After the personage or personages have cleared the area, the guard may be marched off and dismissed.
  2. For safety reasons when a personage is departing by air, immediately after the aircraft door has been closed, the guard commander shall order FRONT RANK, THREE PACES FORWARD – MARCH; and GUARD, MOVE TO THE LEFT, RIGHT AND LEFT – TURN (turning away from the aircraft); and then march the guard and band off to the dismissal area.
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