Manual of Drill and Ceremonial | Chapter 12 Miscellaneous ceremonial

A-DH-201-000/PT-000

How Canadian Armed Forces members should form at other ceremonies. This includes tattoos, Freedom of the City, the Ceremony of the Flags and sunset ceremonies.

Table of contents

SECTION 1 STREET LINING

GENERAL

  1. The number of personnel required to line a route is dependent on the length of the route allotted to unit and the interval allowed between service personnel required. The following formula allows you to calculate the number of personnel required:

Distance to be lined (paces) x 2 = Total number of personnel
Interval (in paces)

  1. Arms may be carried by units lining the street.
  2. Colours may be carried in accordance with Chapter 13, Annex A to A-AD-200-000/AG-000, The Honours, Flags and Heritage Structure of the CF soon to become A-DH-200-000/AG-000; The Heritage Structure of the CAF.
  3. Bands must not be placed at points where traffic is uncontrolled. They shall be positioned opposite the Colour party when circumstances permit. Otherwise, they should be positioned conveniently where a side street opens into the route of the procession. The leading rank shall be in line with other personnel lining the route. The bands formation may be adjusted to fit the depth of the space available.

DEFINITIONS

  1. Near End. The end of the unit from which the procession will approach.
  2. Far End. The end of the unit farthest away from the direction of the procession’s approach.

STREET LINING

  1. Markers, one for each company, shall be pre-positioned by the chief warrant officer, commencing from the near end of the battalion position, one pace from the curb.
  2. The battalion shall be formed in company blocks (no intervals between platoons), in line, sized and with bayonets fixed (except at funerals). The battalion then shall be marched to the street lining location from the near end, each company being halted on its marker beginning with the rear company of the battalion, in accordance with Table 12-1-1 and Figure 12-1-1.
  3. The battalion commanding officer shall be positioned one pace in front of the marker of the company at the near end, and the adjutant shall be positioned directly opposite the commanding officer, one pace in front of the first member of the front rank. The deputy commander shall be positioned one pace in front of the last member at the far end, on the same side of the road as the commanding officer, and the chief warrant officer shall be positioned directly opposite the deputy commander, one pace in front of the last member of the front rank of the last company.
  4. The company commanders shall position themselves one pace in front of the rear rank at the near end of their company (in front of the marker or in front of the second member if the commanding officer is in front of the marker), and the company deputy commanders shall position themselves one pace in front of the rear rank at the far end. The master warrant officer shall be positioned opposite the company deputy commander.
Table 12-1-1 Street Lining
No. Command By Action Remarks
1 Just before reaching his own coy marker, the Coy Comd will move off to his left and halt in the centre of the street, allowing his coy to continue marching until its right flank is one pace past the marker.
2 COMPANY – HALT Coy Comd Coy comes to a halt. -
3 COMPANY ADVANCE, LEFT – TURN Coy Comd Coy turns left. -
4 COMPANY WILL FORM TWO RANKS, FORM TWO – RANKS Coy Comd Coy forms two ranks. -
5 COMPANY, RIGHT – DRESS Coy Comd Coy acts as ordered. -
6 COMPANY, EYES – FRONT Coy Comd Coy acts as ordered. -
7 FRONT RANK, BY THE RIGHT, QUICK – MARCH Coy Comd The front rank shall march across the road. -
8 FRONT RANK – HALT Coy Comd The front rank halts. -
9 COMPANY, RIGHT – TURN Coy Comd Coy turns to the right. -
10 COMPANY, TO A __ PACE INTERVAL, IN TWO SINGLE FILES, QUICK – MARCH Coy Comd The first service member of the rear rank wheels into position the required number of paces past the marker, the second member wheels into position the same number of paces past the first, and the remainder carry on in a like manner. The first man of the front rank wheels into position opposite the marker and the remainder carry on as did the rear rank. See Figure 12-1-1. When arriving in position, each member halts, observes the standard pause, turns to face the centre of the street, covers off the member on the opposite side, dresses on the marker or No. 1 of the front rank, and awaits further orders.
11 COMPANY, ORDER – ARMS Coy Comd The coy orders arms. -
12 COMPANY, STAND AT – EASE Coy Comd The coy stands at ease. -
13 As the procession approaches, each Coy Comd shall order, __ COY, ATTEN – TION.
Note
See also paragraph 16.

Figure 12-1-1 Street Lining

  1. The remaining officers shall position themselves one pace in front of the front and rear ranks of their companies, equally spaced across the frontage of each rank.
  2. The remaining warrant officers and the sergeants shall be dispersed within the ranks of their respective companies.
  3. The Colours shall be positioned in the centre of the battalion, on the right hand side of the road as seen by the procession.
  4. As the carriage or vehicle containing the royal personage or dignitary closes to within 20 paces of the battalion’s position, the commanding officer shall order IN SUCCESSION OF COMPANIES, PRESENT – ARMS. Beginning with the company at the near end, each company commander shall order his company to present arms as the carriage or vehicle closes on the company’s position.
  5. If the procession is to return, the battalion and the company commanders shall take post on the other flank of their commands in front of the front rank. The Colours shall cross the road. Thus commanders and Colours are always stationed on the procession’s right.

FUNERALS

  1. As the head of the funeral procession approaches the commanding officer shall order IN SUCCESSION OF COMPANIES, PRESENT – ARMS. Beginning with the company at the near end, each company commander shall order his company to PRESENT – ARMS; then REST ON YOUR ARMS – REVERSED, as the firing party or leading detachment approaches (see also Chapter 11, Section 2, paragraph 46).
  2. When Colours are on parade for royal or state funerals, they will be brought to the carry position and the Colour party will shoulder arms. Colours will only be lowered and arms presented by the Colour party if the deceased, or one of the mourners are entitled to that compliment.

DISPERSAL

  1. Following the passing of the procession, troops should remain in position for approximately 10 minutes in order to facilitate the normal dispersal of crowds. The battalion is then reformed on the lead company by reversing the procedures and marched off to the dispersal area.

SECTION 2 FREEDOM OF THE CITY

GENERAL

  1. The granting of the Freedom of the City is a traditional means for a municipality to honour a unit of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF). The granting is, therefore, a private matter between civic officials and the unit concerned, and the decision to grant this symbolic freedom rests with the municipal authorities. This honour may be granted to both regular and reserve components. It is common for municipal authorities to issue two signed scrolls (one for the unit, the other to be kept as part of the official record by the municipality) with the text of the proclamation. The wording of the text is the responsibility of the municipal authority.

THE CEREMONY

  1. The unit to be granted the Freedom of the City marches towards city hall, in column of route, Colours cased and bayonets unfixed. As the unit approaches city hall, the chief constable stands in the centre of the road to bar the unit from proceeding further. A light movable barrier may also be used.
  2. The unit halts at the barrier. The chief constable challenges the unit on its identity and the commanding officer responds with the unit’s title. The chief constable then calls for the unit to “Advance one and be recognized”. The commanding officer advances to the barrier.
  3. The commanding officer, accompanied by the chief constable, then marches to the door to city hall. The commanding officer knocks on the door three times with the pommel of his sword. The door is opened by the mayor and the commanding officer declares his name and that of the unit. The mayor, accompanied by the city council, forms up at the entrance to city hall. The mayor then reads the proclamation proclaiming the Freedom of the City. The commanding officer accepts the freedom and returns to the unit.
  4. The chief constable then causes the barrier to be removed.
  5. The unit will fix bayonets, and uncase the Colour. The unit marches past, with the mayor taking the salute.

REPORTING

  1. Following the granting of the Freedom of the City, the following information shall be forwarded to NDHQ, Attention: Director History and Heritage (DHH):
    1. unit granted the Freedom of the City;
    2. city; and
    3. date of ceremony.

EXERCISING THE FREEDOM

  1. A unit may exercise its freedom as arranged between the civic authorities and the unit.
  2. The procedure is the same as that for granting the freedom, except that:
    1. the unit will march to the city hall with bayonets already fixed and carrying Colours; and
    2. in the mayor’s proclamation, the unit is welcomed and invited to exercise its freedom.
  3. The report in paragraph 7 shall be forwarded to DHH.

SECTION 3 RETREAT (SUNSET) AND TATTOO CEREMONIES

GENERAL

  1. These ceremonies take place at sunset. The simplest one is a bugler sounding “Retreat” while the duty sergeant lowers the National Flag. On special occasions, a guard is mounted to participate in Retreat, accompanied by a band or massed bands, and, for the most elaborate occasions, a full evening ceremonial routine is carried out.
  2. The origins of these ceremonies lie in two evening routines formerly carried out by soldiers:
    1. The first occurred at sunset, when soldiers fired evening guns, withdrew into fortified camps and cities, locked the gates, and, as the sun set and darkness approached, lowered their flags for the night. This was Retreat. Originally, the calls sounded to order this routine were beaten on drums and the routine is still commonly called “beating the retreat”.
    2. The second routine followed at or near dusk, when the night watch was set. Rounds were made to check sentries (with drum or bugle calls sounded to indicate when the “First Post” and “Last Post” were reached). During this period, the drums beat a warning for all to return to barracks, and often the band played entertainment tunes, an evening hymn and, finally, the National Anthem. This became known as Tattoo, from the Flemish words “tap toe”, meaning “turn off the taps” in the inns and bars, since the soldiers had to leave.
    3. Shortly after “Last Post”, the bugler sounded the call “Lights Out”. No other calls or gun shots were allowed until morning, except for the sounding of the alarm.
    4. The two routines often blended together, and were generally and collectively known as Retreat. Today they may be performed separately or as one.
  3. Modern customs often include additional music and marching displays. When a corps of drums, bugles or pipes and drums are present, they should perform the traditional drum beats and marches. The sounding of the calls, whether by bugle or in an orchestrated version, should remain the focus of the ceremony.
  4. The sequence of a full evening ceremony conducted for a visiting dignitary and guests is:
    1. the review of the guard;
    2. Retreat (at Sunset);
    3. Tattoo; and
    4. the departure.

REVIEW OF THE GUARD

  1. The guard may be either a working or ceremonial quarter guard or a guard of honour, depending on the availability of personnel and the rank of the visiting dignitary (see Chapter 10). The guard shall form up in two ranks facing the dais, with the band in the centre rear of the guard.
  2. Appropriate compliments shall be paid when the reviewing officer arrives at the dais. The reviewing officer normally inspects the guard. Following the inspection, the guard marches past, in quick time, in line or column.
  3. After the march past, the guard returns to its original position. The band takes up a new position on the right flank of the guard between the march past line and the inspection line or in an alternate position suited to its subsequent involvement in the ceremony.

RETREAT (SUNSET)

  1. At the exact time of sunset, the guard commander orders PRESENT – ARMS, and:
    1. the guard acts as ordered;
    2. the band plays “Retreat” (“Orchestrated Sunset”), or, if no band is present, the bugler sounds “Retreat”; and
    3. the National Flag is slowly lowered.
  2. When the flag has been lowered and the call completed, the guard commander orders the guard to shoulder arms. If Colours are being carried, they are cased. If there is to be no Tattoo, the guard may then carry on with its duties as noted in paragraphs 15 and 16.

TATTOO

  1. Tattoo normally follows Retreat during twilight (see also paragraphs 20 and 21). Even when performed for purely ceremonial purposes, the routine usually includes the sounding of “First Post” and “Last Post”, and these calls are included in the sequence below. Unless it is to participate in the display, the guard stands at ease.
  2. The routine traditionally starts with the sounding of “First Post”, which may be followed by drum beating and a band display for entertainment. There are no set tunes for Tattoo, though the pause notes “Three Cheers” are often played before and after the chosen marches, with “doublings”, played between each march.
  3. An evening hymn may then be played.
  4. Following the hymn, the guard commander orders PRESENT – ARMS and the band plays the National Anthem, “O Canada” (see also Chapter 7 to A-AD-200-000/AG-000, The Honours, Flags and Heritage Structure of the CF soon to become A-DH-200-000/AG-000; The Heritage Structure of the CAF).
  5. The guard commander then orders SHOULDER – ARMS. Immediately thereafter, “Last Post” may be sounded.

THE DEPARTURE

  1. The guard commander marches to the dais and requests permission to carry on with the night’s duties. (If no guard is in attendance, the drum-major requests permission to march off.)
  2. The guard commander returns to his position and orders the appropriate compliment to the reviewing officer. Following the compliment, the guard and band march off the parade ground.

COMPLIMENTS

  1. Compliments are paid to the reviewing dignitary on arrival and before the guard marches to its duties.
  2. Compliments are also paid during the sounding of “Retreat” as the National Flag is lowered, and during the playing of the National Anthem.
  3. Compliments are not paid during “Last Post”, which is sounded as a routine duty call.

TATTOOS INDOORS AND AT DUSK

  1. A Tattoo may be performed separately, indoors or out, solely for the purposes of presenting an elaborate martial show for entertainment purposes. Under these circumstances, “First Post” and “Last Post” are often not sounded since no attempt is being made to simulate a working routine.
  2. If the National Flag is left flying during an outdoor Tattoo and lowered at the conclusion of the ceremony:
    1. it shall be illuminated after sunset; and
    2. “Retreat” (or “Orchestrated Sunset”) is sounded or played before the National Anthem.

SECTION 4 THE SUNSET CEREMONY (NAVAL)

INTRODUCTION

  1. The Sunset Ceremony is a display which combines elements of the Retreat, Tattoo and other ceremonial procedures. Field guns and a rifle Feu de Joie are fired to symbolize the origins of these ceremonies, when evening guns were fired and the night watch proved their weapons and cleared damp charges for the night.

NOTE

This ceremony is considered to be an “Exhibition and Display”. As such special drill sequences are performed to memorized routines and without the normal sequence of commands (see also Chapter 1, Section 1, paragraph 16).

  1. The ceremony was created by the navy based on naval battalion and naval field battery drills, and eventually evolved into the format described below. The ceremony is designed for:
    1. a 50-person guard;
    2. a section (two guns) of field artillery;
    3. two bands, one brass-reed and one bugle band (from the pattern of the Royal Marines band and drums, which is based on an infantry corps of drums and regimental band); and
    4. one flag signaller.
  2. Naval ranks and appointments are used in this section because of the ceremony’s origins, with equivalents noted in paragraph 12. Gun drill for the naval field guns normally used in the Sunset Ceremony is contained in Annex A.

GENERAL

  1. The ideal parade ground for this ceremony is 75 metres square.
  2. Units participating in the ceremony shall form in an assembly area removed from the view of spectators around the parade ground. They shall form up in the following order of march: the bands, the guard, and the No. 1 and No. 2 Gun Crews, one behind the other. When forming the guard, it shall be positioned so that, after marching on by the most direct route, halting and turning to face the dais, the rear rank of the guard will be the rank closest to the dais. This will allow the guard to march past, during Phase 3 of the ceremony, with its right flank closest to the dais and its front rank leading.
  3. Prior to marching onto the parade ground, the guard shall be numbered in two divisions so that centre rank personnel of each division knows the direction in which to move to form two ranks during Phase 4 of the ceremony. The centre file of each division shall also be identified so that guard members know the file on which to dress when required to dress by the centre.
  4. The guard shall march on in column of route, the guard commander positioning himself two paces in front of the centre file and the guard officer, two paces in rear of the centre file.
  5. It is preferable that the entrance to the parade ground be situated to the right of the dais (when facing the dais). Should the entrance be situated to the left of the dais, the guard shall be marched on in reverse order, i.e., left flank leading, so that it may be marched directly into position.
  6. The positioning of the guns and the direction of fire must be determined prior to the ceremony, bearing in mind the proximity of spectators, the guard and bands.
  7. In order to facilitate the precision and exactness that this ceremony requires, the parade ground should be suitably marked to indicate where the guard and bands will perform movements on the march.

SEQUENCE OF SUNSET CEREMONY (naval)

  1. The Sunset Ceremony is divided into eight phases as follows:
    1. Phase 1, The March On;
    2. Phase 2, Beating Retreat and Tattoo;
    3. Phase 3, The March Past;
    4. Phase 4, Section Drill;
    5. Phase 5, Feu de Joie;
    6. Phase 6, The Evening Hymn;
    7. Phase 7, Sunset; and
    8. Phase 8, The March Off.

PERSONNEL

  1. The personnel required for the ceremony are:
    1. Guard Commander – lieutenant (N) (captain);
    2. Guard Officer – sub-lieutenant (N) (lieutenant);
    3. Battery Officer – chief petty officer, second class (master warrant officer);
    4. Guides – two petty officers, first class (warrant officers);
    5. Gun Commanders – two petty officers, second class (sergeants);
    6. Guard – 48 leading seaman/able seaman (corporals/privates);
    7. Gun Crews – maximum 32 per gun and minimum 20 per gun (if guns are in position throughout the ceremony, five members per gun are required as a firing party);
    8. Bands – one brass-reed band and one bugle band; and
    9. Signalman – one able seaman (private).

PHASE 1: THE MARCH ON

  1. As the time approaches for units to march onto the parade ground, the bands, guard and gun crews shall be ordered to attention and the guard shall be ordered to shoulder arms. At the appointed time, the brass-reed band shall play a musical fanfare. Upon completion of the fanfare, the guard commander shall order GUARD, BANDS AND GUN CREWS, BY THE RIGHT (LEFT), QUICK – MARCH.
  2. Just before or immediately after wheeling into the parade ground entrance, depending upon the direction of their approach to the parade ground, the guides will position themselves so that they are one pace in front and one pace in rear of the rear rank.
  3. Upon wheeling into the entrance from the left flank of the parade ground, the No. 2 Gun Crew shall step out until they reach a position three paces to the left of No. 1 Gun Crew, when they shall resume a normal pace (see Figure 12-4-1).
  4. After entering the parade ground, the bands shall lead the procession by the most direct route to where the guard is required to halt. At this position, the band shall wheel right and proceed directly towards the dais. They will countermarch in front of the dais, proceed back towards the guard, countermarch once again in front of the guard and halt.
  5. On reaching their designated position in front of the dais, the guard shall mark time and, on the bass drummer’s signal, halt, turn to face the dais, and dress by the centre, observing a standard pause between all movements. On a signal from the front rank man of the centre file, each division shall turn their head and eyes to the front in succession from the centre.
  6. After halting and observing a standard pause, the guard commander shall step off and position himself three paces to the rear of the third file from the left. Similarly, and in time with the guard commander, the guard officer shall position himself three paces in rear of the third file from the right.
  7. Approaching the guard, both gun crews shall wheel half right, proceeding on a route which will bring them to a position in front of the guard. Upon reaching a position in front and on the right of the guard, they shall wheel half left to parallel the front rank of the guard and, upon reaching a position opposite the centre of the right division of the guard, the No. 1 Gun Crew shall wheel right, stepping short. The No. 2 Gun Crew shall proceed to a position opposite the centre of the left division of the guard and wheel right. When the No. 2 Gun Crew arrives in line with the No. 1 Gun Crew, the No. 1 Gun Crew shall resume a normal pace. Upon reaching a position halfway between the guard and the dais, the No. 1 Gun Crew shall wheel half right and the No. 2 Gun Crew half left. Both crews shall continue to their respective corners of the parade ground, wheel the guns into the previously determined position for firing, mark time and on the bass drummer’s signal, HALT.

Figure 12-4-1 Sunset Ceremony – Phase 1: The March On

  1. As the gun crews wheel half right and half left towards their respective corners of the parade ground, the battery officer shall move to his position in centre rear of the guard, at a predetermined distance. The battery officer shall be positioned where both crews can view his visual signals (see Section 5, paragraph 30).

PHASE 2: BEATING RETREAT AND TATTOO

  1. When the bands halt, one of the guns shall fire “The Evening Gun” as the signal to commence the Tattoo.
  2. The drum major and the drum section of the bugle band step off in quick time, advance 10 paces and countermarch (see Figure 12-4-2). They march back through the bands, breaking into the slow march. When the drum major and drummers have passed through the bands, they countermarch once again and break into the quick march.
  3. After the drummers break into the quick march, the bugle section of the bugle band step off, arriving in line in front of the drummers and one pace in front of the drum major. At a given signal, the drum major, drummers and buglers halt. The buglers observe a standard pause, incline inwards and play “First Post” (see Figure 12-4-3).

PHASE 3: THE MARCH PAST

  1. On completion of the “First Post”, the guard commander orders GUARD, MOVE TO THE LEFT IN THREES, LEFT – TURN; and GUARD AND BAND, QUICK – MARCH.
  2. The guard and band step off together, the buglers countermarching to resume their original position within the band. The band proceeds directly toward the dais (Figure 12-4-4) to Point A, where it wheels right, marches to Point B and again wheels right. Upon reaching Point C, the band shall wheel right and proceed directly toward the guard. Concurrently, the guard shall march to Point D, wheel right and proceed to Point E. As the guard wheels at Point D, the guides shall assume positions one pace in front and one pace in rear of the left rank. At Point E, the guard wheels right to march through the ranks of the band at Point F.
  3. The distance along the route A, B, C, F, at Figure 12-4-4 must be equal to the distance marched by the guard along route D, E, F, so that the guard will pass through the ranks of the band directly in front of the dais.
  4. After the guard has passed through the band, the band shall countermarch and follow the route of the guard. At Point C, the guard shall wheel left and proceed to the march past line. As the right guide reaches the march past line, the guard commander shall order GUARD, ADVANCE, LEFT – TURN, and after completing the turn, BY THE – RIGHT. The band wheels left at the march past line, dressing on the centre of the guard.
  5. Upon reaching Flag C (Figure 12-4-5, see also Figure 9-2-1 for the standard points along the march past line) the guard commander shall order GUARD, EYES – RIGHT, and when the guard has cleared Flag D, GUARD, EYES – FRONT.
  6. On completion of the march past and on arriving at Flag F, the guard commander shall order GUARD, MOVE TO THE RIGHT IN COLUMN OF THREES, RIGHT – TURN; LEFT – WHEEL; and LEFT – WHEEL. When in line with its original position, the guard shall wheel left and march to its original position, where the guard commander shall order GUARD – HALT; and GUARD, ADVANCE, LEFT – TURN. On completion of the turn, the guard shall dress automatically towards the centre, with the head and eyes turned to the front as detailed in paragraph 17. The band takes up a position in rear of the guard facing the dais.

PHASE 4: SECTION DRILL

  1. From his position within the band, the side drummer shall give a drum roll which will be followed by a single beat of the bass drum.

Figure 12-4-2 Sunset Ceremony – Phase 2: The Drums

Figure 12-4-3 Sunset Ceremony – Phase 2: The Buglers

Figure 12-4-4 Sunset Ceremony – Phase 3-1

  1. Acting on the single beat of the bass drum, the guard shall form two divisions, the right division turning right and the left division turning left. After completing the turn and observing a standard pause, both divisions step off together in quick time and march 20 paces. On the twentieth pace, both divisions turn to face the dais, the left division commencing their right turn with the right foot forward and on the ground. As both divisions turn, they shall mark time four paces, commencing with the first left foot pace after turning. During the four mark time paces, both divisions will form two ranks. This is accomplished by the centre rank taking a half pace left on the first mark time pace, the odd numbers then taking two half paces forward while the even numbers take two half paces back on the second and third mark time paces. The whole of both divisions complete the fourth mark time pace with the right foot and step off together in quick time on the fifth pace (left foot). Both divisions then will advance toward the dais in quick time for six paces before changing into slow time on the seventh pace (left foot). Both divisions continue to advance in slow time for six further paces and, on the next left foot, commence to fix bayonets at the shoulder, on the march, whilst marching a further 20 paces in slow time (see Section 5, paragraph 25). On the first left foot following the twentieth pace, both divisions change into quick time and march forward 16 additional paces, commencing four mark time paces on the first left foot following the sixteenth pace. On the completion of the fourth mark time pace, both divisions simultaneously shall turn inwards, taking two mark time paces to complete the turn. After taking two further mark time paces, both divisions march towards each other, stepping off with the left foot and, when both divisions meet in the centre, they shall halt on a bass drum signal. After halting, both divisions shall observe a standard pause, turn to face the dais, observe another standard pause and dress automatically by the centre. On a signal from the front rank man of the centre file, each file shall turn its head and eyes to the front in succession from the centre.

Figure 12-4-5 Sunset Ceremony – Phase 3-2

  1. As the guard changes into quick time after fixing bayonets, the band will step off in quick time and move straight forward towards the dais, coming to a halt on the drum major’s signal, in rear of the rejoined guard.

PHASE 5: FEU DE JOIE

  1. The guard commander gives the orders in Table 12-4-1:
Table 12-4-1 Preparation for the Feu de Joie
No.
No
Command Action
1 GUARD, ORDER – ARMS The guard orders arms.
2 GUARD, OPEN ORDER – MARCH The rear rank takes three half paces to the rear.
3 GUARD, SHOULDER DRESSING, RIGHT – DRESS The guard dresses to the right, taking up shoulder dressing intervals between files.
4 GUARD WILL UNFIX BAYONETS, UN – FIX The guard unfixes bayonets.
5 GUARD, BAYO – NETS The guard sheathes bayonets.
6 GUARD, ATTEN – TION The guard assumes the attention position.
  1. The Feu de Joie is fired as detailed in Chapter 9, Table 9-6-1, items 4 to 16 inclusive.

PHASE 6: THE EVENING HYMN

  1. After completion of the Feu de Joie, the guard shall be stood at ease.
  2. The brass-reed band plays an appropriate evening hymn.
  3. On completion of the hymn, the guard commander orders GUARD, ATTEN – TION; GUARD WILL FIX BAYONETS – FIX; GUARD, BAYONETS; and GUARD, ATTEN – TION.

PHASE 7: SUNSET

  1. After the guard has assumed the attention position, the signalman, from his position at the base of the flag pole, shall report to the guard commander ONE MINUTE TO SUNSET, SIR, and then prepare to lower the National Flag.
  2. The guard commander shall then order GUARD, SHOULDER – ARMS.
  3. On completion of the shoulder arms, the bugler sounds “Alert” and the band commences to play the “Orchestrated Sunset”. On the seventh measure of music, the bass drummer accentuates the beat on his drum. This is the signal for the guard commander to order GUARD, GENERAL SALUTE, PRESENT – ARMS.
  4. On the last movement of the present arms, the No. 1 gun commander fires one gun and the signalman commences to lower the National Flag. On completion of the “Orchestrated Sunset” the band plays the National Anthem, “O Canada” (see also Chapter 7 to A-AD -200-000/AG-000, The Honours, Flags and Heritage Structure of the CF, soon to become A-DH-200-000/AG-000; The Heritage Structure of the CAF ). The signalman shall time the lowering of the National Flag so that it is completed on the last note of the “Orchestrated Sunset”.

PHASE 8: THE MARCH OFF

  1. At the conclusion of the Anthem, the guard commander orders GUARD, SHOULDER – ARMS.
  2. On the last movement of the shoulder, the battery officer fires both guns. The bugler sounds “Carry On”.
  3. The guard commander orders GUARD, CLOSE ORDER – MARCH; and GUARD, REFORM THREE – RANKS.
  4. On the command CLOSE ORDER – MARCH, the gun crews limber up and form the order of march (see Annex A).
  5. The guard commander then orders GUARD, MOVE TO THE RIGHT IN THREES, RIGHT – TURN, and GUARD, BANDS AND GUN CREWS, QUICK – MARCH. The procession shall move off the parade ground in the following order of march: the guard, the bands, No. 1 and No. 2 Gun Crews, one behind the other. They shall march to the dispersal area, where the guard shall unfix bayonets prior to the units being dismissed.

SECTION 5 THE CEREMONY OF THE FLAGS

INTRODUCTION

  1. The Ceremony of the Flag is a display originally developed by the Royal Canadian Navy out of the Sunset Ceremony after the introduction of the Canadian National Flag in 1965. Because of this origin, naval ranks and appointments are used in this section, with equivalents noted in paragraph 11.
  2. The theme of the ceremony is distinctively Canadian. The National Flag of Canada, the flags of each province and territory are paraded together.
  3. The ceremony is designed to be held during the day or at sunset; in the latter case, an additional phase is completed.

GENERAL

  1. The ideal parade area should be 60 by 120 metres. The minimum requirement to perform the ceremony is 30 by 60 metres.
  2. Units participating in the ceremony shall form in an assembly area removed from the view of spectators situated around the parade ground. They shall form up in the following order of march: the band, the guard, and the No. 1 and No. 2 Gun Crews, one behind the other. The national and provincial/territorial flags shall be positioned at a six-pace interval abreast of the left flank of the guard, in the following order from front to rear:
    1. Nunavut Territory;
    2. Yukon Territory;
    3. the Province of Alberta;
    4. the Province of Prince Edward Island;
    5. the Province of Manitoba;
    6. the Province of Nova Scotia;
    7. the Province of Ontario;
    8. the senior escort to the National Flag;
    9. the National Flag of Canada;
    10. the junior escort to the National Flag;
    11. the Province of Quebec;
    12. the Province of New Brunswick;
    13. the Province of British Columbia;
    14. the Province of Saskatchewan;
    15. the Province of Newfoundland; and
    16. The Northwest Territories.
  3. Prior to marching onto the parade ground, the guard shall be numbered in two divisions so that centre rank personnel of each division knows the direction in which to move in order to form two ranks in Phase 2 of the ceremony. The centre file shall also be identified so that guard members know the file on which to dress when required to dress by the centre.
  4. The guard shall march on in column of route, the guard commander positioning himself two paces in front and the guard officer, two paces in rear of the centre file.
  5. It is preferable that the entrance to the parade ground be situated to the left of the dais (when facing the dais). Should the entrance be situated to the right of the dais, the guard shall be marched on in reverse order, i.e., left flank leading, so that it will be positioned properly when halted.
  6. The positioning of the guns and the direction of fire must be determined prior to the ceremony, bearing in mind the proximity of spectators, guard and band.
  7. In order to facilitate the precision and exactness that this ceremony requires, the parade ground should be suitably marked to indicate where the guard and band will perform movements on the march.

PERSONNEL

  1. The personnel required to perform the ceremony are:
    1. Guard Commander – lieutenant (N) (captain);
    2. Guard Officer – sub-lieutenant (N) (lieutenant);
    3. National Flag Bearer – sub-lieutenant (N) (lieutenant);
    4. Battery Officer – chief petty officer, second class (master warrant officer);
    5. Guides – two petty officers, first class (warrant officers);
    6. National Flag Escort – two leading seaman/able seaman (corporals/privates);
    7. Gun Commanders – two petty officers, second class (sergeants);
    8. Provincial and Territorial Flag Bearers – 13 petty officers, second class (sergeants);
    9. Guard – 48 leading seaman/able seaman (corporals/privates);
    10. Gun Crews – maximum 32 per gun and minimum 20 per gun (if guns are in position throughout the ceremony, five members per gun are required as a firing party);
    11. Bands – one brass-reed band or one bugle band; and
    12. Signalman – one able seaman (private) (if ceremony is performed at sunset).

SEQUENCE OF THE CEREMONY OF THE FLAGS

  1. The Ceremony of the Flags is divided into six phases as follows:
    1. Phase 1, The March On;
    2. Phase 2, Section Drill;
    3. Phase 3, Feu de Joie;
    4. Phase 4, Salute to the Flags;
    5. Phase 5, The March Past; and
    6. Phase 6, Sunset (if appropriate).

PHASE 1: THE MARCH ON

  1. As the time approaches to march onto the parade ground, the band, guard, flag bearers and gun crews shall be ordered to attention and the guard shall be ordered to shoulder arms. At the appointed time, the band shall play a musical fanfare. Upon completion of the fanfare, the guard commander shall order GUARD, BAND, FLAG BEARERS AND GUN CREWS, BY THE LEFT (RIGHT), QUICK – MARCH.
  2. Throughout the ceremony, the guides shall position themselves on the directing flank, changing position as required just before or immediately after wheeling.
  3. Upon wheeling into the entrance of the parade ground, the No. 2 Gun Crew shall step out until they reach a position three paces to the left of No. 1 Gun Crew, when they shall resume a normal pace.
  4. After entering the parade ground, the band shall lead the procession by the most direct route to where the guard and flag bearers are required to halt. At this position, the band shall wheel left and proceed directly towards the dais. At the march past line the band will wheel right and proceed to Flag B where it shall change into slow time, immediately countermarch and proceed along the march past line to Flag E, with the drum major and band director saluting the reviewing officer or dignitary as they pass. At Flag E, the band shall change into quick time and immediately countermarch, proceeding back on the march past line to a position in front of the dais where the band shall wheel right. Nearing the flag bearers, the band shall countermarch and halt in a position in front and centre of the flag bearers (see Figure 12-5-1).
  5. As the guard and flag bearers enter the parade ground, the flag bearers shall maintain themselves at a six-pace interval from the left flank of the guard and in individual alignment with the appropriate file of the guard. On reaching their position in front of the dais, the guard and flag bearers shall mark time and, acting on the bass drummer’s signal, halt, turn to face the dais, and dress by the centre, observing a standard pause between movements. While the guard and the remainder of the flag bearers are dressing, the National Flag and Escort shall take up a position, three paces forward and in the centre of the provincial flags (see Figure 12-5-1).
  6. After ensuring that the National Flag is in position, the front rank member of the centre file of the guard will give a vocal signal and each division of the guard and flag bearers will turn their head and eyes to the front in succession from the centre.
  7. After halting and observing a standard pause, the guard commander shall step off and position himself three paces in front of the third file from the right. Similarly, and in time with the guard commander, the guard officer shall position himself three paces in front of the third file from the left.
  8. Approaching the guard, both gun crews shall wheel half left, proceeding on a route which will bring them to a position in front of the flag bearers. Upon reaching a position in front and on the left of the flag bearers, they shall wheel half right to parallel the flag bearers and, upon reaching a position opposite the centre of the left half of the flag bearers, the No. 2 Gun Crew shall wheel left, stepping short. The No. 1 Gun Crew shall proceed to a position opposite the centre of the right half of the flag bearers and wheel left. When the No. 1 Gun Crew arrives in line with the No. 2 Gun Crew, No. 2 Gun Crew shall resume a normal pace. Upon reaching a position half-way between the flag bearers and the dais, the No. 1 Gun Crew shall wheel half right and the No. 2 Gun Crew half left. Both crews shall continue to their respective corners of the parade ground, wheel the guns into positions previously determined for firing, mark time, and on the bass drummer’s signal, HALT.
  9. As the gun crews wheel half right and half left towards their respective corners of the parade ground, the battery officer shall move to his position in the centre rear of the guard, at a predetermined distance. The battery officer shall be positioned where both gun crews can view his visual signals.

PHASE 2: SECTION DRILL

  1. From his position within the band, the side drummer shall give a drum roll which will be followed by a single beat of the bass drum.

Figure 12-5-1 Ceremony of the Flags – Phase 1

  1. Acting on the single beat of the bass drum, the guard shall form two divisions, the right division turning right and the left division turning left. After completing the turn and observing a standard pause, both divisions step off together in quick time and march 20 paces. On the twentieth pace, both divisions turn to face the dais, the left division commencing their right turn with the right foot forward and on the ground. As both divisions turn, they shall mark time four paces, commencing with the first left foot pace after turning. During the four mark time paces, both divisions will form two ranks; this is accomplished by the centre rank taking a half pace left on the first mark time pace, the odd numbers then taking two half paces forward while the even numbers take two half paces back on the second and third mark time paces. The whole of both divisions complete the fourth mark time pace with the right foot and step off together in quick time on the fifth pace (left foot). Both divisions then will advance toward the dais in quick time for six paces before changing into slow time on the seventh pace (left foot). Both divisions continue to advance in slow time for six further paces and, on the next left foot, commence to fix bayonets at the shoulder, on the march, whilst marching a further 20 paces in slow time (see paragraphs 22 to 24). On the first left foot following the twentieth pace, both divisions change into quick time and march forward 16 additional paces, commencing four mark time paces on the first left foot following the sixteenth pace. On the completion of the fourth mark time pace, both divisions simultaneously shall turn inwards, taking two mark time paces to complete the turn. After taking two further mark time paces, both divisions march towards each other, stepping off with the left foot and, when both divisions meet in the centre, they shall halt on a bass drum signal. After halting, both divisions shall observe a standard pause, turn to face the dais, observe another standard pause and dress automatically by the centre. On a signal from the front rank man of the centre file, each file shall turn its head and eyes to the front in succession from the centre (see Figure 12-5-2).
  2. The provincial flag bearers shall turn right and left with their respective divisions, carry out the same foot drill as their respective division, and maintain their position, six paces in front of the front rank of their division throughout the drill. The National Flag bearer and escorts shall stand fast until both divisions of the guard have advanced to face the dais and formed two ranks. They shall then step off with the guard, changing into slow and quick time with the guard, marking time when they have completed the 16 paces in quick time and halting with the guard on the bass drum signal. The National Flag bearer and escort shall maintain their relative position nine paces in front of the front rank of the guard (three paces in front of the provincial flag bearers) throughout the foot drill.

FIXING BAYONETS ON THE MARCH

  1. On the seventh pace of slow march:
    1. One. Grasp the bayonet handle with the left hand, with the thumb over the ring of the bayonet, the back of the hand to the body and the fingers around the handle. Rotate the scabbard counter clockwise. Hold the scabbard point upward in line with the left shoulder blade. The fingers are to be held together in an all-around grasp;
    2. Two. Withdraw the bayonet from the scabbard to the full extent of the left arm keeping the bayonet behind the back;
    3. Three. Bring the bayonet to a position in front of the body, arm extended to an angle of 45 degrees in line with the right shoulder. Force the wrist down so as to make the arm straight;
    4. Four. Turn the head to the right and look directly at the muzzle. Simultaneously, bend the left elbow and align the bayonet with the bayonet stud and force the rifle butt one foot to the rear of the right hip;
    5. Five. Fix the bayonet to the bayonet stud, retaining an all-round grip of the bayonet handle with the left hand; and
    6. Six. Cut the left hand to the side. Simultaneously, force the rifle to the position of the shoulder and turn the head to the front.
  2. Each movement is executed as the left foot is forward and on the ground and on the heavy beat of the drum.

PHASE 3: FEU DE JOIE

  1. The guard commander shall give the orders in Table 12-5-1.

Figure 12-5-2 Ceremony of the Flags – Phase 2

PHASE 4: SALUTE TO THE FLAGS

  1. On the commands GUARD, SHOULDER – ARMS; and GUARD, GENERAL SALUTE, PRESENT – ARMS, the guard acts as ordered. On the completion of the last movement of the present arms, the provincial flag bearers shall observe a standard pause, turn outwards, the six flags in front of the right division turning right and those in front of the left division turning left. After observing a standard pause, both step off at the slow march, executing two successive right and left wheels to move between the front and rear ranks of the guard. When passing through the ranks, the six flags that previously stood in front of the left division shall pass those who stood in front of the right division on their left. On reaching the right and left flanks of the guard, they shall wheel right and left once again. Abreast of their original line, they shall wheel inward and halt, each occupying the other’s former position. After observing a standard pause, the provincial flag bearers simultaneously shall turn to face the front (see Figure 12-5-3).
  2. As the provincial flag bearers turn outwards, the National Flag bearer and the escorts shall step off in quick time, immediately wheeling left through full 90 degrees, then halting. The National Flag party and the provincial flag bearers then shall step off together in slow time. The National Flag party shall proceed towards the left flank of the guard for 20 paces and, on the twentieth pace, execute a right about turn, proceed across the front of the guard and, on the fifty-eighth pace, execute a left about turn to proceed back to the position from whence they commenced the slow march, halting on the eighty-fourth pace. As the provincial flag bearers turn to face their front, the National Flag party shall turn about, wheel right into their original position and halt. After observing a standard pause, they shall turn about to face the front. The paces executed during the two about turns by the National Flag party shall be counted in the 84 paces marched in slow time, the whole of the trooping of all flags being performed to a count of 84 paces.
  3. The guns shall fire, on order of the battery officer, on every fourth pace until 21 guns have been fired. The battery officer shall signal the order to fire by adopting the recover position from the carry, then pointing his sword at the gun required to fire. When pointing the sword, the right arm shall be fully extended, with the sword and arm being held parallel to the ground. Upon the gun being fired, the battery officer shall resume the recover position prior to signalling the second gun to fire. In the event of a misfire, the battery officer shall resume the recover position and then point his sword at the alternate gun. The guns should be rotated for each round fired.
  4. The band shall commence to play the Royal Anthem, “God Save The Queen”, and the National Anthem “O Canada”, as the flag bearers step off. The guard remains at the present throughout.
  5. Upon completion of the National Anthem, the guard commander shall order GUARD, SHOULDER – ARMS; and GUARD, ORDER – ARMS and the guard shall act as ordered.

PHASE 5: THE MARCH PAST

  1. On the command GUARD, CLOSE ORDER – MARCH, the guard acts as ordered, the limber box lids are slammed down on the order GUARD and MARCH, is the order for the gun crews to limber up (see Annex A).
  2. On the command GUARD, FORM THREE – RANKS, the guard acts as ordered. Automatic dressing is not carried out because the common frontage with the flags should not change. On the second movement of the form threes, the even numbers in the front rank, i.e., those on the left of the man who moved to form the centre rank, take a side pace to the right and similarly, the even numbers in the rear rank take a side pace to the left.
  3. The guard commander then shall order GUARD, SHOULDER – ARMS; and GUARD, OUTWARDS – TURN. On the executive order TURN, the guard divisions shall turn outwards and the provincial flag bearers shall turn inwards; the National Flag bearer and escorts turn right.
Table 12-5-1 The Feu de Joie
No. Command Action Remarks
1 GUARD, ORDER – ARMS The guard orders arms. -
2 GUARD, OPEN ORDER – MARCH The rear rank takes three half paces to the rear. -
3 GUARD, SHOULDER DRESSING, RIGHT – DRESS The guard dresses to the right taking up shoulder dressing. -
4 GUARD, EYES – FRONT All heads and eyes are turned to the front. -
5 GUARD WILL UNFIX BAYONETS, UN – FIX The guard shall unfix bayonets. -
6 GUARD, BAYO – NETS The guard sheathe their bayonets. -
7 GUARD, ATTEN – TION The guard assumes the attention position. -
8 GUARD, WITH BLANK CARTRIDGES, STANDING – LOAD - -
9 GUARD, PRESENT The rifles are brought to the right shoulder at an angle of 30 degrees. Prior to this command being given, the guard officers shall step forward three half paces.
10 - - The drummers give a drum roll and the battery officer fires one gun. When the gun fires, the right guide fires his rifle. The remainder of the guard fire consecutively from right to the left in the front rank and left to right in the rear rank.
11 GUARD, RE – LOAD The guard reload their rifles. The sequence, load, present, drum roll, field gun fire, and rifle fire is carried out three times.
12 GUARD, MAKE – SAFE The guard return to the standing load position and unload their rifles. -
13 GUARD, ORDER – ARMS The guard order arms, from the examine position. -
14 GUARD WILL FIX BAYONETS – FIX The guard withdraw their bayonets. -
15 GUARD, BAYO – NETS The guard fix bayonets to their rifles. -
16 GUARD, ATTEN – TION The guard assumes the attention position. -

Figure 12-5-3 Ceremony of the Flags – Phase 4

  1. On the command GUARD, BAND AND GUN CREWS, QUICK – MARCH, the right division of the guard wheels right, the left division wheels left, the provincial flag bearers wheel right and left away from the dais. The National Flag bearer and escorts wheel right and form in the centre of the file of provincial flag bearers, and the flag bearers march through the band. After the flag bearers have passed through the band, the band countermarches, stepping off in quick time. The gun crews shall step off, from their positions at the corners of the parade square, angle across the parade square and fall in for the march past, positioned in rear of the band. As the procession passes the battery officer, he shall fall in between the gun crews at the head of the gun battery. The guard commander and guard officer shall adopt a position three paces from and abreast of the centre of their respective division of the guard. The guard officer, during the first left wheel executed by the left division, shall adopt a position three paces from and abreast of the rear rank. Prior to the first left wheel executed by the left division, the left marker shall adopt a position one pace in front of the rear rank.
  2. Upon reaching the march past line opposite Flag A (see Figure 9-2-1), each sub-unit commander shall order _____, ADVANCE, LEFT – TURN. On reaching Flag C, the sub-units shall be ordered, _____, EYES – RIGHT, and upon clearing Flag D _____, EYES – FRONT. On arrival at Flag F, each sub-unit commander shall order _____, MOVE TO THE RIGHT IN COLUMN OF ROUTE, RIGHT – TURN, followed by two successive left wheels.
  3. The procession then shall be marched off the parade ground to the dispersal area where the guard shall unfix bayonets and all shall be dismissed.

SUNSET

  1. If the lowering of the National Flag flown on a flagpole is to be performed at sunset with the ceremony of the flags, it shall follow Phase 5. Upon completion of the march past, each sub-unit shall return to its original position (see Figure 12-5-1) from where the guard commander shall give the orders in Table 12-5-2.
  2. Upon completion of the sunset portion of the ceremony, the guard commander shall proceed as detailed in paragraph 38.

BAND MUSIC

  1. Phase 1
    1. Fanfare – Played just prior to ceremony.
    2. March (Quick) – Played until cut off.
    3. March (Slow) – 16 bars.
    4. March (Quick) – Played until the band halts in front of guard.
  2. Phase 2
    1. March (Quick) – Commence playing as the guard steps off (duration 30 paces).
    2. March (Slow) – The change from the quick to the slow is immediate (duration 38 paces).
    3. March (Quick) – This change is also immediate and can be the same quick march as the previous one. This march is played until both sections of the guard meet, at which time the halt is given on the bass drum at the end of a phase.
  3. Phase 4
    1. March (Slow) – Begins as the flag bearers step off (duration 84 paces).
    2. The Royal Anthem, “God Save The Queen”.
    3. The National Anthem, “O Canada”.
Table 12-5-2 Ceremony of the Flags: Sunset
No. Command Remarks
1 GUARD, ORDER – ARMS -
2 GUARD, STAND AT – EASE Guard stands at ease and the flag bearers order flags and stand at ease.
3 GUARD, STAND – EASY The whole parade, less the flag bearers, lowers their heads.
4 - The band plays a hymn and the signalman reports “One minute to Sunset, Sir”.
5 GUARD, ATTEN – TION -
6 GUARD, SHOULDER – ARMS -
7 - The signalman reports “Sunset, Sir”.
8 GENERAL SALUTE, PRESENT – ARMS On the completion of the last movement of the present, one gun is fired. The band plays the “Orchestrated Sunset” and the National Anthem (see also Chapter 7 to A-AD-200-000/ AG-000, The Honours, Flags and Heritage Structure of the CF, soon to be A-DH-200-000/AG-000, The Heritage Structure of the CAF). The National Flag flown from a flagpole is lowered during the playing of the “Orchestrated Sunset” and completed on the last note of that piece.
9 GUARD, SHOULDER – ARMS -
10 GUARD, ORDER – ARMS -
  1. Phase 5
    1. March (Quick) – Preceded by a five-beat roll on the drums; band standing fast until flag bearers have marched through the band.
    2. Navy, Regimental, Air or Command Quick March – five-beat roll is given as the first section is turned into line to march past. This is played until all sections have marched past.
    3. March (Quick) – Played to take all sections off the field.
  2. Sunset
    1. Evening Hymn.
    2. “Orchestrated Sunset” (Retreat).
    3. The National Anthem (see also Chapter 7, A-AD-200-000/AG-000, Honours, Flags and Heritage Structure of the CF (soon to become A-DH-200-000/AG-000; The Heritage Structure of the CAF)).

Figure 12-5-4 Ceremony of the Flags – Phase 5

SECTION 6 SPECIAL OCCASIONS

GENERAL

  1. Normal unit organization and planning suffices for routine parades and concerts. For special, complex occasions, such as elaborate tattoos and music festivals, a separate project staff must be established. This section provides guidance to assist with the technical advice to planning staffs in such a project’s development.
  2. The operational commander ordering the programme is responsible for appointing the show producer or programme director and forming the project staff. Unless the programme involves only a simple series of concert performances, the producer will usually be a line officer, with a senior Music Branch officer or Director of Music acting as a technical adviser and the programme’s musical director.
  3. Special occasions vary widely. Guidance for a range of examples are provided in the following references:
    1. Sections 1 to 5 detail special ceremonies, including a full retreat ceremony with a traditional tattoo. The customary musical requirement for such ceremonies normally needs little advance planning.
    2. A-PD-202-001/FP-000, CF Military Bands and Marches, Volume 1 (Band Instructions) (soon to become A-DH-202-001/FP-001; CAF Music Instructions, Vol 1, Operations and administration).

PLANNING SEQUENCE

  1. It is essential to start planning as early as possible. Although traditional or simple retreat and tattoo ceremonies can be arranged on reasonably short notice with local resources, more complex events will require considerable advance planning.

FINANCES

  1. Traditional retreat and tattoo ceremonies are often performed as a free public spectacle. More elaborate shows, especially indoors, require admission charges, both to help defray expenses and – often just as important – to attract audiences. The public often associates “free” with amateur performances put on as much to involve the performers as to entertain the audience. Experience indicates that quality shows are expected to have a cost for admission.
  2. If government funds have been directly expended for such things as hall deposits, these must be repaid to clear accounts. It is contrary to government regulations to mix public and non-public organizations or outside sponsors or partners. Any profits gained from an event should be contributed to an acceptable charitable organization to avoid charges of advantage.
  3. The same considerations apply to merchandising receipts derived from the sale of souvenirs, programmes, recordings and the like.
  4. Further information on the subject of finances, sponsors, partners and charities, and communications strategy is contained in A-PD-202-001/FP-000, CF Military Bands and Marches, Volume 1 (Band Instructions) (soon to become A-DH-202-001/FP-001; CAF Music Instructions, Vol 1, Operations and administration)

ANNEX A NAVAL CEREMONIAL SALUTING GUN DRILL

GENERAL

  1. Naval ceremonial saluting guns are used in the Sunset Ceremony and the Ceremony of the Flags, and may be used in state and military funerals.
  2. The gun crew consists of one junior officer (funerals) or petty officer, 1st class (warrant officer) (funerals, Sunset Ceremony or Ceremony of the Flags) and 32 leading seamen/able seamen (corporals/privates). Their positions on the gun are illustrated in Figure 12A-1.

TAKE UP DRAG ROPES

  1. On the command TAKE UP DRAG ROPES BY NUMBERS, SQUAD – ONE:
    1. bend the knees and, keeping the back straight and head up, grasp the loop of the drag rope by the forward edge, with the back of the hand down; and
    2. simultaneously, numbers 9, 10, 19 and 20, keeping their head and eyes to the front, grasp the pole slats.
  2. On the command SQUAD – TWO:
    1. return to the position of attention; and
    2. simultaneously, numbers 9, 10, 19 and 20 bring the pole up.
  3. On the command SQUAD – THREE:
    1. drag rope numbers take one pace forward; and
    2. reverse drag rope numbers take one pace step back.
  4. On the command TAKE UP DRAG – ROPES, the three movements are combined. A standard pause is observed between movements.

GROUND DRAG ROPES

  1. On the command GROUND DRAG ROPES BY NUMBERS, SQUAD – ONE:
    1. drag rope numbers take one pace step back; and
    2. reverse drag rope numbers take one pace forward.
  2. On the command SQUAD – TWO:
    1. bend the knees and, keeping the back straight and the head up, place drag ropes on the ground; and
    2. simultaneously, numbers 9, 10, 19 and 20 allow the pole to go down.
  3. On the command SQUAD – THREE, all assume the position of attention.

Figure 12A-1 Order of March, Gun Carriage Crew

  1. On the command GROUND DRAG – ROPES, the three movements are combined. A standard pause is observed between movements.

QUICK MARCH

  1. On the command QUICK – MARCH, numbers 17 and 18, 27 and 28 lock forearms, grasping the hands, fingers interlocked in a horizontal position. Drag ropes and reverse drag ropes are brought horizontal to the ground by bending the elbows.

WHEELING

  1. On the command RIGHT (LEFT) – WHEEL, the gun carriage crew gradually change direction by wheeling, until the command FOR – WARD is given.

HALT

  1. On the command GUN CREW – HALT, given as the right foot comes forward and is on the ground:
    1. the crew halts and the drag ropes and reverse drag ropes are brought down to the full extent of the arms; and
    2. numbers 17 and 18, 27 and 28 unlock their arms and cut their hands to their sides.

OPEN ORDER MARCH

  1. On the command OPEN ORDER MARCH, BY NUMBERS, SQUAD – ONE, with the exception of the numbers 9, 10, 19 and 20, the crew turns outwards.
  2. On the command SQUAD – TWO:
    1. drag rope and reverse drag rope numbers march out ten paces and halt on the tenth pace at a 90 degree angle to the gun (see Figure 12A-2);
    2. numbers 1 and 2 let go the drag ropes, and take up a position in rear of the limber;
    3. numbers 3 and 4 let go the drag ropes, and take up a position at their respective limber wheel; and
    4. numbers 21 and 22 let go the reverse drag ropes and take up a position at their respective gun wheel, facing inwards.
  3. On the command SQUAD – THREE, the reverse drag rope and pole numbers about turn by turning inwards, i.e., odd numbers turn left about, even numbers turn right (Figure 12A-2).
  4. On the command OPEN ORDER – MARCH, the three movements are combined. A standard pause is observed between the movements.

UNLIMBER

  1. On the command UNLIMBER BY NUMBERS, SQUAD – ONE:
    1. numbers 1 and 2, bending from the waist, take hold of the trail;
    2. number 1 removes the pin;
    3. numbers 1 and 2 lift the trail clear of the limber hook;
    4. numbers 3 and 4 grasp the limber wheels, with the backs of their hands down, and hold the limber steady; and
    5. numbers 21 and 22 take hold of the gun wheels, with the backs of their hands down.
  2. On the command SQUAD – TWO:
    1. reverse drag rope numbers take one pace forward;
    2. numbers 21 and 22 move the gun one pace forward; and
    3. numbers 1 and 2, holding the trail, take one pace forward.
  3. On the command UN – LIMBER, the two movements are combined. A standard pause is observed between the movements.

LOAD

  1. On the command LOAD:
    1. the leading numbers (5, 7, 6, 8, 27, 29, 31, 28, 30 and 32) take a pace forward with the outside foot and then kneel on the inside knee, hands crossed on their knee, outside hand on top;
    2. the rear numbers (11, 13, 15, 17, 12, 14, 16, 18, 23, 25, 24 and 26) take a pace to the rear with the inside foot and then kneel on the inside knee, hands crossed on their knee, outside hand on top;
    3. the drag ropes and reverse drag ropes are placed on the ground;
    4. numbers 3 and 4 open their respective limber box lids and then kneel on the inside knee, hands crossed on their knee, outside hand on top;
    5. numbers 9 and 10 kneel on their inside knee, resting their inside arms on the pole, holding the slat with their outside hand;
    6. numbers 1, 2, 19 and 20 kneel on their inside knee, hands crossed on their knee, outside hand on top; and
    7. numbers 21 and 22 take up a position in rear of their respective gun wheel, kneeling on their inside knee with hands crossed on their knee, outside hand on top.
  2. Figure 12A-3 depicts the positions occupied by the following numbers:
    1. Number 1, loading number;
    2. Number 2, extracting number;
    3. Number 21, firing number;
    4. Number 22, breech worker;
    5. Number 3, ammunition supply number;
    6. Number 4, cylinder return number.

Figure 12A-2 Open Order March

Figure 12A-3 The Load Position

LIMBER UP

  1. When the command GUARD, CLOSE ORDER MARCH BY NUMBERS, SQUAD – ONE, is given on the cautionary word GUARD, numbers 3 and 4 shall close the limber box lids.
  2. On the executive word of command ONE:
    1. all the gun crew except numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, 9, 10, 19, 20, 21 and 22 bend down and grasp the drag rope loops; and
    2. numbers 9, 10, 19 and 20 bend down and grasp the pole slats.
  3. On the command SQUAD – TWO, all those detailed in subparagraphs 24a and b shall assume the position of attention, holding the drag ropes and pole slats with both hands in front of the body.
  4. On the command SQUAD – THREE:
    1. numbers 1 and 2 grasp the trail;
    2. numbers 3 and 4 grasp their respective limber wheel; and
    3. numbers 21 and 22 grasp the gun wheels, with the backs of their hands down.
  5. On the command SQUAD – FOUR, numbers 1 and 2 lift the trail.
  6. On the command SQUAD – FIVE:
    1. drag rope and pole numbers take one pace forward;
    2. numbers 3 and 4 move to the limber by turning the wheels;
    3. numbers 1 and 2 place the ring of the trail on the limber hook;
    4. number 1 replaces the pin; and
    5. numbers 21 and 22 hold the gun steady.
  7. On the command SQUAD – SIX, the gun crew returns to the position of attention.
  8. On the command SQUAD – SEVEN:
    1. drag rope and pole numbers about turn by turning inwards; and
    2. numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, 21 and 22 turn to face their respective position on the drag ropes.
  9. On the command GUARD, CLOSE ORDER – MARCH given by the guard commander or the gun commander, the seven movements are combined. A standard pause is observed between the movements.

QUICK MARCH AFTER LIMBER UP

  1. On the command QUICK MARCH BY NUMBERS, SQUAD – ONE:
    1. drag rope numbers and reverse drag rope numbers march forward nine paces and halt; and
    2. numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, 21 and 22 step off and take up their positions on the drag ropes.
  2. On the command SQUAD – TWO, the drag rope and reverse drag rope numbers turn to the front.
  3. On the command SQUAD – THREE, the disengaged hands are cut to the side.
  4. On the command QUICK – MARCH given by the guard commander or the gun commander, the three movements are combined. A standard pause is observed between movements.

FUNERAL DRILL – GENERAL

  1. For funerals, equipment consists of a field gun carriage, limber, two drag ropes and two reverse drag ropes. The gun carriage is fitted with a funeral board which has straps for securing the casket.
  2. The gun crew consists of one junior officer or petty officer, 1st class (warrant officer) and 32 leading seamen/able seamen (corporals/ privates). In a state funeral, four drag ropes and four reverse drag ropes and 28 additional personnel are required (see Figure 12A-4).
  3. The gun crew are formed up, at either end of the gun carriage, facing inwards, in four or eight ranks as appropriate (see figures 12A-4 and 12A-5).

FUNERAL DRILL – POSITIONING THE GUN CARRIAGE

  1. On the command FALL – IN, the gun crew take up their position beside the drag ropes.
  2. On the command LEAD SECTION, ABOUT – TURN, the lead section acts as ordered.
  3. On the command TAKE UP DRAG – ROPES:
    1. the drag ropes are taken up;
    2. the four personnel on the pole lower the pole to level the casket board; and
    3. numbers 17 and 18 and Numbers 27 and 28 link arms.
  4. The gun carriage moves off at the quick march and is positioned to receive the casket. The gun carriage is positioned correctly when the rear section of the gun crew is just clear of the church entrance.

FUNERAL DRILL – RECEIVING THE CASKET

  1. On the command LEAD SECTION, ABOUT – TURN, the lead section:
    1. about turns; and
    2. changes hands on the drag ropes.
  2. On the command REAR SECTION, THREE PACES RIGHT AND LEFT CLOSE – MARCH, the rear section act as ordered.
  3. On the command REAR SECTION, ONE PACE FORWARD – MARCH, the rear section act as ordered.
  4. On the command REAR SECTION, INWARDS – TURN, the rear section act as ordered.
  5. The gun carriage is now ready to receive the casket.

Figure 12A-4 Naval Gun Crew – State Funeral

Figure 12A-5 Naval Gun Crew – Military Funeral

  1. When the casket has been secured and the bearer party are in position alongside the gun carriage, on the command LEAD SECTION, ABOUT, REAR SECTION, RIGHT AND LEFT – TURN, the gun crew turn to face the front and the lead section change hands on the drag ropes.
  2. On the command REAR SECTION, THREE PACES RIGHT AND LEFT CLOSE – MARCH, the rear section act as ordered.
  3. The gun carriage is now ready to move off.
  4. While the gun carriage is moving, the rear section shall keep the reverse drag ropes taut.

FUNERAL DRILL – REMOVAL OF THE CASKET

  1. After the gun carriage is halted, the command LEAD SECTION, ABOUT – TURN is given.
  2. On the command REAR SECTION, THREE PACES RIGHT AND LEFT CLOSE – MARCH, the rear section act as ordered.
  3. On the command REAR SECTION, ONE PACE FORWARD – MARCH, the rear section act as ordered.
  4. On the command REAR SECTION, INWARDS – TURN, the rear section act as ordered.
  5. The casket now is removed from the gun carriage.
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