Senior Advisors – Overview and Priorities

Archived content

This page was proactively published to meet the requirements of the Access to Information Act. It is a historical record which was valid when published, but may now contain information which is out of date.

  • Assistant Deputy Minister (Data, Innovation, Analytics) – Stephen Burt

    Download placemat [PDF, 400KB]

    Biography

    • Mr. Burt has spent 25 years in the Public Service, including Revenue Canada, the Privy Council, National Defence and most recently as Assistant Chief of Defence Intelligence at Canadian Forces Intelligence Command, before joining DIA in July 2018.

    Mandate

    • Provide strategic leadership, governance and guidance to successfully transition National Defence to a data-driven organization that manages data as an enterprise asset and uses it effectively for decision-making.
    • Vision is to ensure data is leveraged in all aspects of Defence programs, enhancing our capabilities and decision-making, and providing an information advantage in military operations.

    Key facts

    • Total Employees: 100 (68 FTE, 9 Casual, 7 Students, 16 Military) as of 19/08/21
    • Budget: ~$16 million (2021/2022 fiscal year), and ~$55 million devoted to executing DND/CAF-wide projects
    • Primary location(s): 3rd Floor, 285 Coventry Rd, Ottawa, ON K1K 4M7
    • L1 structure:
      • ADM Data, Innovation, Analytics
        • Data, Analytics, Strategy and Innovation
        • Digital Enterprise Modernization
        • Corporate Planning and Reporting

    Key partners

    Internal:

    • Assistant Deputy Ministers
    • Information Management
    • Material
    • Finance
    • Vice Chief Defence Staff

    External:

    • Chief Data Officer Council members
    • Treasury Board Secretariat
    • Statistics Canada
    • Canada School of Public Service Digital Academy
    • Public Services and Procurement Canada
    • Private Sector (e.g., SAP Defence Interest Group, which Canada chairs)
    • Academia
    • Five-Eyes Partners

    Top issues

    Enterprise-wide Adoption of Analytics

    • Ensuring access to timely and high-quality data analytics services.
    • Adoption of emerging data analytics capabilities and practices, such as predictive analytics.
    • Evolving a culture where data is foundational for decision-making.
    • Challenge: Modernizing business processes so that reliable, relevant data can be accessed to inform evidence-based decision-making.

    Departmental Data Governance

    • The DND/CAF Data Strategy was released in September 2019.
    • An implementation plan is being developed to communicate expectations to all L1s.
    • Challenge: Transitioning from 20 years of ungoverned enterprise data to a real data-driven culture relies on creating a world-class data governance framework, sustained senior executive support, and substantial changes to our business processes.

    Defence Resource Business Modernization Programme

    • Vendor support for the current Defence Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system expires in 2027.
    • DND will use this as an opportunity to adopt industry best practices and modern technology tools, improving decision support and operational effectiveness.  
    • Challenge: [REDACTED], and moving this complex project successfully through options analysis and into definition in late 2022.

    Professional Conduct

    • In April 2021, ADM(DIA) and ADM(IM) were tasked with identifying and integrating data assets related to professional conduct.
    • Data discovery found 31 data assets held by 15 L1s under 50+ policies and laws.
    • DIA is collaborating with CPCC to define priority use cases to improve data and create digital processes.
    • Challenge: Conduct definitions vary and customized data assets are not interoperable or designed for Defence-wide reporting. Data quality is uneven and governance is limited. Integration will require changed practices and significantly improved data stewardship.
  • Acting Assistant Deputy Minister (Defence Research and Development Canada) – Sophie Galarneau

    Download placemat [PDF, 400KB]

    Biography

    • Acting Assistant Deputy Minister (Defence Research and Development Canada) (ADM(DRDC)) as of August 2021.
    • 20 years of public affairs and strategic services experience in government, political, and not-for-profit settings.
    • Joined DRDC in 2018 as the Chief of Staff.

    Mandate

    Provide national leadership on defence and security Science, Technology and Innovation (ST&I) to enhance Canada’s Defence and Security posture.

    • Act as the Chief Science Advisor to DND/CAF and public safety and national security communities.
    • Engage and collaborate with an extended network of stakeholders, domestic, and international partners.
    • Exercise functional authority to ensure coherence of the DND/CAF ST&I investment.

    Key Facts

    • Total Employees: 1,300
    • Budget: $397M per year
      • The annual budget includes the Innovation for Defence Excellence and Security (IDEaS) program funded at $1.6B over 20 years.
    • Primary location(s): National Defence Headquarters (NDHQ) Carling Campus, and 7 research centres across Canada, each with unique science and technology expertise that informs evidence-based decision-making.

    Key partners

    • Internal:
      • All Defence Team
    • External:
      • Public Safety Canada
      •  National Research Council
      • Science-based departments and agencies (SBDAs)
      • Safety and Security Departments and Agencies
      • North Atlantic Treaty Organization
      • Five Eyes Community
      • Industry
      • Academia

    Top issues

    Defence and Security Science and Technology (DSST) Program

    Deliver and oversee an integrated program that is founded on DND/CAF priorities and focused on outcomes relevant to Canada’s defence and security.

    • Provide strategic focus on future military superiority and technological advantages.
    • Implement a business model that supports agility and helps develop a robust innovation environment based on a diverse set of partners.

    Continental Defence

    Support the Defence Policy vision in which Canada is secure in North America.

    • Generate and provide science and technology (S&T) advice and guidance to the DND/CAF on continental defence and the modernization of the North American Aerospace Defence Command (NORAD).
    • Provide advice on Northern approaches surveillance based on the scientific results of the All Domain Situational Awareness (ADSA) S&T program.

    Advancing Defence and Security Innovation

    Address DND/CAF’s strategic and tactical needs through innovation.

    • Continue evolution of IDEaS so DND/CAF can assess new innovative solutions and better integrate the results.
    • Design DND’s Innovation Centre of Excellence to facilitate DND/CAF access to a variety of innovation instruments in a flexible and timely manner.

    Open Science & Research Security

    Deliver on federal commitments that promote the open sharing of science while safeguarding R&D.

    • Improve the management of science data to optimize its value without compromising on operational and national considerations such as security, privacy, and ethics.
    • Provide advice on economic security risks and vulnerabilities related to emerging and disruptive technologies, intellectual property, and access to innovation.

    Organizational Culture

    Instill significant change management outcomes and continuously reflect and adapt to evolving government priorities and scientific landscapes.

    • Continue to ensure that DRDC is more agile, focused, functional, and streamlined.
    • Further develop important work on diversity and inclusion.
    • Support DND/CAF culture change through research and development (R&D) initiatives.
  • Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance) and Chief Financial Officer – Cheri Crosby

    Download placemat [PDF, 400KB]

    Biography

    • Appointed in June 2019.
    • Wide range of experience in the Public Sector including; Privy Council Office, Special Advisor to the Deputy Secretary to the Cabinet, Citizenship and Immigration Canada, and Assistant Deputy Minister of Corporate Services and Chief Financial Officer at Natural Resources Canada.

    Mandate

    • Provide the Minister of National Defence with timely strategic financial advice and guidance on key departmental direction to better support Defence’s mandate and operations.
    • Be a trusted partner that provides financial support services and advice to enable sound decision-making and accountability across the department.
    • Lead the departmental financial community by creating a vision for the finance of the future, which further enables the business of Defence.

    Key facts

    • Total Employees:
      • 454
    • Budget:
      • $46M per year and $160M for corporate accounts, for a total of $206M
    • Primary location(s):
      • National Defence Headquarters (Carling)
      • National Defence Headquarters (Pearkes Building as required)

    Key partners

    Internal:

    • All Defence Team

    External:

    • Treasury Board Secretariat
    • Privy Council Office
    • North Atlantic Treaty Organization
    • Five-Eyes Partners
    • Allied countries
    • Industry
    • Academia, including Chartered Professional Accountants Canada
    • Finance Canada

    Top issues

    Strong, Secure, Engaged (SSE)

    • Continued implementation of SSE is critical and National Defence is making significant progress on the 342 funded capital projects announced in SSE: 74% are in implementation or have been completed as of July 2021.
    • The Finance team is leading the costing development for Strengthening Canada’s Domestic and Continental Defences and NORAD Modernization to inform policy decisions for future Defence commitments.

    Treasury Board Submission Plan 2021-22

    • The Treasury Board Submission Plan is determined by funding availability, project readiness, Departmental and Governmental priorities, and Treasury Board agenda capacity. The 2021-22 Plan [REDACTED], requiring close coordination with the Minister’s office. 
    • Due to the pause in Treasury Board meetings resulting from the election period, the forward agenda is heavily subscribed. There is a risk that not all DND submissions will be considered as planned. If submissions are not approved, it could result in significant financial pressures and project schedule and delivery delays.

    Funding through the Estimates Process 2021-22

    • National Defence funding is comprised of multi-year reference levels approved by Treasury Board each year whereby cash is accessed through the Parliamentary Estimates process.
    • Due to the election, there is a risk that the Estimates process will not unfold as per the normal budget cycle. Should there be delays in the Supplementary Estimates, there is a risk that the department may have to defer or cancel planned spending. Risk is mitigated via cash management but a prolonged absence of in-year access to funding may impact the execution of departmental priorities.

    Tabling of OAG Audit Observations for 2020-21

    • National Defence is audited annually by the Auditor General (AG). For the past 17 years, the AG has included commentary in its annual report about the department’s ability to properly account for the quantities and values of its inventory and asset pooled items. We do not anticipate change this year.
    • The AG is required to table its annual report by December 31 of each year (or where the House is not sitting at that time, then the report is tabled within the first 15 days that the House resumes).
    • The department may then be requested to appear at the Standing Committee on Public Accounts.
  • Assistant Deputy Minister (Human Resources – Civilian) – Ms. Isabelle Desmartis 

    Download placemat [PDF, 400KB]

    Biography

    • Appointed as ADM(HR-Civ) in September 2021.
    • Worked as ADM(DRDC) since 2018 and has held various key leadership positions with DND over the last two decades, such as DG of Policy Planning and Assistant Chief of Defence Intelligence.
    • Trained as a lawyer and earned a PhD in international security from Laval University.

    Mandate

    • Develops and implements plans, policies and programs to recruit, develop and retain public service employees to effectively support the CAF in operation.
    • Supports the department by providing guidance, tools and ensuring sound stewardship in the HR management of DND’s public servants.
    • Informs strategic decision making and develops HR strategies that support a modern, healthy, and inclusive workforce reflective of Canada’s rich diversity as is outlined in the letter to Clerk on the Call to Action currently being drafted.

    Key facts

    • Total Employees: ~1,300
    • Budget: $92,963,131 (SWE and O&M)
    • Primary location(s): The majority of employees are located in the NCR (55%), with the remaining employees located at 21 offices across Canada.
    • Who we Support:
      • ~28,700 public service employees
      • ~3,700 military supervisors of public service employees

    Key partners

    Internal:

    • Vice Chief of the Defence Staff (VCDS)
    • Military Personnel Command (MPC)
    • Chief Financial Officer (CFO)
    • ADM (Data, Information and Analytics)
    • ADM (Information Management)
    • Chief, Professional Conduct and Culture

    External:

    • Treasury Board Secretariat
    • Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer Public Service Commission
    • Public Services and Procurement Canada Bargaining Agents
    • Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

    Top issues

    Compensation

    With its launch in 2016, Phoenix created a backlog of 77,000 cases impacting 21,000 DND public service employees. HR-Civ has reduced the pay backlog by ~62,000 cases. As of 4 August 2021, there are 15,000 unresolved cases, impacting ~10,000 employees.

    Mitigation: To stabilize HR-to-Pay and resolve Phoenix issues, DND has expanded its resources to provide personalized services and designed digital tools like the HR Contact Centre, Human Resource Services and Support system, and the HR Go mobile app, the first of its kind within the federal government. This support has reduced stress and improved pay outcomes for DND employees.

    Collective Bargaining & Workplace Management

    Previous Bargaining Round: Ships’ Officers remains in negotiation, arbitration selected for dispute resolution

    Current Bargaining Round:The Public Service Alliance of Canada units are in the initial stages of renegotiations. Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada (PIPSC) Computer Systems unit can give notice to bargain in August 2021. Remaining PIPSC and other units can serve notice throughout 2022.

    Workplace Management: Longstanding issues at Fire Halls, which have garnered media attention, are being addressed in consultation with bargaining units.

    Mitigation: DND is actively participating in the current round bargaining process. There is no risk of strike at this time. DND hosts regular consultations with unions to address issues.

    Support to Language and Cultural Advisors (LCAs)

    Twenty public service LCAs, who provided support to deployed CAF in Afghanistan, have submitted Workplace Safety and Insurance Board claims and contracted legal services. [REDACTED].

    Mitigation: HR-Civ Office of Disability Management is providing support for these cases. HR-Civ continues to communicate with ADM(Finance) to refine cost estimates and with ADM(Public Affairs) on media response lines to prepare for claim decisions.

    Post-Pandemic Planning

    DND is actively planning for and responding to the return to the workplace and future of work pressures. Planning is underway to respond to the vaccine mandate for all federal public servants, with alternative measures for those unable or unwilling to be vaccinated. Implementation of the vaccine mandate is anticipated over Fall 2021.

    Mitigation: HR-Civ is supporting managers with persona- and scenario-based Direction and Guidance (D&G) on managing a hybrid workforce. DND is also working closely with central agencies and interdepartmental planning committees on post-pandemic transition and the COVID-19 vaccine mandate implementation.

  • Assistant Deputy Minister (Infrastructure and Environment) – Rob Chambers

    Download placemat [PDF, 400KB]

    Biography

    • Appointed June 2019.
    • 20 years in public service, in central agencies (e.g. Privy Council Office, Treasury Board Secretariat and Department of Finance) and departments (e.g. Employment and Social Development Canada and Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada). He is also a former Army Reservist (30th FD Regt RCA) and Canadian Forces College National Security Programme graduate.

    Mandate

    • Infrastructure Custodian and Functional Authority
      • Responsible for full lifecycle
    • Housing through the Canadian Forces Housing Agency
    • Also Functional Authority for:
      • Environmental protection and sustainability;
      • Indigenous affairs;
      • Fire and respiratory safety and protection;
      • Ionizing radiation regulation and safety; and,
      • Hazardous materials management

    Key facts

    Total Employees: Approximately 4,000

    • Civilian – 3,646 filled (out of 4,688)
    • MIL / Regular: 361 filled (out of 451)
    • MIL / Reserve: 13 filled (out of 32)

    Budget (FY 21/22): ~$2.1B

    • Operating: $1.4B
    • Capital: $738M

    Primary location(s): NDHQ (Carling); all Defence establishments.

    • Largest and most varied real property portfolio in the federal government with an estimated replacement cost of $26B.
    • Largest contributor to the federal greenhouse gas emissions baseline.

    Key partners

    Internal:

    • Defence Construction Canada
    • Treasury Board Secretariat
    • Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada; Indigenous Services Canada
    • Public Services and Procurement Canada
    • Environment and Climate Change Canada
    • Canada Lands Company

    External:

    • Local Communities
    • Indigenous Peoples
    • Other Levels of Government
    • Industry Associations
    • Bargaining Agents
    • NATO & Five-Eyes Partners

    Top issues

    Infrastructure Portfolio Sustainability

    Defence infrastructure is essential to supporting defence capabilities and institutional functions, but the current portfolio is misaligned with future DND/CAF requirements. Insufficient funding to maintain and recapitalize assets has resulted in declining conditions and suitability and increased risk and operating costs. Key files include:

    • [REDACTED]
    • Continue to advance long-term solution for P Res armoury infrastructure in Sherbrooke, QC;
    • Upcoming decision on National Defence Secure Campus (NDSC) NCR site location; and,
    • Upcoming decision on potential PRes land transfer in Surrey, BC and engaging with local indigenous groups.

    Indigenous Affairs Priorities

    Provide leadership in support of advancing the GoC’s Indigenous reconciliation agenda in a manner that can serve as an enabler of SSE. While not all of the files will have decision points within the first 90 days, some of the issues can be unpredictable and have the potential to generate unexpected attention. Key files include working with partners to:

    • Advance the St. Foy, QC divestment process and related consultations with indigenous groups and other interested parties;
    • Advance negotiations with indigenous groups regarding claims and potential site access to the Cold Lake Air Weapons Range (CLAWR); and,
    • Advance negotiations with indigenous groups regarding claims at Ipperwash, ON.

    Environmental Priorities

    Provide leadership in environmental protection and sustainability. Focus includes compliance with legislation and regulations, meeting GoC greening policy commitments, climate change, contaminated sites, and legacy UXO. While the decision points are not planned within the first 90 days, some of the issues can be unpredictable and have the potential to generate unexpected attention. Key files include:

    • Large-scale PFAS assessment/mitigation projects are underway at Comox, Wainwright, Edmonton, North Bay, Trenton and Borden with off-site impacts at each site. At North Bay (22 Wing), there is active litigation for PFAS contamination. DND has recently signed a $19.4M agreement with the City to support remediation;
    • [REDACTED]
    • TCE is is expected to proceed with regulatory review of a Pumped Storage Energy Project on DND lands at Meaford, ON. DND will need to work with TCE to support impact assessments and lead its own Environment Effects Determination.
  • Assistant Deputy Minister (Information Management) and Chief Information Officer – Len Bastien

    Download placemat [PDF, 400KB]

    Biography

    • Appointed in 2012
    • Assistant Deputy Minister (Information Management) and Defence Chief Information Officer
    • 22 years in the Information Technology industry, including 14 years in the Public Service

    Mandate

    • Deliver timely, trusted and secure information capabilities
    • Accountable for the conduct of IT enterprise systems for DND/CAF including all IT network operations, cybersecurity, as well as the overall management of Cyber Command capabilities for CAF missions.
    • Oversee the Defence Major Capital Program for digital and digitally enabled capabilities, including cyber, space, and command and control capabilities
    • Operate and maintain all corporate enterprise systems supporting finance, human resources, materiel, and infrastructure

    Key facts

    Total Bench Strength: 4,448 (Civilians, Regular Force, Reserve Force, Students) Includes varying levels of contracting services when required.

    Operations: 44 people deployed and 368 providing reach-back support.

    Budget:

    • FY 20/21 notional allocation: $481.9M
    • FY 21/22 notional allocation: $563.4M
    • Responsible for the management of more than 40 Major Capital Projects with a total value of over $13B.

    Primary location: National Capital Region.

    Key partners

    Internal:

    • Vice Chief of Defence Staff
    • Army, Navy, Air Force
    • Chief of Military Personnel/ Assistant Deputy Minister (Human Resources - Civilian)
    • Assistant Deputy Minister (Data, Innovation, Analytics)
    • Assistant Deputy Minister (Materiel)
    • Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance)

    External:

    • Shared Services Canada
    • Communications Security Establishment
    • Treasury Board Secretariat
    • Public Safety Canada
    • U.S. Department of Defense
    • Five Eyes partners
    • North Atlantic Treaty Organization

    Top issues

    Major Capital Program

    • A number of project files are programmed for Ministerial approval between July-Dec 2021 worth approximately $1.2B.
    • [REDACTED]

    Evolving Cyber

    DND/CAF’s cyber domain will continue to evolve with a focus on:

    • Clarifying the role of the CAF in Continental Defence in cyberspace
    • Evolving the relationship with CSE, including the development of active cyber capabilities, the conduct of active cyber operations in government-authorized military missions, and the implementation of the Communications Security Establishment Act; and
    • Continuing to advance the Cyber Mission Assurance Program

    Shared Services Canada

    ADM (IM) will continue to work closely with Shared Services Canada to:

    • Evolve a service delivery framework that is mutually-beneficial to the DND and Shared Services Canada
    • Enable digital services and a cloud-by-default culture within DND/CAF

    Enabling Digital Modernization

    ADM (IM) is responsible for delivering technology solutions to enable DND/CAF digitization while maintaining and operating extant systems

    • ADM (IM) will continue to work with key internal and Whole-of-Government partners and Canadian industry to develop the skilled capacity, modern procurement mechanisms, and stable funding needed to leverage and deploy new technologies at pace to stay ahead of evolving threats

    Defence Resource Business Modernization

    The corporate supply chain, real property, defence logistics, and financial system, known as the Defence Resource Management Information System is due for a significant modernization and transformation effort to optimize the business processes.

    • The system will undergo a major upgrade over the next seven years with significant department wide effects via a major capital project sponsored by ADM(DIA)
    • Several Enterprise Initiatives are currently on-going to address pressing business needs
  • Assistant Deputy Minister (Materiel) – Troy Crosby

    Download placemat [PDF, 400KB]

    Biography

    • Twenty-three year career in the Canadian Armed Forces and twelve years as a public servant with the Department of National Defence, Public Services and Procurement Canada and the Transportation Safety Board of Canada.
    • Worked in various Defence acquisition and modernization projects and provided project oversight as a Director General and as the Chief of Staff for the Materiel Group.

    Mandate

    • Departmental Functional Authority for materiel acquisition and support, including disposal; materiel and inventory management, including write-off; materiel assurance; procurement and contracting; radio frequency safety; controlled goods; and, project management policy (held jointly with the Vice Chief of the Defence Staff).
    • Provides centralized procurement support to other Level 1s.

    Key facts

    Total Employees:

    • 4,789 (3485 civilians, 1304 military)

    Budget:

    • $7.5B ($4B capital, $3.5B national procurement & operating)

    Manages:

    • $27B in capital asset equipment and $5B in inventory

    Primary location(s):

    • National Capital Region
    • Montreal
    • Valcartier
    • Cold Lake
    • Esquimalt

    Key partners

    Internal:

    • Strategic Joint Staff, Vice Chief of the Defence Staff, Army, Navy, Air Force, Operational Commands
    • Chief of Military Personnel
    • Military Staff in the Canadian Embassy in Washington, DC
    • ADM(Information Management), ADM(Finance), ADM(Infrastructure and Environment)

      External:

    • Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS)
    • Public Services and Procurement Canada
    • Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada
    • Canadian and international defence industry
    • NATO Conference of National Armaments Directors
    • Bilateral and multilateral engagements with several nations such US, UK, Spain, Germany, France, Netherlands and Denmark

    Top issues

    Capacity Challenge:

    • The Materiel Group is faced with capacity challenges impacting its ability to execute the current Defence Policy Strong, Secure, Engaged. To address this, a robust program to professionalize the procurement workforce, improve diversity and inclusion and, promote a respectful workplace is in place, ensuring that the Materiel Group continues to be an employer of choice and delivers on its mandate.

    Sustainment Challenge:

    • Sustainment of Canadian Armed Forces equipment relies on a complex web of contracts, industry and government partners, and international arrangements.
    • The success of the sustainment enterprise requires a careful balance between operational requirements, equipment maintenance needs and resources.
    • A detailed programme review is underway with central agencies to help illuminate sustainment drivers and improve this balance.

    Capability Delivery Challenge:

    • Delivering new defence equipment to the Canadian Armed Forces requires competencies in engineering, procurement, and project management disciplines.
    • While competencies continue to improve as a result of professionalization efforts, the significant complexities of the defence procurement process remain an ongoing challenge for which the Materiel Group continually engage with internal and external partners seeking innovative solutions.

    Projects requiring MND approval

    [REDACTED]

    Projects requiring TBS approval with MND approval beforehand

    [REDACTED]

    Decisions, announcements, engagements, litigations

    • Future Fighter Capability (potential for an announcement)
    • Canadian Surface Combatant procurement (ongoing litigation)
    • Canadian International Trade Tribunal – Challenge
    • C-22 9mm pistol request for proposal closing 15 Nov 2021
  • Assistant Deputy Minister (Policy) – Peter Hammerschmidt

    Download placemat [PDF, 400KB]

    Biography

    • Appointed in January 2018
    • 23 years in the Public Service, including at National Defence, Treasury Board Secretariat, the Privy Council Office and Public Safety.

    Mandate

    • Provide the Minister with advice and support on the shaping and implementation of Canada’s defence policy
    • Provide policy advice on Canadian Armed Forces operations
    • Manage the Minister’s international defence and security relations
    • Provide the Minister with policy advice on trends and implications of the global security environment
    • Advise and support the Minister in fulfilling Cabinet and Parliamentary responsibilities
    • Manage Federal/Provincial/Territorial relations
    • Facilitate engagement with external defence and security experts (Mobilizing Insights in Defence and Security)

    Key facts

    Total Employees:

    • 245 (201 civilians, 44 military)

    Budget:

    • $39.07M across three votes
    • Vote 1 O&M - $3.74M
    • Vote 1 SWE- $19.41M
    • Vote 5 - $262K
    • Vote 10 - $15.54M

    Primary location:

    • 101 Colonel By (Pearkes Building)

    Key partners

    Internal:

    • All Defence Team

    External:

    • Other government departments – Central Agencies, Global Affairs Canada, Public Safety and Portfolios
    • Defence and Security Expert Community
    • United States Office of Secretary of Defense
    • North Atlantic Treaty Organization and Five-Eyes Partners

    Top issues

    Continental Defence

    • ADM(Pol) is leading the development of a proposal to strengthen continental defence through NORAD modernization, enhanced Canadian domestic defence capabilities, and greater contribution to national resilience.
    • This would also support broader priorities such as national security, emergency management, innovation, economic recovery, Indigenous reconciliation and economic development, and climate action.

    Policy Development to Enable Modern Military Capabilities

    • Anticipatory policy making is essential for the successful adoption of military capabilities needed in new and emerging domains. In close coordination with Defence and OGD stakeholders, ADM(Pol) is undertaking policy work to enable DND/CAF activities in the cyber, space and information domains [REDACTED] to guide the application of artificial intelligence in the military context, and shape the Defence response to the challenges presented by climate change.

    Global Engagement

    • Maintaining strong partnerships with allies, partners and regional and international organizations is critical to the Defence Team’s ability to effectively realize its mandate and is a top priority for ADM(Pol). Specifically, ADM(Pol) will be working to increase both its engagement and presence in the Indo-Pacific, in order to help buttress the rules-based international order and preserve peace and stability given the region’s strategic importance. Additionally, ADM(Pol) is focussed on ensuring Canada is well-represented and engaged with our Euro-Atlantic allies through NATO, as we face common challenges posed by the evolving security environment.

    Policy Advice on CAF Operations

    • ADM(Pol) leads the process for the development of options and advice to Government on CAF operations. The mandates for a number of significant missions expire early in 2022 [REDACTED].

    Cabinet and Parliament

    • ADM(Pol) will continue to focus on providing the Minister with timely advice to support Cabinet discussions, as well as developing Memoranda to Cabinet, to support capital projects, operations, and personnel initiatives.
    • Moreover, with Parliament's sustained interest in defence issues, ADM(Pol) will continue to manage and coordinate, on behalf of National Defence, the typical and anticipated high volume of Parliamentary inquiries and committee appearance requests, particularly in a minority setting.
  • Assistant Deputy Minister (Public Affairs) – Laurie Kempton

    Download placemat [PDF, 400KB]

    Biography

    • Appointed in July 2020.
    • More than 25 years of public service
    • Served as Chief of Staff to the Clerk and Deputy Clerk of the Privy Council.
    • Led policy development with Foreign Affairs and International Trade and the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, crisis response for Passport Canada, and public consultation with the Bank of Canada.

    Mandate

    • Communications advice, guidance, services and products in support of Government defence priorities.
    • Direction and guidance to the DND/CAF public affairs federation aligned with the Treasury Board Directive on the Management of Communications.
    • Communicate DND/CAF policies, priorities and activities internally and externally.
    • Implement strategic marketing and advertising related to recruitment.
    • Coordinate with whole of government strategic communications efforts.

    Key facts

    • Total Employees: 374 (225 civilian and 149 military personnel)
    • Budget: 33.7M
    • Primary location(s): National Defence Headquarters (Carling and Pearkes), and the National Printing Bureau (Gatineau)
    • Across DND/CAF approximately 55% of public affairs resources reside with and report to other senior leaders.

    Key partners

    Internal:

    • Defence Team

    External:

    • Central agencies
    • Other Government Departments including Global Affairs Canada, Public Services and Procurement Canada, Public Safety Canada
    • North American Aerospace Defence Command
    • NATO, Five Eyes Partners, United Nations; and Defence and security experts including academia.

    Top issues

    Our People, Conduct and Culture

    • Credible communication of measurable, enduring cultural change in support of our people to rebuild public confidence (ongoing)
    • Clear communication regarding implementation of Justice Fish recommendations (military justice)
    • Re-launch of Recruitment Advertising Campaigns and support to force reconstitution paramount in the face of pandemic-related challenges (Immediate – for awareness)
    • Total Health and Wellness Strategy (internal – Fall 2021)

    CAF Operations & Activities

    • Public awareness and understanding of breadth of CAF operations internationally (NATO, UN, partner) and high deployment of CAF resources in support of Canadian civil authorities (pandemic, forest fires, flooding) challenging in the communications space dominated by controversy
    • Communications approach (active, passive) varies by sensitivity of the operation, operating location, or needs of the operations lead.

    Defence Policy and International Relationships

    • Communications regarding international engagements reinforces global engagement:
      • Five Eyes Defence Ministers’ Meeting (TBC)
      • NATO Secretary General visit to Canadian Arctic (Late Fall)
      • Commander NORAD and USNORTHCOM visit to Canada and Canadian Arctic (NORAD Modernization and defence – was postponed)

    Procurement and infrastructure

    • Defence procurement can be highly complex and involve many internal and external stakeholders.
    • Major procurement projects have complex histories:
      • Future Fighter Capability
      • Canadian Surface Combatant
    • Infrastructure issues (condition - Sherbrooke Armouries) or local environmental concerns (presence of PFAS – a toxic chemical found in water) are local concerns but national issues.
  • Assistant Deputy Minister (Review Services) – Julie Charron

    Download placemat [PDF, 400KB]

    Biography

    • Joined Defence in 2017. Appointed Assistant Deputy Minister (Review Services) August 2019, previously Associate Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance), and Acting Assistant Deputy Minister (Finance)/Chief Financial Officer.
    • Certified Public Accountant, Chartered Accountant, Auditor.
    • Has held various senior executive positions across Government of Canada Departments.

    Mandate

    To provide the Deputy Minister and Chief of Defence Staff with independent, objective and timely assurance services concerning:

    • The integrity of the Department’s financial management and reporting processes;
    • The effectiveness and adequacy of the Department’s and Non-Public Funds risk management, internal controls, governance and accountability processes;
    • The compliance with governmental legislation, regulations, and policies; and
    • The relevance, effectiveness and efficiency of the Department’s programs, initiatives and policies.

    Key facts

    • Structure: Review Services comprises the DND/CAF Chief Audit Executive, Head of Evaluation, Senior Departmental Internal Disclosure Officer and Senior Ethics Officer.
    • Total Employees: 175
    • Budget: $20.7M Vote 1 (Operating); $113K Vote 5 (Capital)
    • Primary location(s): National Capital Region – National Defence Headquarters Carling

    Key partners

    Internal:

    • Review Services works with all other groups in the Department to carry out its mandate

    External:

    • Office of the Auditor General
    • Treasury Board Secretariat (Results sector and Office of the Comptroller General)
    • Office of the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner
    • Institute of Internal Auditors
    • International Society for Military Ethics
    • Five-Eyes Defence Fraud and Anti-Corruption Network

    Top issues

    Internal Audit and Evaluation Reports

    • The Office of the Minister of National Defence is generally briefed on internal audits and evaluations prior to publishing. For awareness, the following reports have the potential for high media/political interest and therefore may be of interest to the Minister:
      • Assessment on the status of implementation of Deschamps/OAG Management Action Plans (Fall 2021)
      • Review of the Royal Canadian Chaplain Service

    Office of the Auditor General Reports

    • National Defence is regularly a subject of planned audits from the Office of the Auditor General. Review Services is the liaison between the Office of the Auditor General and the Department. There are three upcoming audits that involve the Department of National Defence / Canadian Armed Forces:
      • Spring 2022: Processing Disability Payments for Veterans and their Survivors
      • Spring 2022: Greening Government Strategy
      • Fall 2022: Protecting the North

    Publication of Internal Audit and Evaluation Reports

    • Treasury Board Secretariat policy requires approved audit and evaluation reports to be published publicly within 90/120 days of approval
  • Acting Commander Canadian Army – MGen Michel-Henri St-Louis, OMM, MSC, MSM, CD

    Download placemat [PDF, 400KB]

    Biography

    • Appointed Acting Commander Canadian Army on 19 April 2021
    • 34 years in the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) with operational tours to Bosnia, Croatia, Kabul, Kandahar and the Middle East
    • Commanded JTF IMPACT in the Middle East as well as at multiple levels of the Canadian Army
    • He served as Deputy Commanding General for Operations of America’s First Corps (U.S. Army) as well as three times at the strategic level with the Director General of Strategic Planning for the Canadian Armed Forces, within the Canadian Army Staff and with the Strategic Joint Staff.

    Mandate

    • As part of the CAF, the CA force generates land capabilities for the achievement of Canadian defence objectives across the full spectrum of operations
    • Work alongside whole-of-government, whole-of-nation colleagues, non-governmental agencies and international partners
    • Commander CA is the Departmental Champion for Indigenous Peoples. The Army promotes engagement with Indigenous communities through a variety of programs, such as summer programs for Indigenous youth

    Key facts

    • The Army consists of: (largest organization in CAF)
      • 22,123 Regular Force;
      • 21,440 Army Reserve (total);
      • 5,245 Canadian Rangers; and
      • 3,543 Civilians
    • Budget: $1,034M Operating Budget (Fiscal Year 21-22)
      • Allocation of Major Capital Project Funding (3rd amongst Services, after RCN and RCAF)
        • $22.3B for CA equipment projects over next 20 years
    • Primary location(s): (largest footprint of CAF across Canada)
      • 21 Army Bases and 169 Armouries in 117 communities across Canada
      • 201 Ranger patrols in over 220 remote communities
      • 915 personnel currently on expeditionary operations (Latvia, Ukraine, Africa, Iraq/Kuwait/Jordan/Lebanon)
      • 13 personnel currently on domestic operations (National Sentry Program, Operation AEGIS, Operation VECTOR)

    Key partners

    Internal:

    • Vice Chief of the Defence Staff
    • Chief Professional Conduct and Culture
    • Royal Canadian Navy, Royal Canadian Air Force
    • Canadian Joint Operations Command
    • Canadian Special Operations Forces Command
    • Strategic Joint Staff
    • Chief Military Personnel
    • Assistant Deputy Minister (Infrastructure and Environment)
    • Assistant Deputy Minister (Materiel)

    External:

    • North Atlantic Treaty Organization
    • Five Eyes Armies (US, Australia, UK, New Zealand)
    • [REDACTED]
    • Department Public Safety and Partner Agencies
    • Local Indigenous Communities
    • Veterans Affairs Canada
    • Law enforcement (federal, provincial, municipal)
    • Local communities (via bases/Reserve units); service clubs

    Top issues

    Professional Conduct and Culture Change

    • CA initiating directive for professional conduct and culture change released with initial focus on engagement, listening and learning.
    • Importance of One Army, with Regular, Reserve, Ranger, and civilian components operating as part of an integrated whole.
    • CA will implement and reinforce an inclusive, diverse, respectful, safe and team-based work environment with a view to harness the full potential of the One Army Team.

    Capital Investment / Procurement

    • Seeking Ministerial Project Approval (Definition) and Expenditure Authority
      [REDACTED]

    Canadian Army Modernization

    • Advancing with Purpose: The Canadian Army Modernization Strategy (CAMS) is our change agenda for the next half decade.
    • Force 2025 is the Canadian Army plan to adapt to changes in the operational environment, technological changes, and doctrinal adaptations. This in-horizon (2020-2025) effort will re-balance Canadian Army organizational structures across the field force and the institution.
    • Essential to CA modernization: investments towards digitalization.

    Reconstitution

    • COVID has resulted in an erosion of readiness, training backlogs, reduced intake of recruits and exacerbated the number of vacancies in the junior to mid-level leadership within the CA.
    • CA Reconstitution planning will be nested within CAF efforts to Recruit, Train, and Retain soldiers.
    • Culture Change, the ‘Missing Middle’, ‘high demand’, low density’ capabilities/trades as well as materiel stewardship are the key areas of focus for CA Reconstitution.
  • Commander Canadian Forces Intelligence Command – Major-General Michael Wright, MMV, MSM, CD 

    Download placemat [PDF, 400KB]

    Biography

    • Appointed Commander Canadian Forces Intelligence Command (CFINTCOM) and Chief of Defence Intelligence (CDI) in June  2021 after serving as Commander Joint Task Force Impact in the Middle East
    • 31 years of service as an Infantry Officer (PPCLI)
    • Commanded at every level including brigade
    • Numerous staff appointments, including in the Chief of the Defence Staff’s office, the Canadian Army, Canadian Joint Operations Command and CFINTCOM
    • Operational deployments in Bosnia, Afghanistan, and the Middle East. Awarded the Medal of Military Valour (MMV) and the Meritorious Service Medal (MSM) 

    Mandate

    • To provide credible, timely and integrated defence intelligence capabilities, products and services to the Canadian Armed Forces, Department of National Defence, Government of Canada and Allies in support of Canada’s defence and national security objectives;
    • Develop and promulgate policy, processes and governance as the Functional Authority for Defence Intelligence; and
    • Coordinate and generate intelligence capabilities across the Defence Intelligence Enterprise.

    Key facts

    • Total Employees:
      • 1076 total positions
      • 372 civilians
      • 660 Regular Force CAF members
      • 44 Reserve Force CAF members)
    • Budget:
      • Vote 1: $92.7 M including $666K (OFA)
      • Vote 5: $26.7 M
    • Primary location(s):
      • National Capital Region
      • Kingston
      • Winnipeg
      • Gagetown

    Key partners

    Internal:

    • Strategic Joint Staff
    • Canadian Joint Operations Command
    • Canadian Special Operations Command
    • Canadian Army
    • Royal Canadian Navy
    • Royal Canadian Air Force
    • North American Aerospace Defence
    • Assistant Deputy Minister (Information Management)
    • Assistant Deputy Minister (Policy)
    • National Security and Intelligence Review and Oversight Coordination Secretariat

    External:

    • Privy Council Office
    • Global Affairs Canada
    • Communications Security Establishment
    • Canadian Security Intelligence Service
    • Five-Eyes (AUS-CAN-NZ-UK-US) and North Atlantic Treaty Organization allies

    Top issues

    Defence Intelligence Enterprise Renewal

    • CFINTCOM is leading an effort to enhance the agility, timeliness and relevance of the Defence Intelligence Enterprise in order to better support strategic decision-makers and operational commanders.
    • This will require changing processes and organisational structure, as well as modernizing the authorities of the Chief Defence Intelligence (CDI), including through the Ministerial Directive on Defence Intelligence. The new Ministerial Directive will update authorities, responsibilities and accountabilities pertaining to Defence Intelligence.

    Evolution and Expansion of Defence Intelligence Priorities

    • While CFINTCOM continues to assess conventional military threats, it has also been increasing its ability to analyze the impacts that other factors, such as climate change, competition for natural resources, economic espionage and migration, have on defence and national security interests.
    • More comprehensive, holistic analysis is enabling CFINTCOM to better support decision-makers at all levels within National Defence and the broader government of Canada.

    External Reviews

    • The National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians (NSICOP) and the National Security and Intelligence Review Agency (NSIRA) have both conducted reviews pertaining to defence intelligence (DI).
    • While NSICOP is not currently conducting a review on DI specifically, NSIRA is reviewing the Human Source Handling Program and the Operational Collection and Privacy Practices of the National Counter-Intelligence Unit. It is also conducting its annual reviews of the implementation of the Ministerial Directive on Avoiding Complicity in Mistreatment by Foreign Entities Act and the disclosures of information under the Security of Canada Information Disclosure Act.
  • Department of National Defence / Canadian Forces’ Legal Advisor – Michael Sousa

    Download placemat [PDF, 400KB]

    Biography

    • Mr. Sousa became Legal Advisor and Senior General Counsel on August 14, 2017. Prior to becoming the Legal Advisor for DND/CAF, Mr. Sousa headed the Departmental Legal Services Units at Public Safety and Environment Canada. He has extensive experience managing teams of legal counsel and administrative staff to provide legal services to client departments in relation to their policy, operational and corporate activities.

    Mandate

    • The Office of the National Defence and Canadian Forces Legal Advisor (DND/CF Legal Advisor) provides objective and strategic legal advice and services to the Department of National Defence and to the Canadian Armed Forces in all areas of the law, except military law, military discipline and the military justice system, for which the Judge Advocate General is responsible.

    Key facts

    • Total Employees: 82 (32 civilian, 6 military, 44 Department of Justice)
    • Budget: $26.9 million
    • Primary location(s): MGen Pearkes Building, 101 Colonel By Dr.

    Key partners

    Internal:

    • The Office of the Judge Advocate General
    • Chief Military Personnel
    • Assistant Deputy Minister (Materiel)
    • Assistant Deputy Minister (Infrastructure & Environment)
    • Assistant Deputy Minister (Public Affairs)

    External:

    • The Department of Justice.

    Top issues

    [REDACTED]
  • Commander Canadian Joint Operations Command (CJOC) – Vice-Admiral Bob Auchterlonie

    Download placemat [PDF, 400KB]

    Biography

    • Appointed Commander CJOC in June 2021
    • Leadership positions include command of HMCS Fredericton, CFB Esquimalt, Canadian Fleet Pacific, and Maritime Forces Pacific / JTF Pacific, former Deputy Commander of CJOC and of the Coalition Combined Joint Task Force for RIMPAC
    • Has a Master’s Degree in Defence Studies from the Royal Military College of Canada, graduate of the Canadian Forces Command & Staff College, the US Naval War College, and the Harvard University Senior Executives in National and International Security Program.

    Mandate

    • Prepare for and conduct operations to defend Canada, assist in the defence of North America, and, as directed, promote peace and security abroad.
    • Command Canada’s deployed military personnel globally.
    • Develop, generate and integrate capabilities from Force Generators (e.g. Army, Navy, Air Force) to harmonize activity in the following areas: command and control; intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance; information operations; influence activities; space operations; cyber support; and operational support.

    Key facts

    Total Employees:

    • 2,833 Total (Military and Civilian)
    • Canadian Joint Operations Command Headquarters: 703
    • Joint Targeting Intelligence Centre: 128
    • Joint Task Force North: 169
    • Canadian Materiel Support Group: 667
    • Canadian Forces Joint Operations Support Group: 1008
    • 1st Canadian Division Headquarters: 146
    • Canadian Joint Warfare Center: 70
    • Canadian Joint Operations Command Outside of Canada: 70

    Budget:

    • $407M Total
    • $121M Local budget
    • $286M Operations Fund Account

    Primary location(s):

    • National Capital Region
    • 1 Canadian Division Headquarters: Kingston, Ontario
    • Joint Task Force North: Yellowknife, Northwest Territories

    Key partners

    Internal:

    • Strategic Joint Staff
    • Vice Chief of Defence Staff
    • Canadian Special Operations Forces Command
    • Assistant Deputy Minister (Policy)
    • Royal Canadian Navy, Royal Canadian Airforce, Canadian Army
    • Regional Joint Task Forces
    • Component Commands (Space, Cyber, Air, Maritime)
    • Judge Advocate General

    External:

    • Global Affairs Canada
    • Royal Canadian Mounted Police
    • Canadian Coast Guard
    • Public Safety
    • Five-Eyes (US, UK, Australia, New Zealand)
    • North Atlantic Treaty Organization Partners
    • Regional security planning and working groups

    Top issues

    ENHANCE: Operational Review

    • Great Power Competition – Growing strategic competition between states, evolving non-state threats and the increasing centrality of the space and information domains all challenge militaries’ ability to plan and execute successful operations. Changes in the nature of our missions and the geopolitical situation couple with continuous pandemic-related Domestic Operations necessitates renewed direction from Government to ensure the CAF’s continued ability to secure and advance Canadian interests abroad.
    • CAF Reconstitution – COVID-19 disrupted the CAF’s recruiting and training efforts, which also necessitates focussing attention towards reconstituting the CAF to ensure our long term ability to protect Canadians and to globally deploy well trained and capable forces. CJOC is in the process of examining and optimizing its operations to free up capacity for these reconstitution efforts.

    ENSURE: Continental Defence and Arctic Security

    • Changing North American Security Context – Interest in the Arctic is increasing and threats in new operational domains such as Cyber and Space are becoming ever-present.
      • Existing policy and Contingency Plans (CONPLANS) to be modified to reflect a growing interest in the Arctic, competition in the information domain, and the increased reliance on CAF for domestic operations.
      • CJOC will support the development of options for continental defence renewal and development of the CAF Arctic Campaign Plan.
      • CJOC is also working with US and other partners to maximize responsiveness to domestic emergencies.

    EXECUTE: Delivering Global Mission Effects

    • Changing International Order – Operational rebalancing is required to counter the progressive shift in global power. Canada must deliver “effects” as a priority over “presence” while understanding the global threats in all regions/domains.
    • With the renewal of the mandate of several CAF operations due shortly, the Government of Canada will have an opportunity to direct how Canada will move forward to contribute to global and Canadian security, especially in an uncertain multi-domain environment. CJOC will continue to partners in reviewing and refining CAF missions, [REDACTED].

    EMPOWER: Building the CAF’s Future

    • Joint Force Enablers - Discussions on capability development and readiness often focus on single service capabilities (e.g. ships, aircraft and land vehicles). CJOC champions critical enabling capabilities such as:
      • Communications
      • Intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance, and
      • Health services
    • Sustainment Enterprise/Logistics Corps – CJOC continues to work to define the future structure of the CAF Logistics Corps.
    • Culture and our Personnel – With dynamic social and institutional change in Canada and the CAF, the trust in the institution has been shaken, which will require the CAF leadership to listen, empathize and act decisively.

    ENABLE: Strengthening Allied Relationships

    • Partners and Allies – With international presence and support to Allies made more difficult by the pandemic, Canada must ensure key relationships are nurtured within our US, Five Eyes and Key Allied partners. CJOC will continue participation in major exercises globally with allies and partners in that regard.
    • NATO Ambition – CJOC will continue working with DND/CAF partners to define NATO ambition with respect to declared forces, specifically regarding 1 CAN DIV. 
    • Building Partner Capacity – Capacity building is a core mission of the CAF, central to operations in Ukraine, Latvia, and the Middle East. DND/CAF needs to continue to improve the necessary programming and coordination to deliver capacity building effectively.
  • Canadian Special Operations Forces Command (CANSOFCOM) – Major-General Steve Boivin

    Download placemat [PDF, 400KB]

    Biography

    • Assumed command of CANSOFCOM in May 2021.
    • Commanding Officer of JTF2 from 2013 to 2016.
    • 30 years of service in the Canadian Armed Forces.
    • Deployed to Haiti, East-Timor, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Afghanistan, and Iraq.

    Mandate

    • CANSOFCOM provides the Chief of the Defence Staff with agile, high-readiness Special Operations Forces (SOF) optimized to prevail on operations in defence of Canada at home and abroad.
    • Its unifying purpose is the pursuit of operational excellence in the conduct of high-risk, high-value and often politically-sensitive strategic missions.
    • 2020 strategic plan, Beyond the Horizon, envisions a key partner in the joint force, confronting asymmetric threats, and operating in the grey space

    Key facts

    • Total Employees: 3016
    • Budget: $258.6 million [N.B. An additional $54.2 million is allocated to CANSOFCOM as National Procurement funds]
    • Units: Joint Task Force 2 (JTF 2); Canadian Joint Incident Response Unit (CJIRU); Canadian Special Operations Regiment (CSOR); 427 Special Operations Aviation Squadron (427 SOAS); Canadian Special Operations Training Centre (CSOTC)

    Key partners

    • Internal:
      • Canadian Joint Operations Command, Canadian Forces Intelligence Command, Canadian Army, Royal Canadian Air Force, Royal Canadian Navy, ADM Policy, ADM Mat, ADM IM, ADM IE.
    • Inter-agency:
      • Royal Canadian Mounted Police
      • Canadian Security Intelligence Service
      • Communications Security Establishment
      • Global Affairs Canada
      • Public Safety
    • External:
      • Five Eyes (United States, United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand), French, and NATO SOF

    Top issues

    JTF 2 Infrastructure

    • CANSOFCOM requires policy guidance to carry out much needed infrastructure improvements for JTF2.
    • In 2007 it was decided that JTF2 would move to Trenton. For various reasons, that plan was revisited, and CANSOFCOM recommended staying in the National Capital Region (NCR) in 2017. MND publicly announced JTF2 would remain in the NCR in February 2020.
    • Any delay to policy guidance will result in cost and schedule overruns.
    [REDACTED]
    • CANSOFCOM contributes a key element to Operation IMPACT in the Special Operations Task Force. The task force continues to contribute to counter-Daesh efforts and is CANSOFCOM’s largest standing operation.
    • As MES evolves, CANSOFCOM’s efforts in the region will be a major consideration.

    Due to the nature of CANSOFCOM’s work, other key items are at a higher security classification. CANSOFCOM will provide further information on these items and CANSOFCOM operations under separate cover as part of transition briefings.

  • Acting Chief of Military Personnel Command – Major General M.H.L. Bourgon

    Download placemat [PDF, 400KB]

    Biography

    • Assumed responsibilities as Acting Chief of Military Personnel Command and Acting Commander Military Personnel Command in October 21.
    • Service includes international operations, including on HMCS Montreal and as Commander Joint Task Force OP IMPACT. Within Chief of Military Personnel, she was recently Deputy Commander.

    Mandate

    • To recruit, train and educate, prepare, support, honour and recognize military personnel and their families for service to Canada.

    Key facts

    Total Employees (August 2021): 19,151

    • Civilians: 3,846
    • Military:
      • 9,178 Regular Force
      • 2,171 Reserve Force
    • Advanced Training List: 696 (ATL)
    • Basic Training List: 3,260 (BTL)

    Budget: $7.442B for Fiscal Year 2021-2022 ($5.381B is for Corporate Regular and Reserve Force Pay and Allowances)

    Primary location(s):

    • Ottawa, CFB Borden, Kingston (RMC), St-Jean (CMR), and multiple Recruiting Centres (26), Transition Centres (32), and Dental/Health Services Clinics (48)

    Key partners

    Internal:

    • The Defence Team
    • Canadian Forces Housing Agency
    • Canadian Forces Morale and Welfare Services

    External:

    • Veterans Affairs Canada
    • Treasury Board of Canada
    • The Department of Justice Canada
    • Canadian Institute for Military and Veteran Health Research
    • Five-Eyes partners
    • Library and Archives Canada
    • Provincial and Territorial Governments
    • Intergovernmental Affairs

    Top issues

    Sustainable Culture Change

    • Supporting the alignment of CAF culture and professional conduct through GBA+ aligned:
      • HR policies
      • Benefits and compensation
      • Recruitment and retention strategies
      • Career progression
      • Training and education
    • In order to foster a safe, healthy, diverse, inclusive, equitable, respectful institution and profession of arms

    CAF Reconstitution

    • Developing strategies to mitigate both pandemic and culture crisis impacts on attraction, to ensure a sustainable and operationally effective CAF that is respectful and reflects the society it serves:
      • Diversity and Inclusion at the forefront of planning
      • Culturally consistent testing and training
      • Holistic “family” focus
      • CAF Profession of Arms doctrine modernization
      • Retention strategy aligned
      • Data and analytics driven

    Innovation in Personnel Management

    • Aligning military personnel selection processes with Employment Equity, GBA+ compliance, and suitability through:
      • Culture Reform Training and Education
      • Modernized digital recruiting platforms
      • Psychometric screening for career advancement
      • Business Process Modernization

    Compensation and Benefits

    • Re-assessing ways to mitigate the impacts of service life on members and their families; to include:
      • Data and analytics to improve policy development, service delivery, and timely grievance administration.
      • Reframing the Post Living Differential policy
      • Expanding the Home Equity Assistance policy

    Service Delivery

    • Evaluating how members access support services related to: career transition tools, geographical relocation, and pay, pension and benefits, as well as:
      • Total Health and Wellness, including targeted Women’s Health Programs
      • Canadian Forces Health Care Modernization and Digital Health Care
      • Expanded Member and Family Transition Support
  • Chief Professional Conduct and Culture (CPCC) – Lieutenant-General Jennie Carignan

    Download placemat [PDF, 400KB]

    Biography

    • Appointed CPCC in April 2021
    • Commander NATO Mission Iraq: 2019-20
    • Commander 2nd Division/JTF-East: 2018-19
    • Chief of Staff – Army Operations: 2016-18

    Mandate

    • Establish an enduring capability to continuously align Defence culture.
    • Ensure professional conduct meets the standards expected of the profession of arms and the Defence Team.
    • Set the overall strategic direction for all Defence conduct and culture elements.
    • Develop and oversee the implementation of all conduct and culture strategies.
    • Advise Chief of Defence Staff (CDS) and Deputy Minister (DM) on all matters of professional conduct and culture.

    Key facts

    • Context: As a new L1, CPCC is currently growing. Total number of employees/budget will increase as new capabilities are built, existing capabilities transfer from other DND organizations.
    • Total Employees: 40 (Pending approvals CPCC could reach up to 350-400 employees.)
    • Budget: $4 million for FY 2021-22. (CPCC is currently in the process of conducting a costing exercise for its planned size.)
    • Primary location: National Defence Headquarters (Carling)

    Key partners

    Internal:

    • All Defence Team

    External:

    • Privy Council Office
    • Veterans Affairs Canada
    • Global Affairs Canada
    • Women and Gender Equality Canada

    External non-GOC partners:

    • CPCC will frequently conduct extensive consultations with civil society organisations, academics, former and serving CAF members, advocates and the survivor community.

    Top issues

    30 days – Developing and consolidating CPCC as a new L1:

    • CPCC is in the final stages of seeking approvals for its mandate and functional authorities.
    • This includes the consolidation of programs already underway across the Defence Team.
    • This will mark an important step in the development of CPCC as a new L1.

    30 days – Consulting DND/CAF members across Canada

    • LGen Carignan will begin conducting consultations with DND/CAF members at Bases and Wings across Canada.
    • This will help to ensure that CPCC programs and initiatives are grounded in lived experiences of members and not an Ottawa-based solution.
    • It will also help ensure CPCC consult and hear from members at all levels across the country.

    60 days – Implementing Restorative Services

    • CPCC is fast-tracking the implementaion of restorative services, to reach initial operating capacity in Fall 2021.
    • Restorative Services are processes that bring together individuals who have experienced harm with others to address and repair the harm.
    • This is designed to impact individual relationships, as well as the community and institutional culture.

    90 days – Minister’s Advisory Panel on Systemic Racism to submit Final report

    • Final report issued to the MND by Advisory Panel on Systemic Racism and Discrimination with a focus on anti-Indigenous and anti-Black racism, LGBTQ2 Prejudice, Gender Bias and White Supremacy.
    • The report will be issued to the MND in Dec 21.
  • Corporate Secretary – Joanne Lostracco

    Download placemat [PDF, 400KB]

    Biography

    • Appointed in February 2020.
    • Joined Canada’s Public Service in 2000.
    • Spent her first years at Global Affairs Canada, including in Cabinet Relations and International Trade Negotiations and Policy.
    • Taught international trade and international relations at graduate and undergraduate level at Johnson and Wales University and University of Gothenburg in Sweden.

    Mandate

    • Provide corporate services to/for:
      • Support the Minister of National Defence and the Minister of National Defence’s Office
      • Respond to Ministerial correspondence
      • Support Governor in Council appointments
      • Ensure compliance with the Access to Information and Privacy Acts
      • Management and Support of Corporate Governance
      • Strategic Support to the Senior DND Leadership
      • Mainstreaming the integration of GBA+ and the use of findings for decision making across DND/CAF
      • Expand Canada’s support for UN peace operations including women, peace and security (WPS) agenda

    Key facts

    • Total Employees: Approx. 220
    • Budget: $20M
    • Primary location(s):
      • NDHQ Pearkes
        • Meeting Coordination and Ministerial Briefings
        • Correspondence support to Minister
        • Departmental Assistant and Liaison Office
      • NDHQ Carling
        • Director, Governance and Management Services
        • Director, Strategic Corporate Services
        • Director, Gender, Diversity & Inclusion
        • Director, Access to Information and Privacy

    Key partners

    Internal:

    • Minister of National Defence’s Office
    • Deputy Minister’s Office
    • Chief of the Defence Staff’s Office
    • Assistant Deputy Minister (Public Affairs)
    • Assistant Deputy Minister (Policy)
    • Strategic Joint Staff
    • Chief of Military Personnel
    • Assistant Deputy Minister (Human Resources)
    • Chief Professional Conduct and Culture

    External:

    • Privy Council Office
    • Treasury Board Secretariat
    • Office of the Information Commissioner
    • Office of the Privacy Commissioner
    • Women and Gender Equity Canada
    • Global Affairs Canada

    Top issues

    Diversity and Inclusion

    • Conducting GBA+ for all DND/CAF activities and the use of findings to inform decision is crucial to positive outcomes for D&I and culture change.
    • WPS and the Vancouver Principles on the prevention of the recruitment and use of child soldiers as criteria in military planning of operations to enhance Canada’s leadership on issues of Human Rights.

    Governance

    • Facilitate effective decision making across DND/CAF by ensuring Stakeholder accountability.

    Governor in Council Appointments

    • Timely Ministerial decisions on GiC appointments.
    • There are 12 positions requiring appointments in 2021-2022.
    • There are a total of 26 GiC appointments in the Defence portfolio.

    Ministerial Correspondence Unit

    • Timely responses to Ministerial correspondence and invitations.
    • High volume of correspondence and invitations expected in the first 180 days of the Minister’s tenure.
    • Review of processes with the Minister of National Defence and their office to ensure timely responses that meet the Minister’s intent.

    Access to Information and Privacy Requests

    • High volume of Access to Information and Privacy requests expected to continue this FY on sensitive and complex subjects (Sexual Misconduct, COVID-19 and Afghanistan).
    • ATIP Annual Reports must be tabled within 15 days of Parliament resuming post-election. DND/CAF ATIP on-time compliance rates are lower this year and were negatively impacted by the pandemic and ongoing staffing shortage of ATIP analysts. The backlog of files increased during the pandemic.
    • Implementation of the Management Action Plan to address the Information Commissioner Systemic Investigation into DND handling of ATIP issued in July 2020 is 78% complete.
    • The Directorate of Access to Information and Privacy provides document review and redaction services to support Departmental responses to House of Commons Committees Motions for the production papers. This support is expected to continue this FY.
    • Personal Information and Privacy Protection is a priority for DND/CAF and a Defence Team Privacy Management Framework is under development.
  • Independent Review Panel for Defence Acquisition (IRPDA) - Mr. Larry Murray (Chair)

    Download placemat [PDF, 400KB]

    Biography

    Panel members

    • Mr. Larry Murray (Chair) - former Vice Chief of the Defence Staff and acting Chief of the Defence Staff; former Deputy Minister of Veterans Affairs, and Fisheries and Oceans
    • Mr. Martin Gagné - former Group President for CAE; former Royal Canadian Air Force officer
    • Mr. Philippe Lagassé - Associate Professor & William and Jeanie Barton Chair in International Affairs, Norman Paterson School of International Affairs; independent reviewer of the 2012-14 evaluation of options to replace CF-18s
    • Ms. Margaret Purdy- former Associate Deputy Minister of National Defence; former member of the Minister’s Advisory Panel for the Defence Policy Review
    • Ms. Christine Tovee - aerospace engineer; former Vice President and Chief Technology Officer for Airbus Group

    Mandate

    • To help validate the requirements for major military procurements by providing independent, third-party advice to the Minister and Deputy Minister before project approval.
    • Criteria for IRPDA engagement:
      • Projects of $100M or more;
      • Projects with significant risk or complexity;
      • Projects identified for Treasury Board approval;
      • Projects identified for independent challenge by the Minister or Deputy Minister.
    • The Panel generally reviews each project twice – after project identification and after options analysis. Formal advice is submitted to the Minister of National Defence after the second engagement.

    Key facts

    • Executive Director: Ms. Jennifer Foster
    • Total employees: 5 Governor-in-Council appointed Panel members, and 8 full-time employees in the support office.
    • Budget: $1.67M ($1.478M salary and $195K Operations & Maintenance).
    • Primary location(s): 60 Moodie Drive (Carling Campus), Ottawa.
    • Schedule: Since June 2015, the Panel meets monthly (previously in Ottawa, and virtually since the COVID-19 pandemic), reviewing about 3-4 projects at each meeting.
    • 70 project reviews initiated (including the Canadian Coast Guard),
    • 47 pieces of independent advice submitted
    • 147 stakeholder engagements as part of those reviews.

    Key partners

    Internal:

    • Project Sponsors (i.e., Royal Canadian Air Force, Royal Canadian Navy, Canadian Army, Canadian Special Forces Command, etc.)
    • Project Implementers (i.e., Assistant Deputy Minister for Materiel, Assistant Deputy Minister for Infrastructure & Environment, etc.)
    • Chief of Force Development

    External:

    • Canadian Coast Guard
    • Treasury Board - While it is beyond the mandate of the Panel to deliver advice directly to Treasury Board, it is within the Minister of National Defence’s discretion to forward a copy of the advice for any projects going onward for Treasury Board approval

    Top issues

    Forthcoming Advice

    • The Minister of National Defence can expect to soon receive formal written advice from the Panel on the following major procurement projects:
      • [REDACTED].

    Forward Agenda

    • The Terms of Reference for the Panel are sufficiently flexible to allow meaningful and timely engagement on priority projects, including under compressed timelines.
    • The Panel carefully synchronizes its agenda with Departmental priorities, to deliver reliable and timely advice to the Minister of National Defence.
    • The Panel continues to consider its review process to ensure it is best supporting senior decision-making.

    Agile Approaches to Procurement

    • In the Panel’s view, the traditional lengthy approach to defence procurement is increasingly ill-suited to a world of quickly evolving/complex technologies.
    • The Panel is reassured to see that the Department is exploring various ways to procure complex capabilities in a more agile and flexible way.
    • The Panel will continue to support innovative approaches in this area.

    High-Level Mandatory Requirements

    • High-level mandatory requirements are central to the Panel’s review process.
    • High-level mandatory requirements should define the core capability elements that a procurement project must address; should be clear, specific and measurable; and should serve as the measures of success for a project.
    • However, the use of high-level mandatory requirements remain inconsistent, and the Panel is working with the Department on this issue.

    Capability-Based Planning

    • The Panel has been a consistent proponent of using capability-based options in procurement decision-making.
    • The Panel assesses that capability-based options better highlight risks and trade-offs, provide more space for innovative solutions, and lead to more informed decision-making than procurement-based options (buy, lease, etc.).
  • Office of the Judge Advocate General – Rear Admiral Geneviève Bernatchez, OMM, CD

    Download placemat [PDF, 400KB]

    Biography

    • Appointed as the 15th JAG on 27 June 2017, reappointed to the role on 27 June 2021. She is the first woman to be JAG.
    • A native of Gaspé (Québec), she enrolled in the Naval Reserve in 1987 and in 1997, transferred to the Regular Force and joined the Office of the JAG.
    • Deployed with the Canadian Air Component during the Kosovo conflict in 1999.
    • Holds a Masters of International Legal Studies degree, with a specialization in National Security Law, from Georgetown University.

    Mandate

    • Legal adviser to the Governor General, the Minister, the Department and the Canadian Forces in matters relating to military law, including military justice, administrative, operational and international law.
    • Superintendence of the administration of military justice in the Canadian Armed Forces and general supervision of the Director of Military Prosecutions and the Director of Defence Counsel Services.
    • Responsible to the Minister in the performance of the Judge Advocate General’s duties and functions.

    Key facts

    • Total Employees: 335, including:
      • 195 Regular Force legal officers
      • 15 Regular Force non-legal personnel
      • 58 Reserve Force legal officers
      • 3 Reserve Force non-legal personnel
      • 64 civilians
    • Budget: $12.3M
    • Primary location(s): NCR, with regional offices in Halifax, Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg, Edmonton, Victoria and Geilenkirchen.

    Key partners

    Internal:

    • All Defence Team

    External:

    • Department of Justice:
    • Public Safety, Defence & Intelligence Portfolio (including Legal Services Units at DND, CSE, PS, CSIS, RCMP)
    • PCO Legal Service Unit
    • Public Law Sector
    • Criminal Law Policy Section
    • Global Affairs Canada Legal Bureau

    Top issues

    [REDACTED]
  • National Security and Intelligence Review and Oversight Coordination Secretariat (NSIROCS) – Linda Rizzo Michelin

    Download placemat [PDF, 400KB]

    Biography

    • Executive Director
    • 25+ years of public and private sector experience in strategic planning, evaluation, review and results management including 8+years with Public Safety Canada portfolio
    • Led Transformation and Change Management Projects in various departments
    • MA (U of Ottawa), BSc (Health) (U of Windsor), BSc Education (U of Windsor)

    Mandate

    • Provide strategic advice to the DM, CDS and other stakeholders on National Security and Intelligence (NSI) external reviews
    • Provide consolidated, comprehensive, and timely DND/CAF responses to reviews from the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians (NSICOP) and the National Security Intelligence Review Agency (NSIRA).
    • Acts as the Secretariat for the Defence Intelligence Oversight Board (DIOB), the highest ranking integrated Defence Intelligence body providing strategic management and oversight of DND/CAF Defence Intelligence programs, administration and activities.

    Key facts

    • Total Employees: 13 (civilian)
    • Budget: $1.9M
    • Primary location(s): 101 Colonel By Drive (Pearkes Building) and the Carling Campus.
    • Reporting structure: Executive director, who reports directly to the DM and CDS.

    Key partners

    Internal:

    • Canadian Forces Intelligence Command
    • Strategic Joint Staff
    • Office of the Judge Advocate General
    • Canadian Forces Legal Advisor
    • Assistant Deputy Minister (Policy)
    • Assistant Deputy Minister (Public Affairs)

    External:

    • NSICOP
    • NSIRA
    • PCO
    • Other government departments in the security and Intelligence community

    Top issues

    External Reviews (General)

    • DND/CAF fully supports external review and is committed to working with NSICOP and NSIRA.
    • Challenges for the department have included record-keeping practices, multiple IT systems, and a culture shift towards sharing information, including highly sensitive material.
    • DND/CAF continues to address issues with new processes and practices.

    Defence Intelligence Oversight Board

    • DM and CDS Co-chair with meetings held at least 3 times per year. MND receives annual report.

    NSIRA – Annual Reviews

    • Review of Departmental Implementation of the Avoiding Complicity Act (ACA) 2020 – In the previous 2019 Report, NSIRA raised concerns regarding the lack of standardized country/entity assessments.
    • Security of Canada Information Disclosure Act (SCIDA) Review – NSIRA has joined with the Office of the Privacy Commissioner to review departmental compliance with the Act.
    • Both reports expected late fall 2021.
    • MND will be expected to review Whole of Government response to recommendations.

    NSIRA – Ongoing Reviews

    • Defence Intelligence Enterprise (DIE) Scoping Review – Focused on internal oversight, review, and compliance.
    • HUMINT Review – Launched in June 2021 to examine the entirety of DND/CAF Human Source Handling Program.
    • Canadian Forces National Counter-Intelligence Unit (CFNCIU) Ops Review – Focused on areas identified in NSIRA’s previous CFNCIU Review.
    • OSINT/MEDINT – To be launched in early fall 2021

    NSICOP – Ongoing Reviews

    • Review of GAC’s intelligence activities - Implicates DND-CAF operations abroad, with a report due in 2022.
    • Cyber Defence Review - Examined the government’s framework for cyber-defence activities, limited discussion of DND/CAF. The report has been provided to the Prime Minister, is expected to be tabled in Parliament in the fall.  Publication expected in early 2022.

    NSICOP – Past Reviews

    • 2019 Special Report on the Collection, Use, Retention and Dissemination of Information in the Context of DND/CAF Defence Intelligence Activities (CANCIT) - Recommended the MND legislate defence intelligence to ensure that DND//CAF fully complies with the Privacy Act in intelligence activities conducted abroad.
    • Annual Report, 2019 -Critical of challenges faced in the area of diversity and inclusion in the CAF and will conduct a follow-up study.
    • Reports were tabled in Parliament in early 2020 and DND/CAF continues to address recommendations.
  • North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) – General Glen D. VanHerck

    Download placemat [PDF, 400KB]

    Biography

    • Gen VanHerck, Commander NORAD and USNORTHCOM
      • Pilot with Squadron, Group and Wing Command experience
      • Took command 20 Aug 2020
    • LGen Pelletier, NORAD Deputy Commander
      • Pilot with Squadron, Wing, Division and NATO Air Component Comd experience
      • Domestic and expeditionary command experience (DComd CONR, Comd CANR)
    • SgtMaj Porterfield, Command Senior Enlisted Leader
      • Marine with combat, instructor and headquarters experience
      • Principal advisor on all non-commissioned member matters

    Mandate

    • NORAD conducts air defence operations
    • Deter, detect, deny and defeat air threats to Canada and the United States
    • NORAD is a bi-national command that provides:
      • Aerospace control through surveillance and exercising operational control of airspace over Canada and the United States
      • Aerospace warning of attack by aircraft, missiles or space vehicles
      • Maritime warning of our approaches
    • Commander NORAD Strategic Principles: Global Integration; All Domain Awareness; Information Dominance; Decision Superiority
    • Commander NORAD Priorities: Influencing future NDS and NORAD Modernization; Joint Operations Center requirements; Globally Integrated Exercises; Digital Advancement and Literacy

    Key facts

    Total Employees:

    • 4,842 (Canada 1,097, USA 3,751)

    Budget:

    • Unique bi-national combatant command leveraging Canadian and US Services as a Force Employer
    • Canadian NORAD budget supported by VCDS budget

    Primary location(s):

    • NORAD HQ (Colorado Springs, CO)
    • 3 NORAD Regions:
      • Canadian NORAD Region HQ (Winnipeg, MB); Continental US NORAD Region HQ (Panama City, FL); Alaskan NORAD Region HQ (Anchorage, AK)
    • 4 Air Defence Sectors (ADS):
      • Canadian ADS (North Bay, ON); Eastern ADS (Rome, NY); Western ADS (Tacoma, WA); Anchorage, AK
    • 17 Fighter Alert Locations including Bagotville, QC and Cold Lake, AB
    • 3 Cdn Forward Operating Locations (FOLs):
      • Inuvik, NT; and Iqaluit, NU; Yellowknife, NT

    Key partners

    Internal:

    • Canada:
      • VCDS
      • CJOC
      • RCAF, RCN, CA
      • ADM (IE)
      • ADM (Pol)
      • ADM (S&T)
      • ADM (IM)
      • ADM (Mat)
      • SJS
    • United States:
      • Department of Defense
      • Joint Staff
      • US Services
      • US Northern Command
      • US Transport Command
      • US Space Command
      • US Cyber Command

    External:

    • Canada:
      • Nav Canada & TC
      • RCMP
      • Public Safety Canada
      • CSE
    • United States:
      • Department of Homeland Security
      • USSS
      • Federal Aviation Administration
      • TSA
      • Intelligence Community

    Top issues

    North America is No Longer A Sanctuary

    • The current approach to Continental Defence does not effectively address today’s threats
    • Rapidly growing disparity between NORAD defence capacity and increasingly sophisticated offensive capabilities of our competitors is putting Canada and the US at risk
    • Vulnerability to near-peer competitors is increasing in all domains
    • Due to limited ability to deter by denial, we have a risk of strategic deterrence failure
    • We must transition to a synchronized and globally integrated, whole of nation, all domain effort
    • Current Joint Force capabilities and budget priorities will not close the capability gap

    SSE Initiatives with NORAD Nexus:

    • Initiative 44: Future Fighter
    • Initiative 47: Air-to-air Refueling
    • Initiative 109: Upgrade to North Warning System (NWS)
    • Initiative 111: Initially not costed/resourced in SSE. NORAD requirements defined in 2019:
      • Layered Sensing Grid
        • Over The Horizon Radar
        • Space and ground based surveillance systems
        • Integrated Underwater Surveillance System
      • Limited Area Air Defence
      • Advanced C2
      • Dual/multi-use infrastructure in the North

    NORAD Modernization

    • Erosion of military defence and deterrence capabilities results in critical deficiencies in NORAD’s ability to detect and defeat threats to North America
    • Requires short-term investment to address immediate vulnerabilities
    • Requires long-term commitment to develop new capabilities to regain technological and military advantage
    • All domain awareness is the #1 priority
    • Resourcing challenges are increased in the Arctic
    • Slow acquisition processes unable to effectively respond to rapidly emerging technology being developed by adversaries

    Whole of Government

    • Homeland defence of Canada and the US is the number one, no-fail, non-discretionary mission assigned to our military forces
    • Policy decisions are required to address NORAD Modernization & Continental Defence multi-domain vulnerabilities
    • NORAD is a contributor to a coordinated WoG Continental Defence response
    • Vulnerabilities exceed scope of NORAD Modernization
    • Global Competitors calls for Global Integration of efforts (5E)
    • Assessment of critical assets & vulnerabilities is required
    [REDACTED]
  • Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) – Lieutenant-General Al Meinzinger

    Download placemat [PDF, 400KB]

    Biography

    • Appointed in May 2018.
    • Pilot with 36 years of service.
    • Experience in Haiti, Afghanistan, 1 Canadian Air Division, North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD), Royal Military College and National Defence Headquarters. 

    Mandate

    • Provides the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) and the Government of Canada with relevant, responsive and effective air and space power to meet the defence challenges of today and into the future.
    • In cooperation with the US, the RCAF directly contributes to NORAD’s aerospace warning and control mission.
    • Force generates all air and space power capabilities (e.g. search and rescue, air mobility, long range patrol, etc.).
    • Provide the Chief of the Defence Staff with advice on the Air and Space domain.

    Key facts

    • Total Employees:
      • 12,074 Regular Force Personnel
      • 1,969 Reserve Force Personnel
      • 1,518 Civilian Personnel
    • Budget:
      • $1.15B
    • Primary location(s):
      • National Defence Headquarters (Carling Campus)
      • 14 Wings operating from 43 locations, including nine bases, across Canada

    Key partners

    Internal:

    • Various Department of National Defence and Canadian Armed Forces organizations

    External:

    • Air and Space Chiefs of the United States, United Kingdom, Australia, and New Zealand
    • North Atlantic Treaty Organization Air Chiefs, System of Cooperation Amongst the Air Forces of the Americas (SICOFAA) Air Chiefs, Pacific Air Chiefs.

    Top issues

    Op EXPERIENCE and Op TALENT

    • Global circumstances continue to impact the aviation industry and the CAF, with follow-on effects to the overall health of RCAF occupations.
    • Retention of experienced RCAF personnel is key to maintaining delivery of air and space power.
    • Op EXPERIENCE and Op TALENT seek to ameliorate the experiential gaps through targeted growth and retention initiatives that enrich quality of service and improve quality of life for RCAF personnel and their families.
    • Analysis and recommended compensation and benefits for RCAF Pilots and SARTechs were [REDACTED].

    Future Aircrew Training (FAcT)

    • The FAcT Program will replace the CAF’s current Pilot, Air Combat Systems Officer and Airborne Electronic Sensor Operator training systems.
    • After sharing the final draft Request for Proposal (RFP) with the qualified suppliers, the FAcT team will initiate an internal review of the RFP documentation prior to its official release during the fall of 2021.
    • The qualified suppliers will be granted approximately 8 months to prepare their bids. It will then take approximately 6 months to conduct the bid evaluation. 

    Fighter Capability

    • The rigorous selection process for the Future Fighter is well underway and is working towards a contract award in 2022 with first aircraft delivery as early as 2025.
    • All 18 former Royal Australian Air Force aircraft and two assembled spares are in Canada. The first four have been introduced to service and we currently expect all 18 aircraft to be introduced to service in 2022.
    • The Hornet Extension Project is on track to deliver regulatory and interoperability upgrades on up to 94 CF-18s with enhanced combat capabilities to 36 CF-18s by 2025.

    RCAF Reconstitution

    • The COVID-19 impact on recruiting coupled with higher than normal attrition rates requires a multi effort campaign to ensure future Air Force readiness.
    • The first effort is to identify means to enable a greater basic force generation capacity to increase the number of individuals available to conduct future operations.
    • The second effort is to determine what the air force of 2030 will look like and how best to develop an adaptive workforce to operate within resource constraints.

    Tactical Narrowband Satellites (TNS) in Space Operations

    • TNS was [REDACTED] to allow PSPC(W) to obtain Contracting Authority, establish the necessary requisitions and transfer funds.
    • Response to a US Govt LOA has an expiry date of 15 Dec 21.
    • Failure to meet 15 Dec 2021 deadline will create project delays.
    • 15 Dec 2021 deadline is still achievable [REDACTED].
  • Commander Royal Canadian Navy – Vice-Admiral Craig Baines

    Download placemat [PDF, 400KB]

    Biography

    • Assumed command Jan 2021.
    • Naval Warfare Officer, prior commands include: HMCS Winnipeg, Base Commander CFB Esquimalt, Commander Canadian Fleet Atlantic, Commander Maritime Forces Atlantic and Joint Task Force Atlantic.

    Mandate

    • Prepare combat-effective naval forces that support Canadian interests at home and abroad.
    • Protect Canadian sovereignty and economic interests.
    • Work with the United States to protect continental maritime approaches.
    • Support international security and rules-based international order by projecting force in the context of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, United Nations, and multilateral missions.
    • Provide Canadian presence on world’s oceans and engage Allies and partners through naval diplomacy.

    Key facts

    • Total Employees:
      • 6300 trained Regular Force personnel filling 8100 Regular Force positions (1800 supernumerary or untrained personnel)
      • 4100 Reservists filling 5475 Reserve positions
      • 3800 Civilian employees
    • Budget:
      • $743,910,000 (FY 20/21)
      • $816,330,000 (FY 21/22)
    • Primary location(s):
      • National Defence Headquarters (Carling Campus)
      • National Capital Region
      • Maritime Pacific Command (Esquimalt)
      • Maritime Forces Atlantic (Halifax)
      • 24 Naval Reserve Divisions across Canada

    Key partners

    Internal:

    • Canadian Joint Operations Command
    • Strategic Joint Staff
    • Canadian Army
    • Royal Canadian Air Force
    • ADM (Policy)
    • ADM (Materiel)
    • ADM (Human Resources)
    • ADM (Science and Technology)

    External:

    • Global Affairs Canada
    • Public Services and Procurement Canada
    • Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada
    • Maritime Security Operations Centre

    Partners & Allied Navies:

    • NATO and NORAD (Maritime Domain Awareness)
    • Australia, New Zealand, United Kingdom, United States
    • [REDACTED].

    Top issues

    Culture Change

    • The RCN will:
      • Publish Employment Equity and Diversity & Inclusion (EEDI) policy focusing on the aspects of LISTEN / LEARN / ACT.
      • Continue collaboration with and support to Chief Professional Conduct and Culture (CPCC), Anti-Racism Secretariat, and other Directorates within DND/CAF focussing on EEDI.
      • Identify and remove systemic barriers to inclusion within RCN culture, processes, and policies.

    Personnel and Training

    • The RCN will:
      • Develop and implement Project Navy Generation to better manage personnel generation across the HR system, with a view to correcting significant shortages in Regular and Reserve Force personnel.
      • Implement the Future Naval Training System to develop and deliver world-class training in a modern environment.
      • Continue to review, analyse, and refine occupations to ensure sailors are selected, trained, and employed to fill operational and institutional requirements.

    Future Fleet

    • The RCN, in close collaboration with ADM(MAT) is in midst of largest ever peacetime renewal.
      • Canadian Surface Combatant (CSC) - Working closely with ADM(MAT) toward technical baseline and enable Preliminary Design Review (PDR) in Dec.
      • Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ship (AOPS)–. Two now in service with AOPS 3 delivery 2022.
      • Joint Support Ship (JSS) – 2 x JSS to fill RCN at-sea replenishment gap; COVID impacting scheduled 2023 delivery of JSS 1.
      • Interim Auxiliary Oil Replenishment (iAOR) – Analysis with ADM(MAT) and PSPC. into whether to pursue a contract extension this Fall
      • Canadian Patrol Submarine Project (CPSP): Work has commenced to provide options for the replacement for Victoria-class submarine.

    Current Fleet

    • Halifax-class Frigates: Maintenance demand is growing exponentially as ships age beyond design life. Requirement to sustain until arrival of Canadian Surface Combatant (CSC).
    • Victoria-class Modernization: (VCM) projects will maintain submarine capability as they continue to operate into the mid-2030s. Three key areas: Survivability; Habitability; and Operational Relevance.
    • Kingston-class Maritime Coastal Defence Vessels: National Procurement funding essential to continue to operate into 2030s.

    Infrastructure

    • Current Fleet: Existing naval infrastructure continues to deteriorate and is beginning to impact operations, training and support to personnel.
    • The current forecasted funding assessed as insufficient to curb the downward trend. Additional resources and rationalization will be required to support training of sailors for Fleet in Being and Future Fleet.
    • Nanisivik Naval Facility (NNF): work to operationalize NNF continues. [REDACTED].
    • CSC: RCN is working with ADM(Mat) and ADM(IE) on developing the infrastructure plan to support the Future Fleet consisting of CSC, AOPS and JSS.
  • Sexual Misconduct Response Centre (SMRC) – Dr. Denise Preston

    Download placemat [PDF, 400KB]

    Biography

    • Joined the Department of National Defence as Executive Director (ED) of the Sexual Misconduct Response Centre in May 2017.
    • Prior, worked for the Parole Board of Canada for 8 years, and as Psychologist for the Correctional Service of Canada for 19 years.
    • Ph.D. in Psychology from Queen’s University, registered with the College of Psychologists of Ontario, and member of the Canadian Psychological Association.

    Mandate

    • Provide support services or referrals to support services for CAF members who are affected by sexual misconduct (since 2015).
    • Provide guidance and recommendations to the military that shape the development and implementation of policies and programs to eliminate sexual misconduct in the military (new since April 2019).
    • Monitor progress of military policies and programs, providing independent, external analysis of their effectiveness and recommendations for improvement (new since April 2019).
    • Per Budget 2021, the Mandate will be expanding to DND public servants and former CAF members.

    Key facts

    • Total Employees: 86 positions staffed, expanding to 215 positions (Permanent, Casual, Students and Military staff)
    • Budget:
    Fiscal Year 2020-2021 $25,248,455
    Operating & Maintenance $8,101,872
    Civilian Salary $16,133,433
    Grants & Contributions $500,000
    Reserve Pay $109,744
    Capital $392,750
     
    • Primary location(s): Ottawa. Regional presence to be planned.

    Key partners

    Internal:

    • Chief, Professional Conduct and Culture
    • All Level 1s (heads of branches and services)
    • Judge Advocate General
    • Canadian Forces Health Services
    • Military Police/Canadian Forces National Investigative Service
    • Integrated Conflict and Complaint Management
    • Chaplain General
    • National Defence/Canadian Forces Ombudsman

    External:

    • External Advisory Council to the Centre
    • Department of Justice
    • Women and Gender Equality Canada
    • Veterans Affairs Canada
    • Five-Eyes partners (United States, United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand)

    Top issues

    Heyder-Beattie Class Action Settlement

    • Restorative Engagement Program (October 2021): For class members to share their experience of sexual misconduct with senior defence representatives with the help of restorative practitioners.
    • Survivor Support Consultation Report (published November 2021): The ED and two CAF members met with class member representatives, supported by three subject matter experts, to provide a report on enhancing Defence Team resources and support programs for survivors.

    Budget 2021 Programs, Part 1

    • Peer Support: A key ask from many stakeholder survivor groups. Program to be launched in conjunction with Veterans Affairs Canada. Undergoing program design and ensuring that those with lived experiences are consulted throughout the design. Program will include online and face-to-face options.

    Budget 2021, Part 2

    • SMRC Expansion: SMRC expanded its services to DND public servants in August and to former CAF members in September. Will be adding regional services, first in QC in October, and then in Pacific in early 2022.
    • Contribution Program: Launched August 2019, provides funding to sexual assault centres in communities near 10 most populated bases. Budget 2021 provides an expansion to the program and promotes innovation to meet needs of underserved locations and populations.

    Budget 2021, Part 3

    • Prevention and Training: Developing comprehensive prevention plan to support the military’s culture change strategy, including a program at Canadian Military Colleges to launch this academic year with all officer cadets.
    • Responsive Legal Options: Two initiatives aimed at increasing victims’ access to justice. First is provision of Independent Legal Advice. Second is Alternative Reporting Options, including consideration of restricted and online reporting.

    Arbour Review

    • Mme Arbour will be examining the mandate and governance of SMRC as part of her review.
    • Sexual misconduct will also feature heavily in her review, thus SMRC will be actively engaged.
  • Strategic Joint Staff – Major General Paul Prevost

    Download placemat [PDF, 400KB]

    Biography

    • Appointed Director of Staff (DOS) 3 September 2021.
    • 31 years in the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) with Operational experience in NORAD, the Balkans, Afghanistan and the Middle East.
    • Commanded at all levels of the CAF.

    Mandate

    • Provision of situational awareness, military analysis and decision support to the Chief of Defence Staff (CDS)
    • Conduct of strategic level engagement with other government departments, allies, and partner nations
    • Conduct of strategic analysis to achieve military strategic effects
    • Provision of CDS directives and orders
    • Force Posture and Readiness planning and support
    • Synchronization of CAF strategic sustainment and support
    • Arms control verification
    • Integration of GBA+ into CAF policies and operations.

    Key facts

    • Total Employees: 238 CAF / 99 civilian
    • Budget: $60 Million
    • Primary location: National Defence Headquarters, Carling
    • SJS Structure:
      • Director General – Operations
      • Director General – Plans
      • Director General - Strategies, Effects and Readiness
      • Director General – Support
      • Director General - Coordination

    Key partners

    • Privy Council Office
    • Public Safety Canada
    • Public Health Agency of Canada
    • Royal Canadian Mounted Police
    • Canadian Security Intelligence Service
    • Communications Security Establishment
    • Canadian Border Services Agency
    • Global Affairs Canada
    • Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
    • All DND/CAF branches and commands
    • COS MND

    International

    • NATO
    • Five-Eyes Partners (US, UK, NZ, AU)
    • NORAD
    • UN

    Top issues

    Planning for Upcoming Mission Renewals

    • Op CALUMET - Canada's support to the Multinational Force and Observers (MFO) – Ministerial Letter
    • Royal Canadian Navy Activities Calendar years 2022-2024 – Ministerial Letter
    • Op FREQUENCE – Ministerial Letter
    • Op ACKEE – Ministerial Letter
    • [REDACTED]

    Areas of Focus

    • Continue CAF support to the Whole of Government response to the pandemic
    • CAF Reconstitution - Last 18+ months in support of operations will result in a reconstitution period
    • Support the efforts of Chief Professionnal Conduct and Culture
    • Implementation of the recommendations of the Third Independent Review of the National Defence Act
    • Support Justice Arbour’s effort in her Independent External Comprehensive Review
    • Gather and analyse DND/CAF lessons from the pandemic and promulgate adaptation measures
    • Promulgate a revised policy for Information Operations
    • Provide decision support for MND’s discussion on NATO Defence Planning Process at NATO Defence Ministers Meeting
    • Synchronize CAF activities with Allies to deter malign actors [REDACTED]
    • [REDACTED]
  • Vice Chief of the Defence Staff (VCDS) – Lieutenant-General Frances J. Allen, CMM, CD

    Download placemat [PDF, 400KB]

    Biography

    • Appointed June 2021.
    • Commanded at multiple levels of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF), including the National Systems Management Center, Aerospace and Telecommunications Engineering Support Squadron, and Canadian Forces Network Operations Center.
    • Previously Military Representative of Canada to the NATO Military Committee in Brussels, Belgium.
    • Staff appointments have included Director General Defence Security, Director General Cyberspace, Director General Information Management Operations, Joint Force Cyber Component Commander, and Deputy Vice Chief of the Defence Staff.

    Mandate

    • Senior Designated Official for the management of Defence projects and programs.
    • Command a diverse group of 18 organizations within Canada and abroad that support the entire DND/CAF including:
      • Programme, Force Development, Defence security, General Health and Safety, Cadets, Reserves, NATO Military Representative, Canadians assigned outside Canada, Foreign liaison, Conflict and Complaint Management, Military Police, National Capital Region administration.

    Key facts

    • Members: ~11,950
      • 2,725 Regular Force, 883 outside Canada
      • 458 Primary Reservists (full & part-time)
      • 2,200 Employees of the Public Service
      • 6,567 Reserves Supporting Cadets
    • Budget: $402,997,849
      • $227,815,194 – Cadets & Junior Rangers
      • $76,850,511 – Operations & Maintenance
      • $52,549,729 – Civilian Salary Wage Envelope
      • $18,626,068 – Primary Reserve Salary
    • Primary location(s):
      • National Defence Headquarters (Pearkes & Carling), Uplands, Bases/Wings;
      • 69 Countries: United States (Colorado Springs, Washington), United Kingdom (London), Belgium (Brussels), Germany (Niederheid), Italy (Naples), France, Australia, etc.

    Key partners

    Internal:

    • Minister of National Defence Office
    • Deputy Minister Office/Associate Deputy Ministers
    • Chief of the Defence Staff Office/Strategic Joint Staff
    • Judge Advocate General
    • Commanders (CAF Formations & DND senior officials)
    • Ombudsman

    External:

    • Central Agencies
    • Public Services and Procurement Canada, Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada
    • Public Safety and Portfolio agencies
    • Transport Canada
    • North Atlantic Treaty Organization, North American Aerospace Defence Command, United Nations
    • Global Affairs Canada and Foreign Embassies in Ottawa
    • Five Eyes Military Partners: Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

    Top issues

    Execution of the Defence Services Programme (DSP)

    • The execution of the DSP is a priority area for the VCDS organization ensuring the continued implementation of defence policy objectives, and integration and modernization imperatives.
    • The continuity of that activity is essential to manage while also responding to the impacts that COVID-19 has had on industry and defence over the past 18 months.

    Reconstitution

    • The VCDS will prioritize the work to restore defence activities and readiness, which was affected by the pandemic.
    • The VCDS is responsible for the CAF Modernization Focus Area, which includes the prioritization of Digitalization, Joint Capabilities, and Objective Force 2030 (the Force design aspiration to ensure the CAF remains strategically relevant, operationally responsive, and tactically decisive)
    • The VCDS will concurrently support the other two Focus Areas of Reconstitution: People and Culture, and Excellence in Operations.

    Implementation of External Comprehensive Reviews

    • The VCDS, along with the JAG, will provide strategic oversight to the External Comprehensive Reviews Implementation Committee (ECRIC), which will develop a campaign to analyze and implement the 107 recommendations from the Third Independent Review and other external comprehensive reviews.
    • The ECRIC will be a Permanent Secretariat, which should be established in Sept 2021 within the VCDS Group.
    • The VCDS is also working with the JAG to implement the Bill of Victim’s Rights.

    New Vision for the Reserves

    • The Reserve Force will integrate new roles and capabilities in order to support emerging CAF priorities such as sustainment, digitalization, and specialized enablers.
    • A strategy is being developed which will provide direction for the structure, roles and capabilities of the Reserve Force.
    • The size of the Reserve Force will be increased to 30,000; it will fill new roles and enhance existing ones.
Report a problem or mistake on this page
Please select all that apply:

Thank you for your help!

You will not receive a reply. For enquiries, contact us.

Date modified: