Vaccination coverage in Canada

Canada monitors vaccination coverage on a regular basis to:

On this page

Why getting vaccinated is important

When you're vaccinated, you build immunity (ability to resist infection). This protects you from getting the disease and prevents you spreading it to others. Some vaccines protect you for several years and some protect you for the rest of your life.

The more people who are vaccinated in the community, the lower the risk of infection for those who:

When you're vaccinated, you help to create community immunity, sometimes called herd immunity. You protect both yourself and those around you.

The more contagious a disease, the more we need high vaccination coverage to reach community immunity. For measles, the most contagious vaccine-preventable disease, we need coverage rates as high as 95%.

How we monitor vaccination coverage

We do a survey every 2 years to track coverage for all vaccines recommended by the National Advisory Committee on Immunization.

How we calculate the numbers for vaccination coverage

We estimate the percentages of people vaccinated for vaccine-preventable diseases.

For example, to calculate vaccination coverage for pertussis (whooping cough) in 2-year-olds, we:

  1. divide the number of 2-year-old children who received the recommended 4 doses of pertussis vaccine before age 2 by the total number of children aged 2
  2. multiply the result by 100, to get the percentage

Results from recent vaccination coverage surveys

Childhood National Immunization Coverage Survey (cNICS)

cNICS measures coverage for all vaccines given to infants, children and teens every second year.

Adult National Immunization Coverage Survey (aNICS)

aNICS measured coverage for vaccines recommended for adults. As of 2018, it was merged into the Seasonal Influenza Vaccination Coverage Survey.

Seasonal Influenza Vaccination Coverage Survey

The Seasonal Influenza Vaccination Coverage Survey measures coverage for the flu shot in adults every year. Every second year, it measures other adult vaccines as well.

Supporting provincial and territorial immunization registries

The Public Health Agency of Canada works with the provinces and territories to develop tools and best practices, so that they can best manage their vaccination programs. Most provinces and territories have an electronic immunization registry for their jurisdiction, in order to:

Related links

Federal, provincial and territorial tools and best practices

Report a problem or mistake on this page
Please select all that apply:

Thank you for your help!

You will not receive a reply. For enquiries, contact us.

Date modified: