Guide 5196: Sponsorship of adopted children and other relatives 

You now need to apply online

As of September 23, 2022, it is now mandatory to apply online.

If you can’t apply online, and require accommodations, including for a disability, you can ask for the application in another format (paper, braille or large print).

If you can’t apply online and require accommodations

If you, your sponsor (if being sponsored by a family member) or representative cannot apply online and require accommodations, including for a disability, you may ask for an alternative format. After we review your request, we’ll send you the application package in one of these formats:

  • paper
  • braille
  • large print

To request another format:

  1. Open a new email
  2. In the subject line of your email, include:
    • the format you need (paper, braille, or large print), and
    • the application package you want
  3. In the body of your email, include
    • your full name (principal applicant) as shown on your passport
    • the full name of your sponsor, if you’re being sponsored by a family member
    • a statement explaining that you’re asking for an alternate format
    • if you want the application in English or French
    • how we should send it to you (by email or regular mail)
      • Include your email address if you want us to send it electronically so you can print it yourself. This option will save you the time it would take to mail it to you.
      • Include your mailing address if you want it mailed to you.
  4. Send your email to: IRCC.PRPortalALTRequest-DemandeALTPortailRP.IRCC@cic.gc.ca

We will only reply to requests for alternative formats. We won't reply to any other emails.

After we get your request, we’ll reply with instructions and tell you where to send your application.

To submit your application

  • fill out and sign any paper forms
  • return the application by mail or courier to the mailing address provided in our instructions

For more information about applying with an alternate format, call 1-888-242-2100 (from inside Canada only).

Table of Contents


This is not a legal document. The explanations and definitions are not legal definitions. In case of a discrepancy between the language in this document and the relevant legislation or regulations, the legal text in the legislation and regulations prevails.

For legal information, see the:

This information will help you complete the forms and guide you through the application process.


Overview

Application package

This application package has:

  • an instruction guide, and
  • the forms you need to fill out.

The instruction guide:

  • has information you must know before you submit your application, and
  • explains how to fill out the forms and gather your supporting documents.

Read the instruction guide completely and then fill out each of the applicable forms.

For an application to be considered complete, the principal applicant must fill out the forms listed below and must submit them all together in the Permanent Residence Online Application Portal for the principal applicant and each of their dependants. Incomplete applications will be returned.

The forms are designed with questions that will help the processing of your application.


Symbols used in this guide

This guide uses these symbols to draw your attention to important information:

Required step
What you must do to have your application processed.
Important information

Important information that you need to know to avoid delays or other problems.

Get more information

Where to get more information.

Note: Tips that will help you with this application.

Before You Apply

Sponsorship of members of the Family Class

The Canadian government allows citizens and permanent residents of Canada to sponsor members of the family class, but it requires that arriving immigrants receive care and support from their sponsors.

Members of the family class include:

  • a sponsor’s spouse
  • a sponsor’s  common-law partner or conjugal partner
  • a sponsor’s dependent child
  • a sponsor’s parent
  • a person the sponsor intends to adopt
  • and other relatives of the sponsor as defined by regulation

Who may use this application?

Use this application package if you’re a Canadian citizen, Registered Indian or a permanent resident of Canada who is 18 years of age or older and you want to sponsor:

  • Children that are adopted or to be adopted and persons who wish to be re-united with close family members in Canada. In order to use this application package, you must, with respect to the sponsor, be
    • a child they adopted outside Canada or intends to adopt in Canada,
    • their sibling, nephew, niece, grandchild, and be an orphan, under the age of 18 and not a spouse or common-law partner,
    • their relative, regardless of your age, if the sponsor does not have a spouse, common-law partner, conjugal partner, child, parent, sibling, grandparent, uncle, aunt, nephew or niece, who is a Canadian citizen, Indian or permanent resident or whose application for permanent residence in Canada they could sponsor.

Please be aware that individuals who are adopted by Canadian Citizens may be eligible for Canadian citizenship. Learn more about the application process for citizenship grants for adopted persons.

Use this guide to help you prepare:

  • your application to sponsor an adopted child or orphaned family member OR
  • other family members who are not your spouse, partner or dependent child.

Adopted children and orphaned relatives

A permanent resident visa cannot be issued to a child as a member of the family class if that child is the adopted child of the sponsor or an orphaned brother, sister, nephew or niece of the sponsor, unless the adoptive parents/the sponsor demonstrate they have obtained information concerning the medical condition of the child. In doing so, the government ensures that the child’s best interests are protected.

The sponsor must complete and submit a Medical Condition Statement [IMM 0133] (PDF, 2.3 MB) if they have not already done so with their sponsorship application.


What does it mean to sponsor?

When you sponsor persons who are members of the family class, you must sign an undertaking with the Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship (or with the Ministère de l'Immigration, de la Francisation et de l'Intégration [MIFI] if you live in Quebec).

The undertaking is a promise to provide financial support and basic requirements for the family members you are sponsoring.

Basic requirements are:

  • food
  • clothing
  • utilities
  • personal requirements
  • shelter
  • fuel
  • household supplies

This also includes health care not provided by public health, such as eye and dental care.

The undertaking ensures that these persons and their family members do not have to apply for social assistance. The length of the undertaking and duration of time you are to provide support varies according to their age and relationship to you.

Your obligations as a sponsor begin as soon as the person you are sponsoring and, if applicable, their family members arrive in Canada.

Important information: The undertaking is an unconditional promise of support. For example, the granting of Canadian citizenship, divorce, separation or relationship breakdown or moving to another province does not cancel the undertaking. The undertaking also remains in effect even if your financial situation deteriorates.


May I have a co-signer?

Your spouse or common-law partner may help you meet the income requirement by co-signing the sponsorship application. A common-law partner is a person who is living with you in a conjugal relationship and has done so for at least one year prior to the signing of the undertaking.

The co-signer must:

  • meet the same eligibility requirements as the sponsor;
  • agree to co-sign the undertaking; and
  • agree to be responsible for the basic requirements of the person you want to sponsor and their family members for the validity period of the undertaking.

The co-signer will be equally liable if obligations are not performed.

Note: Assets, potential earnings, or assistance from other family members will not be considered.


Do I need more than one application?

You must complete separate applications for each person you want to sponsor. Each application may include that person’s family members.

For example:

If you want to sponsor…

  • your two orphaned brothers
    • you must complete two applications: one for each of your brothers.
    • The application for each of your brothers would identify each individual as the person being sponsored (principal applicant).

Sponsorship eligibility

In order to sponsor, you must…

  • be 18 years of age or older;
  • be a Canadian citizen, Registered Indian or permanent resident;
  • be sponsoring a member of the family Class;
  • live in Canada;
  • sign an undertaking promising to provide for the basic requirements of the person being sponsored;
  • sign an agreement with the person you are sponsoring that confirms that each of you understands your mutual obligations and responsibilities;
  • have an income that meets or exceeds the minimum necessary income, which is published yearly by the Canadian government in the Low-Income Cut-offs (LICO). You will have to provide documents that show your financial resources for the past 12 months and prove you are financially able to sponsor members of the family class. You may also have a co-signer. If you live in Quebec, see also Sponsors living in Quebec.

Note: The minimum necessary income requirement does not apply if the person you are sponsoring is a child you adopted or intend to adopt in Canada and that child has no children of their own.

You may NOT sponsor if you…

  • receive social assistance for a reason other than disability,
  • are in default of an undertaking, an immigration loan, a performance bond, or family support payments,
    For more information. See Defaults below.
  • are an undischarged bankrupt,
  • were convicted of an offence of a sexual nature, a violent criminal offence, an offence against a relative that results in bodily harm or an attempt or threat to commit any such offences—depending on circumstances such as the nature of the offence, how long ago it occurred and whether a pardon was issued
    For more information. See Sponsorship Bar for Violent Crime
  • are under a removal order,
  • are detained in a penitentiary, jail, reformatory or prison,

Defaults

You are not eligible to sponsor if you are in default of a previous undertaking. If you are in default and you submit an application to sponsor, it will be refused and the sponsorship fees that you have paid will not be refunded or applied to subsequent sponsorship applications.

If you are in default of…

A previous sponsorship undertaking

You can be found in default of a previous sponsorship undertaking if the family members you sponsored in the past received social assistance or welfare while the undertaking was valid.

You may not sponsor until you repay the full amount of any social assistance or welfare payment or repay the debt to the satisfaction of the government authority that issued the benefit or ordered you to pay.

An immigration loan

You received a transportation, assistance or Right of Permanent Residence Fee (previously called the Right of Landing Fee) loan and have missed payments or are in arrears.

You may not sponsor until you pay all arrears on your loan. For more information, contact Collection Services at 1-800-667-7301 (in Canada and the United States only).

Support payment obligations

You were ordered by a court to make support payments to a spouse or child and have neglected to do so.

You may not sponsor until you resolve the family support matter.

A performance bond

You agreed to pay money to guarantee that an immigrant would fulfil their obligations under immigration legislation.

You may not sponsor until you pay the full amount of the bond.


Sponsorship bar for violent crime

The sponsorship bar prevents people who’ve been convicted of certain crimes from sponsoring a family member.

If you’ve been convicted of a crime that caused bodily harm to any of the relatives listed below, you can’t sponsor anyone under the Family Class.

Note:

  • “Partner” includes common-law and conjugal partners.
  • Relatives not listed here may still fall under this category. If you aren’t sure, check the full list of rules or contact us.

Relatives the sponsorship bar can apply to:

  • your current or ex-spouse/partner and/or their children,
  • your children,
  • your parent/grandparent, child/grandchild, sibling, niece/nephew, aunt/uncle, or cousin, or
    • the current or ex-spouse/partner and children of the above
  • the parent/grandparent, child/grandchild, sibling, niece/nephew, aunt/uncle, or cousin of your current or ex-spouse/partner or children, or
    • the current or ex-spouse/partner and children of any of the above
  • your child’s spouse, partner or children,
  • your spouse’s, partner’s or child’s ex-spouse or ex-partner and children,
  • your partner’s parent/grandparent, child/grandchild, sibling, niece/nephew, aunt/uncle, or cousin, or
    • the current or ex-spouse/partner (and their children) of any of the above,
  • a foster child who is or was cared for by
    • you,
    • your current or ex-spouse/partner or their children,
    • your parent/grandparent, child/grandchild, sibling, aunt/uncle or cousin, or
    • the current or ex-spouse/partner (and their children) of any of the above, or
  • your current or ex-boyfriend/girlfriend, their spouse or common-law partner, and their dependent children.

Contact information of Provincial Authorities

If the person you sponsor or a member of their family receives financial support under a federal, provincial or municipal assistance program during the validity of the agreement, you will be deemed in default of your obligations.

If you need information about how to repay the money owed, contact the corresponding provincial office listed below. The services offered by these offices are available during local business hours only.

  • British Columbia
    Ministry of Social Development and Social Innovation
    Sponsorship Default Coordinator
    P.O. Box 9950 STN PROV GOVT
    Victoria, BC V8W 9R3
    1 (866) 866-0800
  • Quebec
    Centre de service du recouvrement
    1415 Jarry St. Est, Suite 400
    Montréal, QC H2E 3B4
    Telephone: 1 (514) 873-4362
    Fax: 1 (514) 352-2395
  • Alberta
    Alberta Human Services
    Income Support Contact Centre
    Telephone: 1 (866) 644-5135
    Edmonton: 1 (780) 644-5135
    Email: Hs.iscc@gov.ab.ca
  • Newfoundland and Labrador
    Department of Social Services
    P.O. Box 8700
    St. John’s, NL A1B 4J6
    Telephone: 1 (709) 729-0583
  • Saskatchewan
    Department of Community Resources and
    Employment
    Saskatchewan Social Services
    1920 Broad Street, 11th Floor
    Regina, SK S4P 3V6
    Telephone: 1 (306) 787-1388
    Website
  • New Brunswick
    Department of Social Development
    P.O. Box 6000
    Fredericton, NB E3B 5H1
    Telephone: 1 (506) 453-2001
  • Manitoba
    Family Services
    203 South Railway Street East
    Killarney, MB R0K 1G0
    Telephone: 1 (877) 812-0014
  • Nova Scotia
    Department of Community Services
    P.O. Box 696
    Halifax, NS B3J 2T7
    Telephone: 1 (902) 424-4262
    Website
  • Ontario
    Ministry of Community and Social Services
    Overpayment Recovery Unit
    Box 333
    Toronto, ON M7A 1N3
    Toll free: 1 (888) 346-5184
    Fax: 1 (416) 212-7707
    Website
  • Prince Edward Island
    Department of Social Services and Seniors
    11 Kent Street, 2nd floor
    P.O. Box 2000
    Charlottetown, PE C1A 7N8
    Telephone: 1 (902) 368-6369
    Fax: 1 (902) 894-0242

Sponsors living in Quebec

The province of Quebec is responsible for determining whether sponsors living in the province have the financial ability to sponsor family members and the length of the undertaking.

The province of Quebec has its own immigration rules. Find out how to sponsor someone if you live in Quebec.

If you live in Quebec:

  • you must first send us your application.
  • if you meet the federal requirements to apply for sponsorship, we will send you an email or letter with instructions to download Quebec’s sponsorship kit.
  • fill out and submit Quebec’s undertaking kit. You must attach a copy of the email or letter we sent you to the undertaking application that you submit to the Quebec government.

The Quebec government will review your sponsorship application and tell you if you’re eligible. The Quebec government may deem that you’re not eligible if:

  • you didn’t meet the terms of a sponsorship agreement in the past because the person you sponsored received social assistance and you haven’t repaid the Quebec government;
  • during the five years before you submitted your sponsorship application, you didn’t pay alimony or child support even though a court ordered it;
  • you didn’t follow other conditions imposed by the Quebec authorities or with any federal regulatory requirements, particularly if you received social assistance and aren’t exempt from that condition.

We can’t make a decision on your application until we receive Quebec’s decision about your undertaking application.

The Quebec government will inform IRCC if you are approved as a sponsor.

If the federal eligibility requirements are met, we will send the sponsor a letter with instructions to download the MIFI undertaking kit, then to complete and submit it to the MIFI with a copy of the letter we sent you.

For more information on Quebec’s requirements, or if you need help, you may call MIFI’s general information line at 514-864-9191 or 1-877-864-9191 or consult the MIFI website.


Length of undertaking

Your obligations as a sponsor begin when your family members enter Canada to remain as permanent residents. The following will help you determine how long your undertaking will be valid.

Dependent child 22 years of age or over

Your dependent child or a dependent child of your spouse, common-law or conjugal partner, including an adopted child or a child to be adopted in Canada who is 22 years of age or over on the day they become a permanent resident.

Length of undertaking is three years after that child becomes a permanent resident.

Any other person

Any other person (e.g. brother, sister, uncle, aunt).

Length of undertaking is 10 years after that person becomes a permanent resident.

Note: If provincial/territorial social assistance payments are made to your relative while the undertaking is in effect, you will be considered in default.


How to calculate the family size?

The size of the family determines the amount of income you need to make to sponsor. In calculating the size of your family:

  1. Count:

    • yourself,
    • your spouse or common-law partner and
    • dependent children, if applicable. See the “Definition of dependent child (types 1 and 2)”

    Note: Dependent children who meet this definition must be included in the calculation, even if you as a sponsor do not have custody nor provide child support.

  2. Count:

    • the number of persons you are now sponsoring and
    • all family members of that person, whether or not they are accompanying.
  3. Count the number of persons covered by other valid undertakings you have made or co-signed in the past.
  4. If you have a co-signer, count all persons covered by still valid undertakings made or co-signed by your co-signer.
  5. Calculate the number of persons covered in steps 1 to 4. The total represents the family size
  6. Look at the Income tables and charts at the end of this guide to help you decide if you have the financial ability to meet sponsorship requirements. Note that your calculations will only be an estimate.

For sponsors in Quebec:

Quebec residents should refer to MIFI’s Financial capacity evaluation webpage. Quebec’s Income Scale amounts are indexed each year. Note that any calculation will only be an estimate since an MIFI employee will make the official financial assessment. For further information on Quebec’s requirements, go to the MIFI’s website and click on Sponsors and Sponsored Persons, or call the general information line at 1-877-864-9191.


Do I have to maintain a minimum income during the processing of the application?

Your income must meet or exceed the minimum necessary income requirement, as identified annually in the Low-Income Cut-Offs (LICO), on the date which the sponsorship application is signed.

Income may be reassessed at any time during processing if new information is received or brought to our attention indicating that you may no longer meet the minimum income requirements.

Note: The minimum necessary income requirement does not apply if the person you are sponsoring is a child you adopted or intend to adopt in Canada and that child has no children of their own.


May I cancel my undertaking once it has been approved?

If you change your mind about sponsoring a child placed for adoption or other relatives, you must inform us of your decision to withdraw your undertaking prior to the sponsored person becoming a permanent resident. You must use this Web form and clearly state your name, date of birth and Universal Client Identification (UCI) /Client ID number, if known, in all correspondence.

  • If you inform us before the sponsored person is granted permanent residence
    • We will assess your request and inform you in writing if your withdrawal request is accepted.
  • If you inform us after the sponsored person is granted permanent residence
    • The commitment you and your co-signer, if applicable, made to support your family is valid for the term of your undertaking.

What happens if I fail to meet my obligations?

If the person you sponsored (one of the sponsored family members) receives financial support from a federal, provincial or municipal assistance program while the undertaking is still valid, you:

  • will be considered to be in default of your obligations,
  • may have to repay to the government concerned any benefits they received, and
  • will not be allowed to sponsor other members of the family class until you have reimbursed the amount of these payments to the government concerned.

Why might the application of the person I want to sponsor be refused?

There are many possible reasons why an application for permanent residence might be refused. Some examples are:

  • the person you want to sponsor is not a member of the family class;
  • you may not meet the financial requirements where these are applicable;
  • the person you want to sponsor or their family members may not have provided the required documents as requested;
  • the relationship between you and the person you want to sponsor or their family members is not genuine or has been entered into for immigration purposes only; or
  • the person you want to sponsor or their family members have a criminal record or serious illness.

Suspension of processing

If any of the proceedings below apply to you and you send a sponsorship application, your application will not be processed until a final decision is rendered with respect to that proceeding.

  • You have been charged with the commission of an offence that is punishable by a maximum term of imprisonment of at least 10 years.
  • You are subject of a report that would render you inadmissible to Canada.
  • You are the subject of an application to revoke your citizenship.
  • You are the subject of a certificate signed by the Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship and the Solicitor General of Canada stating you are inadmissible on grounds of security, human or international rights violation, serious criminality or organized criminality.
  • You are appealing the loss of your permanent resident status.

Information for the Principal Applicant (Adopted Child or Other Relative)


Does the principal applicant need to include a child in the sole custody of a former spouse or partner in their application?

The principal applicant must list all children who are in the sole custody of a former spouse or partner on the application for permanent residence since all family members, whether accompanying or not, must be declared and examined. If a child is not examined, the principal applicant will not be able to sponsor the child as a member of the family class in the future, regardless of changes to custody or living circumstances. To preserve the right to sponsor that child in the future, the child must be included and examined.

Do I need a passport or travel document?

You must have a valid passport or travel documents. If any of the documents are to expire soon, you should renew them and provide copies of the new passport or travel document to the office processing your application.

Diplomatic, official, service or public affairs passports cannot be used to immigrate to Canada. You must have a valid regular or private passport when you arrive.

Note: The validity of your visa may be affected by the validity of your passport.


How long is a permanent resident visa valid?

A permanent resident visa is issued for a period not exceeding the earliest expiry date of the following documents:

  • your medical results or
  • your passport.

Important information: Permanent resident visas cannot be extended once issued. If applicants do not use the visas within their validity period, they must re-apply for immigration to Canada. Their sponsor will have to submit a new sponsorship application and pay new processing fees.


Staying informed

Selection criteria, requirements and other information for applicants can sometimes change. Please note that:

  • Applications will be processed according to the rules and regulations in effect at the time the application is made. Rules and regulations may change at any time.

Our Immigration and citizenship page contains the latest news, selection criteria updates and applications links. Check periodically for updated information.


Family member definitions

Your family members include your spouse or common-law partner, your dependent children and any children that are their dependent children.

Spouse

Refers to either of the two persons (any gender) in a marriage legally recognized in the country in which it took place, as well as in Canada.

Important information

Proxy, telephone, fax, internet and similar forms of marriage where one or both parties were not physically present are not considered as valid spousal relationships under the Regulations. For more information, consult our policy on the legality of a marriage.

Common-law partner
Refers to a person who is living in a conjugal relationship with another person (any gender), and has done so continuously for a period of at least one year. A conjugal relationship exists when there is a significant degree of commitment between two people.

This can be shown with evidence that the couple share the same home, support each other financially and emotionally, have children together, or present themselves in public as a couple.

Common-law partners who have been in a conjugal relationship for at least one year but are unable to live together or appear in public together because of legal restrictions in their home country or who have been separated for reasons beyond their control (for example, civil war or armed conflict) may still qualify and should be included on the application.

Dependent children

We assess your child’s eligibility as a dependant based on how old they were at a specific point in time, called the lock-in date. This is usually the date we received your application. To see if your child qualifies as a dependant, we consider the age of your child on the lock-in date, even though your child’s age may change during processing.

Your child or the child of your spouse or common-law partner can be considered a dependent child if that child meets the requirements below on the lock-in date:

  • They’re under 22 years old, and
  • They don’t have a spouse or common-law partner

Children 22 years old or older qualify as dependants if they meet both of these requirements:

  • They have depended on their parents for financial support since before the age of 22, and
  • They are unable to financially support themselves because of a mental or physical condition

With the exception of age, dependants must continue to meet these requirements until we finish processing your application.

Not sure if your child is a dependant? Check if your child qualifies by answering a few questions.

If your child’s age was locked in on or before October 23, 2017, a previous definition of dependent children may apply.

Dependent child of a dependent child
Refers to children of dependent children of the applicant and those of the spouse or common-law partner, if applicable.

Biometric (fingerprints and photo) requirements

You and your family members may need to appear in person to have fingerprints and a photograph (biometric information) taken at a biometric collection service point.

Canadian citizens and existing permanent residents of Canada are exempt from giving biometrics.

As of December 3, 2019, you need to give biometrics when you apply from within Canada. You can go to a designated Service Canada location.

Find out if you need to give biometrics.

If you have to give biometrics, you can give them after you:

  • pay for and submit your application and biometric fees, and
  • get a biometric instruction letter (BIL) which will direct you to a list of biometric collection service points you may choose from

You must bring the BIL with you to the biometric collection service point to give your biometrics.

We encourage you to give your biometrics as soon as possible after getting the BIL. We’ll start processing your application after we get your biometrics.

When to give your biometrics

You will need to pay for and then give your biometrics, even if you gave biometrics in the past to support a visitor visa, study or work permit application, or a different permanent resident application.

Where to give your biometrics

You need to book an appointment to give your biometrics at one of these official biometric collection service points.


Step 1. Gather Documents


What documents are required?

Use the Document Checklist [IMM 5287] (PDF, 0.86 MB) , which you can find in this package, to assist you in gathering the necessary documentation

Important information: If you do not provide all the requested information or documents, the processing of your application could be delayed.

Applicants under the age of 18

A clear and legible copy of one of the following:

  • applicant’s birth certificate (showing the applicant’s name, date of birth, place of birth and the names of the parents or adoptive parents)
    or
  • legal documentation proving guardianship, if the applicant has a legal guardian.

Visa office-specific instructions

The visa office-specific instructions should be uploaded with your application. These instructions may still reflect the paper application process however no documents should be mailed to the visa office unless specifically requested by an immigration officer.

Do not submit originals as they will not be returned. Copies should be submitted electronically with your online application as a PDF.

Choose the visa office that serves your area. If you are not sure which one to use, see our list of countries and which offices serve them.

The documents below have more detailed information for each visa office.


Translation of documents

You must include the following along with any document that is not in English or French:

  • the English or French translation; and
  • an affidavit from the person who completed the translation

Translations may be done by:

  • a person who is fluent in both languages (English or French, and the unofficial language), or
  • a Canadian certified translator (a member in good standing of a provincial or territorial organization of translators and interpreters in Canada)

If the translation isn’t done by a Canadian certified translator, the person who completed the translation must provide an affidavit swearing to their language proficiency and the accuracy of the translation.

The affidavit must be sworn in the presence of:

In Canada:

  • a notary public
  • a commissioner of oaths
  • a commissioner of taking affidavits

Authority to certify varies by province and territory. Consult your local provincial or territorial authorities.

Outside of Canada:

  • a notary public

Authority to administer oaths varies by country. Consult your local authorities.

small exclamation warning signImportant information: Translations must not be done by the applicants themselves nor by members of the applicant’s family. This includes a parent, guardian, sibling, spouse, common-law partner, conjugal partner, grandparent, child, aunt, uncle, niece, nephew and first cousin.

Note: An affidavit is a document on which the translator has sworn, in the presence of a person authorized to administer oaths in the country where the translator is living, that the contents of their translation are a true translation and representation of the contents of the original document. Translators who are certified in Canada don’t need to supply an affidavit.


Certified true copies

To have a photocopy of a document certified, an authorized person must compare the original document to the photocopy and must print all of the following on the photocopy:

  • “I certify that this is a true copy of the original document”
  • the name of the original document
  • the date of the certification
  • their name
  • their official position or title
  • their signature

Who can certify copies?

Only authorized people can certify copies.

Important information: Certifying of copies must not be done by the applicants themselves nor by an applicant’s parent, guardian, sibling, spouse, common-law partner, conjugal partner, grandparent, child, aunt, uncle, niece, nephew or first cousin.

People authorized to certify copies include the following:

In Canada:

  • a notary public
  • a commissioner of oaths
  • a commissioner of taking affidavits

Authority to certify varies by province and territory. Check with your local provincial or territorial authorities to learn who has the authority to certify.

Outside Canada:

  • a notary public

Authority to certify international documents varies by country. Check with your local authorities to learn who has the authority to certify in your country.


Police certificates

If you and your family members are 18 years of age and older and aren’t permanent residents or Canadian citizens, you must provide a valid police certificate for any country other than Canada in which you spent 6 or more months in a row since the age of 18.

Note: You do not need to provide a police certificate from a country if you or your family members were under 18 years of age the entire time you lived in that country.

If the original certificate isn’t in English or French, you must get an accredited translator to translate it. You must include both the police certificate and the translation.

We’ll also do our own background checks to see if there are reasons why you or your family members may not be admissible to Canada.

For specific and up-to-date information, see our guide on where to get a police certificate.

Criminality

Find out more information on Overcoming Criminal inadmissibility.


Medical requirements

You must undergo and pass a medical examination in order to come to Canada. To pass the medical examination you must not have a condition that:

  • is a danger to public health or safety
  • would cause excessive demand on health or social services in Canada.

Examples of “excessive demand” include ongoing hospitalization or institutional care for a physical or mental illness.

About the medical examination

The medical examination includes but is not limited to:

  • a complete physical examination for all family members;
  • chest X-ray and a radiologist’s report for everyone aged 11 years and over;
  • blood test for everyone aged 15 years or over;
  • urinalysis for everyone aged 5 years or over;
  • Syphilis and HIV screening tests for everyone aged 15 years and over.

Medical instructions

Information on medical instructions will be provided to you by the visa office (See Visa office specific instructions).

Authorized doctors

Your own doctor cannot do the medical examination. You will have to see a physician on Canada’s list of panel physicians.

Note: The physician is only responsible for conducting a medical examination; they cannot give you any advice on the immigration process.

Exam validity

The medical examination results are valid for 12 months from the date the medical evaluation is completed. If you are not admitted as a permanent resident during this time, you may have to undergo another medical examination.

Medical fees

You are responsible for paying all costs related to the medical examination.

Step 2. Complete the Application

Filling out the application

The sponsor must fill out these PDF forms

The person being sponsored (principal applicant) must sign in or create a Permanent Residence online application portal account.

Sign in or create a Permanent Residence online application portal account.

If you’re having technical issues with the permanent residence online application portal, contact us using the web form

  • under type of application/enquiry, choose technical difficulties from the drop-down menu
  • in the text box, specify the program you’re applying under
  • upload screenshots from your account that show us
    • the page where you’re having problems
    • the error message(s) you get

If you need to upload a number of images, find out how to combine them into 1 document.

The principal applicant must fill out these digital forms online

  • Generic Application Form for Canada (IMM 0008)
  • Schedule A – Background/Declaration (IMM 5669)
  • Additional Family Information (IMM 5406)

If you want to appoint someone to do business with us on your behalf, you must

Note: If a paid representative is submitting your application online on your behalf, they must sign in to their Representative Portal account to do so. You, as the Principal Applicant, need to electronically sign your application and your representative must also provide their declaration before submitting the application.

If you want to allow us to release information from your application to someone other than yourself who will not act as your representative you must

Important information: It is a serious offence to give false or misleading information on these forms. The information you provide on your application may be subject to verification.


Be complete and accurate

Complete all sections. If a section does not apply to you, write “Not Applicable” or “NA”.

If you need more space for any section, include an additional page containing the appropriate section, complete it and upload it with your application. For the document type, choose “other.” Your other information can be in any of the following formats: JPG, JPEG or PDF. 


Application to Sponsor, Sponsorship Agreement and Undertaking (IMM 1344)

Who must fill out this application form?

This form must be filled out and digitally signed by:

  • the sponsor,
  • the co-signer, if applicable,
  • the principal applicant (person being sponsored).


Note

Completing the form

You must answer all the questions on this application form unless indicated otherwise.

You also have the option of saving your form and completing it later.

Read and follow the steps below to help you fill out the form.


Part 1: Application to Sponsor and Undertaking

Question 1

Check one box to indicate how you wish to proceed if you do not meet the sponsorship requirements.

  • If you check the box to withdraw your sponsorship application then
    • the sponsorship application will not be processed. All fees will be refunded, except for the $75 sponsorship fee.
  • If you check the box to proceed with the application for permanent residence then
    • the sponsorship application will be refused. None of the fees will be refunded.

Note: Check “proceed with the application for permanent residence” if you submit an undertaking of assistance to support the permanent residence application of a family member or close relative on Humanitarian and compassionate considerations.

Question 2

Would you like to receive your correspondence in French or English?

Question 3

Check one box to indicate if you have a co-signer or not.

Only your spouse or common-law partner can co-sign this application.

Note: If you are sponsoring your spouse or common-law partner, you cannot have a co-signer.

Question 4

Write the following details about the principal applicant you are sponsoring:

  • Family name(s) (surname)
  • Given name(s) (first, second or more)

Note: If you are sponsoring a child to be adopted in Canada who is not yet identified, write:

  • your Family name(s) and
  • “Child” in the given name field or leave it blank.
Question 5

Indicate the principal applicant’s date of birth. If the complete date of birth is unknown, use “*” (star sign/asterisk) to fill in the spaces for the year, month or day, where applicable.

Question 6
  1. Indicate the nature of your relationship to the principal applicant:
    • Spouse
    • Common-law partner
    • Conjugal partner
    • Child
    • Grandchild
    • Parent
    • Adoptive parent
    • Other
  2. If you chose “Other”, provide details (i.e., brother, sister, uncle, aunt, nephew, etc.).
  3. If you are a conjugal partner, provide the date you entered into that conjugal relationship.
Sponsor Personal Details
Question 1

Full name

Indicate your family name(s) (surname) exactly as it appears on your passport or travel document (even if the name is misspelled). Do not use initials.

Note: If you do not have a family name on your passport or travel document, enter all your given name(s) here and leave the given name field blank.

Write all of your given name(s) (first, second, or more) exactly as it appears on your passport or travel document (even if the name is misspelled). Do not use initials.

Note: If you do not have a given name on your passport or travel document, leave this field blank.

Question 2

Nickname/Alias

Check the box to indicate if you ever used any other name. This could include your birth name, maiden name, married name, nickname, etc.

If you checked “Yes”, indicate any other family name(s) that you have ever used.

If you checked “Yes”, indicate any other given name(s) (first, second, or more) that you have ever used.

Question 3

Indicate your gender (F-Female, M-Male or X-Another gender).

Question 4

Indicate your date of birth. If your complete date of birth is unknown, use “*” (star sign/asterisk) to fill in the spaces for the year, month or day, where applicable.

Question 5

Indicate your city or town of birth.

Indicate your country of birth.

Question 6

Indicate your status in Canada:

  • Canadian citizen by birth
  • Canadian citizen by descent (citizenship through a parent)
  • Naturalized Canadian citizen (after immigrating to Canada)
  • Permanent resident
Question 7

If you are a permanent resident or a naturalized Canadian citizen (i.e., you came to Canada as a permanent resident and were later granted Canadian citizenship), provide:

  1. The date on which you obtained this status (whichever is more recent)
  2. Your UCI (Unique Client Identifier)/Client ID number)
  3. Check the box to indicate if your actual full name is the same as when you became a permanent resident. If you checked “No”, provide your full name (family name(s) and given(s) name(s)) at the time you became permanent resident.
Question 8
  1. Indicate your current marital status:
    Annulled Marriage:

    This is a marriage that is legally declared invalid. An annulment can also be a declaration by the Catholic Church that the marital union did not have a binding force.

    Common-Law:

    This means that you have lived continuously with your partner in a marital-type relationship for a minimum of one year.

    Divorced:

    This means that you are officially separated and have legally ended your marriage.

    Legally Separated:

    This means that you are married, but no longer living with your spouse.

    Married:

    This means that you and your spouse have had a ceremony that legally binds you to each other. Your marriage must be legally recognized in the country where it was performed and in Canada.

    Single:

    This means that you have never been married and are not in a common-law relationship.

    Widowed:
    This means that your spouse has died and that you have not re-married or entered into a common-law relationship.
  2. Enter the date (year, month, day) you were married or you entered into your current common-law relationship.

    Note: This is the date your status officially changed from being single to common-law, not the date you started living together.

  3. Write the family name(s) and given name(s) of your current spouse or common-law partner.

Question 9

Check the box to indicate whether you have previously been married or in a common-law relationship. If you checked “Yes”, provide:

  • Family name(s)
  • Given name(s)
  • Type of relationship:
    • Common-law or
    • Married
  • Dates (From – To) for which you were in the relationship with your previous spouse/common-law partner.
Sponsor Contact Information
Question 1

Indicate your current mailing address (where information should be mailed):

  • Post Office Box (P.O. Box) number, if applicable. If you do not indicate post office box, the Street number must be provided
  • Apartment (Apt.) or Unit, if applicable
  • Street number (No), if applicable. This must be provided if you did not indicate in a P.O. Box
  • Street name, if applicable
  • City or Town
  • From the list, select the Country of your current mailing address
  • Province or State
  • Postal code/zip code
  • District, if applicable

Note: All correspondence will go to this address unless you indicate your e-mail address.

If you wish to have a representative who can conduct business on your behalf, you must provide their address in this section and on the Use of a Representative (IMM 5476) form.

For more information read the “Use of Representative” section in this guide.

Question 2

Check the box to indicate whether your residential address (where you live) is the same as your mailing address. If “No”, indicate the following information:

  • Apartment (Apt.) or Unit, if applicable
  • Street Number (No.)
  • Street Name
  • City or Town
  • Country
  • Province or State
  • Postal Code/zip code
  • District, if applicable
Question 3

Check the appropriate box to indicate if the telephone number is from Canada/the United States (US) or Other (any other country).

Indicate the type of telephone:

  • Residence (home)
  • Cellular (cell/mobile)
  • Business (work)

Write your telephone number including the country code, area/regional codes, etc.

If you have an extension number, write it after your phone number under “Ext.

Question 4

Check the appropriate box to indicate if your additional telephone number is from Canada/the United States or Other (any other country).

Indicate the type of telephone:

  • Residence (home)
  • Cellular (cell/mobile)
  • Business (work)

Write your telephone number including the country code, area/regional codes, etc.

If you have an extension number, write it after your phone number under “Ext.

Question 5

Check the appropriate box to indicate if the facsimile (fax) number is from Canada and United States or Other (any other country).

If applicable, write your facsimile (fax) number, including country code, area/regional codes, etc.

Question 6

If applicable, write your e-mail address using a format similar to the following: name@provider.net

Note: By indicating your e-mail address, you are hereby authorizing Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada to transmit all correspondence, including your file and personal information to this specific e-mail address.


Note
Sponsor Residency Declaration

This section is to be completed only if you are a Canadian citizen living exclusively outside of Canada and sponsoring a spouse, a common-law or conjugal partner, and/or dependent children who have no children of their own.

You must check the appropriate box to confirm where (Canadian province, territory or the province of Quebec) you intend to live should your spouse, common-law or conjugal partner and (or) dependent children become permanent residents.


Note
Sponsor Eligibility Assessment
Question 1-18

Check “Yes” or “No” in the appropriate boxes.

Note: Sponsors residing in Quebec (or who intend to) do not need to answer questions 8, 9, 10 and 15.

  • If you answer “No” to questions 1 to 3
    • You are not eligible to be a sponsor. You should not submit an application.
  • If you answer “No” to question 4, but are a Canadian citizen living exclusively outside Canada
    • You may submit a sponsorship for your spouse, common-law partner or conjugal partner and children who have no children of their own.
    • You must, however, come to Canada to reside with the sponsored person. If this is your situation, complete the section “Residency Declaration”.
  • If you answer “Yes” to any question between 5 and 15
    • You are not eligible to be a sponsor. You should not submit an application.
  • If you answer “Yes” to questions 13, 16, 17 or 18
    • Provide the details including date and place, and
    • Read the section “Suspension of processing” for situations where processing may be suspended.

Note
Co-Signer Personal Details

The questions under “Co-signer Personal Details” are the same as in “Sponsor Personal Details”, except for question 8.

Follow the previous instructions to answer the questions for the co-signer.

Note: Remember that all questions in this section are about the co-signer.

Co-Signer Contact Information
Question 1

Check the appropriate box to indicate if the telephone number is from Canada/the United States (US) or Other (any other country).

Indicate the type of telephone:

  • Residence (home)
  • Cellular (cell/mobile)
  • Business (work)

Write your telephone number including the country code, area/regional codes, etc.

If you have an extension number, write it after your phone number under “Ext.

Question 2

Check the appropriate box to indicate if your additional telephone number is from Canada/the United States or Other (any other country).

Indicate the type of telephone:

  • Residence (home)
  • Cellular (cell/mobile)
  • Business (work)

Write your telephone number including the country code, area/regional codes, etc.

If you have an extension number, write it after your phone number under “ Ext.
Question 3
Check the appropriate box to indicate if the facsimile ( fax) number is from Canada and United States or Other (any other country).

If applicable, write your facsimile (fax) number, including country code, area/regional codes, etc.

Question 4

If applicable, write your e-mail address using a format similar to the following: name@provider.net

Note: By indicating your e-mail address, you are hereby authorizing Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada to transmit all correspondence, including your file and personal information to this specific e-mail address.


Note
Co-Signer Residency Declaration

This section is to be completed only if you are a Canadian citizen living exclusively outside of Canada and sponsoring dependent children who have no children of their own.

You must check the appropriate box to confirm where (Canadian province, territory or the province of Quebec) you intend to live should your dependent children become permanent residents.


Note
Co-Signer Eligbility Assessment
Question 1-15

Check “Yes” or “No” in the appropriate boxes.

Note: Co-signers residing in Quebec (or who intend to) do not need to answer questions 5, 6, 7 and 12.

  • If you answer “No” to questions 1 or 2
    • Then you are not eligible to be a sponsor. You should not submit an application.
  • If you answer “No” to question 3, but are a Canadian citizen living exclusively outside Canada
    • Then you may submit a sponsorship for your spouse, common-law partner or conjugal partner and children who have no children of their own.
    • You must, however, come to Canada to reside with the sponsored person. If this is your situation, complete the section “Residency Declaration”.
  • If you answer “Yes” to any question between 4 and 12
    • Then you are not eligible to be a co-signer. You should not co-sign this application.
  • If you answer “Yes” to any questions between 13 and 15
    • Then provide the details including date and place, and
    • Then read the section “Suspension of processing” for situations where processing may be suspended.


Important information

Undertaking by Sponsor and Co-Signer, if applicable

This section outlines what your role and responsibilities will be by submitting this application.


Part 2: Sponsorship Agreement

Obligations of the Sponsor and, if applicable, the Co-Signer; and Obligations of the Person to be Sponsored

All parties (sponsor, co-signer and person to be sponsored) must read the obligations carefully.


Note
Declaration

Read the declaration statement carefully before signing.

By digitally signing your application, you certify that you fully understand the questions asked, and that the information you have provided is complete, accurate and factual.

You understand that any false or misleading statement may be grounds for prosecution and the removal of the person you are sponsoring and their family members from Canada.

By signing this form, you also declare that you will provide immediately any change of address and or any other information changed on the application by web form.


Note
Signatures

By digitally signing your application, you certify that you fully understand the questions asked, and that the information you have provided is complete, accurate and factual.

This section must be digitally signed and dated by:

  • the sponsor;
  • the co-signer (if there is one)
  • the sponsored person (principal applicant).

Note: A parent or legal guardian must sign on behalf of a dependent child under the age of 18, where they are the principal applicant being sponsored on an application.

The application will be returned if any signatures are missing (see section 10 of the IRPR for more information).


Financial Evaluation (IMM 1283)

Who completes this form?

The Financial Evaluation (IMM 1283) will help you, the sponsor, assess if you (and your spouse or common-law partner, if they are co-signing) will have the ability to support the person you are planning to sponsor and their family members.

Note: Quebec residents do not need to complete this form.


When must a financial evaluation be submitted?

You must submit a financial evaluation when you are sponsoring:

  • A spouse, common-law partner or conjugal partner who has a dependent child who has a dependent child of their own
  • Dependent children who have dependent children of their own
  • Other relatives
  • Orphaned relatives under the age of 18

Note: If you plan to legally adopt an orphaned relative under the age of 18 in Canada, you are not required to complete this form.


About THE SPONSOR and, if applicable, THE co-signer

Question 1
  1. Your full name

    Indicate:

    • Family name (surname
    • Given name(s) (first, second or more)
  2. Is your spouse or common-law partner co-signing the undertaking? Check ‘‘Yes’’ or ‘‘No’’.

    If you check ‘‘Yes’’, provide the following details:

    • Family name (surname)
    • Given name(s) (first, second or more)
    • Date of birth (day, month, year)

the sponsor's family members and persons included in undertakings in effect or not yet in effect signed by the sponsor and, if applicable, the sponsor's co-signer

Question 2
You must include yourself as part of your family
Question 3
  1. Current undertaking

    Provide the number of persons included in your current undertaking

  2. Previous undertakings

    You must indicate the following:

    1. number of persons included in previous undertakings you signed as a sponsor and that are still in effect.
    2. number of persons included in previous undertakings you signed as a sponsor and that are not yet in effect.
    3. number of persons included in previous undertakings you co-signed, where the undertakings are still  in effect.
    4. number of persons included in previous undertakings you co-signed but the undertakings are still not in effect.

    Note: For any of these questions, provide details on page 2, if required.

Question 4

Complete this section only if you spouse or common-law partner is co-signing the undertaking

You must indicate the following:

  1. number of persons included in previous undertakings your spouse or common-law partner signed as a sponsor and that are still in effect. Do not include persons accounted for in questions 2 and 3B iii).
  2. number of persons included in previous undertakings your spouse or common-law partner signed as a sponsor and that are not yet in effect. Do not include persons accounted for in 3.B iv).
  3. number of persons included in previous undertakings your spouse or common-law partner co-signed, where the undertakings are still in effect. Do not include persons accounted for in 3.B i)
  4. number of persons included in previous undertakings your spouse or common-law partner co-signed but the undertakings are still not in effect. Do not include persons accounted for in 3.B ii).

Note: For any of these questions, provide details on page 2, if required.

Question 5

You must add your spouse or common-law partner if they are not included in question 3.

Note: Provide details on page 2.

Question 6

Indicate every other family member not included and dependent on you financially, whether they are living with you or not. Enter the number in the box.

Note: Provide details on page 2.


Financial requirement

Question 7

Add the numbers entered in boxes for questions 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 and write the total amount of persons.

Note: Consult the Low-Income Cut-Off (LICO) table which illustrates the minimum income you must have to sponsor your family.

Question 8

Minimum necessary income

Indicate the minimum income required in order to sponsor the number of persons included in question 7 based on the LICO table.

Question 9

Total income available to sponsor

Indicate the amount of money that you have by adding questions 14 and 19

Note: Complete this financial evaluation before entering your number. This is the amount of money that you and, if applicable, your co-signer have available to sponsor.

Question 10

Your current situation

Check the appropriate box to indicate if you are

  • Unemployed
  • Employed
  • Self- employed.

If you are unemployed, provide details in the space provided.

Question 11

Complete the sections A, B, and/or C, which ever applies to you in the last 12 months preceding the date of your application.

If your situation changed in the last 12 months, provide the most recent information in the Period 1 column and in the next columns the information of the rest of the 12 months.

  1. Unemployed

    If you were unemployed, provide:

    • dates: (From – To)
    • income
  2. Employed

    If you were employed, provide:

    • Name of employer
    • Address of employment
    • Telephone number
    • Name of supervisor
    • Occupation/position
    • Hours worked per week
    • Rate per week and per hour
    • Income
  3. Self-employed

    If you were self-employed, provide:

    • Name of business
    • Occupation/position
    • Share in business (in percentage)
    • Net income (earnings or profits after all taxes and costs have been subtracted)
Question 12

Calculation of income based on Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) Notice of Assessment.

You can view your tax return(s) as well as other personal tax information using the CRA’s My Account online service. To register or login, visit My Account.

  1. Enter the amount which appears on line 15000 of your most recent Notice of Assessment issued by the CRA or from your CRA My Account document.
  2. Enter all the following payments that are included in the amount at line 15000 of your Notice of Assessment:
    • Provincial instruction or training allowance
    • Social assistance (paid by the province)
    • Guaranteed income supplement (paid under the Old Age Security Act)
    • Employment insurance

      Note: Maternity, parental and sickness benefits paid under the Employment Insurance Act are considered income. You can still sponsor, if you’re eligible, while on these benefits. Other payments such as employment insurance and federal training allowances are not considered income.

  3. Deduct the total entered at 12.B (line 6) from the amount at 12.A (line 1). The result in 12.C is your total income based on the Notice of Assessment.
Question 13

Calculation of income based on preceding 12 months

Complete this section if you:

  • are unable to produce a Notice of Assessment or a document from your CRA My Account for the most recent taxation year preceding the date of your application to sponsor, or
  • have a Notice of Assessment but the amount at line 15000 is less than the minimum necessary income and your financial circumstances have improved since you received your Notice of Assessment.
  1. Personal income from employment

    • Add the amounts in periods I, II and III of section 11.B and enter the total on line 1.
    • If you have other sources of income not listed in line 1, enter the amount on line 2 and provide details about these sources on a separate sheet.

    Personal income from employment, business and self-employment

    • Add the amounts in periods I, II and III of section 11.C and enter the total on line 3.
    • If you have other sources of income not listed in line 3, enter the amount on line 4 and provide details about these sources on a separate sheet.

    Add up all personal income from employment, business and self-employment from lines 1 to 4 and enter the total on line 5.

  2. Other income Calculate and enter income received from other sources. Use the following terms in the form defined in the table below:

    Net rental income

    Net income earned (or loss incurred) and reported to CRA from rental property

    Investment and interest income

    Income reported to and accepted by CRA from dividend payments, interest, stocks, bonds and other investments

    Pension income

    Income from Old Age Security, Quebec/Canada Pension Plan, other pensions, superannuation and annuity payments from Canadian sources. Do not include Guaranteed Income Supplement.

    Maternity/ parental/ sick-ness benefits

    Only maternity, parental and sickness benefits paid under the Employment insurance act are considered income. Other payments such as employment insurance and federal training allowances are not considered as income.

    Other sources of income
    Include all income you have received and will continue to receive on a regular basis that is not included above (e.g. spousal, child support). Also specify the source of the income.

    Important information: You cannot include provincial instruction and training allowances, social assistance, child tax benefits, guaranteed income supplement or employment insurance payments.

    Add up all incomes received from other sources listed above and enter the total on line 11.

  3. Available income base on preceding 12 months

    Add the totals entered at 13.A (line 5) and 13.B (line 11). The result is the total income you must put in 13.C.

Question 14
Enter the higher amount between 12.C or 13.C.

Important information

Complete questions 15 to 19 if your spouse/common-law partner is co-signing your sponsorship undertaking

Question 15

Your spouse/common-law partner’s current situation. Check the appropriate box to indicate if your spouse/common-law partner is:

  • Unemployed
  • Employed
  • Self- employed.

If your spouse/common-law partner is unemployed, provide details in the space provided.

Question 16

Complete sections A, B, and/or C, which ever applies to your spouse/common-law partner in the last 12 months preceding the date of your application.

If their situation changed in the last 12 months, provide the most recent information in the Period 1 column and in the next columns the information for the rest of the 12 months.

  1. Unemployed

    If your spouse/common-law partner was unemployed, provide:

    • dates: (From – To)
    • income
  2. Employed

    If your spouse/common-law partner was employed, provide:

    • Name of employer
    • Address of employment
    • Telephone number
    • Name of supervisor
    • Occupation/position
    • Hours worked per week
    • Rate per week and per hour
    • Income
  3. Self-employed

    If your spouse/common-law partner was self-employed, provide:

    • Name of business
    • Occupation/position
    • Share in business (in percentage)
    • Net income (earnings or profits after all taxes and costs have been subtracted)
Question 17

Calculation of income based on Option C printout.

You may obtain an Option C printout free of charge by contacting the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) at 1-800-959-8281.

  1. Enter the amount which appears on line 15000 of your spouse/common-law partner’s most recent notice of assessment (Option C printout) issued by Canada Revenue Agency (CRA).
  2. Enter all the following payments that are included in the amount at line 15000 of your spouse/common-law partner’s Option C printout:

    • Provincial instruction or training allowance
    • Social assistance (paid by the province)
    • Employment insurance

      Note: Only maternity, parental and sickness benefits paid under the Employment Insurance Act are considered income. Other payments such as employment insurance and federal training allowances are not considered as income.

    • Guaranteed income supplement (paid under the Old Age Security Act)
  3. Deduct the total entered at 17.B (line 6) from the amount at 17.A (line 1). The result in 17.C is the total income based on the Option C printout of your spouse/common-law partner.
Question 18

Calculation of income based on preceding 12 months

Complete this section if your spouse/common-law partner:


  • is unable to produce an Option C printout for the most recent taxation year preceding the date of your application to sponsor, or
  • has an Option C printout but the amount at line 15000 is less than the minimum necessary income and their financial circumstances have improved since the reception of their Option C.

Part A


  • Personal income from employment, business and self-employment


    • Add all personal income from employment earned in the 12 months preceding the date of your application (periods I, II, and III of section 16.B). Enter the total amount on line 1.
    • If you have other sources of employment revenue not mentioned on line 1, enter it on line 2 and provide details about this income on a separate page.

  • Personal income from business (professional) and other self-employment


    • Add amounts entered on last line of columns I, II, and III in Section 16C and enter total on line 3
    • If you have other sources of business and self-employment income not mentioned on line 3, enter them on line 4 and provide details about these sources of income on a separate page.

    Add all personal income from employment, business, and self-employment from lines 1 to 4 and enter the total on line 5.


Part B

  • Other income

    Calculate and enter income received from other sources. Use the following terms in the form defined in the table below:

    Net rental income

    Net income earned (or loss incurred) and reported to CRA from rental property

    Investment and interest income
    Income reported to and accepted by CRA from dividend payments, interest, stocks, bonds and other investments
    Pension income
    Income from Old Age Security, Quebec/Canada Pension Plan, other pensions, superannuation and annuity payments from Canadian sources. Do not include Guaranteed Income Supplement.
    Maternity/ parental/ sick-ness benefits
    Only maternity, parental and sickness benefits paid under the Employment insurance act are considered income. Other payments such as employment insurance and federal training allowances are not considered as income.
    Other sources of income
    Include all income you have received and will continue to receive on a regular basis that is not included above (e.g. spousal, child support). Also specify the source of the income.

    Important information: You cannot include provincial instruction and training allowances, social assistance, child tax benefits, guaranteed income supplement or employment insurance payments.

    Add up all incomes received from other sources listed above and enter the total on line 11.

  • Available income base on preceding 12 months

    Add the totals entered at 18.A (line 5) and 18.B (line 11). The result is the total income you must put in 18.C (line 12).

Question 19
Enter the higher amount between 17.C or 18.C.

Generic Application Form for Canada (IMM 0008)

Who must fill out this application form?

This form must be completed by:

  • you, the principal applicant

Completing the form

You’ll fill out and submit the Generic Application Form for Canada (IMM 0008) online. You don’t need to print and sign by hand. Please follow the instructions below to ensure the form is properly completed.

You must answer all questions on this application form unless otherwise indicated.

You also have the option of saving your form and completing it later.

Read and follow the steps below to help you fill out the form.


Application Details

Language preference

From the list, select your preferred language for:

  1. correspondence (any letters or emails we send you)
  2. interview: if your native language is not in this list, select “other”
  3. interpreter requested: you must select “yes” if you do not select English or French for the interview
Where do you plan to live in Canada?

If you plan to live in the Province of Quebec and haven’t received your Certificat de Sélection du Québec (CSQ), enter the date when you applied for it. If you haven’t applied yet, you must do so before applying for permanent residence.


Personal Details

Family name

Family name is also known as last name or surname.

Note: If you are a parent of a child to be adopted in Canada whose details you don’t know yet (and you’re filling this form out on their behalf), enter your family name(s).


Given name

Given names are also known as first name and middle name. Do not use initials.

Note: If you are a parent of a child to be adopted in Canada whose details you don’t know yet (and you’re filling this form out on their behalf), enter your family name(s). For given name(s) enter “Child” or leave the given name field blank.


Physical characteristics - sex

If you choose “X” for gender, you need to complete the Request for a Change of Sex or Gender Identifier (PDF, 1.6 MB) form and send it with your application if

  • your foreign travel document or passport does not have the X gender identifier (or an equivalent non-binary option)
  • you have or have had a Canadian temporary resident document with a different gender identifier, including a
    • visa
    • electronic travel authorization
    • work permit or
    • study permit

You don’t need any supporting documents.

Note: If you are a parent of a child to be adopted in Canada whose details you don’t know yet, select U – Unknown.


Physical characteristics - Eye colour

If you are a parent of a child to be adopted in Canada whose details you don’t know yet, select “Other.”


Birth information - Date of birth

If you don’t know your complete date of birth, write 1901/01/01 in the fields fill in the spaces for the unknown year, month or day. Include a letter of explanation saying why you used this date.


Birth information - Place of birth

As shown in your passport or your travel document.

Note: If you are a parent of a child to be adopted in Canada whose details you don’t know yet, indicate “Unknown” for the city or town and select the country where you plan to adopt a child.


Citizenship(s)

If you aren’t a citizen of any country, choose “stateless.”

If you are a citizen of more than one country, choose your other country of citizenship in the second field.

Note: If you are a parent of a child to be adopted in Canada whose details you don’t know yet, select the country where you intend to adopt a child.


Current country of residence

You must be in this country legally.

For refugee claimants in Canada only: select Canada whether you have been lawfully admitted or not.


If you’ve lost your status
  • for “Status,” choose “Other”
  • in the details field, enter “Out of status, requires restoration”
  • leave the “From” and “To” fields blank

Note: If you are a parent of a child to be adopted in Canada whose details you don’t know yet, select the country where you plan to adopt a child and “Citizen” as the immigration status in that country.


Previous countries of residence

This means you lived in the country for 6 months total, not just in a row.

If you chose “Other” as a status, try to provide as much detail and an explanation as to why you are out of status.


Marital and relationship status

You’re single if you’ve never been married and are not in a common-law relationship.

You’re married if you and your spouse have had a ceremony that legally binds you to each other. Your marriage must be legally recognized in the country where it was performed and in Canada.

You’re common-law if you’ve lived continuously with your partner in a marital-type relationship for 1 year or more.

You’re divorced if you are officially separated and have legally ended your marriage.

You’re legally separated if you’re still legally married but no longer living with your spouse.

You’re widowed if your spouse has died and you have not re-married or entered into a common-law relationship.

An annulled marriage has been legally declared as not valid. An annulment can also be a declaration by the Catholic Church that the marriage was not binding.

  • Family name is also known as last name or surname.
  • Given names are also known as first name and middle name. Do not use initials.
  • If you’re in a common-law relationship, enter the date (year, month and day) you began living together.
  • If you’re legally separated or divorced, enter the date you were no longer living together.

Note: If you are a parent of a child to be adopted in Canada whose details you don’t know yet, select “Single.”


Contact Information

Current mailing address

  • Post office box (P.O. box) number: If you don’t enter a post office box, you must enter your street number
  • Street number (no.): The number on your house or apartment building. You must enter a street number if you didn’t enter a P.O. box

All correspondence will be mailed to this address unless you include your email address.

If you want a representative to do business with us on your behalf, you must provide their address in this section and on the Use of a Representative (IMM 5476) form.

For more information, read the Use of a Representative guide.


Email address

Use this format: name@provider.net

By entering your email address, you authorize IRCC to transmit your file and personal information to this specific email.


Passport

Passport/travel document number (exactly as shown on your passport or travel document)

If you have more than one passport, choose the one you’ll use to travel to Canada.

Most people will need a passport to travel to Canada. If you’re approved to come here, you’ll need to get one.

A travel document is an identity document issued by a government or international organization (like the United Nations). It has a photo and personal information, and let the holder travel between countries. If you have a passport, you don’t need a travel document.

Issue/expiry dates

You can find this information on the page in your passport that shows your photo and date of birth (also called the biodata page)


National Identity Document

A national identity document is an identity card with a photo which is issued by a government or official authority, and can be used as identification inside the country that issued it. It may also be known as "ID," "ID card," "identity card," "citizen card" or "passport card."

Document number

Enter your national identity document number exactly as shown on the identity document. Make sure there is no space between each number or letter.


Education/Occupation Details

Highest level of education

  1. None: No education.
  2. Secondary or less: High school diploma obtained after elementary school and before college, university, or other formal training.
  3. Trade/apprenticeship certificate/diploma: Diploma completed in a specific trade, such as carpentry or auto mechanics.
  4. Non-university certificate/diploma: Training in a profession that requires formal education but not at the university level (for example, dental technician or engineering technician).
  5. Post-secondary – no degree: Post-secondary studies at a college or university but no degree earned.
  6. Bachelor’s degree: Academic degree awarded by a college or university to those who have completed an undergraduate curriculum. Also called a baccalaureate. Examples include a Bachelor of Arts, Science or Education.
  7. Post graduate – no degree: Post-graduate studies at a college or university but no degree earned (Master or PhD).
  8. Master’s degree: Academic degree awarded by a graduate school of a college or university. You must have completed a Bachelor’s degree before you can earn a Master’s degree.
  9. Doctorate – PhD: Highest university degree, usually based on at least 3 years of graduate studies and a thesis. Normally, you must have completed a Master’s degree before you can earn a PhD.

Current occupation

If you don’t work, enter “not employed.”

Intended occupation

If you aren’t planning to work in Canada (for example, if you’re retired), enter “none.”


Language Details

Native language/mother tongue

This is the language that you learned at home during your childhood and that you still understand. If your native language is not in this list, choose “Other.”

Note: If you are a parent of a child to be adopted in Canada whose details you don’t know yet, choose the native language of the country where you plan to adopt a child.

Test from a designated testing agency to assess English or French

Approved testing agencies include:

  • IELTS
  • CELPIP
  • TEF
  • TCF

Dependant’s Personal Details

Select the box to tell us if your dependant will accompany you to Canada.

If you answered “No,” explain why your dependant is non-accompanying.


Dependant’s relationship to the principal applicant

Select your dependant’s relationship to you, the principal applicant:

  • Adopted Child
  • Child
  • Common-Law Partner
  • Grandchild
  • Other
  • Spouse
  • Step-Child
  • Step-Grandchild

Dependant type

Type A

The dependant is under the age of 22 and single (not married and not in a common-law relationship).

Type B (Important: This dependant type applies only if your child’s age was locked in before August 1, 2014)

The dependant has been continuously enrolled in and in attendance as a full-time student at a post-secondary institution accredited by the relevant government authority and has depended substantially on the financial support of a parent since before the age of 22.

Type C

The dependant is 22 years of age or older, has depended substantially on the financial support of a parent since before the age of 22, and is unable to provide for themselves because of a medical condition.

Not sure which type of dependant your child is? Check if your child qualifies as a dependant by answering a few questions.


Family name

Family name is also known as last name or surname.

Note: If you are a parent of a child to be adopted in Canada whose details you don’t know yet (and you’re filling this form out on their behalf), enter your family name(s).


Given name

Given names are also known as first name and middle name. Do not use initials.

Note: If you are a parent of a child to be adopted in Canada whose details you don’t know yet (and you’re filling this form out on their behalf), enter your family name(s). For given name(s) enter “Child” or leave the given name field blank.


Physical characteristics - sex

If you choose “X” for gender, you need to complete the Request for a Change of Sex or Gender Identifier (PDF, 1.6 MB) form and send it with your application if

  • your foreign travel document or passport does not have the X gender identifier (or an equivalent non-binary option)
  • you have or have had a Canadian temporary resident document with a different gender identifier, including a
    • visa
    • electronic travel authorization
    • work permit or
    • study permit

You don’t need any supporting documents.

Note: If you are a parent of a child to be adopted in Canada whose details you don’t know yet, select U – Unknown.


Physical characteristics - Eye colour

If you are a parent of a child to be adopted in Canada whose details you don’t know yet, select “Other.”


Birth information - Date of birth

If you don’t know your complete date of birth, enter 1901/01/01 to fill in the spaces for the unknown year, month or day. Include a letter of explanation.


Birth information - Place of birth

As shown in your passport or your travel document.

Note: If you are a parent of a child to be adopted in Canada whose details you don’t know yet, indicate “Unknown” for the city or town and select the country where you plan to adopt a child.


Citizenship(s)

If you aren’t a citizen of any country, choose “stateless.”

If you are a citizen of more than one country, choose your other country of citizenship in the second field.

Note: If you are a parent of a child to be adopted in Canada whose details you don’t know yet, select the country where you intend to adopt a child.


Current country of residence

You must be in this country legally.

For refugee claimants in Canada only: select Canada whether you have been lawfully admitted or not.


If you’ve lost your status
  • for “Status,” choose “Other”
  • in the details field, enter “Out of status, requires restoration”
  • leave the “From” and “To” fields blank

Note: If you are a parent of a child to be adopted in Canada whose details you don’t know yet, select the country where you plan to adopt a child and “Citizen” as the immigration status in that country.


Previous countries of residence

This means you lived in the country for 6 months total, not just in a row.

If you chose “Other” as a status, try to provide as much detail and an explanation as to why you are out of status.


Marital and relationship status

You’re single if you’ve never been married and are not in a common-law relationship.

You’re married if you and your spouse have had a ceremony that legally binds you to each other. Your marriage must be legally recognized in the country where it was performed and in Canada.

You’re common-law if you’ve lived continuously with your partner in a marital-type relationship for 1 year or more.

You’re divorced if you are officially separated and have legally ended your marriage.

You’re legally separated if you’re married but no longer living with your spouse.

You’re widowed if your spouse has died and you have not re-married or entered into a common-law relationship.

An annulled marriage has been legally declared as not valid. An annulment can also be a declaration by the Catholic Church that the marriage was not binding.

  • Family name is also known as last name or surname.
  • Given names are also known as first name and middle name. Do not use initials.
  • If you’re in a common-law relationship, enter the date (year, month and day) you began living together.
  • If you’re legally separated or divorced, enter the date you were no longer living together.

Note: If you are a parent of a child to be adopted in Canada whose details you don’t know yet, select “Single.”


Passport

Passport/travel document number (exactly as shown on your passport or travel document)

If you have more than one passport, choose the one you’ll use to travel to Canada.

Most people will need a passport to travel to Canada. If you’re approved to come here, you’ll need to get one.

A travel document is an identity document issued by a government or international organization (like the United Nations). It has a photo and personal information, and let the holder travel between countries. If you have a passport, you don’t need a travel document.

Issue/expiry dates

You can find this information on the page in your passport that shows your photo and date of birth (also called the biodata page)


National Identity Document

A national identity document is an identity card with a photo which is issued by a government or official authority, and can be used as identification inside the country that issued it. It may also be known as "ID," "ID card," "identity card," "citizen card" or "passport card."

Document number

Enter their national identity document number exactly as shown on the document. Make sure there is no space between each number or letter.


Education/Occupation Details

Highest level of education

  1. None: No education.
  2. Secondary or less: High school diploma obtained after elementary school and before college, university, or other formal training.
  3. Trade/apprenticeship certificate/diploma: Diploma completed in a specific trade, such as carpentry or auto mechanics.
  4. Non-university certificate/diploma: Training in a profession that requires formal education but not at the university level (for example, dental technician or engineering technician).
  5. Post-secondary – no degree: Post-secondary studies at a college or university but no degree earned.
  6. Bachelor’s degree: Academic degree awarded by a college or university to those who have completed an undergraduate curriculum. Also called a baccalaureate. Examples include a Bachelor of Arts, Science or Education.
  7. Post graduate – no degree: Post-graduate studies at a college or university but no degree earned (Master or PhD).
  8. Master’s degree: Academic degree awarded by a graduate school of a college or university. You must have completed a Bachelor’s degree before you can earn a Master’s degree.
  9. Doctorate – PhD: Highest university degree, usually based on at least 3 years of graduate studies and a thesis. Normally, you must have completed a Master’s degree before you can earn a PhD.

Current occupation

If your dependant doesn’t work, enter “not employed.”

Intended occupation

If your dependant isn’t planning to work in Canada (for example, if they are younger than working age), enter “none.”


Language Details

Native language/mother tongue

This is the language that they learned at home during their childhood and they still understand. If their native language does not appear in this list, select “Other.”

Test from a designated testing agency to assess English or French

Approved testing agencies include:

  • IELTS
  • CELPIP
  • TEF
  • TCF

Consent and Declaration of Applicant

  1. Follow the instructions at the bottom of the online application to view the declaration.
  2. Read all of the statements in all sections carefully and
    1. check the yes/no buttons to show if you agree that the information in this application about your intended occupation, education and work experience may be shared with prospective employers to help them hire workers
    2. type your name in the blue field

By typing your name, you’re signing the application electronically. By doing so, you certify that you fully understand the questions asked, and the information you provided is complete, truthful, and correct. You can’t submit your application online unless you sign it.


Schedule A – Background/Declaration (IMM 5669)

For refugee claimants in Canada: Only family members included in your application for refugee protection who are with you in Canada must be included using this form.


Personal details

Family and given names

Family name is also known as last name or surname.

Given names are also known as first name and middle name. Do not use initials.

Enter your names exactly as they appear on your passport, travel document or identity document.


Questionnaire

If you answered “Yes” to one or more of these questions, you must enter an explanation in the details field.


Education

If you didn’t earn a diploma, leave the “Type of certificate or diploma issued” field blank.


Personal history

Important: do not leave any gaps in time.

If you don’t account for all time periods, it may delay the processing of your application.

Personal history - Activity

Examples of activity types

  • employment (please specify)
  • unemployed
  • educational activity

Personal history - Status in country or territory

Examples of status

  • work visa
  • citizen
  • study visa
  • visitor visa

Exception: If you have not worked in the past 10 years (for example, you’re retired), you must provide details of your personal history since the age of 18. The resume or Curriculum Vitae (CV) that you provide with your application will help verify the information in this question.


Membership and association with organizations

Examples of organizations

  • political organizations
  • social organizations
  • youth or student organizations
  • trade unions
  • professional associations

Don’t use abbreviations.


Government positions

Examples of government positions

  • civil servant
  • judge
  • police officer
  • employee in a security organization

Don’t use abbreviations.


Military and paramilitary service

Important: do not leave any gaps in time.

If you don’t account for all time periods, it may delay the processing of your application.


Addresses

Write out addresses in full without using any abbreviations. Use the apartment or unit number, if this applies.

Example: 999 Family Street, Unit #3, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, K3J 9T5


Authority to disclose personal information

Declaration of applicant

Read all of the statements in all sections carefully and type your full name into the blue field (this is your digital signature).

By signing, you certify that you fully understand the questions asked, and that the information you provided is complete, truthful, and correct.


Additional Family Information (IMM 5406)

Section A

Relationship - Applicant

Marital status

  • If you’re married and you were physically present at the marriage, choose “married – physically present” under “marital status”
  • If you’re married and you were not physically present at the marriage, choose “married – not physically present” under “marital status”

Relationship - Spouse, common-law partner or conjugal partner (if this applies)

  • If you’re married and your spouse was physically present at the marriage, choose “married – physically present” under “marital status”
  • If you’re married and your spouse was not physically present at the marriage, choose “married – not physically present” under “marital status”

Section B

Include:

  • married children,
  • adopted children,
  • children of your spouse(step-children) or common-law partner,
  • any of your children who have been adopted by others,
  • any of your children who are in the custody of an ex-spouse, former common-law partner or other guardian.

You must answer all questions. If any sections don’t apply to you, enter “Not Applicable”.

Section C

Write personal details about your:

  • brother(s),
  • sister(s),
  • half-brother(s) and half-sister(s),
  • step-brother(s) and step-sister(s).

Read all of the statements in all sections carefully.

By clicking the “Complete and return to application” button, you certify that

  • you fully understand the questions asked and
  • the information you provided is complete, truthful, and correct

Statutory Declaration of Common-Law Union (IMM 5409)

Who must complete this form?

This form must be completed and signed with handwritten signatures.

Submitting an application to sponsor a family member

  • If the sponsor's common-law partner is a co-signer on the application to sponsor
    • the sponsor and their common-law partner must complete this form.
  • If the person being sponsored (the principal applicant) has a common-law partner
    • the person being sponsored and their common-law partner must complete this form.
Question 1

Write the following information in the space provided:

  • Country of current residence
  • Province/state/territory of current residence
  • Name of the declarant
  • Name of the declarant’s partner
  • Name of city, town, village
  • Name of county (if applicable)
  • Name of province/state/territory
  • Name of the country
  • Number of continuous year(s) in a conjugal relationship
  • Date of the relationship (from-to)
Question 1A

Check the box to indicate if you have jointly signed a residential lease, mortgage or purchase agreement relating to a residence in which you both live.

Question 1B

Check the box to indicate if you jointly own property other than your residence.

Question 1C

Check the box to indicate if you have a joint bank, trust credit union or charge card accounts.

Question 1D

Check the box to indicate if you have declared your common-law union under the Canadian Income Tax Act (T-1 “General individual income Tax Return”).

Question 2

Check the box to indicate if you have life insurance on yourself which names your common-law partner as a beneficiary.

Question 3

Check the box to indicate if your common-law partner has life insurance on themselves which names you as a beneficiary.

Question 4

If you answered “no” to questions 1 to 3, indicate other documentary evidence you have that would indicate your relationship as common-law partners.

Question 5

solemn declaration
Write the following information in the space provided:

  • Name of the declarant
  • Name of the declarant’s partner
  • Name of the city, town, village
  • Name of the county
  • Name of the province/state/territory
  • Name of the country
  • Date (day, month, year)
  • Signature of the declarant
  • Signature of the declarant’s partner
  • Name of the person who administered the declaration
  • Select the person’s title from the choices provided
  • Signature of the person who administered the declaration

Use of a Representative (IMM 5476)

Who may use this form?

Fill out this form only if you:

  • are appointing a representative;
  • need to update contact information for your previously appointed representative; or
  • are cancelling a representative’s appointment.

If you have dependent children aged 18 years or older, they must fill out their own copy of this form if a representative is also conducting business on their behalf.

Who is a representative?

A representative is someone who:

  • you have appointed by completing the IMM 5476 form;
  • gives advice, consultation, or guidance to you at any stage of the application process; and
  • has your consent to conduct business on your behalf with IRCC and the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA).

You are not obliged to hire a representative. We treat everyone equally, whether they use the service of a representative or not.

For more information, see: Use of a Representative.

Notify IRCC about any changes

You must use this Web form to tell us if any information changes regarding the person you authorized to represent you on your application.


Step 3. Pay the Fees

Use the table below to calculate the total amount of fees to be paid (all fees are in Canadian dollars). Fees must be included with this application.

We recommend you pay the right of permanent residence fee ($515) now to avoid delays. You will have to pay it before you become a permanent resident.


Your fees

Application (per person) $CAN
Sponsor your relative (22 years or older)
Sponsorship fee ($75), principal applicant fee ($490) and right of permanent residence fee ($515)
1,080
Sponsor your relative (22 years or older without right of permanent residence fee)
Sponsorship fee ($75) and principal applicant processing fee ($490)
565
Sponsor a dependant, adopted child (or child to be adopted) or orphaned relative
Sponsor only a dependent child ($75 sponsorship fee and $75 processing fee)
150(per child)
Include a dependant, adopted child (or child to be adopted) or orphaned relative on an application with your relative
The fee for including a dependent child in your family member's sponsorship application ($155)
155(per child)
Sponsor your relative (Principal applicant under 22 and not a spouse/partner)
Sponsorship fee ($75), principal applicant processing fee ($75) and right of permanent residence fee ($515)
665
Sponsor your relative (Principal applicant under 22 and not a spouse/partner without right of permanent residence fee)
Sponsorship fee ($75) and principal applicant processing fee ($75)
150
Include the spouse or partner of your relative
Processing fee ($570) and right of permanent residence fee ($515)
1,085
Include the spouse or partner of your relative (without right of permanent residence fee) 570

Note: The following people are exempt from the Right of Permanent Residence Fee:

  • the dependent children of the principal applicant;
  • a child you are adopting;
  • your orphaned brother, sister, nephew, niece or grandchild.
Biometrics fees $CAN
Biometrics (per person) 85
Biometrics (per family) (2 or more people)

Maximum fee for a family of 2 or more people applying at the same time and place

170

Residents of Quebec

If you are a resident of Quebec, you will need to pay an additional processing fee to the province of Quebec when you submit your undertaking to MIFI. For more information about Quebec provincial processing fees, visit the MIFI website. Do not include this fee with this sponsorship application.


Payment Issues

No fee included or Insufficient Fees

If you do not pay the full fees for your application(s) we will return your application(s). We will only start processing your application after you return it with the correct fees.

blue question mark For immigration applications, see section 10 of the IRPR and for citizenship applications, see section 13 of the Citizenship Act for more information.


Overpayment

If you pay more than the fees needed for your application(s) we will start processing your application, and send you a refund as soon as possible.

Note: You don’t have to ask for a refund. It will be done automatically.

Note: If you’re eligible for a refund, we will issue the refund to the person indicated on the Payer Information section of the receipt (If a receipt is attached to a paper application or uploaded as part of an online application). If you paid directly within an online application (no receipt attached), or if there is no name indicated on the receipt, we will send the refund to the applicant.

stop sign
Remark 

Only online payments are accepted in Canada. If any other forms of payment are received, IRCC will return your application.


How to pay the fees for your application

To pay your fees for your application you’ll need:

  • a valid email address;
  • a credit card, Debit MasterCard® or Visa® Debit card.

Follow these instructions to pay your fees online.

stop sign hand Do not exit without printing or saving the receipt! The receipt is your proof of payment!

  • At the end, click on the “Save” button to save a PDF copy of the IRCC official receipt.
  • Upload a copy of this receipt to your online application when asked.

Step 4. Submit the Application

Now that you’ve prepared your application, you can submit it for processing. To help make sure the application can be processed as quickly as possible:

  • answer all questions
  • electronically sign your application (type your full name exactly as shown on your passport)
  • include your processing fee receipt
  • upload all the supporting documents

After you read the declaration, you must be the one who types your name and clicks the “submit” button. This is the legal requirement for your application to be considered “signed,” according to Canada’s Immigration Law.

Principal applicants who are under 18 years of age must have their parent or legal guardian electronically sign and create the application on their behalf.


What Happens Next

Communicating with IRCC

There are several ways we may communicate with you:

  • Through your (or your representative’s) online account: We recommend that you or your authorized paid representative (if applicable) create an online account and link your application to that account. Once an application has been linked to an online account, we will send correspondence there. This makes communication easier, more secure, and quicker and will allow you or your representative to get more detailed application status information and to receive mail from us online. Using online services will ensure that you receive any correspondence (including medical forms and other requests) from us almost immediately after we send it to you. This will allow us to input your responses directly into your application for timely review.
  • E-Mail: If you or your representative provide us with an e-mail address when you apply, this will be our primary means of contacting you, unless your application is linked to an online account.

Important: Do not attempt to link your application to your personal online account if you have appointed a representative. If you have appointed a representative and attempt to link your application to your own online account, you will have to cancel your representative before you can link.

If you have an authorized paid representative, they can link your application to their own online account instead.

Unpaid representatives cannot use online accounts. If you have an unpaid representative, you should remind them to regularly monitor their e-mail and mail to ensure correspondence is received.

When you authorize the use of a representative, they’ll receive all correspondence about the application on your behalf. It’s important to make sure that we always have your, and your representative’s (if applicable) most current contact information, including:

  • Phone numbers
  • Email addresses
  • Mailing addresses

We’ll send time-sensitive and official correspondence using the most up-to-date contact information we have.

If we send a request, an answer must be provided within the timeframe provided.

For more information, see our Help Centre for instruction on changing your address or contact information.

Note: If your application was received before someone else’s, but you have not received all of the same requests, don’t be alarmed. Each file is different, and application steps may happen at different times for each file. We will contact you when:

  • we need more information to process your file
  • an update is available
  • a decision has been made, or
  • if your file is transferred to another office for processing

Make sure you regularly check to see if we have contacted you.

Be sure to check the email you gave us when you submitted if you

  • are waiting to hear about your application or
  • think there may be forms or documents missing

Is there a right of appeal?

In the event you do not meet the sponsorship requirements, there are two possible scenarios:

Scenario 1

If you checked the box to "Withdraw your application" on the IMM 1344 in case you do not meet sponsorship requirements, then no further processing will occur and all the fees will be refunded except for the $75 sponsorship fee. You will have no right of appeal.

Scenario 2

If you checked the box to "Proceed with the application for permanent residence" on the IMM 1344 in case you do not meet sponsorship requirements, then the application of the person being sponsored will be processed at the Canadian visa office. If their application is denied, you will have the right to appeal the decision.

If you meet the sponsorship requirements, you may also have a right to appeal in the following circumstance:

You meet the sponsorship requirements, but the person being sponsored does not meet the eligibility requirements or admissibility criteria for the family class. Their application will be refused and you will be notified of your right to appeal the negative decision, if you should decide to do so.

Note: Instructions to appeal a negative decision will be sent with the refusal letter.

Exceptions:

A sponsor has no right of appeal in the following circumstances:

  • the individual being sponsored is inadmissible on grounds of security, violating human or international rights, serious criminality or organized criminality;
  • the individual being sponsored is refused on the ground of misrepresentation;
  • the sponsor has discontinued or has withdrawn their sponsorship application.

Eligibility for rehabilitation

This section gives a summary of the type of offences and length of rehabilitation periods.

If you were convicted of an offence outside Canada that, if committed in Canada, would be an indictable offence punishable by a maximum term of imprisonment of less than ten years:

  • You are deemed rehabilitated: at least ten years after completion of the sentence imposed.
  • You are eligible to apply for rehabilitation: five (5) years after completion of the sentence imposed.

If you committed an offence outside Canada that, if committed in Canada, would be an indictable offence punishable by a maximum term of imprisonment of less than ten years:

  • You are deemed rehabilitated: at least ten years after commission of the offence.
  • You are eligible to apply for rehabilitation: five (5) years after commission of the offence.

If you were convicted of an offence or you committed an offence outside Canada that, if committed in Canada, would be punishable by a maximum term of imprisonment of ten years or more:

  • You are deemed rehabilitated: not applicable.
  • You are eligible to apply for rehabilitation: five (5) years from completion of the sentence or commission of the offence.

If you were convicted for two (2) or more offences outside Canada that, if committed in Canada, would constitute summary conviction offences:

  • You are deemed rehabilitated: at least five (5) years after the sentences imposed were served or to be served.
  • You are eligible to apply for rehabilitation: not applicable.

Note: To be deemed rehabilitated, the person must not have committed or been convicted of any other indictable offence.

What you should expect at the interview?

You, your spouse or common-law partner and dependent children may be asked to come to the interview. The visa officer may ask, among others, about your:

  • relationship to the sponsor
  • education,
  • reasons for emigrating
  • plans and preparations
  • family
  • your health
  • your financial situation
  • past difficulties with the law

Note: There may also be questions to determine your ability to settle successfully in Canada.


What you can do to help processing

There are certain things you can do to help make sure your application is processed as fast as possible:

  • submit all documents and information we have asked for  with your application
  • pay your application and biometric fees (if required)
  • provide your biometrics as soon as possible (if required)
  • tell us if your contact information changes, including:
    • mailing address
    • telephone numbers
    • facsimile number (fax)
    • e-mail address

Things that delay processing

The following may delay processing:

  • unclear photocopies of documents
  • verification of your information and documents
  • a medical condition that may need more tests or consultations
  • a criminal or security problem
  • consultation is needed with other offices in Canada and abroad

Permanent resident status

If your application is successful, you and your family members will receive permanent resident visas. You will become permanent residents of Canada when you move to Canada within the validity of your visa(s). Some conditions will apply:

  • You will remain a permanent resident until you become a Canadian citizen, as long as you spend at least two years of each five-year period in Canada.
  • You may leave and re-enter Canada as often as you wish.

Residency obligations

Permanent residents may leave and re-enter Canada as often as they wish to settle their affairs or to travel. But, at the time the re-enter Canada, they must prove that they have been physically present for at least 730 days within five years, starting from the day they became permanent residents.

If you have been a permanent resident, for 5 years or more

Then you must have accumulated 730 days of physical presence in Canada within the 5 years preceding the date you re-enter

If you have been a permanent resident, for less than 5 years

Then you must either have accumulated 730 days or will be able to have the required physical presence within 5 years.

Note: Permanent residents outside Canada may also meet the residency obligations if certain conditions apply.


Rights as a permanent resident

As permanent residents, you and your family members will have the right to:

  • live, study and work in Canada for as long as you remain permanent residents
  • access most social benefits accorded to Canadian citizens (see “Limitations”)
  • apply for Canadian citizenship, and if granted, apply for a Canadian passport once you have been a legal permanent resident for three of the four previous years

Obligations as permanent resident

As permanent residents, you will also have the same legal obligations as Canadians, such as paying taxes and respecting all federal, provincial, and municipal laws.


Limitations

There are a few limitations on permanent residents:

  • You cannot vote in certain elections.
  • You may be ineligible for certain jobs requiring high-level security clearances.

If you or any of your family members commit a serious crime, you or your family members may be stripped of permanent resident status and deported from Canada.


The Permanent Resident Card

All new permanent residents will be issued a card as part of the process. Cards will be mailed to your home address soon after you become a permanent resident. For more information, visit Get a permanent resident card.


What if the co-signer wants to withdraw their financial support?

If your spouse or common-law partner withdraws support for the sponsorship application, follow the steps below:

  1. You or your spouse/ common-law partner must inform the Case Processing Centre and the visa office using this Web form before permanent residence is granted to the person you are sponsoring and their family members.
  2. You must include an amended copy of the sponsorship application and of the agreement.
  3. We will assess your financial situation to see if you have enough money to support your family without a co-signer.
  4. If you do not meet the financial requirements on your own, the application for permanent residence will be refused.

Informing us of any changes

Note: Clearly state your name, date of birth and Universal Client Identification (UCI) or file number which is found at the top of the acknowledgment letter, if you received one from us.

If you move

Then inform us immediately by:

  • using our on-line service. Visit Change my address and follow the instructions for filling out and submitting the electronic change of address form.

If you move from Quebec to another province in Canada

Then you must fill out and sign Application to sponsor, Sponsorship Agreement and Undertaking (IMM 1344).

If you move to Quebec from another province in Canada

Then you must sign an “engagement” with the province of Quebec.



For more information

Current processing times

You can check current processing times on the Application processing times webpage.



Important information

Updating your contact information

While your application is in process, you must tell us if you change your address, email address, or telephone number. Use the Change your address tool to give us your new contact information.

Note: If your personal situation changes (for example change of marital status, birth of a child, or you wish to withdraw your sponsorship, etc.) after you have submitted your application, you must notify us in writing. For more information, visit After you apply.


Checking application status

The person you are sponsoring can receive instant email updates and a more detailed, up-to-date case status on their permanent residence application by creating an online account. Find out how.

In Canada and the United States

You may Contact Us or go online to see the current status of your application:

To obtain details on how to remove your application status information from the Internet, visit the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) section.

Outside Canada and the United States

Contact the Canadian embassy, high commission or consulate responsible for your region.


Protecting your information

Your personal information is:

  • available to IRCC and the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) employees who need to see it to provide the services to you, and
  • not disclosed to other organizations except as permitted under the provisions of the Privacy Act or the Citizenship Regulations.

For more information about the protection of your data, visit the Help Centre.


Quality Assurance Program

Our quality assurance program randomly chooses applications for a special review. If chosen, we will ask you to attend an interview with an IRCC official to:

  • verify that the documentation and any other information you submitted is accurate,
  • verify that your application has been completed properly.

Note: We will notify you in writing if your application is chosen.



Online services

For more information about the programs offered by IRCC, visit Immigration and Citizenship.


Need help?

If you need help, you can find answers to your questions by visiting the Help Centre.


Federal Income Scale

Federal Income Table, 2021

The following table applies to all provinces except Quebec. Quebec residents should refer to MIFI’s Financial capacity evaluation webpage.

Table 1

Low Income Cut-Off (LICO)
Size of Family Unit Minimum necessary income
1 person (the sponsor) $26,620
2 persons $33,140
3 persons $40,742
4 persons $49,466
5 persons $56,104
6 persons $63,276
7 persons $70,448
More than 7 persons, for each additional person, add $7,172

Appendix A: Sponsoring an adopted child or a child you intend to adopt

Citizenship process for adopted persons

Canada’s citizenship law was amended to allow Canadian citizens (except for those born outside Canada) who adopt a child from a foreign country the option of applying for Canadian citizenship for their adopted child without first having to apply for permanent residence. An application for Canadian Citizenship for a person adopted by a Canadian citizen (on or after January 1, 1947) is available. Adopted persons who are adults may apply for themselves. Download the Application for Canadian Citizenship for an adopted person.

If you want to apply for Canadian citizenship for an adopted child or you are a child adopted by a Canadian citizen, refer to our website to help you determine if you should apply for citizenship or for permanent residence.


The Hague Convention

Many intercountry adoptions are now subject to the requirements of the

Hague Convention on Adoption.

These adoptions must be initiated through provincial or territorial adoption authorities and receive the appropriate approvals. Contact your provincial or territorial authorities for information on how the Convention may affect your adoption.

Provincial and Territorial Contacts for Adoptions

As adoption is a provincial responsibility, people who wish to adopt a child from outside of Canada must first contact provincial or territorial adoption authorities. Once you have initiated the adoption application through the provincial or territorial authorities and have obtained the appropriate approval, you may begin the sponsorship process for a child.

  • Alberta
    Ministry of Children’s services, Adoption Services
    Senior Manager, Adoption Services
    Tel: (780) 422-0178
    Fax: (780) 427-2048
  • British Columbia
    Ministry of Children and Family Development
    Adoption Branch
    Tel: (250) 387-1317
    Fax: (250) 356-1864
  • Manitoba
    Department of Families, Child Protective Services Branch
    Child and Family Services
    Intercountry Adoptions Specialist
    Tel: (204) 945-7274
    Fax: (204) 945-6717
  • New Brunswick
    Department of Social Development
    Tel: (506) 444-2859
    Fax: (506) 453-2082
  • Newfoundland and Labrador
    Department of Children, Seniors and Social Development
    Tel: (709) 729-3527
    Fax: (709) 729-1853
  • Northwest Territories
    Department of Health and Social Services
    Tel: (867) 767-9061 ext. 49866
    Fax: (867) 873-7706
  • Nova Scotia
    Department of Community Services
    Manager of Adoption and Foster Care
    Tel: (902) 424-3205
    Fax: (902) 424-0708
  • Nunavut
    Department of Family Services
    Tel: (867) 975-5227
    Fax: (867) 975-5298
  • Ontario
    Ministry of Children, Community and Social Services
    Tel: (416) 327-4736
    Fax: (416) 212-6799
  • Prince Edward Island
    Ministry of Social Development and Housing
    Tel: (902) 368-6515
    Fax: (902) 620-3776
  • Quebec
    Ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux
    Secrétariat à l’adoption internationale (SAI)
    Tel: (514) 873-5226 or 1-800-561-0246
    Fax: (514) 873-0157

     

  • Saskatchewan
    Department of Social Services
    Tel: (306) 787-5698
    Fax: (306) 789-0038
  • Yukon
    Ministry of Health and Social Affairs
    Family and Children’s Services
    Tel: (867) 667-3002
    Fax: (867) 393-6204

     


Adoptions completed abroad

The requirements that must be met for sponsorships of children adopted abroad are as follows:

  • the child was under the age of 18 when the adoption took place;
  • the adoption was in the best interests of the child.

What does ‘the best interests of the child’ mean?

The best interests of the child means that:

  • a competent authority had conducted or approved a home study of the adoptive parents;
  • before the adoption, the child’s parents gave their free and informed consent to the child’s adoption;
  • the adoption created a genuine parent-child relationship;
  • the adoption was in accordance with the laws of the place where the adoption took place;
  • the adoption was in accordance with the laws of the sponsor’s country of residence;
    • if the sponsor lived in Canada at the time the adoption took place, the competent authority of the child’s province of intended destination must have stated in writing that it does not object to the adoption;
  • if the adoption was subject to the Hague Convention on Adoption, the competent authority of the country where the adoption took place and the province of destination have stated in writing that they approve the adoption as conforming to the Convention;
  • if the adoption was not subject to the Hague Convention on Adoption, there is no evidence that the adoption is for the purpose of child trafficking or undue gain within the meaning of the Convention.

Adoptions completed in Canada

The requirements that must be met for sponsorships of children adopted in Canada are as follows:

  • the child is under the age of 18;
  • there is no evidence that the adoption is for the purpose of acquiring any privileges or status under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act;
  • if the adoption was subject to the Hague Convention on Adoption, the competent authority of the country in which the child lives and the province of destination of that child have stated in writing that they approve the adoption as conforming to the Convention;
  • if the adoption was not subject to the Hague Convention on Adoption,
  • the child has been placed for adoption in the country in which they live or is legally available in that country for adoption and there is no evidence that the adoption is for the purpose of child trafficking or undue gain within the meaning of the Convention and
  • the competent authority of the child’s province of intended destination must have stated in writing that it does not object to the adoption.

Unnamed child

Sponsorships for children who are not yet identified are accepted; once the child is identified, the sponsor must notify the appropriate visa office and provincial authority.

For Quebec residents, contact the office of the Ministère de l’Immigration, de la Francisation et de l’Intégration (MIFI) for sponsorship requirements in Quebec

Sibling adoptions

Situations may arise where an adoption application is still pending for an unknown child and sponsors are notified that the birth resulted in multiple births, or that there are additional siblings available for adoption.

If sponsors wish to adopt the second child or the additional siblings, they will have to submit an additional:

  • Application to Sponsor, Sponsorship Agreement and Undertaking (IMM 1344);
  • Generic Application Form for Canada (IMM 0008)
  • Processing fees.

Medical Condition Statement

  1. You will have to satisfy the visa office that you have obtained good and reliable information about the child’s health status before a permanent resident visa can be issued to that child if you are sponsoring:
    • a child you have adopted or are in the process of adopting outside Canada and you were or are living in Canada at the time the adoption took/takes place, or
    • a child you intend to adopt in Canada, or
    • an orphaned brother, sister, nephew or niece.
  2. You may obtain this information from authorities in the country of adoption, through an independent medical examination or from the child’s immigration medical record.
  3. Once you have obtained the information with respect to the child’s medical condition, read the Medical Condition Statement [IMM 0133] (PDF, 2.3 MB) provided, complete the bottom portion, sign it and send it to the visa office processing the permanent residence application submitted on behalf of the child.

Requirements for issuing an immigration visa

For all adoption cases, there is an immigration requirement prior to visa issuance:

  • to obtain a letter from the provincial or territorial authorities stating that they have no objection to the adoption. IRCC will make this request directly to the appropriate provincial or territorial authorities at the time of the sponsorship approval;
  • to provide a written statement confirming that the sponsor of a child has obtained information about the medical condition of the child whom the sponsor has adopted or is in the process of adopting outside Canada, or intends to adopt in Canada. Read the Medical Condition Statement.

Note: If you are sponsoring a child adopted abroad or whom you intend to adopt in Canada, make sure you obtain the medical information. Then complete and sign the bottom portion of the Medical Condition Statement and return it to the visa office processing the permanent residence application you are submitting on behalf of the child


More information on adoptions

For more information, contact the provincial and territorial authorities or visit Adopt a child.

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