GST/HST Credit and Climate Action Incentive Payment

Including related provincial and territorial credits and benefits

For the 2022-2023 payment period

RC4210(E) Rev. 22

Our publications and personalized correspondence are available in braille, large print, e-text, or MP3 for those who have a visual impairment. For more information, go to Order an alternate format or call 1-800-387-1193.

La version française de ce guide est intitulée Crédit pour la TPS/TVH et paiement de l'incitatif à agir pour le climat.

Find out if this guide is for you

This guide gives information about the goods and services tax/harmonized sales tax (GST/HST) credit and the climate action incentive payment, such as:

This guide uses plain language to explain most common tax situations. It is provided for information only and does not replace the law.

New measures for the 2022-2023 payment period

Climate action incentive payment

The climate action incentive will change from a refundable tax credit claimed annually on personal income tax returns to quarterly tax-free payments made through the CRA benefit system, starting in July 2022.

For more information, see Climate action incentive payment.

Definitions

Adjusted family net income – your family net income minus any universal child care benefit (UCCB) and registered disability savings plan (RDSP) income received plus any UCCB and RDSP amounts repaid. If you received split income, refer to the information sheet for Form T1206, Tax on Split Income.

Note

If you are an Indian as defined in the Indian Act, do not report the portion of income that qualifies for the tax exemption under section 87 of the Indian Act. For more information, go to Information on the tax exemption under section 87 of the Indian Act.

Common-law partner – a person to whom you are not married, with whom you are living in a conjugal relationship, and to whom one of the following situations applies. They:

Family net incomeyour net income added to the net income of your spouse or common-law partner, if you have one. Family net income does not include your child’s net income.

If you or your spouse or common-law partner were non-residents of Canada for part or all of the year, family net income includes your or your spouse or common-law partner's income from all sources, both inside and outside Canada, for any part of the year that either of you were not residents of Canada. Income from sources outside Canada must be determined in the same way net income is determined in Canada.

Kinship or close relationship programs – programs of the Government of Canada or a provincial or territorial government, or under proposed changes an Indigenous governing body, for the care and upbringing, on a temporary basis, of a child in need of protection.

Unlike other foster care arrangements, the child is generally placed in the care of a grand-parent, an extended family member, or a close friend without being brought into the legal custody and guardianship of the province or territory. Certain jurisdictions may offer financial assistance to help individuals cover the expenses in caring for the child.

Married – you are legally married to someone.  

Separated – you have been living apart from your spouse or common-law partner because of a breakdown in the relationship for a period of at least 90 days and you have not reconciled.

Once you have been separated for 90 days (because of a breakdown in the relationship), the effective day of your separation is the date you started living apart.

You would still be considered to have a spouse or common-law partner if there is no breakdown in the relationship and you were living apart for reasons such as:

Note

Generally, you are not considered separated if your spouse or common-law partner is incarcerated or does not live in Canada, as long as there is no breakdown in your relationship. However, you may not get the GST/HST credit for your spouse or common-law partner if the eligibility criteria are not met.

Single – you are single and no other marital status applies to you.

Spouse – the person to whom you are legally married.

GST/HST credit

The GST/HST credit is a non-taxable amount paid four times a year to individuals and families with low and modest incomes to help offset the goods and services tax/harmonized sales tax (GST/HST) that they pay.

Eligibility criteria

You are eligible for this credit if you are a resident of Canada for income tax purposes at the beginning of the month in which the CRA makes a payment (see When we pay your GST/HST credit). In the month before we make a quarterly payment, you must also meet at least one of the following conditions during the same period:

Note

If you will turn 19 years of age before April 2023, see If you turn 19 years of age before April 2023.

Generally, you are not eligible for the GST/HST credit if at the beginning of the month in which we make a quarterly payment, any of the following apply:

Note

You cannot get the credit for a spouse, common-law partner, or child who meets any of the above conditions at the beginning of the month in which we make a quarterly payment.

How to get the GST/HST credit

To get the GST/HST credit, including any related provincial and territorial credits, you have to file a tax return for 2021, even if you have not received income in the year.

If you are a newcomer to Canada and you want to get the GST/HST credit, there are two ways to proceed:

For more information for newcomers to Canada, go to Newcomers to Canada or see Pamphlet T4055, Newcomers to Canada.

You need a social insurance number

You and your spouse or common-law partner (if you have one) need a social insurance number (SIN) to get the GST/HST credit. To get a SIN, go to a Service Canada office to apply in person and you will get one during that visit. You will have to provide a document that proves your identity, such as your birth certificate. If you live in an inaccessible area or 100 kilometers or more from a Service Canada office, you can apply by mail.

For more information or to get an application for a SIN, go to Social Insurance Number or call 1-866-274-6627.  To find the address of the Service Canada Centre nearest you, go to Find a Service Canada Office or call 1-800-622-6232.

If Service Canada will not give you a SIN, you can still get the GST/HST credit if you meet all of the conditions listed under Eligibility criteria. Attach a note to your Form RC151, GST/HST Credit and Climate Action Incentive Payment Application for Individuals Who Become Residents of Canada, explaining why you cannot get a SIN and include a photocopy of one of your following documents:

If you have a spouse or common-law partner

You can get the credit for your spouse or common-law partner. Generally, your spouse or common-law partner has to be a resident of Canada in the month before and at the beginning of the month in which we make a payment (see When we pay your GST/HST credit).

If you had a spouse or common-law partner on December 31, 2021, fill out "Information about your spouse or common-law partner" on page 1 of your tax return.

Enter their SIN and net income, even if it is zero. Incomplete or incorrect information may delay the processing of your application.

Only one of you can get the credit for both of you. The credit will be paid to the spouse or common-law partner whose tax return is assessed first. No matter which one of you receives the credit, the amount will be the same.

If your marital status changed after December 31, 2021, you must tell us. For more information, see If your marital status has changed.

If your spouse or common-law partner immigrates to Canada, they will have to send us all of the following information in writing:

If you have children who are under 19 years of age

You can get the credit for each of your children if all of the following apply at the beginning of the month in which we make a payment. The child:

Each eligible parent in a shared custody situation may get half of the GST/HST credit for that child. This also applies to any related provincial and territorial credit.

For more information about shared custody situations, see Shared custody, call 1-800-387-1193, or see Booklet T4114, Canada Child Benefit.

The credit for your child will be included in your credit.

You cannot get the credit for a child if, at the beginning of the month in which we make a payment, the child is not living with you because they are maintained by an agency or are in foster care. Also, you cannot get the credit for a foster child in your care. However, if you live with a child that you care for under a kinship or close relationship program, you can get the credit for that child.

Your GST/HST credit will automatically be recalculated to exclude a child who turned 19 years of age during the year. The adjustment is effective in the quarterly payment following the child's 19th birthday.

Example

Cameron and Harper have two children. Cameron gets the GST/HST credit on behalf of the family. Kristin, their elder child, turns 19 years of age on August 6, 2022. Cameron's GST/HST credit will be automatically recalculated to include only one child for the next quarterly payment made in October 2022.

In order for Kristin to get the GST/HST credit, including any related provincial or territorial payments, a tax return must be filed for 2021, even if no income was received in the year. Eligibility will be automatically determined when the tax return is filed. Kristin could get the GST/HST credit in October 2022 and January and April 2023.

How to register your children

Your child is automatically registered for the GST/HST credit if you are currently eligible for the Canada child benefit. If you become primarily responsible for the care and upbringing of a child, you can register them for the GST/HST credit and related provincial or territorial programs by using one of the following methods:

If you turn 19 years of age before April 2023

Generally, you have to be 19 years of age or older to get the GST/HST credit.

If you turn 19 years of age before April 2023, make sure that you file your 2021 tax return. The CRA will automatically determine your eligibility for the GST/HST credit, and if you are eligible, your first payment will be issued in the quarterly payment after your 19th birthday (see When we pay your GST/HST credit).

Example

Alex will turn 19 years of age on January 5, 2023. If Alex files a 2021 tax return, they may be eligible for the GST/HST credit issued in April 2023. Alex will not be eligible for the January 2023 credit, since they will not be 19 years of age before the first day of January 2023.

How we calculate your GST/HST credit

Base year and payment period

The base year is the year of the tax return from which information is taken to calculate the GST/HST credit amount for the payment period.

The payment period is the 12‑month period during which the GST/HST credits are paid. The payment period runs from July 1 of the year following the base year to June 30 of the next year.

For example, GST/HST credit payments calculated on the 2021 tax return will start being issued in July 2022, which is the beginning of the payment period. For more information, see When we pay your GST/HST credit.

The following chart illustrates the link between the base year and the payment period.

Base year and payment period
Base year (tax return) Payment period
2021 July 2022 – June 2023
2020 July 2021 – June 2022
2019 July 2020 – June 2021

If the CRA determines that you are eligible for the GST/HST credit based on your 2021 tax return and that you will receive payments, we will send you a GST/HST credit notice in July 2022. It will show how much you will get and what information we used to calculate the amount.

For the payment period from July 2022 to June 2023, we base your credit on both of the following:

Example

Amir is single with no children. When Amir files their 2021 tax return, the CRA will automatically determine if they are eligible for the GST/HST credit. If Amir is eligible, we will use the information on their 2021 tax return to determine what amount they will get for the payment period starting in July 2022.

Benefits online calculator

Use our online service to get an estimate of your GST/HST credit, by going to Child and family benefits calculator.

How much you can expect to receive

For the 2021 base year (payment period from July 2022 to June 2023), you could get up to:

Be sure to keep your personal information updated to avoid underpayments or overpayments. An increase of your 2021 adjusted family net income could affect your payments starting in July 2022.

When we pay your GST/HST credit

You will get your annual GST/HST credit, which was calculated using information from your 2021 tax return, in four payments. We will make these payments on July 5 and October 5, 2022 and on January 5 and April 5, 2023.

However, if your GST/HST credit calculated in July 2022 is less than $50 per quarter, we will pay you for the entire payment period on July 5, 2022.

 

Note

When the 5th falls on a Saturday, a Sunday, or a federal statutory holiday, the payment will be made on the last business day before the 5th.

If you do not receive your payment on the scheduled day, wait 10 working days before calling 1-800-387-1193.

You can view your GST/HST payment dates and amounts in My Account or by using the MyBenefits CRA mobile app.

When we recalculate your GST/HST credit

A change in your situation may cause your GST/HST credit payment to be recalculated based on the effective date of the change. We will send you a GST/HST credit notice of redetermination showing the revised annual credit amount when any of the following situations apply and change the amount of your payment:

For more information, see When you should contact us.

If you were overpaid

If a recalculation shows you have been overpaid for the GST/HST credit, we will send you a notice to inform you of the amount due. For more information on how to make a payment, go to Payments to the CRA.

We will keep all future GST/HST credit payments or tax refunds until the balance is repaid. We will also apply your GST/HST credit to amounts owing for tax balances or amounts owing to other federal, provincial, or territorial government programs.

Related provincial and territorial programs

The CRA administers the following provincial and territorial programs that are related to the GST/HST credit:

You do not need to apply to a province or territory to get payments for these programs. If you are eligible for the GST/HST credit, your provincial and territorial credit payments will be combined with your GST/HST credit payments (except for the Ontario sales tax credit, as part of the Ontario trillium benefit, which is issued separately).

If you use our direct deposit service for your GST/HST credit payments, we will deposit your provincial and territorial payments into the same account.

BC climate action tax credit

This credit is a non-taxable amount paid to help low-income individuals and families with the carbon taxes they pay.

The program provides a credit of up to $193.50 for an individual, $193.50 for a spouse or common-law partner, and $56.50 per child under 19 years of age ($193.50 for the first child in a single parent family).

For single individuals with no children, the credit is reduced by 2% of their adjusted net income over $36,901. For families, the credit is reduced by 2% of their adjusted family net income over $43,051.

This amount is combined with the quarterly payment of the federal GST/HST credit.

The BC climate action tax credit is fully funded by the Province of British Columbia.

New Brunswick harmonized sales tax credit

This credit is a non-taxable amount paid to help offset the increase in the sales tax for households with low and modest incomes.

The program provides for a maximum annual amount of $300 for an individual, $300 for a spouse or common-law partner, and $100 per child under 19 years of age ($300 for the first child in a single parent family). The credit is reduced by 2% of the adjusted family net income over $35,000.

This amount is combined with the quarterly payments of the federal GST/HST credit.

The New Brunswick harmonized sales tax credit is fully funded by the Province of New Brunswick.

Newfoundland and Labrador income supplement

The Newfoundland and Labrador income supplement (NLIS) is a non‑taxable amount paid quarterly to low‑income individuals, families, seniors, and persons with disabilities to help reduce the impact of additional tax measures. It is calculated based on your family situation and your adjusted family net income.

The maximum annual payment amount is $495 if you are a single individual, $561 if you have a spouse or common law partner, plus $220 per child under 19 years of age.

Your NLIS payment may include a Newfoundland and Labrador disability amount (NLDA). The NLDA is an additional benefit designed to help low and modest income persons with disabilities. To be eligible for the NLDA for a quarter an individual must be eligible for the federal GST/HST credit, the NLIS and the disability tax credit (DTC).

For more information on the DTC, go to Disability tax credit (DTC).

These amounts are combined with the quarterly payments of the federal GST/HST credit.

This program is fully funded by the province.

Newfoundland and Labrador seniors' benefit

This program provides a non‑taxable annual amount of $1,444 for a single senior (65 years of age or older at any time during 2022) or a married or common‑law couple with at least one senior whose adjusted family net income is $29,402 or less. Eligible seniors will get part of this payment if their adjusted family net income is between $29,402 and $41,787.

This amount is combined with the quarterly payments of the federal GST/HST credit.

The Newfoundland and Labrador seniors' benefit is fully funded by the province.

Northwest Territories cost of living offset

This credit is a non-taxable amount paid to individuals and families to help offset the cost of the Northwest Territories carbon tax.

The program provides an annual credit of $260 for an individual, $260 for a spouse or common-law partner, and $300 per child under 18 years of age. The credit is not subject to a benefit reduction based on income.

This amount is combined with the quarterly payments of the federal GST/HST credit.

The Northwest Territories cost of living offset is fully funded by the Northwest Territories.

Nova Scotia affordable living tax credit

This credit is a non-taxable amount paid to make life more affordable for Nova Scotian households with low and modest incomes. This credit offsets the increase in the HST and provides additional income for these households.

The program provides a maximum annual credit of $255 for an individual or a couple, and $60 for each child under 19 years of age. The credit is reduced by 5% of adjusted family net income over $30,000.

This amount is combined with the quarterly payments of the federal GST/HST credit.

The Nova Scotia affordable living tax credit is fully funded by the Province of Nova Scotia.

Ontario sales tax credit

This credit is a non-taxable amount paid to provide relief for Ontario residents with low and modest incomes for the sales tax they pay.

The program provides a maximum annual credit of $324 for each adult and each child under 19 years of age in a family. If you are a single individual with no children, the credit will be reduced by 4% of your adjusted net income over $24,916. If you are a single parent, or are married or living common‑law, the credit will be reduced by 4% of your adjusted family net income over $31,144.

This amount is part of the Ontario trillium benefit. You can choose to get the payments monthly, issued on the 10th of each month, or in one payment at the end of the benefit year (in June) if the annual entitlement is over $360.

If the annual entitlement is $360 or less, it will be issued in one lump‑sum payment in the first payment month (usually in July).

For more information, call 1-877-627-6645. The Ontario sales tax credit is fully funded by the Province of Ontario.

Prince Edward Island sales tax credit

This credit is a non-taxable amount paid to help offset the increase in the sales tax for households with low and modest incomes.

The program provides an annual credit of $110 for an individual plus, if applicable, $55 for a spouse, common-law partner or an eligible dependant. There is also a supplement of 0.5% of adjusted family net income over $30,000, up to a maximum of $55. The total of the above is reduced by 2% of adjusted family net income over $50,000.

Individuals are also eligible for a one-time enhanced payment in July 2022. This one-time enhanced payment is an additional amount of up to $290 for an individual and $150 for a spouse or common-law partner. This amount is combined with the quarterly payment of the federal GST/HST credit.

The Prince Edward Island sales tax credit is fully funded by the Province of Prince Edward Island.

Saskatchewan low-income tax credit

This credit is a non‑taxable amount paid to help Saskatchewan residents with low and modest incomes.

The program provides $358 for an individual, $358 for a spouse or common-law partner (or for an eligible dependant), and $141 per child under 19 years of age (maximum of two children), or an annual credit of up to $998 per family.

The credit starts to be reduced when the adjusted family net income is more than $33,755. Families with adjusted family net income between $33,755 and $70,045 may get part of the credit.

This amount is combined with the quarterly payments of the federal GST/HST credit.

The Saskatchewan low-income tax credit is fully funded by the Province of Saskatchewan.

Yukon government carbon price rebate – individuals

This credit is a non-taxable amount paid to individuals and families to help offset the cost of the federal carbon pollution pricing levy.

The program provides an annual credit of $320 for an individual, $320 for a spouse or common-law partner, and $320 per child under 19 years of age.

Individuals living outside of Whitehorse will also receive a remote supplement amount of $32 for an individual, $32 for a spouse or common-law partner, and $32 for each eligible child under 19 years of age.

The credit is not subject to a benefit reduction based on income.

This amount is combined with the quarterly payments of the federal GST/HST credit.

The Yukon government carbon price rebate – individuals is fully funded by Yukon.

Climate action incentive payment

The climate action incentive payment (CAIP) is a tax-free amount paid to help individuals and families offset the cost of the federal pollution pricing. The CAIP is available to residents of Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and Ontario. The CAIP consists of a basic amount and a 10% supplement for residents of small and rural communities.

The Government of Canada has proposed to change the climate action incentive from a refundable credit claimed annually on personal income tax and benefit returns to quarterly tax-free payments made through the CRA benefit system starting in July 2022. The CAIP information in this guide is subject to Parliamentary approval.

Eligibility criteria

To be eligible, you must be a resident of Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, or Ontario at the beginning of the month in which the CRA makes a payment. In the month before we make a quarterly payment, you must also meet at least one of the following conditions during the same period:

Generally, you are not eligible for the CAIP if, at the beginning of the month in which we make a quarterly payment, any of the following apply:

Notes

You cannot get the CAIP for a spouse, common-law partner, or child who meets any of the above conditions at the beginning of the month in which we make a quarterly payment.

An individual is not eligible to receive the CAIP for a deceased person.

If you have children who are under 19 years of age

You can get the CAIP for each of your children if all of the following conditions apply at the beginning of the month in which we make a payment. The child:

If you are eligible for the Canada child benefit, a credit for each eligible child will be included in the calculation of the CAIP.

Note

You cannot get the CAIP for a child if, at the beginning of the month in which we make a payment, the child is not living with you because they are maintained by an agency or are in foster care. Also, you cannot get the CAIP for a foster child in your care. However, if you live with a child that you care for under a kinship or close relationship program, you can get the credit for that child.

If you share custody of a child

If you share custody of a child and are eligible for the CAIP, each individual will get 50% of the amounts they would have received if the child lived with them all of the time.

How to register your children

Your child is automatically registered for the CAIP if you are currently eligible for the Canada child benefit. If you become primarily responsible for the care and upbringing of another child, you can register them for the CAIP by using one of the following methods:

If you turn 19 years of age before January 2023

Generally, you have to be 19 years of age or older to get the CAIP. If you turn 19 years of age before January 2023, make sure that you file your 2021 income tax and benefit return. The CRA will automatically determine your eligibility for the CAIP and, if you are eligible, your first payment will be issued in the quarterly payment after your 19th birthday. For more information, see When we pay your CAIP.

If you are a new resident of Canada

If you are a new resident of Canada, fill out one of the following forms to apply for the CAIP:

Mail the completed form to your tax centre (go to Find a CRA address).

How much you can expect to receive

The amount you will receive depends on your province of residence.

Residents of Ontario would receive an annual payment of:

Residents of Manitoba would receive an annual payment of:

Residents of Saskatchewan would receive an annual payment of:

Residents of Alberta would receive an annual payment of:

The credit is not subject to a reduction based on income.

To get the quarterly payments you and your spouse or common law partner, if you have one, must file an income tax and benefit return. The credit will be paid to the spouse or common-law partner whose tax return is assessed first. No matter which one of you receives the credit, the amount will be the same.

You have to file a return every year to continue receiving the CAIP.

The CAIP includes a rural supplement of 10% of the base amount for residents of small and rural communities. To claim the rural supplement you must reside outside of a census metropolitan area (CMA). If you live in a rural area, you have to complete Schedule 14, Climate Action Incentive, and attach it to your income tax and benefit return for 2021.

You can use our online calculator to get an estimate of your payment at Child and family benefits calculator.

Base year and payment period

The base year is the year of the tax return from which information is taken to calculate the CAIP amount for the payment period. The payment period is the 12-month period during which the CAIP is paid. The payment period for the CAIP runs from April 1 of the year following the base year to March 30 of the next year.

When we pay your CAIP

The CRA normally sends payments on the 15th of April, July, October, and January. For the 2021 base year, once your 2021 income tax and benefit return is processed and if you are eligible, the first payment will be issued on July 15, 2022 and will include a retroactive amount for April 2022.

If you get your T1 refund by direct deposit, you will also get your CAIP by direct deposit.

When you should contact us

You should tell us immediately about certain changes, as well as the date they happened or will happen. This section explains what the changes are and how you should tell us about them.

If the number of children in your care has changed

We may need to recalculate your GST/HST credit and your CAIP based on new information when any of the following situations apply:

If your marital status has changed

If your marital status changes, let us know by the end of the month following the month in which your status changed. This could affect the amount of your GST/HST credit and your CAIP. You can tell us by using one of the following methods:

Only one GST/HST credit payment and one CAIP are allowed per family for each quarter. If you were both getting payments as individuals before you were married or became common-law partners, and you both continued to get payments after your marital status changed, one of you will have to repay the amounts you got after your status changed. Either your or your spouse or common-law partner’s payments will be adjusted to include the credit for both of you.

Do not tell us of your separation until you have been separated for a period of at least 90 days.

Example

Zachary and Kim separated on October 15, 2022. They have no children. They advised us of their new marital status by sending Form RC65, Marital Status Change, on January 15, 2023. They entered October 15, 2022 as the date their new marital status began. They will both get their own GST/HST credit and CAIP for the rest of the payment period following the separation date.

If the recipient has died

An individual is not eligible to get the CAIP or GST/HST credit payments after they die. We may send out a payment after the date of death if we are not aware of the situation. If this happens, you have to return the payment to us, and let us know the date of the death of the recipient so we can update our records (go to Find a CRA address).

If the deceased recipient was married or living common-law

If the deceased recipient's GST/HST credit or CAIP included an amount for a spouse or common-law partner, the CRA will automatically determine that spouse or common‑law partner’s eligibility for the remaining payments for themselves and for any of their children. If the surviving spouse or common‑law partner did not file a tax return, they have to do so to get the payments.

If the deceased recipient single, separated, divorced, or widowed

If the recipient died before the month in which we issue the credit, we cannot make any more payments in that person’s name or to that person’s estate.

If the recipient died during or after the month in which we issue the GST/HST credit or the CAIP and the payment(s) have not been cashed, return them to us so that we can send the payment(s) to the person’s estate.

If the recipient was getting a credit for a child, the child’s new caregiver should contact us to request the CAIP or GST/HST credit payments for that child.

Example 1

Jessie, a GST/HST credit and CAIP recipient, died on July 1, 2022. Jessie’s sister Judy called us after she got Jessie’s July 2022 payments to find out if the estate is eligible for the GST/HST credit and the CAIP. Since Jessie was alive on the first day of the month in which we issued the payments, the estate is eligible for the July 2022 payments. However, no more payments will be issued. We told Judy to return the cheque to us so we can reissue it to Jessie’s estate.

Example 2

Pat is a divorced GST/HST credit and CAIP recipient who has no eligible children. Pat died on February 28, 2022. Pat’s mother called to tell us of her child’s death and wanted to know if the estate would continue to get Pat’s payments. The estate is not eligible for GST/HST credit or the CAIP for periods after Pat's death.

If you are moving

If you move, let us know your new address immediately. Otherwise, your payments may stop, even if you use direct deposit and your bank account does not change. You can change your address by using one of the following methods:

Other changes

Call 1-800-387-1193 to tell us, if:

Digital services for individuals

The CRA’s digital services are fast, easy, and secure!

My Account

My Account lets you view and manage your personal income tax and benefit information online. Find out how to register at My Account.

MyCRA mobile web app

The MyCRA mobile web app lets you access key portions of your tax information. Access the app at Mobile apps.

Use My Account or MyCRA to:

You can also use My Account to:

Receiving your CRA mail online

You will receive email notifications when your CRA mail, like your notice of assessment, is available in your account. You can manage your notification preferences in My Account or MyCRA.

For more information, go to Email notifications from the CRA.

MyBenefits CRA mobile app

Get your benefit information on the go! Use MyBenefits CRA mobile app throughout the year to:

For more information, go to Mobile apps.

For more information

If you need help

If you need more information after reading this guide, go to GST/HST credit or call 1-800-387-1193.

Direct deposit

Direct deposit is a fast, convenient, reliable, and secure way to get your CRA payments directly into your account at a financial institution in Canada. For more information and ways to enrol, go to Direct deposit or contact your financial institution.

Forms and publications

The CRA encourages filing your return electronically. If you need a paper version of the CRA's forms and publications, go to Forms and publications or call 1-855-330-3305.

Electronic mailing lists

The CRA can notify you by email when new information on a subject of interest to you is available on the website. To subscribe to the electronic mailing lists, go to Electronic mailing lists.

Tax Information Phone Service (TIPS)

For tax information by telephone, use our automated service, TIPS, by calling 1-800-267-6999.

Teletypewriter (TTY) users

If you have a hearing or speech impairment and use a TTY, call 1-800-665-0354.

If you use an operator-assisted relay service, call our regular telephone numbers instead of the TTY number.

CRA service feedback program

Service complaints

You can expect to be treated fairly under clear and established rules, and get a high level of service each time you deal with the CRA. For more information about the Taxpayer Bill of rights go to Taxpayer Bill of Rights.

If you are not satisfied with the service you received,

  1. Try to resolve the matter with the employee you have been dealing with or call the telephone number provided in the correspondence you received from the CRA. If you do not have contact information for the CRA, go to Contact information.
  2. If you have not been able to resolve your service-related issue, you can ask to discuss the matter with the employee’s supervisor.
  3. If the problem is still not resolved, you can file a service complaint by filling out Form RC193, Service Feedback. For more information and how to file a complaint, go to Submit a service feedback.

If you are not satisfied with how the CRA has handled your service-related complaint, you can submit a complaint with the Office of the Taxpayers' Ombudsperson.

Formal disputes (objections and appeals)

If you disagree with an assessment, determination or decision, you have the right to file a formal dispute.

For more information about objections or formal disputes, and related deadlines go to Service feedback, objections, appeals, disputes, and relief measures.

Reprisal complaint

If you have previously submitted a service-related complaint or requested a formal review of a CRA decision and feel you were not treated impartially by a CRA employee, you can submit a reprisal complaint by filling out Form RC459, Reprisal Complaint.

For more information about reprisal complaints, go to Complaints, objections, appeals, disputes, and relief measures.

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