Guide 0104 A1 – Home Child Care Provider and Home Support Worker pilots: Gaining experience category – Application for permanent residence and an occupation-restricted open work permit from outside Canada

The Home Support Worker Pilot is open to new applications

You can still apply under the new 2022 cap for the Home Support Worker Pilot. In 2022, we’ll accept up to 2,750 applications for this pilot.

The Home Child Care Provider Pilot is closed to new applications

As of Monday, January 17, 2022, we received at least 2,750 applications under this pilot. This means

  • the pilot is closed to new applications for 2022
  • we’ll return any other applications we receive and refund the fees.

The pilot will reopen to new applications on January 1, 2023. You can also look into other options for caregivers in Canada.

If you already applied

You don’t need to contact us about your application. We’ll send you a notification letter as soon as possible to confirm we received your application. It may take longer than usual for you to get this letter due to the COVID-19 pandemic.


This is not a legal document. The explanations and definitions are not legal definitions. In case of a discrepancy between the language in this document and the relevant legislation or regulations, the legal text in the legislation and regulations prevails.

For legal information, see the:

This information will help you complete the forms and guide you through the application process.

Before you apply

Use this guide to apply for permanent residence through the Home Child Care Provider Pilot (HCCP) or Home Support Worker Pilot (HSW).

You can use this application package if:  

  • you are submitting an application from outside Canada; or
  • you are in Canada as a visitor, but you are not eligible to apply for a work permit from inside Canada

Read the complete guide and then fill out each of the required forms.

This instruction guide:

  • has information you must know before you submit your application, and
  • explains how to fill out the forms and gather your supporting documents.

Note: It is very important to include the right application forms and pay the right fees. If you don’t, your application could be rejected as incomplete and you or your family members may lose status in Canada.

Symbols used in this guide

This guide uses these symbols to draw your attention to important information:

Required step

What you must do to have your application processed.

Important information

Important information that you must know to avoid delays or other problems.

Important information

Where to get more information.


Biometric (fingerprints and photo) requirements

You and your family members may need to appear in person to have their fingerprints and photograph (biometric information) taken at a biometric collection service point.

Canadian citizens and existing permanent residents of Canada are exempt from giving biometrics.

As of December 3, 2019, you need to give biometrics when you apply from within Canada. You can go to a designated Service Canada location.

Find out if you need to give biometrics.

If you have to give biometrics, you can give them after you:

  • pay for and submit your application and biometric fees, and
  • get a Biometric Instruction Letter (BIL) which will direct you to a list of biometric collection service points you may choose from

You must bring the BIL with you to the biometric collection service point to give your biometrics.

We encourage you to give your biometrics as soon as possible after getting the BIL. We’ll start processing your application after we get your biometrics.

Where to give your biometrics

You need to book an appointment to give your biometrics at one of these official biometric collection service points.


Family member definitions

Your family members include your spouse or common-law partner, your dependent children and any children that are their dependent children.

Spouse

Refers to either of the two persons (opposite or same gender) in a marriage legally recognized in the country in which it took place, as well as in Canada.

Important information

Proxy, telephone, fax, internet and similar forms of marriage where one or both parties were not physically present are not considered as valid spousal relationships under the Regulations. For more information, consult our policy on the legality of a marriage.

Common-law partner
Refers to a person who is living in a conjugal relationship with another person (opposite or same gender), and has done so continuously for a period of at least one year. A conjugal relationship exists when there is a significant degree of commitment between two people.

This can be shown with evidence that the couple share the same home, support each other financially and emotionally, have children together, or present themselves in public as a couple.

Common-law partners who have been in a conjugal relationship for at least one year but are unable to live together or appear in public together because of legal restrictions in their home country or who have been separated for reasons beyond their control (for example, civil war or armed conflict) may still qualify and should be included on the application.

Dependent children

We assess your child’s eligibility as a dependant based on how old they were at a specific point in time, called the lock-in date. This is usually the date we received your application. To see if your child qualifies as a dependant, we consider the age of your child on the lock-in date, even though your child’s age may change during processing.

Your child or the child of your spouse or common-law partner can be considered a dependent child if that child meets the requirements below on the lock-in date:

  • They’re under 22 years old, and
  • They don’t have a spouse or common-law partner

Children 22 years old or older qualify as dependants if they meet both of these requirements:

  • They have depended on their parents for financial support since before the age of 22, and
  • They are unable to financially support themselves because of a mental or physical condition

With the exception of age, dependants must continue to meet these requirements until we finish processing your application.

Not sure if your child is a dependant? Check if your child qualifies by answering a few questions.

If your child’s age was locked in on or before October 23, 2017, a previous definition of dependent children may apply.

Dependent child of a dependent child
Refers to children of dependent children of the applicant and those of the spouse or common-law partner, if applicable.

Do you intend to reside in Quebec?

If you intend to reside in the province of Quebec, you do not qualify to apply under these pilots.

To be eligible for these pilots, you must show that you intend to reside as permanent residents in a province other than Quebec.


Step 1: Make sure you are eligible

What are the requirements?

Your application to immigrate to Canada under either the Home Child Care Provider Pilot or Home Support Worker Pilot will be assessed against the following four requirements:

1. Job offer

You must have a job offer that meets all of these requirements:

  • The job offer was made using the Offer of Employment form [IMM 5983] (PDF, 2.18 MB)
  • Is genuine and likely to be valid when you are issued your work permit
  • The job offer was made by a single Canadian employer (excluding an embassy, high commission or consulate) for a position outside the province of Quebec
  • The job must be non-seasonal and for full-time employment, meaning you’ll work at least 30 paid hours per week
  • The job must be in a NOC 4411 (Home child care provider) or NOC 4412 (Home support worker) occupation, depending on which pilot you apply for

Note: You may live in your employer’s home, but it is not a requirement.

Note: For the Home Child Care Provider Pilot you must have provided in-home care to children under the age of 18 in an occupation listed under NOC 4411, other than a foster parent. For the Home Support Worker Pilot, you must have provided in-home care to adult(s) in an occupation listed under NOC 4412, other than as a housekeeper.

You must submit the job offer with your application for permanent residence. Your employer must complete this form and send you a copy to include with your application. Your employer and you must read and sign the declaration at the bottom of the form.

In addition, you must submit a work permit application together with your permanent residence application.

You must meet employment requirements for the job you are offered. You can find these requirements in the NOC.

Ability to perform the work

An officer will assess if you’re able to perform the work described in the lead statement of your eligible occupation, as set out in the occupational descriptions of the National Occupational Classification (NOC). Refer to the Document Checklist – Home Child Care Provider and Home Support Worker [IMM 5981] (PDF, 3.39 MB) for more information on what you need to provide as proof of ability.

2. Proficiency in English or French

You must have a level of proficiency of at least benchmark level 5 in either official language for all four language skill areas, as set out in the Canadian Language Benchmarks or the Niveaux de compétence linguistique canadiens.

You must prove your ability in English or French in these four areas:

  • listening,
  • speaking,
  • reading, and
  • writing.
Proof of language proficiency

To prove that you meet the required level of language proficiency in all four language skill areas, you must include a copy of the results of one of the following language tests designated by IRCC with your application:

English
French

Language proficiency test

You must take a language proficiency test offered by an organization or institution designated by IRCC before submitting your application.

Your test results must be less than two years old at the time that we receive your application.

  • Make arrangements to take a designated language proficiency test and pay the test costs.
  • Refer to the language test scoring grids to confirm that your test results meet the language proficiency requirement.
  • Submit a copy of the test results with your application.
  • Keep a copy of your language proficiency test results for your records and future use.

Note: Designated language test results will be used as proof of whether you meet the language proficiency requirement.

3. One-year post-secondary education

You must have at least a completed Canadian one-year post-secondary educational credential (or an equivalent foreign credential).

To prove that you meet the required level of education, you must submit with your application evidence of:

  • a completed Canadian educational credential of at least one year of post-secondary studies,

    or

  • a completed foreign educational credential and an Educational Credential Assessment (ECA) report issued by an organization designated by IRCC, if your educational credential was obtained outside Canada.

Note: The ECA report must indicate that your completed foreign educational credential is equivalent to at least a completed Canadian one-year post-secondary educational credential.

Proof of foreign educational credential equivalency

You must have your foreign educational credentials assessed by an organization designated by IRCC and obtain an ECA report before submitting your application.

Your ECA report must have been issued on or after the date the organization was designated by IRCC. Your ECA report must be less than five years old on the date that we receive your application.

You need to:

  1. make arrangements to obtain an ECA report for your completed foreign educational credential(s) from an organization designated by IRCC and pay the assessment costs.
  2. refer to Appendix B to confirm that the outcome stated on your ECA report matches at least one of the assessment outcomes identified in the list.
  3. submit the a copy of the ECA report with your application along with proof of your completed foreign educational credential(s) (examples of proof of your completed foreign educational credential(s) can include copies of your diplomas/degrees, transcripts, etc).
  4. keep a copy of your ECA report for your records and future use.

Note: The ECA report and proof of your completed foreign educational credential(s) will be used as proof of whether you meet the post-secondary education requirement.

4. Qualifying Canadian work experience

This section will be assessed after you have obtained your occupation-restricted open work permit.

If you meet the permanent residence eligibility criteria (i.e. education, official language, offer of employment and ability to perform the work) to qualify for either the Home Child Care Provider Pilot or the Home Support Worker Pilot and you’re admissible to Canada, you’ll be issued an occupation-restricted open work permit so that you can start or continue to gain your eligible Canadian work experience. In order to continue to qualify for either of these pilots, you’ll need to obtain, and provide proof of, at least 24 months of qualifying full-time Canadian work experience within the 36 month period after this work permit was issued. Full-time work means at least 30 hours of work, per week, for which wages are paid and/or commission is earned.

Note: Some applicants may already have some, but less than 24 months, of qualifying Canadian work experience when they receive an occupation-restricted open work permit. They can count this experience toward the 24 month requirement, as long as they show that their combined 24 months of experience was acquired in the 36 month period before their proof was submitted.

Complete Schedule 19b and refer to the Document Checklist – Home Child Care Provider and Home Support Worker [IMM 5981] (PDF, 3.39 MB) for more information on what you need to provide as proof.

Send us your proof of qualifying work experience within the appropriate 36 months period and Schedule 19b by mail to the Case Processing Centre in Edmonton, Alberta (CPC-E), or through our web form.

Note: Do not send this form with your applications for permanent residence and your work permit. Only send us this form once you have acquired the 24 months of qualifying work experience.

Any periods of self-employment or periods of employment during which you were engaged in full-time study (e.g. work experience gained on a co-op, off-campus or on-campus work permit) will not be included when calculating your work experience.

To qualify, your work experience must have been obtained in one of the following occupations listed in the Canadian National Occupational Classification (NOC) system:

  • Home child care providers (NOC 4411).

    Note: You must have provided in-home care to children under the age of 18 in an occupation listed under NOC 4411, other than a foster parent.

  • Home support worker or related occupation (NOC 4412).

    Note: You must have provided in-home care to adult(s) in an occupation listed under NOC 4412, other than as a housekeeper.

The care provided could have been in your own home or your employer’s home. You don’t need to have lived in your employer’s home to qualify.

Determining whether you have qualifying work experience

The NOC is a system used by the Government of Canada to classify occupations and group them based on the types of job duties and the types of work a person does.

Follow these steps to determine if you have qualifying work experience under this Class:

  1. Go to the NOC website.
  2. Go to the “Quick Search” located in the bottom, left-hand side of the website.
  3. Enter the following four-digit NOC code: 4411 or 4412.
  4. Make sure the initial description and list of main duties match what you did in your job.
Proof of qualifying work experience

For the work experience you claim in your application, you must demonstrate you performed:

  • the actions identified in the initial lead statement of the NOC description (NOC 4411 if you are applying for the Home Child Care Provider Pilot or NOC 4412 if you are applying for the Home Support Worker Pilot), and
  • most of the main duties, including all the essential duties, listed in the NOC description

This means that you performed some or all of the main duties, including all the duties that separate your actual job from any other. For example, duties that begin with “may” in the NOC description are not usually considered to be essential duties.

Note: Your work experience does not need to be continuous to qualify, but your 24 months of authorized full-time work experience must not include:

  • any extended absence from Canada (including any time worked for an employer outside Canada),
  • periods of unemployment,
  • long-term sickness or parental leave.

A reasonable period of vacation time will be counted towards meeting the work experience requirement (e.g. a two-week period of paid vacation in or outside of Canada within a given 52-week period).

Note: If you are applying for the Home Child Care Provider Pilot or Home Support Worker Pilot with proof of qualifying Canadian work experience, you are not required to provide us with a job offer from a Canadian employer.

Step 2. Gather your documents

What documents are required?

Use the Document Checklist below to make sure you have included all of the required documents and forms.

Document Checklist – Home Child Care Provider or Home Support Worker [IMM 5981] (PDF, 3.39 MB)

Your application will be returned if any documents are missing or if copies are not clear or legible. We may ask for more information at any time during the application process.

Important: If you can’t provide one or more documents required on the document checklist, you must provide:

  • a written explanation for each missing document
  • any evidence to explain why you won’t be able to get the document, or why you can’t get it right now.

Upload them in the portal as the “document type” that we asked for on the checklist.

We will decide whether your application still needs to be returned to you as incomplete.


Translation of documents

You must submit the following for any document that is not in English or French, unless otherwise stated on your document checklist:

  • the English or French translation; and
  • an affidavit from the person who completed the translation (if they’re not a certified translator); and
  • a certified copy of the original document.

small exclamation warning signImportant information: Translations must not be done by the applicants themselves nor by an applicant’s parent, guardian, sibling, spouse, common-law partner, conjugal partner, grandparent, child, aunt, uncle, niece, nephew or first cousin.

If the translation is not done by a certified translator (a member in good standing of a provincial or territorial association of translators and interpreters in Canada), you must submit an affidavit swearing to the accuracy of the translation and the language proficiency of the translator.

An affidavit is a document on which the translator has sworn, in the presence of a person authorized to administer oaths in the country where the translator is living, that the contents of their translation are a true translation and representation of the contents of the original document.

Translators who are certified in Canada don’t need to supply an affidavit.

The affidavit must be sworn in the presence of:

In Canada:

  • a notary public
  • a commissioner of oaths
  • a commissioner of taking affidavits

Authority to certify varies by province and territory. Consult your local provincial or territorial authorities.

Outside of Canada:

  • a notary public

Authority to administer oaths varies by country. Consult your local authorities.


Certified true copies

To have a photocopy of a document certified, an authorized person must compare the original document to the photocopy and must print all of the following on the photocopy:

  • “I certify that this is a true copy of the original document”
  • the name of the original document
  • the date of the certification
  • their name
  • their official position or title
  • their signature

Who can certify copies?

Only authorized people can certify copies.

Important information: Certifying of copies must not be done by the applicants themselves nor by an applicant’s parent, guardian, sibling, spouse, common-law partner, conjugal partner, grandparent, child, aunt, uncle, niece, nephew or first cousin.

People authorized to certify copies include the following:

In Canada:

  • a notary public
  • a commissioner of oaths
  • a commissioner of taking affidavits

Authority to certify varies by province and territory. Check with your local provincial or territorial authorities to learn who has the authority to certify.

Outside Canada:

  • a notary public

Authority to certify international documents varies by country. Check with your local authorities to learn who has the authority to certify in your country.


Medical requirements

Do not undergo an immigration medical exam unless we advise you to do so. A medical exam will be required and you’ll will receive instructions after you submit your application.

All your family members who are not already Canadian citizens or permanent residents must undergo and pass an immigration medical exam, even if your family members will not be processed for permanent residence with your application. Family members who do not undergo and pass a medical exam will not be eligible to be sponsored at a later date. Your family members will be contacted by the visa office in their area with instructions on their medical exams.


Police certificates

If you and your family members are 18 years of age and older and aren’t permanent residents or Canadian citizens, you must provide a valid police certificate for any country other than Canada in which you spent 6 or more months in a row since the age of 18.

Note: You do not need to provide a police certificate from a country if you or your family members were under 18 years of age the entire time you lived in that country.

If the original certificate isn’t in English or French, you must get an accredited translator to translate it. You must include both the police certificate and the translation.

We’ll also do our own background checks to see if there are reasons why you or your family members may not be admissible to Canada.

For specific and up-to-date information, see our guide on where to get a police certificate.


Step 3. Fill in your forms

Sign in or create an account in our Permanent Residence Portal (opens in a new tab) .

Some forms must be filled through a web form, others are PDFs that you will have to upload.

You must fill out these digital forms online

You’ll answer the questions directly in your web browser (for yourself, and any family members 18 or older). We will not accept the PDF versions.

You must also fill out these PDF forms and upload them to your online application

 Note: If you have visitor status in Canada that is about to expire, and you are not eligible to apply for a work permit from inside Canada, you must also apply to change the conditions or extend your stay in Canada(opens in a new tab)  as a visitor. You must submit the application to change conditions or extend your stay separately from this application.

Submitting work and study permit forms online

  • upload your work permit form under Upload required supporting documentation
  • choose Other as the document type

Follow the same steps if you need to submit work or study permit forms for your family as well.

Depending on your situation, you may need to submit

  • Statutory Declaration of Common-law Union (IMM 5409

Download the form (PDF, 636.51 KB). Get the instructions

If you want to appoint someone to do business with us on your behalf, you must submit

  • a Use of a Representative form (IMM 5476)
  • sign it (digitally or by hand) and get your immigration representative to do so also
  • upload it with your application

Download the form (PDF, 648.31 KB). Get the instructions

Note: If a paid representative is submitting your application online on your behalf, they must sign in to their Representative Portal account to do so. You need to review and electronically sign the application declaration in the client portal.

If you want to allow us to release information from your application to anyone else (other than a representative),  you must submit

Forms for your family members

Accompanying spouses, common-law partners and dependent children may be eligible to apply for a work permit, study permit or temporary resident visa. They can complete the appropriate forms, and submit them with your permanent residence application.

Open work permit: for spouses, common-law partners and dependent children who are at the age of majority (check the age of majority in your province or territory of destination)

Note: Family members who have visitor status in Canada that is about to expire, and who are not eligible to apply for a work permit from inside Canada, must also apply to change conditions or extend their stay in Canada (opens in a new tab)  as a visitor. They must submit the application to change condition or extend their stay separately from this application.

Study permit: for spouses, common-law partners and school-age children

Note: Family members who have visitor status in Canada that is about to expire, and who are not eligible to apply for a study permit from inside Canada, must also apply to change conditions or extend their stay in Canada (opens in a new tab)  as a visitor. They must submit the application to change conditions or extend their stay separately from this application.

Temporary resident visa: for family members outside Canada who are from visa-required countries, including dependent children not attending school, and not applying for a work permit or study permit.

Electronic Travel Authorization (eTA): If your family members are from a visa-exempt country, they can apply for their Electronic Travel Authorization at a later time before travelling to Canada.

Submitting temporary resident forms separately from the PR application

If you want to submit temporary resident applications for your family members later on in the process, you can still do so online, but only when:

  • you have received a letter confirming that we received your permanent residence application (acknowledgement of receipt letter), and
  • it includes your application number that starts with an E

We don’t accept:

  • letters of receipt of permanent residence application with a temporary application number (starting with an X), or
  • automated email notifications of submission in the PR portal

Follow the instructions on the IRCC website but make sure you also upload a copy of the acknowledgement of receipt letter as a supporting document.

Filling out the application

Follow the step-by-step instructions below to complete the application forms. For details about the signature requirements for each form, check out How to apply (opens in a new tab)

small exclamation warning signIt is a serious offence to give false or misleading information on these forms. The information you provide on your application is subject to verification.


Be complete and accurate

Complete all sections of the forms. If a section does not apply to you, write “Not Applicable” or “NA”.

If you need more space for any section, include an additional page containing the appropriate section, complete it and upload it with your application. For the document type, choose “other”.

If signatures are missing (when this applies) or your application is incomplete, we will return it to you without processing it.


Generic Application Form for Canada (IMM 0008)

Who must fill out this application form?

This form must be completed by:

  • you, the principal applicant

Completing the form

You’ll fill out and submit the Generic Application Form for Canada (IMM 0008) online. You don’t need to print and sign by hand. Please follow the instructions below to ensure the form is properly completed.

You must answer all questions on this application form unless otherwise indicated.

You also have the option of saving your form and completing it later.

Read and follow the steps below to help you fill out the form.


Application Details

Language preference

From the list, select your preferred language for:

  1. correspondence (any letters or emails we send you)
  2. interview: if your native language is not in this list, select “other”
  3. interpreter requested: you must select “yes” if you do not select English or French for the interview
Where do you plan to live in Canada?

If you plan to live in the Province of Quebec and haven’t received your Certificat de Sélection du Québec (CSQ), enter the date when you applied for it. If you haven’t applied yet, you must do so before applying for permanent residence.


Personal Details

Family name

Family name is also known as last name or surname.

Note: If you are a parent of a child to be adopted in Canada whose details you don’t know yet (and you’re filling this form out on their behalf), enter your family name(s).


Given name

Given names are also known as first name and middle name. Do not use initials.

Note: If you are a parent of a child to be adopted in Canada whose details you don’t know yet (and you’re filling this form out on their behalf), enter your family name(s). For given name(s) enter “Child” or leave the given name field blank.


Physical characteristics - sex

If you choose “X” for gender, you need to complete the Request for a Change of Sex or Gender Identifier (PDF, 1.6 MB) form and send it with your application if

  • your foreign travel document or passport does not have the X gender identifier (or an equivalent non-binary option)
  • you have or have had a Canadian temporary resident document with a different gender identifier, including a
    • visa
    • electronic travel authorization
    • work permit or
    • study permit

You don’t need any supporting documents.

Note: If you are a parent of a child to be adopted in Canada whose details you don’t know yet, select U – Unknown.


Physical characteristics - Eye colour

If you are a parent of a child to be adopted in Canada whose details you don’t know yet, select “Other.”


Birth information - Date of birth

If you don’t know your complete date of birth, write 1901/01/01 in the fields fill in the spaces for the unknown year, month or day. Include a letter of explanation saying why you used this date.


Birth information - Place of birth

As shown in your passport or your travel document.

Note: If you are a parent of a child to be adopted in Canada whose details you don’t know yet, indicate “Unknown” for the city or town and select the country where you plan to adopt a child.


Citizenship(s)

If you aren’t a citizen of any country, choose “stateless.”

If you are a citizen of more than one country, choose your other country of citizenship in the second field.

Note: If you are a parent of a child to be adopted in Canada whose details you don’t know yet, select the country where you intend to adopt a child.


Current country of residence

You must be in this country legally.

For refugee claimants in Canada only: select Canada whether you have been lawfully admitted or not.


If you’ve lost your status
  • for “Status,” choose “Other”
  • in the details field, enter “Out of status, requires restoration”
  • leave the “From” and “To” fields blank

Note: If you are a parent of a child to be adopted in Canada whose details you don’t know yet, select the country where you plan to adopt a child and “Citizen” as the immigration status in that country.


Previous countries of residence

This means you lived in the country for 6 months total, not just in a row.

If you chose “Other” as a status, try to provide as much detail and an explanation as to why you are out of status.


Marital and relationship status

You’re single if you’ve never been married and are not in a common-law relationship.

You’re married if you and your spouse have had a ceremony that legally binds you to each other. Your marriage must be legally recognized in the country where it was performed and in Canada.

You’re common-law if you’ve lived continuously with your partner in a marital-type relationship for 1 year or more.

You’re divorced if you are officially separated and have legally ended your marriage.

You’re legally separated if you’re still legally married but no longer living with your spouse.

You’re widowed if your spouse has died and that you have not re-married or entered into a common-law relationship.

An annulled marriage has been legally declared as not valid. An annulment can also be a declaration by the Catholic Church that the marriage was not binding.

  • Family name is also known as last name or surname.
  • Given names are also known as first name and middle name. Do not use initials.
  • If you’re in a common-law relationship, enter the date (year, month and day) you began living together.
  • If you’re legally separated or divorced, enter the date you were no longer living together.

Note: If you are a parent of a child to be adopted in Canada whose details you don’t know yet, select “Single.”


Contact Information

Current mailing address

  • Post office box (P.O. box) number: If you don’t enter a post office box, you must enter your street number
  • Street number (no.): The number on your house or apartment building. You must enter a street number if you didn’t enter a P.O. box

All correspondence will be mailed to this address unless you include your email address.

If you want a representative to do business with us on your behalf, you must provide their address in this section and on the Use of a Representative (IMM 5476) form.

For more information, read the Use of a Representative guide.


Email address

Use this format: name@provider.net

By entering your email address, you authorize IRCC to transmit your file and personal information to this specific email.


Passport

Passport/travel document number (exactly as shown on your passport or travel document)

If you have more than one passport, choose the one you’ll use to travel to Canada.

Most people will need a passport to travel to Canada. If you’re approved to come here, you’ll need to get one.

A travel document is an identity document issued by a government or international organization (like the United Nations). It has a photo and personal information, and let the holder travel between countries. If you have a passport, you don’t need a travel document.

Issue/expiry dates

You can find this information on the page in your passport that shows your photo and date of birth (also called the biodata page)


National Identity Document

A national identity document is an identity card with a photo which is issued by a government or official authority, and can be used as identification inside the country that issued it. It may also be known as "ID," "ID card," "identity card," "citizen card" or "passport card."

Document number

Enter your national identity document number exactly as shown on the identity document. Make sure there is no space between each number or letter.


Education/Occupation Details

Highest level of education

  1. None: No education.
  2. Secondary or less: High school diploma obtained after elementary school and before college, university, or other formal training.
  3. Trade/apprenticeship certificate/diploma: Diploma completed in a specific trade, such as carpentry or auto mechanics.
  4. Non-university certificate/diploma: Training in a profession that requires formal education but not at the university level (for example, dental technician or engineering technician).
  5. Post-secondary – no degree: Post-secondary studies at a college or university but no degree earned.
  6. Bachelor’s degree: Academic degree awarded by a college or university to those who have completed an undergraduate curriculum. Also called a baccalaureate. Examples include a Bachelor of Arts, Science or Education.
  7. Post graduate – no degree: Post-graduate studies at a college or university but no degree earned (Master or PhD).
  8. Master’s degree: Academic degree awarded by a graduate school of a college or university. You must have completed a Bachelor’s degree before you can earn a Master’s degree.
  9. Doctorate – PhD: Highest university degree, usually based on at least 3 years of graduate studies and a thesis. Normally, you must have completed a Master’s degree before you can earn a PhD.

Current occupation

If you don’t work, enter “not employed.”

Intended occupation

If you aren’t planning to work in Canada (for example, if you’re retired), enter “none.”


Language Details

Native language/mother tongue

This is the language that you learned at home during your childhood and that you still understand. If your native language is not in this list, choose “Other.”

Note: If you are a parent of a child to be adopted in Canada whose details you don’t know yet, choose the native language of the country where you plan to adopt a child.

Test from a designated testing agency to assess English or French

Approved testing agencies include:

  • IELTS
  • CELPIP
  • TEF
  • TCF

Dependant’s Personal Details

Select the box to tell us if your dependant will accompany you to Canada.

If you answered “No,” explain why your dependant is non-accompanying.


Dependant’s relationship to the principal applicant

Select your dependant’s relationship to you, the principal applicant:

  • Adopted Child
  • Child
  • Common-Law Partner
  • Grandchild
  • Other
  • Spouse
  • Step-Child
  • Step-Grandchild
  • “Other”

Dependant type

Type A

The dependant is under the age of 22 and single (not married and not in a common-law relationship).

Type B (Important: This dependant type applies only if your child’s age was locked in before August 1, 2014)

The dependant has been continuously enrolled in and in attendance as a full-time student at a post-secondary institution accredited by the relevant government authority and has depended substantially on the financial support of a parent since before the age of 22.

Type C

The dependant is 22 years of age or older, has depended substantially on the financial support of a parent since before the age of 22, and is unable to provide for themselves because of a medical condition.

Not sure which type of dependant your child is? Check if your child qualifies as a dependant by answering a few questions.


Family name

Family name is also known as last name or surname.

Note: If you are a parent of a child to be adopted in Canada whose details you don’t know yet (and you’re filling this form out on their behalf), enter your family name(s).


Given name

Given names are also known as first name and middle name. Do not use initials.

Note: If you are a parent of a child to be adopted in Canada whose details you don’t know yet (and you’re filling this form out on their behalf), enter your family name(s). For given name(s) enter “Child” or leave the given name field blank.


Physical characteristics - sex

If you choose “X” for gender, you need to complete the Request for a Change of Sex or Gender Identifier (PDF, 1.6 MB) form and send it with your application if

  • your foreign travel document or passport does not have the X gender identifier (or an equivalent non-binary option)
  • you have or have had a Canadian temporary resident document with a different gender identifier, including a
    • visa
    • electronic travel authorization
    • work permit or
    • study permit

You don’t need any supporting documents.

Note: If you are a parent of a child to be adopted in Canada whose details you don’t know yet, select U – Unknown.


Physical characteristics - Eye colour

If you are a parent of a child to be adopted in Canada whose details you don’t know yet, select “Other.”


Birth information - Date of birth

If you don’t know your complete date of birth, enter 1901/01/01 to fill in the spaces for the unknown year, month or day. Include a letter of explanation.


Birth information - Place of birth

As shown in your passport or your travel document.

Note: If you are a parent of a child to be adopted in Canada whose details you don’t know yet, indicate “Unknown” for the city or town and select the country where you plan to adopt a child.


Citizenship(s)

If you aren’t a citizen of any country, choose “stateless.”

If you are a citizen of more than one country, choose your other country of citizenship in the second field.

Note: If you are a parent of a child to be adopted in Canada whose details you don’t know yet, select the country where you intend to adopt a child.


Current country of residence

You must be in this country legally.

For refugee claimants in Canada only: select Canada whether you have been lawfully admitted or not.


If you’ve lost your status
  • for “Status,” choose “Other”
  • in the details field, enter “Out of status, requires restoration”
  • leave the “From” and “To” fields blank

Note: If you are a parent of a child to be adopted in Canada whose details you don’t know yet, select the country where you plan to adopt a child and “Citizen” as the immigration status in that country.


Previous countries of residence

This means you lived in the country for 6 months total, not just in a row.

If you chose “Other” as a status, try to provide as much detail and an explanation as to why you are out of status.


Marital and relationship status

You’re single if you’ve never been married and are not in a common-law relationship.

You’re married if you and your spouse have had a ceremony that legally binds you to each other. Your marriage must be legally recognized in the country where it was performed and in Canada.

You’re common-law if you’ve lived continuously with your partner in a marital-type relationship for 1 year or more.

You’re divorced if you are officially separated and have legally ended your marriage.

You’re legally separated if you’re married but no longer living with your spouse.

You’re widowed if your spouse has died and that you have not re-married or entered into a common-law relationship.

An annulled marriage has been legally declared as not valid. An annulment can also be a declaration by the Catholic Church that the marriage was not binding.

  • Family name is also known as last name or surname.
  • Given names are also known as first name and middle name. Do not use initials.
  • If you’re in a common-law relationship, enter the date (year, month and day) you began living together.
  • If you’re legally separated or divorced, enter the date you were no longer living together.

Note: If you are a parent of a child to be adopted in Canada whose details you don’t know yet, select “Single.”


Passport

Passport/travel document number (exactly as shown on your passport or travel document)

If you have more than one passport, choose the one you’ll use to travel to Canada.

Most people will need a passport to travel to Canada. If you’re approved to come here, you’ll need to get one.

A travel document is an identity document issued by a government or international organization (like the United Nations). It has a photo and personal information, and let the holder travel between countries. If you have a passport, you don’t need a travel document.

Issue/expiry dates

You can find this information on the page in your passport that shows your photo and date of birth (also called the biodata page)


National Identity Document

A national identity document is an identity card with a photo which is issued by a government or official authority, and can be used as identification inside the country that issued it. It may also be known as "ID," "ID card," "identity card," "citizen card" or "passport card."

Document number

Enter their national identity document number exactly as shown on the document. Make sure there is no space between each number or letter.


Education/Occupation Details

Highest level of education

  1. None: No education.
  2. Secondary or less: High school diploma obtained after elementary school and before college, university, or other formal training.
  3. Trade/apprenticeship certificate/diploma: Diploma completed in a specific trade, such as carpentry or auto mechanics.
  4. Non-university certificate/diploma: Training in a profession that requires formal education but not at the university level (for example, dental technician or engineering technician).
  5. Post-secondary – no degree: Post-secondary studies at a college or university but no degree earned.
  6. Bachelor’s degree: Academic degree awarded by a college or university to those who have completed an undergraduate curriculum. Also called a baccalaureate. Examples include a Bachelor of Arts, Science or Education.
  7. Post graduate – no degree: Post-graduate studies at a college or university but no degree earned (Master or PhD).
  8. Master’s degree: Academic degree awarded by a graduate school of a college or university. You must have completed a Bachelor’s degree before you can earn a Master’s degree.
  9. Doctorate – PhD: Highest university degree, usually based on at least 3 years of graduate studies and a thesis. Normally, you must have completed a Master’s degree before you can earn a PhD.

Current occupation

If your dependant doesn’t work, enter “not employed.”

Intended occupation

If your dependant isn’t planning to work in Canada (for example, if they are younger than working age), enter “none.”


Language Details

Native language/mother tongue

This is the language that they learned at home during their childhood and they still understand. If their native language does not appear in this list, select “Other.”

Test from a designated testing agency to assess English or French

Approved testing agencies include:

  • IELTS
  • CELPIP
  • TEF
  • TCF

Consent and Declaration of Applicant

  1. Follow the instructions at the bottom of the online application to view the declaration.
  2. Read all of the statements in all sections carefully and
    1. check the yes/no buttons to show if you agree that the information in this application about your intended occupation, education and work experience may be shared with prospective employers to help them hire workers
    2. type your name in the blue field

By typing your name, you’re signing the application electronically. By doing so, you certify that you fully understand the questions asked, and the information you provided is complete, truthful, and correct. You can’t submit your application online unless you sign it.


Application for Work Permit Made Outside of Canada (IMM 1295)

Who must fill out this application form?

Each person who needs a work permit must fill out this form.


Note

Fill out the form

You must answer all the questions on this form unless instructed otherwise.

Download and fill out the form on a computer.

You also have the option to save your form and fill it out later.

Note: Filling out the form on a computer is easier and reduces mistakes that can slow down the application process.

Read and follow the questions below to help you fill out the form.

Question 1

Type your universal client identification number (UCI), if known. Otherwise, leave it blank. If this is your first time dealing with IRCC you will not have a UCI.

Question 2

Choose your preferred language of service (English or French).

Personal Details

Question 1
Full name

Type your family name (surname) exactly as shown on your passport or travel document (even if the name is misspelled). Do not use initials.

Note: If you do not have a family name on your passport or travel document, enter all your given names here and leave the given name field blank.

Type all of your given names (first, second, or more) exactly as shown on your passport or travel document (even if the name is misspelled). Do not use initials.

Note: If you do not have a given name on your passport or travel document, leave this field blank. Do not enter “*”, “Not applicable” or “NA”.

Question 2
Nick names or Alias

Check the box to tell us if you have ever used any other name. This could include your birth name, maiden name, married name, nick name, etc.

If you checked “Yes”, type any other family name that you have ever used.

If you checked “Yes”, type any other given name (first, second, or more) that you have ever used.

Question 3

Choose your gender (F-Female, M-Male or X-Another gender).

Note: If you choose a gender identifier that is different than what you currently have or have had on your Canadian temporary resident document (visa, electronic travel authorization, work permit, study permit or visitor record), you need to complete the Request for a Change of Sex or Gender Identifier form and send it with your application. If you’ve never had a Canadian temporary resident document but you intend to apply for one and you identify with a gender that is different than what appears on your foreign travel document or passport, you also need to complete the Request for a Change of Sex or Gender Identifier form and send it with your application. No supporting documents are required.

Question 4

Enter your date of birth. If your entire date of birth is unknown, please use ‘*’ (star sign or asterisk) to fill in the spaces for the year, month or day, where applicable.

Question 5

Note, if your city, town, or country or territory of birth is indicated in your passport or your travel document, please record it as it appears in the document.

Question 6

Choose your country or territory of citizenship. To be a citizen of a country or territory means that you were either born in that country or territory (in most cases) or have been granted citizenship by that country or territory. If you are a citizen of more than one country or territory, choose the country or territory that issued the passport you will be using for this trip.

Question 7

Choose the correct information:

  • The name of the country or territory you live in, if you have been lawfully admitted to that country or territory.
  • Your immigration status in that country or territory (choose one of the following):
    • Citizen
    • Permanent resident
    • Visitor
    • Worker
    • Student
    • Other
    • Protected Person
    • Refugee Claimant
  • Other: You must fill out this section if you chose “Other” as a status.
  • The dates (From – To) you have been living in your country or territory of residence.
Question 8

Check the box to tell us if during the past five years, you have lived in any other country or territory other than your country of citizenship or your current country or territory of residence (indicated above) for more than six months?

If you checked “Yes”, choose the correct information:

  • The name of the country or territory you lived in,
  • Your immigration status for the time you were in that country or territory:
    • Citizen
    • Permanent resident
    • Visitor
    • Worker
    • Student
    • Other
    • Protected Person
    • Refugee Claimant
  • Other: You must fill out this section if you chose “Other” as a status.
  • The dates (From – To) you were living in that country or territory.
Question 9

Check the box to tell us if you are applying from the country or territory you live in.

If you checked “No”, choose the correct information:

  • The name of the country or territory where you are applying from,
  • Your immigration status in that country or territory by choosing one of the following:
    • Citizen
    • Permanent resident
    • Visitor
    • Worker
    • Student
    • Other
    • Protected Person
    • Refugee Claimant
  • Other: You must fill out this section if you chose “Other” as a status.
  • The dates (From – To) that you have been living in that country or territory.

If you are not a citizen of the country or territory where you are applying, you must send proof of your legal status in the country or territory you live in when you submit your application.

Question 10
  1. Choose your current marital status:
    Annulled Marriage
    This is a marriage that is legally declared invalid. An annulment can also be a declaration by the Catholic Church that the marital union did not have a binding force.
    Common-
    Law
    This means that you have lived continuously with your partner in a marital-type relationship for a minimum of one year.
    Divorced
    This means that you are officially separated and have legally ended your marriage.
    Legally Separated
    This means that you are married, but are no longer living with your spouse.
    Married
    This means that you and your spouse have had a ceremony that legally binds you to each other. Your marriage must be legally recognized in the country where it was performed and in Canada.
    Single
    This means that you have never been married and are not in a common-law relationship.
    Widowed
    This means that your spouse has died and that you have not re-married or entered into a common-law relationship.
  2. Enter the date (year, month and day) you were married or you entered into your current common-law relationship.
  3. Type the family names and given names of your current spouse or common-law partner.

If you are in a common-law union, you must also fill out the Statutory Declaration of Common-law Union (IMM 5409) form and include it with your application. If you are married, you must send a photocopy of your marriage licence or certificate with your application.

Question 11

Check the box to tell us if you have ever been married or in a common-law relationship. If you checked “Yes”, enter:

  • All family names,
  • All given names,
  • Date of birth,
  • Type of relationship:
    • Common-law, or
    • Married.
  • Dates (From – To) for which you were in the relationship with your former spouse or common-law partner.

Languages

Question 1
  1. Choose your native language (mother tongue).
  2. If your native language is not English or French, choose the language you would most likely use.
    • Both
    • English
    • French
    • Neither
  3. Choose English, French or both as your language of communication:
    • English
    • French
    • Both
    • Neither
  4. Check Yes or No to tell us if you have taken a test from a designated testing agency to test your abilities in English or French.

Passport

Question 1

Type your valid passport or travel document number exactly as shown on the document. Make sure there is no space between each number or letter.

Question 2

From the list, select the name of the country or territory that issued your passport or travel document.

Question 3

Enter the date your passport or travel document was issued.

Question 4

Enter the date your passport or travel document will expire.

Question 5

For this trip – Check Yes or No to tell us if you are using a passport issued by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Taiwan that shows your personal identification number.

Question 6

For this trip – Check Yes or No to tell us if you are using a National Israeli passport.

National Identity Document

Question 1

Check Yes or No to tell us if you have a national identity document.

Question 2

Enter your national identity document number exactly as shown on the document.

Question 3

From the list, select the name of the country or territory that issued your national identity document.

Question 4

Enter the date your national identity document was issued.

Question 5

Enter the date your national identity document will expire.

US PR Card

Question 1

Check Yes or No to tell us if you are a lawful permanent resident of the United States.

Question 2

Enter your U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) number exactly as shown on the document.

Question 3

Enter when your U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) document will expire.

Contact Information

Question 1

Type your current mailing address (where information should be mailed). Make sure you include the following information:

  • Post Office Box (P.O. Box) number, if you have one. If you do not have a post office box number, you must type the street number.
  • Apartment (Apt.) or Unit,
  • Street number (No.). If you did not type in a P.O. Box number, you must type the street number,
  • Street name. Do not abbreviate words (Street, Avenue, Boulevard, Drive, etc.) except for directions (NW, SE, W, etc.)
  • City or Town
  • From the list, choose the country or territory of your current mailing address.
  • Province or State
  • Postal code or zip code
  • District, if it applies to you.

All correspondence will go to this address unless you give us your e-mail address.

If you wish to have a representative who can conduct business on your behalf, you must give us their email and mailing addresses in this section and fill out the Use of a Representative (IMM 5476) form.

Question 2

Check the box to tell us if the address you live at is the same as your mailing address. If “No”, type the following information:

  • Apartment (Apt.) or Unit, if it applies to you
  • Street Number (No.)
  • Street Name. Do not abbreviate words (Street, Avenue, Boulevard, Drive etc.) except for directions (NW, SE, W, etc.)
  • City or Town
  • Country or territory
  • Province or State
  • Postal Code or zip code
  • District, if it applies to you.
Question 3

Check the correct box to tell us if the telephone number is from Canada, the United States (US) or Other (any other country).

Choose the type of telephone:

  • Residence (home)
  • Cellular (cell or mobile)
  • Business (work)

Type your telephone number including the country code, area or regional codes, etc.

If you have an extension number, write it after your phone number under “Ext.”

Question 4

Check the correct box to tell us if your other telephone number is from Canada, the United States or Other (any other country).

Choose the type of telephone:

  • Residence (home)
  • Cellular (cell or mobile)
  • Business (work)

Type your telephone number including the country code, area or regional codes, etc.

If you have an extension number, write it after your phone number under “Ext.”

Question 5

Check the correct box to tell us if the facsimile (fax) number is from Canada, the United States or Other (any other country).

If you have one, type your facsimile (fax) number, including country code, area or regional codes, etc.

Question 6

If you have one, type your e-mail address using a format similar to the following: name@provider.net

Note: Make sure you check your email regularly. Any emails sent to you by IRCC will end in:

  • “@cic.gc.ca”
  • “@canada.ca” or
  • “@international.gc.ca”.

Please add these to your “safe senders” list in your email program and check the junk mail folder in case important emails get filtered. If we find that your email address does not work or no longer exists, we will communicate with you by mail. By giving us your e-mail address, you are hereby authorizing us to send your correspondence, including file and personal information electronically to this address.

Note: If you need a Temporary Resident Visa (TRV) and your work permit application is approved, you must give us your original passport so we can issue the visa counterfoil.

Details of Intended Work in Canada

Question 1

Choose “Open Work Permit”

No information is needed for questions 2-6.

Education

Check the box to tell us if you have any post-secondary education (including university, college or apprenticeship training).

Examples of post-secondary education:

Trade or Apprenticeship

Training completed in a specific trade, such as carpentry or auto mechanics.

Non-university certificate or diploma

Training in a profession that requires formal education but not at the university level (for example, dental technician or engineering technician).

Bachelor’s degree

Academic degree awarded by a college or university to those who finished an undergraduate curriculum; also called a baccalaureate. Examples include a Bachelor of Arts, Science or Education.

Master’s degree

Academic degree awarded by a graduate school of a college or university. You must have completed a Bachelor’s degree before a Master’s degree can be earned.

PhD

Highest university degree usually based on at least three years of graduate studies and a thesis. Normally, you must have finished a Master’s degree before a PhD can be earned.

If you checked “Yes”, give us full details of your highest level of post-secondary education:

  • Enter the dates (year and month) you attended the institution
  • Field(s) of study (mechanics, social sciences, medicine, etc.)
  • School or Facility name
  • City or Town
  • Country or territory (choose from the list) and
  • Province or State.

Employment (Work or job)

Enter the following information about your employment for the past 10 years. If you are retired, give information about the 10 years before your retirement.

Question 1

Current activity or job

Give details about your current activity or job:

  • dates (year and month) you have been working at your current job,
  • activity or job, or a brief description of your position. If you do not work, describe what you are currently doing (retired, not working, going to school, etc.),
  • name of the company, employer or facility where you work,
  • City or Town,
  • Country or territory,
  • Province or State, if it applies to you
Question 2

Previous activity or job

Give details of your previous activity or job for the past 10 years. If you are retired, include the details about the 10 years before your retirement.

If you need more space, print out another page of the form, fill in this section and submit it with your application.

Background Information

You must answer all questions in this section or your application will be considered incomplete and will be sent back to you.

Question 1

Check the box to tell us if:

  1. you or any of your family members have ever had tuberculosis of the lungs or have been in close contact with a person with tuberculosis within the past two years.
  2. you have any physical or mental disorder that would require social or health services other than medication during your stay in Canada.
  3. If you checked “Yes” to any of the above questions, provide details and the name of the family member, if it applies to you.

Note: See the Family Members definition in this guide.

Question 2

Check the box to tell us if you have ever:

  1. stayed beyond the validity of your status, attended school without authorization or worked without authorization in Canada.
  2. been refused any kind of visa, admission or been ordered to leave Canada or any other country or territory.
  3. applied to enter or stay in Canada.
  4. If you checked “Yes” to one of the above questions, provide details.
Question 3

Check the box to tell us if you have ever:

  • committed,
  • been arrested for, or
  • been charged with or convicted of any criminal offence in any country or territory.

If you checked “yes”, give details.

Question 4
  1. Check the box to tell us if you have ever served in any military, militia, civil defence unit, served in a security organization or police force (including non-obligatory national service, reserve or voluntary units).
  2. If you checked “Yes”, write your dates of service and the countries or territories where you served.
Question 5

Check “Yes” or “No” to tell us if you have ever been a member or associated with any political party, or other group or organization which has engaged in or advocated violence as means to achieving a political or religious objective, or which has been associated with criminal activity at any time.

Question 6

Check “Yes” or “No” to tell us if you have ever witnessed or taken part in the ill treatment of prisoners or civilians, looting or desecration of religious buildings.

To complete your form:

  1. Once you have filled out the form, click on the “Validate” button located at the top or bottom of the form. This will generate a barcode page (page 5 of 5) - see image below. If you filled out the form on a computer and print it, place the barcode page on the top of your application (or, if applying as a group, each individual application package).
    Sample barcode

    Note: This barcode page will not appear if you fill out your application by hand.

  2. If you are 18 years of age or older, you must sign and date the boxes at the bottom of the page.

    If you are less than 18 years of age, one of your parents or a legal guardian must sign your form.

Note: By signing, you certify that you fully understand the questions asked, and that the information you have given is complete, accurate, and factual. If you do not sign and date the application form, it will be sent back to you.


Schedule A – Background/Declaration (IMM 5669)

For refugee claimants in Canada: Only family members included in your application for refugee protection who are with you in Canada must be included using this form.


Personal details

Family and given names

Family name is also known as last name or surname.

Given names are also known as first name and middle name. Do not use initials.

Enter your names exactly as they appear on your passport, travel document or identity document.


Questionnaire

If you answered “Yes” to one or more of these questions, you must enter an explanation in the details field.


Education

If you didn’t earn a diploma, leave the “Type of certificate or diploma issued” field blank.


Personal history

Important: do not leave any gaps in time.

If you don’t account for all time periods, it may delay the processing of your application.

Personal history - Activity

Examples of activity types

  • employment (please specify)
  • unemployed
  • educational activity

Personal history - Status in country or territory

Examples of status

  • work visa
  • citizen
  • study visa
  • visitor visa

Exception: If you have not worked in the past 10 years (for example, you’re retired), you must provide details of your personal history since the age of 18. The resume or Curriculum Vitae (CV) that you provide with your application will help verify the information in this question.


Membership and association with organizations

Examples of organizations

  • political organizations
  • social organizations
  • youth or student organizations
  • trade unions
  • professional associations

Don’t use abbreviations.


Government positions

Examples of government positions

  • civil servant
  • judge
  • police officer
  • employee in a security organization

Don’t use abbreviations.


Military and paramilitary service

Important: do not leave any gaps in time.

If you don’t account for all time periods, it may delay the processing of your application.


Addresses

Write out addresses in full without using any abbreviations. Use the apartment or unit number, if this applies.

Example: 999 Family Street, Unit #3, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, K3J 9T5


Authority to disclose personal information

Declaration of applicant

Read all of the statements in all sections carefully and type your full name into the blue field (this is your digital signature).

By signing, you certify that you fully understand the questions asked, and that the information you provided is complete, truthful, and correct.

Additional Family Information (IMM 5406)

Section A

Relationship - Applicant

Marital status

  • If you’re married and you were physically present at the marriage, choose “married – physically present” under “marital status”
  • If you’re married and you were not physically present at the marriage, choose “married – not physically present” under “marital status”

Relationship - Spouse, common-law partner or conjugal partner (if this applies)

  • If you’re married and your spouse was physically present at the marriage, choose “married – physically present” under “marital status”
  • If you’re married and your spouse was not physically present at the marriage, choose “married – not physically present” under “marital status”

Section B

Include:

  • married children,
  • adopted children,
  • children of your spouse(step-children) or common-law partner,
  • any of your children who have been adopted by others,
  • any of your children who are in the custody of an ex-spouse, former common-law partner or other guardian.

You must answer all questions. If any sections don’t apply to you, enter “Not Applicable”.

Section C

Write personal details about your:

  • brother(s),
  • sister(s),
  • half-brother(s) and half-sister(s),
  • step-brother(s) and step-sister(s).

Read all of the statements in all sections carefully.

By clicking the “Complete and return to application” button, you certify that

  • you fully understand the questions asked and
  • the information you provided is complete, truthful, and correct

Schedule 19 A – Home Child Care Provider and Home Support Worker (Language and Education)

This form must be completed by you, as the principal applicant.

Question 1
Select the box to tell us which pilot you are applying for
Question 2
Write your full name (family name / given name(s)) as shown on your passport or official documents.
Question 3
Write your Unique Client Identification (UCI) – if you have one
Question 4
Write your date of birth
Question 5

Language:

  1. Select the box to tell us your first language in Canada.
  2. Select the box to tell us if you have taken a test designated by IRCC to assess your language proficiency.
    • If you select “Yes”, provide us with a copy of the language test results (speaking, listening, and writing).
Question 6

Canadian education:

Select the box to tell us if you have 1 year post-secondary education (or higher).

If you select “Yes”, provide us with a copy of your completed Canadian post-secondary educational credential.

If you select “no”, you have 2 options:

  • Select “Yes” if you have an ECA report and provide us a copy.
  • Select “No” if you do not have an ECA report.

Offer of Employment Form – Home Child Care Provider and Home Support Worker Pilots

The form is to be completed by:

  • the employer, and
  • the employee

Section 1: Hiring a Caregiver

To be completed by the employer

Select which type of caregiver you are hiring:

  • Home Child Care Provider – NOC 4411 (excluding foster parents)
  • Home Support Worker – NOC 4412 (excluding housekeeping work)

Section 2: Employer Information

To be completed by the employer

Write personal details for:

  • Surname
  • Given name
  • Street address
  • City
  • Province or Territory
  • Postal Code
  • Telephone number (cell)
  • Telephone number (work)
  • E-mail address
  • Relationship with the person(s) receiving care
  • Relationship to the employee
  • Select “yes” or “no” to tell us if you have ever hired a caregiver before
    • Include the dates you have hired a caregiver in the past.
  • Canada Revenue Agency Business Number
  • Business Legal Name (as registered with CRA)
  • Annual Income disclosure on this form is optional. If you do not provide it in this form, an officer may request it from you during processing.

Section 3: Employee Information

To be completed by the employee

Write personal details for:

  • Surname as shown on your passport
  • Given name as shown on your passport
  • Gender
  • Date of birth
  • UCI / ID
  • Passport number
  • Country of birth
  • Country of residence
  • Citizenship
  • Marital status
  • Mailing address
    • P.O. box
    • Apt. – Unit
    • Street number
    • Street name
    • City/Town
  • Country
  • Province or Territory
  • Postal Code
  • District
  • E-mail address
  • Telephone number
  • Select “yes” or “no” if your family members are accompanying you.
  • Tell us how many adult family members are accompanying you
  • Tell us how many children under 18 years of age are accompanying you
  • List the age of each child accompanying you.

Section 4: Work Location

To be completed by the employer

  • Select “yes” or “no” to tell us if the employee will be working from your residence.
  • If you select “no”, tell us the details of where the employee will work
    • Street address
    • City
    • Province or Territory
    • Postal Code
    • Telephone number (cell)
    • Telephone number (work)
    • E-mail address
  • Tell us the description of the house and the household:
    • Total number of rooms
    • Total number of bedrooms
  • Tell us how many adults and children are living in the house:
    • How many adults
    • How many children (under 18 years of age)
    • List the age of each child

Section 5: Live-in Arrangements

To be completed by the employer

  • Select “yes” or “no” to tell us if the employee will reside where the work is being performed.
  • If you select “yes”, tell us if the employee’s accompanying family members (if applicable) will be living with the employee.
  • If you select “yes”, provide us the detail description of the accommodation.
    • Bedroom
    • Tell us how many bedrooms
    • Tell us the size in square meters of the bedrooms
  • Select “yes” or “no” to tell us if the bedroom(s) is/are furnished.
    • Tell us what is provided in the bedroom(s).
  • Tell us if the door:
    • Can be locked from the outside with the key given by you
    • Can be locked from the inside with a safety bolt
  • Tell us if a secure exterior window closes and locks from within and can be used to exit in case of an emergency.
  • Tell us if the following are finished:
    • Floors
    • Ceilings
    • Walls
    • Lightning
    • Heating
    • Closet
  • Tell us if the following are “shared with you and members of your family” or “not”
    • Bathroom
    • Kitchen
    • Living room
  • Select “yes” or “no” to tell us if the employee has their own entrance.
  • Tell us if other services are provided to employee.
  • Provide us with the list of services that are provided to the employee.
  • If you would provide other services to the employee, write the details.

Section 6: Duration of Contract

To be completed by the employer

  • Tell us how long the contract is with the employee.
  • Tell us the anticipated start date of the employee.

Section 7: Job Description

To be completed by the employer

  • Tell us the employee’s job title.
  • List the daily duties and description of the employee’s responsibilities as a caregiver.
  • Tell us the employee’s minimum experience or skill requirements.
  • Tell us the details of the person(s) the employee agrees to provide services as a caregiver.

Section 8: Work Schedule and Wages

To be completed by the employer

Answer each question bellow.

Question 1
Select “yes” or “no” to tell us if you offer the employee a full-time position.
Question 2

Tell us how many hours each day and each week the employee will work.

  • Select “yes” or “no” to tell us if the employee will have irregular work hours.
  • If you select “yes”, provide us the details of the work schedule
Question 3

Tell us what is the regular (non-overtime) wage per hour that you are offering to the employee.

Select to tell us if:

  • you agree to review and adjust the employee’s wages at least once a year to ensure they meet or exceed the prevailing wage rate for the occupation in the region where the employee shall be employed

    or

  • you and the employee will indicate wage increase by amending no. 2 of the section of the contract in writing, signed by you and the employee and the date of the amendment.
Question 4

Tell us if you agrees to pay the employee the wages on the following basis:

  • Weekly
  • Bi-weekly
  • Monthly
Question 5

Tell us the rate you agree to pay the employee for the overtime hours (e.g.: 1.5 X regular rate) and indicate after how many hours of work (e.g. after 44 hours a week).

Question 6

Select “yes” or “no” to tell us if the employee will be paid any contingent wages (e.g. bonuses, predictable overtime).

  • If you select “yes” provide details.
Question 7

If a live-in arrangement is made with the employee, select “yes” or “no” to tell us if deductions are going to be removed from the salary.

  • If you select “yes” indicate the amount.
Question 8

Select “yes” or “no” if there are any other deductions from the employee’s paycheques (e.g.: meals, etc.)

  • If you select “yes”, indicate the amount.
Question 9

Tell us how many days off the employee shall be entitled to per week and include on which days of the week.

Question 10

Tell us how many business days off of paid vacation the employee shall be entitled to per year.

Question 11

Tell us how many days the employee shall be entitled to per year of paid and unpaid sick leave.

Question 12

You must provide the employee all applicable provincial, territorial and national statutory and public holidays with pay.

Question 13

You agree to pay the employee for their work by cheque or alternative means if mutually agreed and with documentation and receipts.

  • Indicate the gross wages before deductions per hour worked.
  • Indicate the equivalent to number of hours per week.
Question 14

You agree to pay taxes and submit all deductions payable as prescribed by law including, but not limited to, employment insurance, income tax, Canada Pension Plan or Quebec Pension Plan.

Section 9: Benefits

To be completed by the employer

Tell us which of the following you will provide the employee:

  • Disability insurance
  • Dental insurance
  • Pension
  • Extended medical insurance (e.g. prescription drugs, paramedical services, medical services, etc.)
  • Vacation – number of paid business days per year
  • Remuneration – percentage of gross salary
  • Other benefits
    • If you will provide the employee “other” benefits, specify.

Section 10: Recruitment Fees

The employer shall not recover from the employee through payroll deductions or any other means, the fee they have paid to a third party recruiter or recruitment agency, or their authorized representative(s) for services related to hiring and retaining the employee.

If the third party recruiter or recruitment agency, or their authorized representative(s) charge the employee for any recruitment fee, the employer must reimburse the employee in full.

Section 11: Notice of Resignation

To be agreed to by the employer and the employee

If the employee wants to terminate the present contract, the employee agrees to give the employer a written notice in advance. Indicate the number of weeks you have agreed on.

The employer and the employee agree to abide by the provincial / territorial labour / employment standards on written notice of resignation.

We recommend that a copy of the relevant portions of provincial / territorial labour standard be attached as an appendix.

Section 12: Notice of Termination of Employment

To be agreed to by the employer and the employee

The employer must give written notice before terminating the contraction of the employee. The employer must indicate the number of week(s) in advance this notice will be given to the employee.

The employer and the employee agree to abide by the provincial / territorial labour / employment standards on written notice of resignation.

We recommend that a copy of the relevant portions of provincial / territorial labour standard be attached as an appendix.

Section 13: Declaration of Employer

To be completed by the employer

The employer must read and add check marks on the form to declare the following:

  • You certify that you are actively engaged in the business of which the offer of employment is made and understand that you must remain so during the period of employment for which the work permit is issued to the foreign national.
  • You certify that you are compliant with, and will comply with, the federal/territorial laws that regulate employment and the recruitment of employees, in the province/territory in which it is intended that the foreign national work and, if applicable, with the terms and conditions of any collective agreement.
  • You certify that you will provide the foreign national with employment in the same occupation as that set out in the foreign national’s offer of employment and with wages and working conditions that are substantially the same.
  • You certify that you will make reasonable efforts to provide a workplace that is free of abuse which includes physical, sexual, psychological or financial abuse.
  • You confirm that you have read and understood the contents of this form and declare that the information provided in this form is true, complete and accurate.
  • You understand that Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) may contact to request additional information about the offer of employment.
  • You understand that IRCC will not disclose the information contained herein to Third Parties, except as described in bilateral information sharing agreements or except as authorized or required by law.
  • You confirm that you understand making a false declaration or have otherwise provided false or misleading information or have undertaken concealment of a material fact, the potential employee’s application could be rejected. You further confirm that you understand providing such false or misleading information, making a false declaration or failing to declare all information material to the potential foreign workers application could be an offense and/or constitute non-compliance under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA).
  • You consent to the collection and disclosure of the information contained herein, including for monitoring and evaluation purposes.

Section 14: Consent of Employer

To be completed by the employer

The employer selects “yes” or “no” if they consent to the following:

  • Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) or an organization at IRCC request may want to contact you in the future to ask about your experience in the hiring of a caregiver under the Home Support Work Class or Home Child Care Provider Class.
  • IRCC will use the information for research, performance measurement or evaluation purposes.
  • IRCC will not use the information to make any decisions about the current application.

Section 15: Signature of Employer

To be completed by the employer

  • Print your surname and given name
  • Include your signature and
  • Date

Section 16: Declaration of Employee

To be completed by the employee

The employee must read and add check marks on the form to declare the following:

  • You confirm that you have read and understood the contents of this form.
  • You declare the information that you have provided is true, complete and accurate.
  • You confirmand understand that if you have made a false declaration or have otherwise provided false or misleading information or have undertaken concealment of a material fact, your application for permanent residence could be rejected. You further confirm and understand that providing such false or misleading information or concealing material facts could be an offense and / or constitute non-compliance under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA).
  • You understand that should you be found to be inadmissible for misrepresenting under section 127 of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA), you may be barred from entering Canada for a period of five years following a final determination of my inadmissibility or, if this determination is made in Canada following my removal from Canada.
  • You consent to the disclosure of the information contained herein, including for monitoring and evaluation purposes.
  • You understand that Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada will not disclose the information contained herein to Third Parties, except authorized or required by law.

Section 17: Signature of Employer

To be completed by the employee

  • Print your surname and given name
  • Include your signature and
  • Date

Use of a Representative (IMM 5476)

Who may use this form?

Fill out this form only if you:

  • are appointing a representative;
  • need to update contact information for your previously appointed representative; or
  • are cancelling a representative’s appointment.

If you have dependent children aged 18 years or older, they must fill out their own copy of this form if a representative is also conducting business on their behalf.

Who is a representative?

A representative is someone who:

  • you have appointed by completing the IMM 5476 form;
  • gives advice, consultation, or guidance to you at any stage of the application process; and
  • has your consent to conduct business on your behalf with IRCC and the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA).

You are not obliged to hire a representative. We treat everyone equally, whether they use the service of a representative or not.

For more information, see: Use of a Representative.

Notify IRCC about any changes

You must use this Web form to tell us if any information changes regarding the person you authorized to represent you on your application.

Statutory Declaration of Common-Law Union (IMM 5409)

Who must complete this form?

This form must be completed and signed with handwritten signatures.

If submitting an application to sponsor a parent or grandparent

  • If the sponsor's common-law partner is a co-signer on the application to sponsor the parent or grandparent
    • the sponsor and their common-law partner must complete this form.
  • If the sponsored parent or grandparent (the principal applicant) has a common-law partner
    • the parent or grandparent and their common-law partner must complete this form.
Question 1

Write the following information in the space provided:

  • Country of current residence
  • Province/state/territory of current residence
  • Name of the declarant
  • Name of the declarant’s partner
  • Name of city, town, village
  • Name of county (if applicable)
  • Name of province/state/territory
  • Name of the country
  • Number of continuous year(s) in a conjugal relationship
  • Date of the relationship (from-to)
Question 1A

Check the box to indicate if you have jointly signed a residential lease, mortgage or purchase agreement relating to a residence in which you both live.

Question 1B

Check the box to indicate if you jointly own property other than your residence.

Question 1C

Check the box to indicate if you have a joint bank, trust credit union or charge card accounts.

Question 1D

Check the box to indicate if you have declared your common-law union under the Canadian Income Tax Act (T-1 “General individual income Tax Return”).

Question 2

Check the box to indicate if you have life insurance on yourself which names your common-law partner as a beneficiary.

Question 3

Check the box to indicate if your common-law partner has life insurance on themselves which names you as a beneficiary.

Question 4

If you answered “no” to questions 1 to 3, indicate other documentary evidence you have that would indicate your relationship as common-law partners.

Question 5

solemn declaration
Write the following information in the space provided:

  • Name of the declarant
  • Name of the declarant’s partner
  • Name of the city, town, village
  • Name of the county
  • Name of the province/state/territory
  • Name of the country
  • Date (day, month, year)
  • Signature of the declarant
  • Signature of the declarant’s partner
  • Name of the person who administered the declaration
  • Select the person’s title from the choices provided
  • Signature of the person who administered the declaration

Step 4. Pay the Fees

Calculating your fees

Use the tables below to calculate the total amount of fees to be paid. The processing fee must be included with your application.

Note: You will need to pay all of the temporary resident fees (work permits and study permits) separately from the permanent resident fees. You must include both fee receipts with your application.

We recommend you pay the right of permanent residence fee ($515) now to avoid delays. You will have to pay it before you become a permanent resident.

Your permanent residence fees (Principal applicant) $CAN
With right of permanent residence fee
Processing fee ($570) and right of permanent residence fee ($515)
1,085
Without right of permanent residence fee 570
Your family members’ permanent residence fees (per person) $CAN
Include your spouse or partner in your application (with right of permanent residence fee)
Processing fee ($570) and right of permanent residence fee ($515) for your spouse or partner
1,085
Include your spouse or partner in your application (without right of permanent residence fee) 570
Include a dependent child in your application – per child 155

Note: The following persons are exempt from paying the Right of Permanent Residence Fee of $515:

  • Your dependent children;
  • You, if you are the principal applicant and the dependent child of a permanent resident or Canadian citizen. You must meet the definition of “dependent child” at the time of the application;
  • You and your family member, if you are a protected person.
Your work permit fees $CAN
Work permit fee ($155) and open work permit holder fee ($100) 255
Your family members’ work or study permit fees (per person) $CAN
Open work permit for spouse, partner or dependent child
Work permit fee ($155) and open work permit holder fee ($100)
255
Study permit for spouse, partner or dependent child 150
Biometrics fees $CAN
Biometrics (per person) 85
Biometrics (per family) (2 or more people)

Maximum fee for a family of 2 or more people applying at the same time and place

170

How to pay the fees for your application

To pay your fees for your application you’ll need:

  • a valid email address;
  • a credit card, Debit MasterCard® or Visa® Debit card.

Visit the links below and follow these instructions to pay. You will have to pay your permanent residence fees separate from your temporary residence fees:

  • Go to Online Payment - Caregivers.
  • Pay your family’s permanent residence and biometrics fees
    • At the end, click on the “Save” button to save a PDF copy the IRCC official receipt.
  • Go to Online Payment – Temporary residence.
  • Pay your family’s temporary residence fees
    • At the end, click on the “Save” button to save the IRCC official receipt.
  • Upload a copy of both receipts (permanent residence and temporary residence) to your online application when asked.
    • Keep a copy of both receipts for your records.

stop sign hand Do not exit without saving the receipt! Thise receipt is your proof of payment!

Incorrect fee payment

Incorrect fee payments may delay processing.

Payment issue – No fee included

We will return your application.

Note: We will start processing of your application after you return your application with the fees.

Payment issue – Not enough fees included

We will return your application and tell you of how much to pay.

Note: We will start processing your application once you return your application with the correct fees.

Payment issue – Overpayment

We will:

  • start processing your application, and
  • send you a refund.

Note: You do not have to ask for a refund, it will be done automatically.

Payment issue – required biometric fee not included

We will:

  • tell you the fee amount and how to pay it.

Note: We will continue processing of your application after you send the missing fees.


Step 5. Submit the Application

To help make sure your application can be processed as quickly as possible:

  • answer all questions
  • electronically sign your application (type your full name exactly as shown on your passport)
  • include your processing fee receipts (for both permanent residence and temporary residence)
  • upload all supporting documents
  • upload your temporary residence application(s):
    • upload your work permit form under Upload required supporting documentation
    • choose Other as the document type
  • follow the same steps if you need to submit work or study permit forms for your family as well

Make sure you use the Document Checklist – Home Child Care Provider or Home Support Worker [IMM 5981] (PDF, 3.39 MB) to ensure you provided everything, and include the checklist with your application.

You should save a copy of all information you want to keep for your records, as you will no longer have access to view your application in the portal after you submit it.

After you’ve prepared your application, you can submit it in the Permanent Residence Portal (opens in a new tab) .


What Happens Next

Confirmation of submission

Once you have submitted your application in the portal, you will receive an automated email message to let you know we received it.

Completeness check check

We will check your application to determine that all required application forms have been properly completed and submitted, the application processing fee has been paid, and that all requested supporting documentation has been provided.

If your application package does not meet these requirements, we will return it to you. No file will be created or record kept until a complete application has been submitted.

Acknowledgment of receipt

If your application is complete, we will begin to process it. You will be sent a letter that:

  • notifies you of this fact and provides you with your file number;
  • sets out some basic instructions for contacting us;
  • gives you a brief outline of future processing steps.

Processing

Review for decision

Your application will undergo a detailed review by an officer. The officer will consider all the information and documentation you have provided, and will assess it against current selection criteria and admissibility requirements.

Note: If you do not provide the results of your language test and/or a copy of an ECA, your application will not be finalized until we receive them. Check the “What are the requirements?” section of this guide for instructions on how to submit these documents after we have received your application.


Submit proof of qualifying Canadian work experience

Don’t forget to submit Schedule 19b and proof of your qualifying work experience, once you have acquired at least 24 months of qualifying Canadian work experience.


Schedule 19 B – Home Child Care Provider and Home Support Worker (Work Experience)

This form must be completed by you, as the principal applicant.

Question 1
Select the box to tell us which pilot you are applying for
Question 2
Write your full name (family name / given name(s)) as shown on your passport or official documents.
Question 3
Write your Unique Client Identification (UCI) – if you have one
Question 4
Write your date of birth
Question 5

Select the box to tell us if you have worked in Canada on a full time basis for at least 2 years within the last 3 years in one of the eligible NOC.

  • Full time basis means – at least 30 hours / week

If you select “YES”, show us the evidence of your work experience.

Question 6

Write your work experience within the last 3 years. Start with your most current occupation.

For each occupation, you have to include:

  • the dates of your employment
  • your occupation title
  • the name of your employer
  • a description of your main duties
  • your weekly working hours

Are you already in Canada?

Note: if you are eligible to apply for a work permit from inside Canada, you should not use this package to complete your application. Follow the instructions in our guide for applications from inside Canada instead. It contains information specific to your situation.

If you are already in Canada, you can stay while waiting for your permanent residence as long as you maintain legal status.

It is important to understand that submitting this permanent residence application will not automatically extend your stay in Canada, even if it includes a work permit application. You must still make sure that your status as a temporary resident remains valid while waiting for the decision on your occupation-restricted open work permit. If your visitor status is about to expire, you must also apply to change conditions or extend your stay in Canada separately from this application.


Leaving Canada

If you go on a vacation outside of Canada, you are not automatically deemed ineligible for permanent residence under the Home Child Care Provider Pilot or Home Support Worker Pilot. However, it is important to note that if you leave Canada while your application is being processed, we cannot guarantee that you will be allowed to re-enter. Each time you re-enter Canada you will need to be re-assessed and meet all eligibility criteria for entering the country.


Updating your contact information

During the application process, you must advise us of any change of address or telephone number by:


In Canada and the United States

You may also Contact Us or go online to see the current status of your application:

  1. Click on Check application status, and
  2. Follow the instructions provided.

For details about how to remove your application status information from the Internet, visit the “Frequently Asked Questions” (FAQ) section.

If you are outside Canada and the United States:

Contact the Canadian embassy, high commission or consulate responsible for your region.


Protecting your information

Your personal information is:

  • available to IRCC and the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) employees who need to see it to provide the services to you, and
  • not disclosed to other organizations except as permitted under the provisions of the Privacy Act or the Citizenship Regulations.

For more information about the protection of your data, visit the Help Centre.


Need help?

If you need help, you can find answers to your questions by visiting the Help Centre.


Appendix A - Photo Specifications

Photograph specifications

Notes to the applicant

Take this information with you to the photographer

  • Photos may be in colour or in black and white.
  • Photos must be original and not altered in any way or taken from an existing photo.
  • Photos must reflect your current appearance (taken within the past six (6) months).

Applying online

  • You need one (1) photo.
  • Follow the instructions in the online application to scan and upload both sides of your photo to your application.

Notes to the photographer

The photo must be:

  • taken by a commercial photographer;
  • 50 mm x 70 mm (2 inches wide x 2 3/4 inches long) and sized so the height of the face measures between 31 mm and 36 mm (1 1/4 inches and 1 7/16 inches) from chin to crown of head (natural top of head);
  • clear, sharp and in focus;
  • taken with a neutral facial expression (eyes open and clearly visible, mouth closed, no smiling);
  • taken with uniform lighting and not show shadows, glare or flash reflections;
  • taken straight on, with face and shoulders centred and squared to the camera (i.e. the photos must show the full front view of the person’s head and shoulders, showing the full face centered in the middle of the photo);
  • taken in front of a plain white background with a clear difference between the person’s face and the background. Photos must reflect and represent natural skin tones and not be altered.
Image described below

The back of the photo must include:

  • the name and date of birth of the person in the photo
  • the name and complete address of the photography studio
  • the date the photo was taken;

The photographer may use a stamp or handwrite this information. Stick-on labels are not accepted.


Appendix B - ECA Report Assessment Outcomes

Verify that the outcome noted on your Education Credential Assessment (ECA) report (from an IRCC designated organization) corresponds to the equivalent of a Canadian educational credential of at least one year of post-secondary studies (or higher) on this list.

One-year post-secondary credential:

  • College Certificate
  • Completion of College-level certificate
  • University Certificate
  • University Diploma
  • One-year certificate in [name of discipline]
  • Post-secondary certificate with a focus in [area of concentration]Footnote 1
  • One-year Post-secondary certificate with a focus in [area of concentration]Footnote 1
  • One-year certificateFootnote 1

Two-year post-secondary credential:

  • College Diploma
  • College Diploma (two years)
  • Diploma (two years)
  • Two-year diploma Footnote 1
  • Two-year diploma in [name of discipline]
  • Secondary school diploma and diploma (two years)
  • Associate Degree
  • Associate of [Arts/Science] degree
  • Post-secondary Diploma with a focus in [area of concentration]Footnote 1
  • Two-year post-secondary Diploma with a focus in [area of concentration]Footnote 1
  • Two-year associate degree Footnote 1

Three-year or longer post-secondary credential:

  • College Diploma (three years)
  • Diploma (three years)
  • Three-year diploma in [name of discipline]
  • Three-year advanced diploma Footnote 1
  • Bachelor’s Degree
  • Applied Bachelor’s Degree
  • Bachelor’s degree (three years)
  • Three-year Bachelor’s degree, specializing in [name of discipline]
  • Three-year Bachelor degree Footnote 1
  • Bachelor’s degree (four years)
  • Four-year Bachelor’s degree, specializing in [name of discipline]
  • Four-year Bachelor degree Footnote 1
  • Three-year post-secondary Diploma with a focus in [area of concentration]Footnote 1
  • Bachelor’s degree with a focus in [area of concentration]Footnote 1
  • Applied Bachelor’s degree with a focus in [area of concentration] Footnote 1
  • Bachelor of Technology degree with a focus in [area of concentration]Footnote 1
  • Three-year Bachelor’s degree with a focus in [area of concentration]Footnote 1
  • Four-year Bachelor’s degree with a focus in [area of concentration]Footnote 1

Post-Bachelor or Post-Graduate credential:

  • Post-Bachelor’s Certificate
  • Post-undergraduate certificate Footnote 1
  • Post-Bachelor’s Diploma
  • Post-undergraduate diploma Footnote 1
  • Graduate Certificate
  • Graduate Certificate with a focus in [area of concentration] Footnote 1
  • Postgraduate Certificate
  • Postgraduate Diploma
  • Graduate Diploma with a focus in [area of concentration] Footnote 1
  • Graduate Diploma Footnote 1
  • Two-year Postgraduate Diploma, specializing in [name of discipline]
  • Two-year Bachelor’s degree with a focus in [area of concentration] Footnote 1
  • One-year Postgraduate Certificate in [name of discipline]
  • One-year of graduate study with a focus in [area of concentration]Footnote 1
  • Study Toward a Master’s Degree

University-level credential at the Master’s level:

  • Master’s Degree
  • Master’s Degree (Taught)
  • Master of [name of discipline]
  • Master’s degree, specializing in [name of discipline]
  • Master’s degree with a focus in [area of concentration]Footnote 1
  • One-year Master’s degree with a focus in [area of concentration]Footnote 1
  • Two-year Master’s degree with a focus in [area of concentration]Footnote 1
  • Master of Business Administration Footnote 1
  • One-year Master of Business Administration degree Footnote 1
  • One-year Master degree Footnote 1
  • Master degree Footnote 1

Doctoral level credential:

  • Earned Doctorate Degree
  • Earned Doctorate (Ph.D.)
  • Professional Doctorate Degree
  • Doctor of [name of discipline, such as Business Administration, Law, Psychology]
  • Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degree with a focus in [area of concentration] Footnote 1
  • Doctorate (Ph.D.) Footnote 1

Appendix C - Maintaining your status and eligibility for a bridging open work permit in Canada

Status while in Canada

If you apply under the Home Child Care Provider or the Home Support Worker pilots and have less than 24 months of qualifying Canadian work experience at the time of application, you will be issued an occupation-restricted open work permit valid for 36 months that will give you temporary resident status in Canada. You may be eligible to apply for a bridging open work permit after you completed your 24 months of qualifying Canadian work experience within 36 months.

You and your family members in Canada must maintain temporary resident status as a worker, student or visitor while your application for permanent residence is in process.

It is illegal to work in Canada without a valid work permit or authorization to work without a work permit.


What is a bridging open work permit and am I eligible to apply for one?

A bridging open work permit allows you to work for any employer for the length of time specified on the work permit.

After you give us proof you’ve gained at least 24 months of eligible Canadian experience, we’ll assess it and send you a letter to let you know if you’re eligible. If you’re eligible, you can then apply for a bridging open work permit.

You can apply for a bridging open work permit online. Make sure to include your permanent residence application number within the bridging open work permit application.

Note: You must pay the work permit fee of $155 and the open work permit holder fee of $100.

To be eligible for a bridging open work permit, you must:

  • be in Canada and intend to reside in a province or territory other than Quebec; and
  • at the time of application,
    • be authorized to work in Canada on a work permit; or,
    • have maintained status, if you have applied for a renewal of your work permit; or,
    • be eligible for restoration of status as a worker
  • be the principal applicant on an application for permanent residence (APR) under the Home Child Care Provider Pilot or Home Support Worker Pilot and have received a positive eligibility decision on that application; and
  • have submitted evidence of the 24 months of eligible Canadian work experience to the Case Processing Center in Edmonton (CPC-E) to finalize your APR and it has been assessed by a PR officer that you meet the requirement.

Your spouse and/or dependents (at age of majority) who are already in Canada who either:

  • have status,
  • have maintained status, or
  • are eligible for restoration of status

are also eligible to apply for an open work permit once you meet the above criteria.

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